T/R Module Design, Assembly and Test

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T/R Module Design, Assembly and Test

Nanomaterials Commercialization

Mike Harris

Georgia Tech Research Institute

1


Introduction

Definition of Nanomaterials

Factors that Influence Commercialization

Differences Between Product and Materials

Commercialization

Time to Commercialize

Nanomaterial Case Study

GTRI Experience and Capabilities

Summary

Outline

2


Ecstasy

ENTHUSIASM

Despair

10

8

6

4

2

0

-2

Customer

likes it!

It works!

Sounds great

We need help

New Business Enthusiasm Curve

Yes it is!

Cost are

too high

It’s not

proprietary

I have an idea

The field trial

worked!

It works!

We have

a fix!

Failures in

field trials

It doesn’t

always

New costs

look great

We don’t have

enough

resources

No, he

loves it!

They need

all sizes

The boss

hates the

project

We have an

order!

The market

estimate

was wrong

They like it!

We will

make it

Deliveries

are late

Costs are and orders!!!

better!

and inventory

and approvals

We have all the sizes!

Several

failures

reported

Installation problem

We need

documentation

Documentation done!

Source: V.K. Jolly, Commercializing New Technologies, Harvard Business School Press, Boston, MA 1997, p20.

3


Introduction

Commercialization is the stage in material development where the

decision is made to order full-scale production

“Nanomaterials” encompasses a wide range of materials including:

� nanocrystalline materials (nanocrystalline cellulose)

� nanocomposites

� nanoparticles

� carbon nanotubes

� quantum dots (semiconductors whose electronic characteristics are closely related to

the size and shape of the individual crystal)

The common link - structural features on the nanoscale.

Nanomaterials exhibit different physical, chemical, electrical and

magnetic properties than conventional materials by virtue of their

structure

4


Market need

Factors That Influence

the Decision to Commercialize

� Is there someone who will buy your material or product?

Material or product maturity

� Can you make it day-in and day-out?

Uniqueness

� Does it have special properties that make it desirable?

Production capacity

� Can you make enough material to satisfy demand when

launched?

Competing materials or products

� Are there other materials on the market that are as good or

better?

5


More Factors

That Influence the Decision to Commercialize

Competing companies

� Are there competing companies with similar products?

Corporate brand

� Are you viewed as the brand name company?

First to market

� Will you be first to market and possibly garner long-term

market share?

Cost to produce

� Are you going to make a profit?

6


Main Differences Between

Product Innovation and Technology Commercialization

Characteristic Product Technology

1. Object to be

commercialized

2. Start of

commercialization

3. Stakeholders to whom

to demonstrate value

Singular Design Multifaceted capability

Product Conception

(1-5 years)

As soon as potentially valuable

(10-20 years)

Customers as end-users Many, whose interests evolve

with the technology

4. Nature of demand Final for the segment target Derived from products made

possible

5. Competition Other products for the same

function

6. Marketing challenge Exploiting unique selling

proposition of finished product

Other technologies for the

same function

Exploiting whatever the

technology can achieve at any

point in time

7. Timing End-user market opportunity Time line of competing

inventors, adopters

8. Opportunity for value

creation and appropriation

Revenue from selling products

competitively

Sales and collateral benefits

over life of technology

Source: V.K. Jolly, Commercializing New Technologies,

Harvard Business School Press, Boston, MA 1997, pxvi.

7


What Is Different When

Commercializing a Nanomaterial?

Unknown applications

Unknown market demand

Concern that pilot line results will not be

duplicated on production machines

Unknown value to the user

Unknown profit margin

8


How Do You Know

When It Is Time To Commercialize?

Process is mature

Properties are well-documented and are unique

Nanomaterials can be made reproducibly

Increasing demand for the material

Materials can be sold for a profit

9


A Case Study In Commercializing

a Nanomaterial

Nanomaterial - Carbon nanotubes

Molecular-scale tubes of graphitic carbon

Among the stiffest and strongest fibers known

Remarkable electronic properties

Academic and industrial interest

Commercial applications

Slow to develop primarily because of the high production costs of the best

quality nanotubes

Current interest is a direct consequence the discovery in 1985

that carbon could form stable, ordered structures other than

graphite and diamond

http://www.personal.reading.ac.uk/~scsharip/tubes.htm

10


Nanomaterial

Commercialization Process for Thomas Swan

Four years of development with the University of Cambridge

Production began in April 2004 at pilot facility

Initial materials were high-purity carbon nanotubes

Produced using a fully scalable Chemical Vapor Deposition

(CVD) process, developed in collaboration with the University

of Cambridge

Growth as a result of close collaboration with key customers

and the University of Oxford

Stable and profitable nanomaterials business

Became a leading supplier in the sector

Established a brand name

Source: http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=16655.php

11


2000

University

Collaboration

Research and

Development

2004

Thomas Swan

Commercialization Path

Pilot Production

Other

University

Collaboration

2010

Production

Scale UP

Customer

Input

12


Commercialization Philosophy

Harry Swan further commented:

"We decided to focus on developing the right grade

of material with our customers first and then

expand production of this grade as demand

increased. The investment in these two new plants

is in direct response to increased demand and we

are very encouraged to see the market developing

in a controlled and sustainable manner.“

Source: http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=16655.php

13


Scale Up

UK | Posted on June 10th, 2010, Thomas Swan & Co. Ltd.

today announced a major step forward in its

nanotechnology manufacturing capability with the

commissioning of a new, state-of-the-art single-wall

carbon nanotube plant at its Consett facility in the UK.

The new plant which can manufacture 50kg per month of

high purity single-wall carbon nanotubes began

commercial production in late May.

The company has announced that the installation of a

second identical plant is planned for the end of 2010

bringing its total capacity up to approximately100kg per

month.

14


Cost for High Purity Carbon Nanotubes

Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Prices

SKU # Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Prices in grams and kilograms

Single Walled

Carbon

Nanotubes

Prices 1g 10g 25g 50g 100g 500g 1kg

Single Walled

Nanotubes

99wt% Prices SKU 0111 $ 200 $ 2,000 $ 4,875 $ 9,750 $ 19,000 $ 90,000 $ 175,000

OH

Functionalized

Single Walled

Nanotubes

99wt% Prices SKU 0112 $ 250 $ 2,500 $ 6,125 $ 12,250 $ 24,000 $ 117,500 $

200,000

http://www.cheaptubesinc.com/carbon-nanotubes-prices.htm#Single_Walled_Nanotubes_Prices#ixzz1Ec9ZQH5e

15


Carbon Nanotube Market Projections

Revenue

(Million US$)

450

400

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

0

Market Revenues for Carbon Nanotubes 2015

175

125

12

200

385

Market for Carbon Nanotubes was

$90.8M in 2008

Source: Nanoposts.com

Market Predicted to be

$1.4B in 2015

147

Markets

40 41

7

115

130

62

16


Carbon-based Materials and

Device Branch established in

2000

Started growth in 2001 using

a horizontal tube furnace

Added full-time staff in 2008

Purchased and installed a

plasma enhanced chemical

vapor deposition (PECVD)

tool in 2010

Research focused on

maturing applications that

use carbon nanotubes

Carbon Nanotube

Growth and Research at GTRI

Axtron Black Magic Plasma Enhanced

Chemical Vapor Deposition

17


How GTRI Can Help

With Emerging Forest Industry Nanomaterial Opportunities

Materials development

Advanced deposition and growth processes

Refining

Extracting

Materials testing

Properties

Life testing

Use testing

Documentation

Prepare datasheets

Prepare performance curves

Applications

Discover potential applications

Products

Incorporate raw materials into higher end products

GTRI is poised to perform

tasks that help move

emerging forest industry

nanomaterials from curiosities

to products.

18


Commercializing a nanomaterial is much like

commercializing any material or product:

� Perform research and development

� Use available academic resources

� Develop the right grade of material with

customer involvement

� Perform pilot production

� Expand production as demand increases

� Establish brand recognition

Summary

19

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