Making Migration Work - Wetenschappelijke Raad voor het ...

wrr.nl
  • No tags were found...

Making Migration Work - Wetenschappelijke Raad voor het ...

labour migration from central and eastern europe and the implications for integration policy115In addition to these requirements, the authorities should work towards achievingthe following four objectives:1 A flexible infrastructure for incorporating temporary, circular labourmigrants into Dutch society. Adequate housing is essential in thisrespect. All sorts of improvised solutions have been attempted in recentyears to organise housing for this group, from campgrounds to housingestates awaiting approval for demolition. In addition, migrant ‘hotels’have been founded in various municipalities. There is an urgent need forinexpensive, simple but decent housing that affords the residents privacy.The challenge is to make this sort of housing available. Both privateparties and housing corporations have a role to play. Cities such as TheHague and Rotterdam are more likely to need housing for settlement ortransnational migrants than the rural municipalities. Another option is tomake housing arrangements at regional level so that the responsibility forproviding housing is shared. In the event of long-term problems, it is upto local authorities to take the lead in finding solutions, in consultationwith employers, employment agencies, and housing corporations. Thatis also true of problems that arise once the migrants’ employment hasended. Workers should not be thrown out of their homes as soon as theircontracts are terminated.2 Mechanisms for assimilating labour migrants who wish to remain in theNetherlands for a longer period of time (transnational and settlementmigrants). The Arbeidsmigratie in vieren study showed that some of the‘stayers’ had taken courses in Dutch offered by commercial providers.They had paid for the lessons themselves. Figures provided by the DutchMinistry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations also show that labour migrantsmade use of facilities for voluntary assimilation. To provide evenmore support for assimilation, the authorities would do well to develope-learning products so that migrants can teach themselves the language.They can also encourage employers to arrange language courses for theiremployees. But we should accept that proficiency in Dutch is not top priorityfor labour migrants who only intend staying in the Netherlands fora short time. Transnational and settlement migrants are likely to benefitthe most from knowing Dutch. The authorities should also be concernedabout educating the children of eu labour migrants (lateral entry into theDutch education system). Many eu labour migrants live in multiculturalneighbourhoods in the cities. Extra efforts are needed to ensure that theirchildren find their place in primary education.3 Mechanisms for tackling the social problems arising from footloose migration(cf. Snel et al. 2011). These are problems of crime, unemployment,irregular work, homelessness and addiction. More information is furtherneeded about the possibility of remigration for migrants who have nomeans of support in the Netherlands. Free movement within the borders

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines