He Oranga Hapori: A model for raising Maori ... - Te Puni Kokiri

tpk.govt.nz
  • No tags were found...

He Oranga Hapori: A model for raising Maori ... - Te Puni Kokiri

kaupapa provided a sense of comfort and direction. Another comment was that as individuals, aswhänau units some participants were able to “make a difference” and make a contribution to thewellbeing of their community. This was seen to be mana enhancing.The Mäori community represented by Te Papaieoa’s sample showed a community that exhibitedless concern for the enrichment received from expressions of kaupapa. However, this communitydemonstrated an understanding and confidence that future expressions of kaupapa could beproblem solving and had potential for peace making and dispute resolution. The positive effectsand the enhanced sense of identity elicited from tikanga designed to give expression to kaupapawere present in the responses.Pursuing the expression of kaupapa through tikanga selected by the communityThe Kapiti and Horowhenua groups were involved in workshops over a period of a year. Duringthose workshops they were repeatedly asked to design and develop tikanga that gave expressionto kaupapa tuku iho within a wellbeing context.The original 29 indicators used to develop the He Oranga Hapori theoretical model wereexpanded upon and refined by this community. The result was 36 wellbeing indicators or tikangabeing designed and implemented by one or more of the Te Aho groups. The number of tikangadeveloped for each of the kaupapa was regulated to ensure balance across the framework.The Te Papaioea experience was very different. The community response to the design of tikangathat give expression to kaupapa and tikanga within the context of Mäori community wellbeingoccurred over a period of only four days by survey, rather than workshops. The opportunities torefine and further develop their framework were not availableDespite this, the survey did reveal that Mäori were willing participants and quite capableof designing tikanga to give expression to kaupapa that could potentially be used to createwellbeing within their Mäori community. The researchers were comfortable that the tikanga thatfinally evolved from this community were reflective of their wishes.Whereas the pursuit of tikanga can be planned and results measuredThe He Oranga Hapori theoretical model was demonstrated in the two case studies. Theseexperiences indicated that within He Oranga Hapori there is a process for the systematicdesign of tikanga that can be measured and furthermore the process can be duplicated, if thecommunity in question is willing.1. Understand the community and build relationships within.2. Engage the key interest groups including röpü tuku iho and community including rangatahiand kaumätua. Mäori sector groups taking account of education, social and health services,industry and finance.3. Identify a representative sample (100-200 participants for a community).4. Invite these groups to collaborate on the design of a kaupapa tuku iho matrix.5. Work with the sample to develop indicators of Mäori community wellbeing throughworkshops and presentations.6. Refine the indicators into tikanga and identify the interest groups with capacity to progressthe tikanga.7. Develop means of measuring the progress of the tikanga and prepare a scorecard.8. Establish forums with responsibility for advancing various tikanga.35

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines