He Oranga Hapori: A model for raising Maori ... - Te Puni Kokiri

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He Oranga Hapori: A model for raising Maori ... - Te Puni Kokiri

Whereas the pursuit of tikanga can be planned and resultsmeasuredCase Study 1: Mäori Community Wellbeing in Kapiti and Horowhenua 39Survival of Mäori as a PeopleMäori in the Kapiti and Horowhenua area have confidence in the forever statement “E kore au engaro; he käkano i ruia mai i Rangiätea” (I will never be lost, a seed from Rangiätea).These käkano accept that through the ages, their tüpuna Mäori have had a care for, expandedupon and bequeathed Te Reo as the repository of all the things that make Mäori distinctive asa people. Current generations are increasingly becoming aware that their contribution to thesurvival of Mäori as a people is through expanding on their inheritance. They do so by buildingthe body of mätauranga Mäori gifted through the expression of kaupapa tuku iho.The enrichment of expressing kaupapaOver 200 käkano, whänau, hapü and other groups within this community developed 36indicators of wellbeing 40 to describe their community wellbeing in the narrative on page 7.The sense of enrichment that one gains from the expressions of kaupapa occurring in thisnarrative are appreciated by Mäori, especially those who have mana whenua over the Kapiti andHorowhenua landscape.As they read the piece, they reflect on times past when their own whänau were able to harvestkaimoana easily from the beach; they’re reminded of korero with their own grandparents onwhakapapa; and they dream of the day when the local marae will be abundant in terms ofpeople, knowledge and skills.He käkano that use the expression of kaupapa to contribute to the comfort and security ofwhänau are uplifted by the rewards of respect, admiration and esteem.Pursuing the expression of kaupapaThe narrative describes a world that 112 rangatahi, 70 kaumätua, 50 Mäori businesses, five iwiauthorities representing 30 marae, numbers of whänau, and tautangata Mäori have told us theydream of for this community.From these statements the definition of Mäori Wellbeing was developed as “a Mäori state ofbeing that is characterised by the abundant expression of kaupapa”. The past nine months haveinvolved developing plans and completing activities that contribute to the wellbeing of ourMäori community by many groups including Te Aho.Te Aho’s circle of interest was the mechanism used to design, plan, implement, monitor andreport on He Oranga Hapori as a study of Mäori community engagement.Te Aho, a Mäori model for regional developmentTe Aho, is a Mäori model for regional development operating in the Kapiti and Horowhenuafor the past 15 months. It is a cluster of Iwi groups, their respective hapü and other Mäoriorganisations (such as educational providers, health and social organisations, and businessoperators). Te Aho is an example of Mäori collaborating with each other, and others to enhancethe wellbeing of a particular Mäori community.39 Huihuinga is a quarterly forum where theTe Aho quarterly report is approved beforeit is presented at the councils JointEconomic Development Forum.40 Kaitiakitanga, Rangatiratanga,Whanaungatanga, Pükengatanga,Manaakitanga and Kotahitanga.25

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