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US ARMY FM 21-150 - Hand To Hand Combat - Modern Prepper

US ARMY FM 21-150 - Hand To Hand Combat - Modern Prepper

FM

FM 21-150e. Period 5 - 2 Hours.(1) Warm-ups and stretches.(2) Overall review.2-4. UNIT SUSTAINMENT TRAINING PROGRAMUnit combative training is best done at company and platoon level. It isdifficult for commanders to find time to conduct hand-to-hand combattraining in typical training schedules. Combative training can be conductedduring the times allotted for unit physical readiness training. Most units haveat least one day a week when organized athletics are conducted for PT; thisis a good time to train in hand-to-hand combat.a. When the unit begins combative training, it starts with the basictraining/OSUT program. After each soldier in the unit has attained the samebasic skill level, the training can then progress to more advanced techniquesand drills. If conducted once a week, this program takes 10 weeks tocomplete. A typical progression might be as follows:Defense and counters against weapons: 3 hoursField-expedient weapons: 3 hours.Sentry removal, silent kills, and quick kills: 2 hours.Advanced knife drills: 3 hours.b. Once the unit has basic proficiency of the topics in Chapters 3 through 7,the commanders can easily plan future combative training. Unit trainers willknow where emphasis should be placed in the unit’s hand-to-hand training,and they can also create more advanced training exercises and drills based onsoldier skill levels.Section IIITRAINING AREASAn advantage of combative training is that it can be conducted almostanywhere with little preparation of the training area. (See Appendix A.)2-5. TRAINING FORMATIONSPhysical training formations may be used for combative training.(See FM 21-20.) If the extended rectangular formation is used, the first andthird ranks should face the second and fourth ranks so that each soldier hasa partner directly across from him.a. When practicing throws or disarming techniques, soldiers need twicethe normal interval between ranks. Instructors also try to pair soldiersaccording to height and weight.2-5

FM 21-150b. A large, grassy outdoor area free of obstructions is suitable for training.Each pair of soldiers should have an 8-foot square training space. Indoorareas, such as gymnasiums, are also appropriate; however, sharp or hardweapons are not used on gymnasium floors or on mats.2-6. PIT CONSTRUCTIONThe most common area for teaching hand-to-hand combat is a sawdust pit.Figure 2-1, shows a training area for 200 soldiers with a sawdust pitsurrounding an instructor and demonstrator platform.a. To construct the pit, dig out and level an area 50 meters wide and builda retaining wall at least 24 inches high. The wall can be cinder blocks,sandbags, or dirt if other materials are not available. To prevent injuries froma cinder block retaining wall, cover the wall and the top of the wall withsandbags. Place a layer of plastic sheeting on the ground to prevent thegrowth of grass and weeds, and place a sand base up to 12 inches deep on topof the plastic. Then, place a layer of sawdust at least 6 inches deep on top ofthe sand.b. Build a 14-foot square demonstration area (Figure 2-1) in the centerof the pit with the same type of retaining wall described in paragraph a. Thisarea is large enough for two demonstrators and the primary instructor.2-7. BAYONET ASSAULT COURSEThe bayonet assault course provides the commander a unique trainingopportunity. It allows his soldiers to employ rifle-bayonet fighting skills undersimulated combat conditions. The course can be built and negotiated so thatdemands placed on the soldiers’ abilities and on their endurance approachthose experienced under combat conditions. Realistic sights and sounds ofbattle—fire, smoke, confusion, and pyrotechnics--can also be created toenhance realism. (See Appendix B.) The training objectives of the bayonetassault course include:Improving rifle-bayonet fighting skills.Improving physical fitness and soldier aggressiveness.Improving speed, strength, coordination, and accuracy.Providing realistic rifle-bayonet fighting under near combatconditions.Challenging the soldiers’ determination and stamina, which areneeded in combat.Providing an opportunity for team and squad leaders to developtheir leadership and control measures.2-6

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  • Page 4 and 5: FM 21-150PrefaceThis field manual c
  • Page 6 and 7: FM 21-150Without balance, the fight
  • Page 8 and 9: CHAPTER 2TRAININGThis chapter discu
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  • Page 14 and 15: FM 21-150CAUTIONSOLDIERS MUST CARRY
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  • Page 32 and 33: FM 21-1502-11. CRAWL, WALK, AND RUN
  • Page 34 and 35: FM 21-150Technique drills help sold
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  • Page 46 and 47: FM 21-1503-2. STRANGULATIONStrangul
  • Page 48 and 49: FM 21-1503-4. COUNTERS TO CHOKESA s
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  • Page 52 and 53: FM 21-150d. Counterstrikes to Rear
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  • Page 56 and 57: FM 21-1503-5. GRAPPLINGGrappling is
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    FM 21-150g. Shoulder Dislocation. A

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    FM 21-150(1) Straight-arm shoulder

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    FM 21-150h. Knee Lock/Break. The op

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    FM 21-150(6) Nose. Any blow can eas

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    FM 21-150(2) Outside of thigh. A la

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    FM 21-1504-6

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    FM 21-150(3) Brachial plexus origin

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    FM 21-150(2) Thumb strike to throat

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    FM 21-150(6) Hammer fist to pectora

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    FM 21-150(10) Knife-hand strike to

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    FM 21-150(12) Palm-heel strike to s

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    FM 21-150b. Elbows as Weapons. The

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    FM 21-1504-20

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    FM 21-150(2) Repetitive elbow strik

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    FM 21-150(2) Knee strike to outside

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    FM 21-150(4) Knee strike to groin.

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    CHAPTER 5LONG-RANGE COMBATIVESIn lo

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    FM 21-1505-3

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    FM 21-150c. Heel Kick to Inside of

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    FM 21-150e. Shin Kick. The shin kic

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    FM 21-150f. Stepping Side Kick. A s

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    FM 21-1505-11

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    FM 21-1505-13

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    FM 21-150Section IIDEFENSIVE TECHNI

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    FM 21-150a. No. 1 Angle of Attack.

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    FM 21-1505-19

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    FM 21-1505-21

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    FM 21-1505-23

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    FM 21-1505-25

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    FM 21-1505-27

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    FM 21-1505-29

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    FM 21-150c. Follow-Up Techniques. O

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    FM 21-1505-33

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    FM 21-1505-35

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    FM 21-150(4) Unarmed defense agains

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    FM 21-150(6) Unarmed defense agains

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    FM 21-1505-7. ADVANCED WEAPONS TECH

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    FM 21-150(2) Modified stance. Thedi

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    FM 21-1505-45

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    FM 21-1505-47

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    FM 21-150d. Optional Low No. 5 Angl

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    FM 21-1505-51

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    FM 21-1505-53

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    FM 21-150(3) The instinctive rifle-

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    FM 21-150in his movements, be ready

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    FM 21-150At combat speed, the comma

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    FM 21-1505-61

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    FM 21-1505-63

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    FM 21-1505-65

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    FM 21-1505-67

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    FM 21-1505-69

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    FM 21-1505-71

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    FM 21-1505-73

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    FM 21-1505-75

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    FM 21-150(5) Modified movements. Tw

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    FM 21-1505-79

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    FM 21-1505-81

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    FM 21-1505-83

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    FM 21-1505-85

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    FM 21-1505-12. THREE-FOOT STICKSinc

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    FM 21-1505-89

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    FM 21-1505-91

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    FM 21-1505-93

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    FM 21-1505-95

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    FM 21-1505-97

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    FM 21-1505-99

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    FM 21-150c. In hand-to-hand combat,

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    CHAPTER 7SENTRY REMOVALCareful plan

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    FM 21-150silently approaches to wit

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    FM 21-150c. Pectoral Muscle Strike,

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    FM 21-150f. Belgian Takedown. In th

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    FM 21-150h. Knockout With Helmet. T

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    FM 21-1507-11

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    FM 21-150A-1. SECURING EQUIPMENTUni

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    FM 21-150a. The instructor must con

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    FM 21-150bout to prevent possible i

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    FM 21-150slash, butt stroke. After

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    FM 21-150B-2

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    FM 21-150B-3. QUALIFICATIONThe qual

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    FM 21-1508 l/2-inch by ll-inch pape

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    FM 21-150c. Lane Scorer’s Record

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    REFERENCESDOCUMENTS NEEDEDThese doc

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    FM 21-150Index-2

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    FM 21-15030 SEPTEMBER 1992By order

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