He Oranga Hapori: A model for raising Maori ... - Te Puni Kokiri

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He Oranga Hapori: A model for raising Maori ... - Te Puni Kokiri

exercise identifies those areas we excel at, such as number 23 - where 13 of our projects in thepast quarter made some contribution to Mäori engaging productively with the wider community.The other extreme are those few indicators (seven in total) that contributed to three indicatorsor less. Now that these have been identified, activities can be developed to advance progress inthese areas.Case Study 2: Te Papaioea describes Mäori Community WellbeingA second pilot of the He Oranga Hapori study tested some of the understandings andlearnings gained in the Kapiti and Horowhenua experience. The absence of an organised Mäoricollaboration of key sectors, community, iwi/hapü and crown agencies in the Manawatu regionmeant there was difficulty duplicating the Kapiti/Horowhenua experience fully. It was thereforedecided to the value of the second pilot would be to concentrate on activities to assist inconfirming the theoretical model by:• describing Mäori community wellbeing with indicators• identifying tikanga that give expression to kaupapa tuku iho• designing a framework for recording and reporting results.Survival of Mäori as a peopleMäori determination over the past 200 years to raise their prospects of survival is extraordinaryand evident in the maintenance of over 1000 marae and their affiliated röpü tuku iho;organisations such as the Mäori Women’s Welfare League, Mäori education bodies, Mäoribroadcasting organisations, sports codes, religious bodies, business networks and similar röpüMäori that give expression to kaupapa tuku iho. One could assert the axiom that Mäori will seekto maximise their survival as a people through the expression of kaupapa tuku iho.Participants in He Oranga Hapori Te Papaioea pilot affirm this assumption. Over four days, foursurveyors interviewed a random sample of 126 Mäori with the following characteristics:• 59% affiliated with local iwi• 6% did not know their iwi• 52% male• Age range 17 to 75 years• Average age 35.7 yearsThe surveys were conducted in the City Square, at a rugby sports ground, the library, busterminals, Massey University’s Hokowhitu campus, the local Work & Income site and in achildren’s playground. Surveys took place over four days from Friday to Monday including theweekend.The enrichment of expressing kaupapaEach käkano was asked the question “what do you look for to know that your Mäori communityis doing well?” The participant was then asked to identify the kaupapa tuku iho 47 that influencedtheir thinking.Their collective responses reveal their aspirations for a Mäori community that gives expressionto kotahitanga, pükengatanga and rangatiratanga. The sample was sensitive to tensions withintheir Mäori community believed to be causing distress between different Iwi and hapü groups.Calls for increased expressions of whanaungatanga and whakapapa were consistent throughout47 Appendix 9 - Potential means to monitorand measure displays of tikanga.29

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