PDF: 1917 KB - Infrastructure Australia

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PDF: 1917 KB - Infrastructure Australia

InfrastructureAustralia2.1 Delivering better governanceb) Accountability• Lack of accountability and transparency;• Inadequate evidence tosupport decisions;• Cost-shifting between entities;• Inappropriate infrastructure pricing; and• Mixed messages to industryand communities aboutinfrastructure investment.The lack of clear responsibility for andleadership in infrastructure planningcompromises clear accountability forinfrastructure outcomes. All too oftenCommonwealth, state, territory andlocal governments can deflect criticismonto other arms of government whendecisions are not made or whereinappropriate decisions are made.There is a tendency to see infrastructureprojects as individual entities, ratherthan in the broader context of land use,community and integrated networks.As a result, infrastructure projects ofteninvolve cost‐shifting between governments.c) Planning• Poorly coordinated planning, especiallyat a national level;• Planning decisions are determinedby administrative boundariesrather than social, economic orenvironmental interdependencies;• Poorly timed, designed or locatedinfrastructure developments, whichimpact negatively on other governmententities, communities or industry;• Projects that are poorly scopedwhich leads to cost increases; andPlanning decisions are often determinedwithin existing administrative boundariesrather than being based on social, economicor environmental interdependencies.This is particularly acute in urban areaswhere inadequate early planning andreservation of infrastructure corridorshas resulted in encroachment by housingdevelopments or alternative land uses.Lack of foresight or commitment to longerterm outcomes has even resulted in therezoning of transport corridors aroundmajor ports and other facilities.Infrastructure and land use integrationsuffers from poor planning, timing andcoordination, most notably in relation toresidential land development and newextractive industries. In some cases,critical infrastructure is not delivered whenand where it is required for private sectordevelopments of national significance.In other cases, poorly timed, designedor placed developments are approved,for which other levels of government orother portfolios must then provide services.Critically, where planning is fragmented,it places a burden on industry to navigateproposals through the various tiers ofgovernment. Whilst most state and territorygovernments have sought to addressthese issues through ‘projects of statesignificance’ legislation, the potentialremains for considerable uncertaintyand increased costs arising fromprotracted processes.While decision-making processesassociated with government-sponsoredcapital projects are often not wellintegrated, there are processes withinjurisdictions for decisions on capitalinvestment as part of annual budgeting.• Increased costs of compliance forindustry, government and communities.14 | Infrastructure Australia – Advising Government on Australia’s Infrastructure

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