He Oranga Hapori: A model for raising Maori ... - Te Puni Kokiri

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He Oranga Hapori: A model for raising Maori ... - Te Puni Kokiri

ki Whakarongotai are gathering at the marae. The Kaunihera Kaumätua has called a wänangawhakapapa for the iwi. They sit at the front of the house proud of their sons and daughtersthat are confidently completing the protocols of powhiri. The smells from the kitchen areenticing the people as the final waiata are sung by the crowd that has gathered. Despite therain and cold wind, the wharenui is warm and dry. Following the karakia, the marae committeecongratulates the tamariki who won the local te reo competition and are off to the regionalsnext week escorted by their kura kaupapa. The iwi have been fundraising and are able toprovide transport for the three local kura to go. Through the day’s activities of möteatea, mauräkau, carving, weaving, preparation of rongoa and kai; whakapapa is taught, whanaungatangais encouraged, the kaumätua are engaged in decision making and learning. In these ways themarae expresses kaupapa abundantly. We travel to the north again and we cross the mightyÖtaki River! Where the tuna swim from bank to bank feeding and to the place where TeWänanga o Raukawa helps us to see the world through Mäori eyes.Travelling through town we know that many of the buildings are owned by Raukawa and thatthe shopkeepers are Mäori - we know this because the signage is in te reo, and people greet uswith kia ora. Groups of rangatahi are on the street, and are campaigning for their whanaungawho is standing for election as a Mäori Party candidate. Arriving at the Wänanga, we see thewharekai is full of students flowing out onto the courtyard for their dinner. The local Mäoribusiness network is hosting the International Business Networks in the conference centre;the conference is exploring how the inherited values of indigenous peoples can be a bridgebetween the Päkehä cultures of the two or more countries. Whakatupu mätauranga is activeand returning benefits to the people, Mäori are hosting events of international significance,pükengatanga is growing and Mäori are expressing their tino rangatiratanga.In the great Horowhenua, the local Mayor is holding his Council meeting at Kawiu Marae. HisMuaüpoko whänau attend in support, and thanks to his skilful oratory the resolutions arepassed unchallenged. They are keen to finish early to attend the national Mäori business awardsbeing held tonight in town. Mäori are involved and influencing community directions andcelebrating Te Ao Mäori events, relationships between Mäori and others are strong.Under the windmill in Foxton, above the whispering harakeke you can hear the Chairman ofthe Foxton River group recite his whakapapa to Ngäti Kahungunu. He is hosting the localtautangata Mäori association and is happy that he and thousands of Mäori from other iwiare supporting the tangatawhenua, and being supported as they seek to make their owncontributions to this wonderful place they now call another ‘home’.Whereas Māori are determined to survive as a peopleThe cultural threshold 77 In the event of cultural decline, thethreshold is the point beyond which thereis no return.Te käkano i ruia mai i Rangiätea, also known as the Mäori people of Aotearoa New Zealand,have flirted with physical extinction. Their adventures around Polynesia required them to adaptto different environmental conditions for their survival. Their arrival on the islands of Aotearoaand the shaping of their world view to explain and understand their discoveries here provedsuccessful. Their observations of these as explanations of their new homeland were conducivewith good health, population growth and refinement of the mätauranga continuum with whichthey arrived on these shores.Following the arrivals of James Cook and the large numbers who were attracted to these islands6

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