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kunstakademiet.dk

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conservation & libraries

architecture & design

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creative studies in art & culture

denmark

fi ne arts


Royal School of Library and Information Science

Aarhus School of Architecture

The Royal Academy of Music, Aarhus

Designskolen Kolding

Academy of Music and Music Communication

Academy of Music, Aalborg

Carl Nielsen Academy of Music Odense

Rhythmic Music Conservatory

The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Conservation

The Danish National School of Theatre

Royal School of Library and Information Science

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture

The national film school of Denmark

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Visual Arts

Danmarks Designskole

The Royal Danish Academy of Music

Welcome to the creative

studies in art and culture at

institutions of higher education

in Denmark.

This booklet contains information

on studying and living in

our country and about the

great variety of creative studies

in art and culture available.

16 academies and schools offer

a wide range of educations in

Fine Arts, Music, Conservation

and Libraries, Film, Theatre and

Dance, and Architecture and

Design.

The booklet also provides useful

links to up-to-date information

on Danish culture and on

living in our country. We hope

this will inspire you to explore

the websites and the many

activities open to you.

In their respective fields, the

16 academies and schools

represent the very best both

in Danish art and culture and

in Danish educational theory

and practice. The academies

and schools, their teachers and

students are in close contact

with artists, performers, and all

Glass and Ceramic School Bornholm

those who practice and enjoy

the cultural activities on offer.

Danish study environments

have an international outlook

and we welcome many inter-

national students to our educational

programmes every

year.

Denmark has a rich and dynamic

cultural life. Traditions and

history go hand in hand with

the latest and most innovative

ideas and trends. Aesthetics

and functionality are united,

while never losing sight of the

individual. Denmark is also an

important bridgehead between

Nordic culture and the rest of

Europe.

As an international student in

Denmark you will form new

academic and social relations

– and get new inspiration. You

will experience the Nordic way

of studying. We are convinced

that you will enjoy your stay in

our country.

Yours sincerely

Rectors’ Conference of the

Danish Ministry of Culture

studying and living in denmark


STUDYING AND LIVING IN DENMARK

A good place to study

Denmark invests large sums in education. Public expenditure on education amounts to 8

per cent of GDP, one of the highest figures in the world. The facilities offered by Danish art

schools and academies are generally excellent – equipment and materials are modern, and

many of the lecturers are of international repute. You can find more information at

www.studyindenmark.dk and www.ciriusonline.dk.

A year of study in Denmark

A Danish academic year is divided into two semesters which typically run from September

until Christmas and from January or February until June or July. However, this may vary,

depending on examinations and projects during the study courses. Some educational programmes

also admit students in February.

Residence permit

Please contact the school or academy at which you are enrolled for detailed information

about the procedure for obtaining or renewing a residence permit. Procedures may vary

according to your nationality. If you live in a non-EU country, you need to apply for a residence

permit from your home country.

A place to live

The most common student accommodation is halls of residence, flat or house-sharing, and

rooms rented in private homes. In Denmark, halls of residence are situated all over the city

and are usually not on a campus as is the case in many other countries. Some schools and

academies help students find a place to live, but often there is no housing guarantee. In order

to find cheap accommodation it is a good idea to start your search well in advance.

Networking is a key concept

The Danish way of teaching is dynamic and informal. A characteristic of Danish creative

studies in art and culture is cross-disciplinary co-operation. Networking across study programmes

or within the same subject can be of great value later in your professional life.

Most studies organise a ‘Fredagsbar’ (Friday Bar) where you can meet your fellow students in

a social setting Friday afternoon after classes. In large cities such as Copenhagen and Aarhus

there are student clubs run by students for students which arrange concerts, cafés etc.


Student administration office and student and career counselling

All the creative studies in art and culture have student administration offices and student

counsellors where you may find help and advice in connection with your studies, student grants,

internships, foundations and scholarships etc. You can also talk to a student counsellor if you

have personal problems. The student counsellors are bound to secrecy.

Libraries

Anyone can borrow books, films, and music from Danish libraries free of charge. The libraries

have a broad selection of newspapers and magazines, and all libraries offer reading facilities and

internet connection.

All creative studies in art and culture have specialist libraries. A few of these libraries lend to the

general public, while others only lend to students, teachers, and staff.

How to get around

The easiest way to get around is by bicycle. The many bicycle paths in the cities make cycling a

safe and quick mode of transport. The public transportation system is an extensive network of

busses, trains, and metro (in Copenhagen) which covers the cities and most of the country.

The cost of living in Denmark

The cost of living varies according to where you live in Denmark. Accommodation is generally

more expensive in the big cities. You should expect to spend between 4,800 and 6,000 Danish

kroner, equal to 645-800 Euro, per month. This covers accommodation, food, and other living

expenses, telecommunication, and pocket money. With a student card you can get discounts in

many places – e.g. at museums and theatres.

If you fall ill

Citizens from the EU/EEA and certain other countries are entitled to free health insurance.

Citizens from other countries are entitled to public health insurance six weeks after arrival.

Anyone living in Denmark is entitled to free emergency hospital treatment. Learn more at

www.workindenmark.dk.

You can speak to the Danes

Most Danes – especially young people – speak and understand English so well that it is easy to

carry out conversations. In many places, international students are offered free Danish classes

during their stay.

The Nordic identity

Although there are many differences between the Nordic countries – Denmark, Sweden,

Norway, Finland, and Iceland – there are also many similarities. One may even speak of a Nordic

identity. The similarities are found in our values, social structure, and languages. They are also

evident in our common pursuit of the simple, light, and clean lines in design and furnishing.

The study environment is characterised by an informal tone amongst students and teachers

alike. This informal tone is also found in the relationship between the population and the

authorities which is all part of Nordic mentality. Another common feature of the Nordic countries

is the welfare model where welfare benefits such as the free health care system, social

security, free education, and subsidies for art and culture are all financed through the tax system.

Feel safe

Denmark is a safe country to study and live in and the crime rate is low.

Denmark: a country of artistic and cultural diversity

A creative oasis in the capital

Centrally in Copenhagen – surrounded by water, green spaces, and with a fantastic view of the

city centre – you will find the district called Holmen. Until a few years ago, this area belonged to

the Danish navy but today Holmen is home to many of the creative art studies in Copenhagen.

Here you find The National Film School of Denmark, The Danish National School of Theatre,

The Rhythmic Music Conservatory, and The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of

Architecture. Apart from state-of-the-art facilities, Holmen also offers a cross-aesthetical learning

environment with collaboration between the various studies.


A versatile art scene

The Danish gallery scene is young and sparkling with great openness towards new up-andcoming

artists. The galleries are mainly found in the major cities where you will also find large

museums of international repute such as ARoS, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Statens Museum for

Kunst, Louisiana, and Arken.

The Danish art scene comprises both modern, contemporary artists such as Olafur Eliasson,

Jeppe Hein, and Peter Land – who have all studied at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts

– and more traditional artists. Denmark also has a unique ceramics and fine arts and crafts

tradition which you can experience at many museums and galleries around the country. You

will find a list of the Danish museums at www.museums.dk.

Classic lamps and haute couture

Danish design is renowned all over the world – especially for its classic lamps and furniture by

well-known architects such as Børge Mogensen, Hans Wegner, Poul Henningsen, Arne Jacobsen,

and Verner Panton. However, contemporary Danish design is also popular. Many are familiar with

Danish designers of clothes, jewellery, kitchen utensils, and audio and video equipment such as

Bruuns Bazaar, Munthe plus Simonsen, Dyrberg/Kern, Pilgrim, Georg Jensen, Bodum, and Bang

& Olufsen.

At The Danish Design Centre in Copenhagen you can see a number of exhibitions of both classic

and new design. At their homepage, www.ddc.dk, you will find a list of design exhibitions and

events. Read about INDEX:, who awards the most prestigious design prizes in the world at

www.index2005.dk.

More than world-famous opera houses

Denmark has fostered many famous names in the field of architecture. Arne Jacobsen is one of

the great architects of modernism, and Jørn Utzon, who designed the Sydney Opera House,

and J.O. von Sprechelsen, who designed La Grande Arche in Paris, have made Denmark famous

abroad. Henning Larsen has made his mark internationally, the Foreign Ministry in Riyadh being

an example of his work. Henning Larsen has also designed the new opera house in Copenhagen.

3xNielsen, Plot, and Schmidt, Hammer & Lassen are examples of young firms of architects who

are making a name for themselves abroad.

Danish towns are full of magnificent examples of architecture from many centuries – everything

from half-timbered houses to ultramodern buildings. Within a very short distance you can

experience a diversity and variety which normally you would find only in books of architecture.

At the homepage of Dansk Arkitektur Center you can take a virtual tour of various examples of

Danish town architecture. See more at www.dac.dk.

Cultural heritage

Denmark is committed to preserving the cultural heritage of all humankind. Archives, libraries,

and museums are dedicated to making our cultural heritage accessible to the general public, not

only in traditional ways such as exhibitions but also by improved electronic access. The Danish

cultural heritage studies are leaders in their field, collaborate with their foreign counterparts, and

are active in international organisations.

A small country with a large screen

Since the 1980s, Denmark has been a strong player on the international film scene – represented

by award winning directors such as Bille August, Lars von Trier and Gabriel Axel. With the

development of the controversial and experimental concept ‘Dogme95’, which challenges and

breaks with modern conventions of film narratives, the success of Danish film is irrefutable. Lars

von Trier, Thomas Vinterberg, and Lone Scherfig are just three of the directors who have spearheaded

the international Dogme fame. Since then, other directors have had their international

breakthrough – e.g. Susanne Bier, Nicolaj Arcel, and Per Fly. In other genres such as short films,

children’s films, and documentaries, Denmark has also won many international awards.

Read about the Copenhagen International Film Festival at www.copenhagenfilmfestival.com and

the documentary film festival Copenhagen Dox at www.cphdox.dk.

From epic drama to experimental theatre

In Denmark there are many small and large theatres. Most theatres give student discounts of up

to 50 per cent on admission. You can find everything from the classic repertoire of ballet, opera,

and plays at The Royal Danish Theatre to small theatres where you may find experimental plays,

dance, and performance approached in novel ways. The newly opened Copenhagen opera

house – The Royal Opera - is part of The Royal Danish Theatre.

There are also theatre festivals – e.g. Vildskud in Copenhagen and Junge Hunde in Copenhagen

and Aarhus. Look out for Copenhagen International Theatre (KIT) at www.kit.dk, which offers

international theatre, dance, performance, and circus, as well as Gran Teater for Dans in Aarhus at

www.gran-teaterfordans.dk.

The classical music scene is rich and diverse

The many local musical societies offer chamber concerts by established ensembles and by upand-coming

young artists. Many churches also host free concerts. The Royal Danish Orchestra,

Danish National Symphony Orchestra, and regional symphony orchestras are recognised both

nationally and internationally and often work closely together with the Danish academies of

music. The Royal Opera hosts The Chorus of the Royal Danish Opera which is hailed as one of

the world’s best opera choir.

During the summer, festivals of classical music are arranged all over the country, and in the

major cities you will find an active environment focused on new composition music and music

performance. In Copenhagen, Den Anden Opera (The Other Opera) and Athelas Sinfonietta

Copenhagen are but two of the standard-bearers, and in the city of Aarhus, Århus Sinfonietta

plays a central role. The city of Odense hosts Musikhøst (Music Harvest), an annual international

festival of contemporary music. www.snyk.dk gives a good overview of the venues and artists on

the contemporary music scene.


Great musical experiences

Denmark has a flourishing music environment offering many opportunities for experiencing

music at an international standard and for performing music. At the many music venues in the

cities, and not least at the music festivals, there is ample opportunity to listen to music. The

Roskilde Festival is the best known of the music festivals. It is the largest in Northern Europe

featuring international names in rock, pop, hip hop, world music etc. Denmark also hosts a

number of other music festivals which range widely in genre and are held all over the country.

Read more at www.festivaldanmark.dk.

Denmark ranks highly internationally due to our great openness to new music and the excellent

facilities for musicians in the form of inexpensive practice rooms and modern studios. Following

the international success of Aqua, Safri Duo and Junior Senior, Denmark – like Sweden – has

become a Scandinavian springboard to an international career in music.

USEFUL LINKS

www.studyindenmark.dk

Website which answers many of the questions you may have about studying and living in

Denmark. Here you can read about the many reasons for choosing to go to Denmark.

www.ciriusonline.dk

Website about the official aspects of studying in Denmark. Here you can find information on

how to apply for grants, on credit transfer, description of the Danish forms of study etc.

www.denmark.dk

Denmark’s official window on the world. You will find information on everything from public

authorities to housing and Danish fields of research.

www.udlst.dk

Website of the Danish Immigration Service. Here you will find information on residence permits

and other rules and regulations.

www.workindenmark.dk

Information on working in Denmark. Learn about the possibilities and conditions which apply if

you wish to get a job in Denmark. There is information about visa, health insurance, and welfare.

www.useit.dk

Useful information for students in Copenhagen. Here is everything from a guide to the cultural

life to advice on how to find accommodation. A useful guide if you are on a low budget.

www.visitdenmark.com

Good advice and information on Danish tourist attractions. Here you will find inspiring information

on things to do in your spare time. Includes a guide to Danish cultural life, nature,

and how to get to the various attractions.

You will find links to the websites of the creative studies in art and culture on the following pages.

useful links


Denmark has a great variety of study programmes in fine arts and crafts. The

Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Visual Arts, offers programmes in

both traditional and new subjects covering painting, sculpting, graphic arts, photography,

and video art. The schools also offer a theoretical study programme in the

presentation of art.

Artistic activities are central to the studies, and students will have to prove their

talent in their chosen field before they are admitted to the schools.

The creation of works of art is not only the starting point and the foundation of

the frequently changing definitions of the various theoretical and technical disciplines

taught at the schools, it is also the lifeblood of the research and development

activities.

The instruction aims at enabling the student to

work independently on a major artistic project

and to solve inherent technical and theoretical

problems.

Denmark has a great tradition for creating new

and exciting works of fine arts and crafts. For

centuries, Denmark’s artistic environments have

benefited from our geographical position as a

bridgehead between the Nordic countries and the

rest of Europe. The resulting dynamics between

history and the present age are uniquely Danish.

fi ne arts


The Royal Danish Academy of

Fine Arts, Schools of Visual

Arts

The Schools of Visual Arts are a modern and innovative institution

of higher education carrying on proud traditions in fine arts.

The schools were founded in 1754 and still exist on the original

premises in the centre of Copenhagen.

The schools offer study programmes in traditional subjects such

as painting, sculpting, graphic arts, ceramics, and new subjects

such as the time-based media.

The schools provide instruction and stimulating research in the

creative arts and in the history and theory of art and civilisation,

and they also develop the various artistic/technical disciplines

which form the basis of the practice of visual arts.

The schools participate in many kinds of international

collaboration. International artists, critics, and philosophers visit

the academy to conduct or participate in seminars. The schools

also collaborate with a number of foreign academies, art centres,

museums, universities, and various organisations, aiming at

student exchanges, joint exhibitions, and publications.

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts,

Schools of Visual Arts

Website: www.kunstakademiet.dk

Location: Copenhagen

Number of students: 200, of whom 33 are international students.

Language requirements: Instruction is mainly in Danish. International students must

master English on a level which allows easy communication with professors, teachers and

fellow students.

Accommodation: Students arrange their own accommodation.

Admission: Regular students are admitted through an entrance exam based on their

artworks through which their talent is judged by a selection committee. International

students are selected by the Study Board on the basis of documentation of their work.


Denmark has a long and flourishing

tradition for musical performance. Six

academies located in different parts of

Denmark specialise in classical music and

rhythmic music such as jazz, pop, rock, and

folk music.

The academies are an important part

of the rich, Danish music life dating back

to the times of Niels W. Gade and Carl

Nielsen. With their roots in classical music,

people like Per Nørgård, Poul Ruders, and

Bent Sørensen have secured new, Danish

compositional music a strong position

internationally. The world-famous violinist

Nikolaj Znaider received his early training

at a Danish academy of music.

In the 1960s and 1970s, Copenhagen was

the capital of jazz. American jazz musicians

such as Thad Jones, Dexter Gordon, and Ben

Webster made their home in Copenhagen and

were instrumental in forming a jazz scene of

international repute which still inspires and

develops talents in Denmark to this day.

World-famous Danish jazz musicians include

the bass player Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen,

the Doky brothers, and the trumpeter

Palle Mikkelborg.

In the genre of popular music, Safri Duo, Aqua,

Mew, and The Raveonettes are examples of

Danish, international successes.

The academies work closely together with

symphony orchestras, ensembles, rhythmic

music venues, and the many music schools

in Denmark. The academies are also active

players in international educational cooperation

and on the national level they have

close contacts to and co-operation with other

educational institutions.

The study programmes aim at giving the

students theoretical and practical qualifications

and enabling the students to specialise in

a narrower subject area. All study programmes

are professionally oriented and qualify the

students for employment as musicians, music

teachers or for other jobs in the music

business.

music


The Royal Danish

Academy of Music

The Royal Danish Academy of Music is a modern institution of higher education

based on a solid foundation of more than a century of tradition and experience.

The academy has deep roots in the golden age of Danish music. The academy was

founded in 1867 by the composer N.W. Gade.

Her Majesty the Queen is patron of The Royal Danish Academy of Music.

The academy specialises in classical music and trains musicians, singers, music teachers,

church musicians, composers, and recording directors in a broad range of subjects.

The students are taught to meet the demands of the professional music scene

– in orchestras, ensembles, choirs, music schools, and churches.

The academy offers bachelor, master, and soloist study programmes, as well as a

number of postgraduate programmes.

The mixture of teachers and students reflects the academy’s international study

environment. The academy’s international collaboration consists partly of exchanges

and partly of major projects at the artistic, pedagogical research level.

The Opera Academy trains opera singers in cooperation with The Danish Royal

Theatre and The Royal Danish Academy of Music, with The Danish Royal Theatre

being responsible for musical drama training and the academy for singing instruction.

The Royal Danish Academy of Music

Website: www.dkdm.dk

Location: Copenhagen

Number of students: 360, of whom 160 are international students.

Language requirements: It is recommended to attend an intensive Danish course before begin-

ning the study. As a minimum, a satisfactory command of spoken and written English is necessary.

General information and class instruction are in Danish.

Accommodation: The academy helps exchange students in their search for accommodation.

There is no housing guarantee.

Admission: Regular students are admitted on the basis of an individual audition. For exchange

students, admission is based on a written application endorsed by the home institution

accompanied by audio documentation.

Rhythmic Music

Conservatory

Rhythmic Music Conservatory (RMC) is the only academy

of music in Denmark exclusively devoted to the teaching of

pop and jazz music. RMC is highly acknowledged as an educational

institution in this particular field, on both a national

and an international level.

RMC is a powerhouse of musical and innovative development.

The level of education is high, and our students are

taught by brilliant teachers from Denmark and abroad.

RMC is in close contact with the vibrant music scene in

Denmark as well as the professional music industry. Our

students have ample opportunity to develop their professional

skills and enjoy campus life with their fellow

students.

RMC is situated in a purpose-built building with top-grade

technical and rehearsal facilities. The neighbouring art

schools of architecture, film, theatre, and dance provide a

unique environment for artistic and educational interaction

between students and staff.

At RMC you can study towards undergraduate and postgraduate

degrees in music performance, music education,

sound engineering, and music management. RMC also

offers an advanced solo performance degree for professionals

with a master’s degree or equivalent educational

background.

Rhythmic Music Conservatory (RMC)

Website: www.rmc.dk

Location: Copenhagen

Number of students: 200, of whom 20 per cent are international students.

Language requirements: Instruction is in Danish. International students are expected to

learn Danish.

Accommodation: Students arrange their own accommodation.

Admission: Regular students are admitted on the basis of an individual entrance exam.

Exchange students are admitted on the basis of a written application endorsed by the home

institution and audio documentation.


The Royal Academy of

Music, Aarhus Academy of Music, Aalborg

The Royal Academy of Music, Aarhus is the largest Danish academy of

music which is home to both classical, rhythmic, and electronic music.

The academy offers bachelor, master, and soloist study programmes in

classical and rhythmic music, and bachelor and master programmes in

electronic music.

The objective of the academy is to give its students the best possible

foundation for taking up employment – not only for the present but

also for the future.

The academy benefits from its location in the city of Aarhus, known

for its cultural and study environment, and the academy participates in

the many music events and festivals in the city, both on its own and in

collaboration with Aarhus Symphony Orchestra and Klüvers Big Band.

The educational profile of the academy is based partly on the best from

the apprenticeship tradition and the old European university tradition,

and partly on innovative initiatives anchored in the latest educational

research.

In March 2007, the academy will move to a new large extension to

Musikhuset Aarhus in the centre of the city. This move will mean a

quantum leap for the study environment. The classical, rhythmic,

and electronic department will then be under the same roof, and the

academy will be at the same address as the Aarhus Symphony

Orchestra and Danish National Opera. Aarhus Music School, Granhøj

Dans, and the art museum ARoS are all in the vicinity.

The Royal Academy of Music, Aarhus

Website: www.musik-kons.dk

Location: Aarhus

Number of students: 310, of whom 42 are international students.

Language requirements: It is recommended to attend an intensive Danish course before begin-

ning the study. As a minimum, a satisfactory command of spoken and written English is necessary.

General information and class instruction are in Danish.

Accommodation: The academy helps exchange students in their search for accommodation.

There is no housing guarantee.

Admission: Students are admitted on the basis of an individual audition.

The academy of Music, Aalborg was founded in

1930. Since then, many professional musicians

and music teachers have graduated from the

academy.

The academy has 107 student places divided

between classical, jazz, pop, and rock music. The

academy offers bachelor, master, and soloist

study programmes in classical and rhythmic

music. The classical repertoire embraces piano,

singing, orchestral instruments, guitar, choir

instruction, history and theory of music, and

church organ. The rhythmic repertoire embraces

all the instruments used in rhythmic music.

The academy offers majors in classical choir

instruction, history of music, theory of music,

aural training, and rhythmic choir instruction.

The objective of the education is to ensure that

the student becomes both a proficient musician

and a good music teacher.

High performance requirements and dedicated

teaching by a competent, highly specialised

teaching staff guarantee serious, innovative,

exciting, and challenging educational

programmes.

Website: www.nordkons.dk

Location: Aalborg

The academy has international relations with e.g.

Gothenburg, Stockholm, The Hague, London,

Seville, Cuba, and New York through guest

teachers and study trips. These connections are

continually being extended through Nordplus,

Nordpuls, Erasmus, and private contacts.

In 2009, The Academy of Music, Aalborg and

Aalborg University’s educational programmes in

music and music therapy will move to Musikkens

Hus on the Aalborg harbour front.

Academy of Music, Aalborg

Number of students: 107, of whom 3-4 are international students.

Language requirements: It is recommended to attend an intensive Danish course

before beginning the study. As a minimum, a satisfactory command of oral and

written English is necessary. Instruction is in Danish.

Accommodation: The academy will advise you on finding accommodation.

The city of Aalborg offers a housing guarantee for the first month.

Admission: Students are admitted on the basis of an individual audition.


Carl Nielsen Academy of

Music, Odense

The Carl Nielsen Academy of Music in Odense offers education

in music and music teaching to the highest level,

and also undertakes research and musical development.

The academy operates in the field between tradition and

innovation, and its artistic and educational environment is

characterised by the highest quality.

The academy offers bachelor and master study programmes

for musicians and music teachers in classical

music, jazz, and, as the only academy in Denmark, folk

music.

The academy also offers a soloist study programme with

emphasis on new and contemporary classical music.

With classical, jazz, and folk music at the same location,

the academy provides the opportunity to concentrate on

the individual genre, but also the inspiration which comes

from working across genres.

International collaboration has a very high priority and

flourishes through well-established channels such as

ANMA and AEC. The academy is also a member of the

Association of Baltic Academies of Music, ABAM, which

is a close and active network of 16 academies in the Baltic

region.

Carl Nielsen Academy of Music, Odense

Website: www.dfm.dk

Location: Odense

Number of students: 145, of whom 18 are international students.

Language requirements: A basic knowledge of Danish is required. The academy will help by

offering intensive Danish courses. Instruction is in Danish.

Accommodation: The academy helps exchange students in their search for accommodation.

The city of Odense offers a housing guarantee.

Admission: Students are admitted on the basis of an individual entrance exam. Exchange students

are admitted without examination, but often submit audio documentation.

Academy of Music and Music

Communication, Esbjerg

The Academy of Music and Music Communication offers

bachelor and master study programmes in classical and

rhythmic music with an emphasis on jazz music. The

academy also offers soloist study programmes in classical

guitar and organ. The academy specialises in church music,

and, as the only place in Denmark, music communication.

The focus of all activities is the music. Be it education,

research, concerts or touring, it is the ambition of the

academy to train graduates who can communicate music

and knowledge about music in all its aspects, based on a

high academic level.

The academy is an active and vibrant study environment

which is very inspiring. Each year, the Academy gives about

140 concerts which makes it a much visited and popular

attraction for the general public. The architecture and

functionality of the buildings are quite unique, and the

collection of instruments is of the highest standard. The

academy has a fine, new Marcussen & Søn concert organ

with 44 stops, and is the only Nordic academy which has

been appointed an All Steinway Institution.

Academy of Music and Music Communication, Esbjerg

Website: www.vmk.dk

Location: Esbjerg

Number of students: 110, of whom 20 are international students.

Language requirements: A basic knowledge of Danish is required. International applicants

are requested to submit documentation for their language skills. Instruction is in Danish.

Accommodation: The academy offers accommodation. Esbjerg Kollegieforening (hall of

residence association) offers a housing guarantee.

Admission: Regular students are admitted on the basis of the individual entrance exam.

Exchange students are admitted without examination, but often submit audio documen-

tation.


The conservation and library

studies in Denmark form a small,

exclusive group which in many ways

has a strong impact abroad. The

field is characterised by its fruitful

collaboration between manual

dexterity and the relevant theory,

where the theory has acquired a

marked role within library and information

science in particular.

Students are taught to preserve

our cultural heritage and make it

accessible to the general public.

At The Royal Danish Academy of

Fine Arts, School of Conservation

students are taught practical and

manual skills and theories within the

humanities and natural science.

At The Royal School of Library and

Information Science students are

taught systematisation of knowledge

in all its forms.

Public libraries have a strong

position in Denmark. Viewed in

figures, the Danish library system

is impressive: 700 local cultural

centres employing 5,000 information

specialists and cultural

mediators – and more than 30

million visits a year. The Danish

tradition of free public libraries

builds on democracy, information,

cultural activity, and respect for

every citizen’s thirst for knowledge.

conservation & libraries


The Royal Academy of

Fine Arts, School of

Conservation

The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Conservation is a

specialised institution of higher education offering bachelor,

master and PhD study programmes in the science of

conservation-restoration.

The field of education and research is the preservation

of our common cultural heritage which constitutes the

evidence of human activity and the development in nature,

as seen through e.g. writings and images, in artistic expression,

in tools and buildings, and in finds of natural

history. Graduates of the school find employment at

museums, archives, libraries etc.

The school is one of the leading institutions in conservation-restoration

in Europe. Its research library is the largest

in Northern Europe offering comprehensive services to the

conservation-restoration profession.

The school is a founding member of the European Network

for Conservation-Restoration Education and enjoys extensive

collaboration both with institutions of higher education

and end-users worldwide. The school has acted as

coordinator on several EC-funded research projects.

The Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Conservation

Website: www.kons.dk

Location: Copenhagen

Number of students: 120, of whom 20 are international students.

Language requirements: Instruction is primarily in Danish. International students

may be asked to take an IELTS test.

Accommodation: The school helps exchange students in their search for

accommodation. There is no housing guarantee.

Admission: Regular students are admitted on the basis of a relevant qualifying

exam and an interview. For exchange students, admission is based on a written

application endorsed by the home institution.

Royal School of Library

and Information Science

The Royal School of Library and Information Science is

one of the largest of its kind in the world. The school has

departments in Copenhagen and Aalborg.

The school carries on long traditions for international

collaboration in the fields of both teaching and research.

The school offers bachelor, master and PhD study programmes.

The school also has extensive continuing training

activities where 5,000 participate each year.

Today the school focuses on systematisation of knowledge

in close dialogue with the libraries which are undergoing

rapid changes in Denmark at present.

The school teaches the following subjects: knowledge

organisation, information seeking and information retrieval,

knowledge and document management, library management

and leadership development, library development,

communication of culture, sociology of knowledge,

development of media, etc.

The school prepares students for fulfilling

the many new roles of the librarian in

both libraries and companies such as

information specialist, web-developer,

researcher, and cultural

mediator.

Royal School of Library and Information Science

Website: www.db.dk

Location: Copenhagen and Aalborg

Number of students: 1,000, of whom 67 are international students.

Language requirements: Students must pass ‘Studieprøven i dansk som andetsprog

for voksne udlændinge’ (Danish language test). Students who are admitted to the

master programme must pass the IELTS or TOEFL test.

Accommodation: The school helps exchange students in their search for

accommodation. There is no housing guarantee.

Admission: Based on relevant qualifying exam.


Denmark has a lot to offer in the

fields of film, theatre, and dance.

The scene is diversified and

experimental and it has its basis in

educations of high quality and class.

The National Film School of

Denmark encompasses various

film study programmes such as

directing, photography, sound,

editing, production, documentary

directing, studio production, scriptwriting,

and animation.

The Danish National School of

Theatre – which includes The

Danish National School of Con-

temporary Dance – offers theatre

and dance educational pro-

grammes such as acting, directing,

scenography, theatre technology

and management, contemporary

dance, choreography, and dance

pedagogy.

In the cities of Odense and Aarhus,

the Odense and Aarhus Drama

Schools offer study programmes in

acting. The drama schools are associated

with Odense Theatre and

Aarhus Theatre.

The art schools in the fields of film,

theatre, and contemporary dance

combine theory and practice. The

students work with professionals

and thereby make contact with

future colleagues, employers, and

employees.

The art schools in Copenhagen

benefit from being located in one

place. This enables the students to

work with fellow students from

other professions as they will do

in their professional careers after

graduation.

In recent years, Denmark has won a

number of international awards for

feature films, short films, and tele-

vision serials.

Denmark is home to Nordisk Film,

one of the oldest film companies

in the world, and has introduced

the Dogme95 concept, which has

been developed by the Danish film

director Lars von Trier and Thomas

Vinterberg among others.

In Denmark, there is also a focus on

producing very high-quality theatre,

films, and television for children.

film, theatre & dance


The National Film School of Denmark

The National Film School of Denmark is

among the best in the world. World-famous

film directors such as Lars von Trier, Bille August,

and Susanne Bier trained here. The school

celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2006 and

has won many national and international

awards since its foundation.

The school offers four study programmes:

film, TV, scriptwriting, and animation directing.

They are all 4-year programmes, except for the

2-year scriptwriting course.

The film programme is divided into five lines of

study: directing, photography, sound, editing,

and production. The television programme has

two lines: documentary directing and studio

production. The scriptwriting study programme

qualifies the students to work professionally as

scriptwriters, co-writers, and episode writers.

The animation study programme qualifies the

students to work with animation directing of

feature films and television productions.

The teaching programme is a mixture of

theoretical and practical training. Graduates

The National Film School of Denmark

Website: www.filmskolen.dk

Location: Copenhagen

are well prepared for employment in the professional

film business, and many have found

employment in their chosen field even before

graduation. The students’ final project is a film

produced on a professional level and presented

on national TV.

The school works together with a number of

other art schools and the use of guest teachers

from these institutions and from the professional,

Danish film business is an integrated

part of the programme.

The education in producing computer games is

the result of a new collaboration between eight

universities and art schools. The students gain

qualifications as project manager, game programmer,

game designer, game director, game

artist, animator, and audio designer. For further

details, see www.dadiu.dk.

The school also arranges courses for film and

TV professionals from abroad as well as seminars

with participants from other Nordic countries.

Number of students: 96. The school has a few students from the other Nordic countries.

Language requirements: Danish and preferably also knowledge of other Nordic languages

and English.

Accommodation: Students arrange their own accommodation.

Admission: All applicants submit a produced film. The actual admission exam lasts 1-2 months.

The Danish National School of Theatre

With 10 different study programmes, The

Danish National School of Theatre – including

The Danish National School of Contemporary

Dance – is one of the few schools in the world

that covers most disciplines in theatre and contemporary

dance. The school offers study programmes

in acting, directing, scenography, stage

and production management, light and sound

technology, contemporary dance, choreography,

and dance pedagogy.

All lines of study are 4-year programmes. Dance

pedagogy is a one-year further education

programme.

The school is characterised by a comprehensive

cooperation between the various study

programmes which introduces the students to

a realistic interdisciplinary work situation.

Website: www.teaterskolen.dk

Location: Copenhagen

The basic course focuses on fundamental

methods of the professions which provide the

students with knowledge of the common

language, concepts, and understanding of

theatre and dance.

Later on, the advanced course develops the

personal, artistic, and specialised expression of

the students.

Small and large productions are included in

all study years, and students meet professionals

from both Denmark and abroad as teachers.

Furthermore, all students gain practical

experience at theatres or dance companies at

least once during the course of their studies,

and they complete their training by putting on

a professional production.

The Danish National School of Theatre

Number of students: 120, of whom approx. 35 are international students.

Language requirements: Instruction is in Danish in all theatre study programmes.

The dance study programmes are taught in Danish, Swedish and English.

Accommodation: Students arrange their own accommodation.

Admission: Students are admitted on the basis of individual auditions.


Architecture and design are Danish raw

materials which for generations have

been used to market Denmark and the

Nordic countries internationally. In the

educational tradition, the academic,

the methodical, the artistic, and the

occupational aspects go hand in hand.

Today, the classic image of architects

and designers as artists/creators of

unique objects is changing, as there is an

increasing demand for methodical and

innovative qualifications as well as

communicative and interdisciplinary

skills. The market is international and

the production facilities are highly

industrialised.

In order to meet current challenges,

the schools of architecture and design

have jointly established the Danish

Centre for Design Research with a

view to strengthening research and

development efforts as well as

developing specialised educational

elements at the highest level.

The Danish architecture and design

study programmes play an important

role internationally by focusing on

such basic values as aesthetics, ethics,

and functionality based on analytical,

experimental, professionally oriented,

and interdisciplinary studies.

The schools are active in the development

of international collaboration in

respect of the architectural and design

educational programmes. It is a priority

that the programmes are firmly rooted

in an international environment where

international students, guest teachers,

and lecturers are part of the research

and teaching environment.

With the schools acting as incubators,

new architect and designer generations

of the 21st century are following

in the footsteps of such fine architects

and designers as Jørn Utzon, Hans

Wegner, Arne Jacobsen, Panton, Grethe

Meyer, Ursula Munch-Petersen, and

Erik Mortensen.

architecture & design


The Royal Danish Academy of Fine

Arts, School of Architecture

Founded in 1754, The School of Architecture is one of the oldest of its

kind in the world and proudly carries on the Danish tradition for functional

quality building. The school brings together tradition and innovation in a

vibrant and creative environment.

The school educates architects in the fields of building design and re-

storation, urban and landscape planning, and industrial and graphic design.

The education on both bachelor and master levels is project-based.

Students work hands-on and receive tuition and feedback individually

at the drawing board. In addition, a series of interdisciplinary courses are

taught.

The bachelor programme provides fundamental knowledge of methods of

architecture, while students in the master programme pursue topics of their

own personal interest within the school’s fields of teaching. The master programme

has a professional focus and 2,5 to 5 months of practical training in

Denmark or abroad are an option.

The school also offers PhD study programmes where research is carried

out in one of seven specialised research units. As of 2007, the school offers

master programmes aimed at professional architects.

The school is situated in one of the most attractive parts of Copenhagen,

Holmen, and has excellent study and research facilities that are constantly

updated with IT, special tools for scale modelling and 1:1 testing, individual

student workspaces, lecture facilities, conference rooms, as well as spacious

exhibition facilities.

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture

Website: www.karch.dk

Location: Copenhagen

Number of students: 1,127, of whom 30 per cent are regular students from Scandinavia

and 80 are international students.

Language requirements: Exchange students receive individual instruction in English.

Some courses are offered in English.

Accommodation: The school helps exchange students in their search for accommodation.

Admission: Regular students are admitted on the basis of either adequate average marks from

a qualifying exam or an individual assessment. Exchange students with a bachelor degree from

an internationally recognised school of architecture are assessed on their portfolio.

Aarhus School of Architecture

The Aarhus School of Architecture is a young school founded in 1965 as an

institution of higher education. The school offers bachelor, master, and PhD

programmes. The master programme is professionally oriented and includes

thesis work and 2 to 5 months of practical training in Denmark or abroad.

The school has established cooperation agreements with leading companies

in Denmark and abroad in connection with the practical training.

Studies at the Aarhus School of Architecture require a basic artistic,

aesthetic, technological and societal understanding. The education is

project-oriented and trains students for a wide range of architectural

tasks where design qualifications are in demand.

The school places great emphasis on being very active in the development

of interdisciplinary cooperation schemes and gives top priority to the

training taking place in an international as well as interdisciplinary en-

vironment where international students, visiting teachers, and lecturers

form part of the research and teaching environment.

The graduates of the school find work within the fields of architecture,

design, and planning, as well as within other interdisciplinary environments

working with e.g. process, component, and communication design, plus

research communication.

Aarhus School of Architecture

Website: www.aarch.dk

Location: Aarhus

Number of students: 800, of whom 175 are international students.

Language requirements: International applicants from outside Scandinavia must pass

‘Studieprøven i dansk som andetsprog for voksne udlændinge’ (Danish language test).

Exchange students receive individual instruction in English. Some courses are offered in English.

Accommodation: The school helps exchange students in their search for accommodation.

Admission: Regular students are admitted on the basis of either adequate average marks from a

qualifying exam or an individual assessment. Exchange students with a bachelor degree from an

internationally recognised school of architecture are assessed on their portfolio.


Danmarks Designskole

Website: www.dkds.dk

Location: Copenhagen

Danmarks Designskole celebrated its 125th anniversary

in 2000 and is undergoing a development whereby the

school’s tradition for artistry and craftsmanship is being

combined with the academic tradition.

The school aims at developing the students’ skills

on an artistic basis within the field of aesthetics,

innovative design, and problem-solving in an interplay

with concrete approaches starting from the characteristics

of materials, so that the students will be qualified

to solve both specific, theoretical, and abstract design

tasks.

The design education is based on a 3-year full study

programme, followed by a 2-year advanced study programme

during which the students concentrate on one

of the school’s special subjects: visual communication,

digital design, production design, fashion design, textile

design, industrial design, ceramic and glass design, and

furniture and spatial design.

The academic activities of the school will be

evaluated in 2010 in order for the school to attain

university status.

Number of students: 650, of whom 10 per cent are regular students from Scandinavia and 20-25 are international

students.

Language requirements: Students who are admitted to the first academic year of the study programme must pass

‘Studieprøven i dansk som andetsprog for voksne udlændinge’ (Danish language test). Students who are admitted to

the advanced study programme must pass the IELTS or TOEFL test. The language requirements to the advanced study

programme may be subject to change.

Accommodation: The school helps exchange students in their search for accommodation. There is no housing guarantee.

Admission: Regular students are admitted on the basis of an individual test. Exchange students are admitted on the basis

of a portfolio.

Danmarks Designskole

Designskolen Kolding

Designskolen Kolding is a recognised design school

in Denmark and Europe. The school trains designers

within graphic design, illustration, fashion, textile,

industrial design, and interactive media. The environment

is international with guest teachers from

across the world.

The tuition is characterised by three areas: specialist

classes where the students acquire specific design

skills within their subject areas, cross-disciplinary

classes where the students are taught general design

disciplines, and interdisciplinary project classes where

the students are taught how to collaborate across

different subject areas.

The school has a strong professional network with

companies and other institutions where students go

on internship.

The school sees the designer of the future as an

innovative, artistically gifted trouble-shooter who

relates to aesthetics, to form, and to sublime expression

based on an understanding of ethics; a designer who

has a profound theoretical and practical knowledge of

his or her profession, who is analytical and experimental

in his or her approach to assignments, and capable of

entering into interdisciplinary collaboration.

Designskolen Kolding

Website: www.designskolenkolding.dk

Location: Kolding

Number of students: 380, of whom 10 per cent are regular students from Scandinavia and 20-25 are international

students.

Language requirements: Students who are admitted to the first academic year of the study programme must pass

‘Studieprøven i dansk som andetsprog for voksne udlændinge’ (Danish language test). Students who are admitted to

the master programme must pass the IELTS or TOEFL test.

Accommodation: The school helps exchange students in their search for accommodation. There is no housing

guarantee. Students can apply for accommodation at kua@kolding.dk and www.ungdomsboliger.dk.

Admission: Regular students are admitted on the basis of an individual test. Exchange students are admitted on the

basis of a portfolio.


Glass and Ceramic School Bornholm

Website: www.glasogkeramikskolen.dk

Location: Nexoe, Bornholm

Glass and Ceramic School

Bornholm

Denmark has a great tradition for creating new and exciting

crafts. The Glass and Ceramic School Bornholm is one of the few

advanced programmes in Scandinavia which trains the students to

become artist craftsmen and craftswomen. The School specialises

in glass and ceramics.

The school provides students with knowledge of and skills in craft

techniques and design. This includes knowledge of materials,

firing techniques, construction of kilns, and aesthetic and artistic

qualifications.

The ambition is that students should be able to safeguard and

develop the Danish tradition for genuine and innovative crafts.

The school offers three years of in-depth study. The interaction

between international impulses and the tranquil pull of Bornholm

with its fantastic scenery is unique.

The school has a formalised collaboration with Danmarks

Designskole in Copenhagen. Consequently, a graduate from the

Glass and Ceramic School may be admitted to the advanced study

programme at Danmarks Designskole. There is also collaboration

in respect of other practical and theoretical projects.

Number of students: 75, of whom approx. 10 are international students, Scandinavian

students included.

Language requirements: The students must be able to speak and understand Danish.

They must also master English at a certain level, as some of the instruction is in English.

Accommodation: The school helps exchange students in their search for accommodation.

There is no housing guarantee.

Admission: Based on a written application, students are selected for a 3-day entrance exam.

The applicants are requested to bring a portfolio of photographs of their own work.

Publisher: Rectors’ Conference of the Danish Ministry

of Culture

Design and layout: Operate A/S

Photos: The creative studies in art and culture, Per

Morten Abrahamsen, Rune Johansen, Martin Dam

Kristensen, Andreas Trier Mørch, Jan Zabell Steffensen,

and www.visitdenmark.com

Copies printed: 20,000

Print: prinfoholbæk-hedehusene

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