2008 Almond Almanac - Almond Board of California

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2008 Almond Almanac - Almond Board of California

Welcome and Table of ContentsThe Almond Board of Californiapresents the 2008 Almond AlmanacThe Almond Almanac is the definitive source of information for thealmond industry. It brings together the industry’s strategic priorities,the programs and projects that support them, and a thoroughcollection of statistics regarding the production and marketingof California Almonds.The information in the Almanac is reported on a crop-year basis,spanning August 1 through July 31. The statistical content is compiledusing various handler forms required by the industry’s Federal MarketingOrder and used in the monthly Position Report issued by the AlmondBoard. Additional data, including crop estimates and farm price, aresupplied by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, California FieldOffice (NASS/CFO). In the following pages, you will find historicalinformation about almond production, acreage, and varieties, aswell as shipment and market information.Almond Board of California | 2008 Almond Almanac2 Board of Directors and Vision Statement3 Realizing Our Vision and Core Values4 Strategic Priorities and Almond Board Programs5 Shaping Our Destiny6 Global Marketing Strategy7 Mega-Markets: North America9 Mega-Markets: European Union10 Priority Development Markets: India and China11 Regional Driver Markets: Northeast Asia12 Global Category Strategy13 Global Health Strategy14 Nutrition Research15 Global Technical and Regulatory Affairs16 Food Quality and Safety Program17 Industry Relations18 Environmental Excellence19 Environmental Research20 Production Research21 California Almond Industry Overview22 Historical Shipments23 Top Ten Exports by Value24 Position Report of California Almonds25 Destination Overview of California Almonds26 Exports by Destination28 World Almond Production30 Competing Nuts32 Almond Production by County33 Receipts by County and Variety34 Top Producing Counties35 Almond Acreage Planted by Variety36 Almond Crop Estimates vs. Actual Receipts38 California Almond Acreage and Farm Value40 Crop Size History vs. Inedible Percentage41 UC Farm Advisors42 USDA Standards for Grades44 Almond Board Websites45 Resources


Board of Directors and Vision StatementVision: To be the healthiestspecialty crop in the world.Christine Long,ChairDougYoungdahl,Vice ChairDavidArakelianDaveBakerBillBrushWilHunterMikeMasonDavePhippen2KeithRiggJohnThoming


Realizing Our Vision and Core ValuesAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacRealizing Our Vision Means:• Enhancing consumer health, food safety,the environment, and quality production.• Building domestic and international awareness and demand.• Promoting stability of supply.• Developing and distributing industry and production information.• Ensuring uniform compliance.Core Values:• We value fairness in our relationshipswith growers and handlers.• We seek consensus to achieve common goals.• Enhancing the financial well-being of the industryis the driving force behind all decisions.• Decisions are made objectively basedon the best available data.• We provide the industry with the toolsnecessary to communicate our messages andto deliver the safest product possible.• The entire industry shares the responsibilityof maintaining a stable supply.• The authority of the Federal Marketing Order isused to strengthen and protect the industry.3


Strategic Priorities and Almond Board ProgramsStrategic Priorities:1. Build the case supporting the vision, and spread the wordamong global consumers and the trade on the benefits ofconsuming more almonds.2. Facilitate an industry-wide system for ensuring food safetyfrom farm to fork.3. Proactively seek solutions to environmental challengesand differentiate the industry.4. Ensure a basic and applied research capability.Program Budget Allocation Fiscal Year 2007–2008Nutrition Research 3%Food Qualityand Safety 5%Operations 19%Environmental 2% GTRA* 1%Production 3% Industry Relations 1%North AmericanMarketing 47%Program Budget Allocation Fiscal Year 2007–2008:Key program areas for the Almond Board include: industryinformation and statistics, nutrition research, globalmarketing, food safety, environmental stewardship, andproduction research. Almond Board programs are funded byan assessment placed on each pound of almonds producedby almond growers. The Board of Directors approvesallocation to each of the program areas, and the AlmondBoard’s staff is responsible for implementing the programsdetailed on the following pages.4InternationalMarketing 19%Source: Almond Board of California.*Global Technical and Regulatory Affairs.


Global Marketing StrategyIn 2008, the Almond Board began implementationof the Global Strategic Marketing Framework thatresulted from the 2007 Global Demand Analysis.Supported by the industry’s legacy of research-based outreach inthe areas of target-audience understanding, nutrition science, andtechnical knowledge, the Global Strategic Marketing Frameworkfocuses on the geographies with the highest potential for demandgrowth (North America and the European Union, India, China,Japan, Korea, and Taiwan), three principal categories of almondusage representing three-quarters of global new almond productintroductions in consumer packaged goods (confectionery, bakery/patisserie, and snacking), and health issues that are commonto our priority geographies (dietary guidelines, nutrition-basedlegislation, and “lifestyle” diseases, such as heart disease,diabetes, and obesity). Reputation Management—the processof defining and proactively managing the industry’s image as6perceived through the eyes of all stakeholders—serves asthe capstone of the Global Strategic Marketing Framework.The Almond Board’s marketing programs provide a constantstream of communications that educate and inform consumers,manufacturers, foodservice operators, and health professionalsabout the nutritional benefits and versatility of product usage—building the case for almonds as an essential part of the daily diet.As one of California’s leading agricultural products, issues suchas food safety, environmental stewardship, and global commerceare not only more visible to consumers and customers, but alsoplay an increasingly prominent role in purchasing decisions. Asa result, the Almond Board has taken a more proactive stanceon Reputation Management, anticipating potential threats to theindustry’s integrity. For example, as the seasonally first and largestcrop to require honeybees for pollination, the California Almondindustry has attracted global media attention since the onset ofColony Collapse Disorder in 2006. In anticipation of continuedmedia and consumer interest in the health of honeybees, in early2008 the Almond Board activated a broad-based communicationsplan, tapping growers, beekeepers, researchers, and independentexperts as spokespeople to deliver key messages about theindustry’s commitment to the health of the honeybee population.The resulting media coverage during bloom reflected a balancedpicture of the California Almond industry as a dedicated stewardof our vital natural resources.In conjunction with the Board’s five-year strategic direction tobecome A Crop of Choice and The Nut of Choice, the AlmondBoard undertook a project to define and articulate the desiredreputation and global image of the California Almond industry. Thenine-month project spanned the globe, soliciting our stakeholderaudiences to provide input on the qualities and attributes thatmake California Almonds unique, desirable, and essential. In early2009, the Almond Board’s communications will begin to reflect astronger, more consistent, and relevant global image, an imagethat will set the visual and verbal tone of California Almonds asa forward-looking leader in providing a sustainable, wholesome,functional food that is sought after by the world’s consumers.


Mega-Markets: European UnionAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacAbove, Chef Olivier Berté teachesFrench journalists to prepareheart-healthy almond recipes.Left, the Volume DriverAlmondsAdd.com microsite.Exports to the EuropeanUnion (EU) continue tomake healthy gains asmore consumers choosealmonds as a nutritious, tastysuperfood. In 2007–2008, theregion accounted for 38 percentof total shipments and 55percent of exports, a 25 percentincrease over the previous year.The Almond Board’s mediadrivenEU marketing programtaps high-visibility, high-impactconsumer, health professional,and trade media to deliver thealmond story across the region.And drive it did. The EU media, hungry for recipes, photos,and news on almond nutrition research, produced over1,000 almond stories—a threefold increase over 2006–2007coverage, creating over one billion positive impressions inhigh-profile media such as BBC Radio 4, The DailyMail, and Grazia in the UK; Top Santé, Le Figaro, andTV channels LCI and Tele 2 in France; and Die Welt,Bild der Frau, Fit for Fun, and Für Sie in Germany. Theaddition of EU trade outreach in 2007–2008 resulted in75 features on almonds’ versatility, nutrition benefits,and consumer preference in key confectionery, bakery,snacking, and food product development media, suchas Wellness Foods Europe, Food Ingredients, Health &Nutrition, and Chocolate and Confectionery International.The 2007 European Consumer Attitudes, Awareness,and Usage research revealed a concern that almonds arefattening, particularly in France. The Almond Board set outto overcome that concern by engaging consumer journalistsin a cooking class, where they prepared heart-healthy, lowfatalmond recipes developed by a celebrity chef, OlivierBerté. Chef Berté led the class, accompanied by a registereddietitian who provided an overview of the Almond Board’slatest weight management research. An electronic recipebook of Chef Berté’s almond recipes was distributed to awide range of consumer media and offered to consumersthrough several of the publications that covered the story.The Almond Board also attended the European Congresson Obesity in Geneva in May 2008, reaching over 1,500influential dietitians and physicians with information onnew research studies related to almonds’ role in weightmanagement. Dr. Richard Mattes presented a poster onthis new research; he was joined by two of the AlmondBoard’s European Advisory Board members, Dr. ArneAstrup and Professor Eric Bruckert, to discuss almondsas a beneficial addition to the European diet.9


Priority Development Markets: India and ChinaWith their dynamic economies and large populations of increasingly prosperous consumers,India and China represent exceptional long-term growth prospects for California Almonds.Both markets saw record shipments in the 2007–2008 fiscal year, which solidified India’s place asthe third largest export destination and moved China from seventh position last year to fifth. It is nosurprise then, that the Almond Board’s Global Strategic Marketing Framework identifies these tworising economic giants as Priority Development Markets for promotional investment.This year the Almond Board carried out extensive research on Indian consumers’ perceptionsand attitudes toward almonds. It was found that Indian women consider almonds their favorite nut.The Almond Board also undertook a study to better understand the southern region of India, wherealmonds are not as widely available. With the findings from these studies, the Almond Board hasa better understanding of the target audience, market situation, and outlook—this will lead tofurther implementation of high-impact and expanded programs. Key activities during the year alsoincluded media outreach about almond nutritional benefits and direct outreach to consumers viapromotions with Barista Café and 150,000 office workers in Mumbai.The China program works on multiple platforms and outlets to educate trade and consumeraudiences about the versatility and desirability of almonds as part of the daily diet. Consumerpromotions and media outreach are also integral componentsof the program.Mo Huilan, 1996 Olympic silver medalwinninggymnast, with almond sport kit.A major success from this past year was partnering with a1996 Olympic silver medalist from the Chinese gymnasticsteam to endorse the nutritional benefits of almonds and spreadthe word about eating a handful of almonds a day. The gymnastpromoted almonds, as well as simple stretches she developedspecially for the Almond Board, in both online and printconsumer media. Consumers also participated in an onlinecontest to win an almond sport kit and download a screensaver,which provided a daily reminder to eat almonds.10While both countries show tremendous long-term promise,infrastructure bottlenecks and market access barriers have thepotential to disrupt trade. Consequently, the Almond Board alsomonitors and reports on regulatory changes that could impactshipments to these important markets.


Regional Driver Markets: Northeast AsiaAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacLeft, Korean consumers experiencethe almond harvest. Right, the AlmondBoard of California’s Japanese website.Three Northeast Asian markets—Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan —share advantageous characteristics for Almond Boardpromotional efforts, particularly their populations of relatively affluent, health-conscious, and trend-setting consumers.These markets have the distinction of strongly influencing trends throughout Asia, ranging from functional foods to informationtechnology and pop culture. Therefore, they have been identified as Regional Driver Markets in the Almond Board’s Global StrategicMarketing Framework.In order to stimulate top-of-mind consumer awareness and encourage greater consumption, the Almond Board conducts a mixtureof media relations and web-based consumer campaigns. Credible third-party endorsers, such as nutritionists, celebrities, athletes,and star bloggers are an integral part of communicating positive, relevant messages about California Almonds. The primary focus isconveying science-based information about the nutritional benefits of almonds while overcoming common misconceptions, such as thebelief that almonds are fattening. The Almond Board’s programs emphasize that almonds are a natural and wholesome addition toa daily diet and show how almonds are a perfect solution for everyday snacking and cooking choices.One example is the harvest event the Almond Board conducts in Seoul, South Korea, where the goal is to convey that almonds area special gift from nature. In 2007–2008, the Almond Board also revamped the Japanese-language website to inspire more interactivitywith consumers and encourage learning about and enjoying all aspects of California Almonds.11


Global Category Strategy12During the 2006–2007 fiscal year, the Almond Board of California introduced a categorystrategy that focuses on the product categories with the greatest potential for the almondindustry worldwide: confectionery, snacking, and bakery/patisserie. Together these categoriesaccounted for 74 percent of total nut introductions and 76 percent of almond introductions globally in2007. The category strategy aims to target major product manufacturers with global, multi-national,and regional reach to stimulate new almond product introductions within the priority categories.Confectionery Strategy: Through secondary, qualitative, and quantitative research,the Almond Board defined a Global Confectionery Strategy that will fuel the growth ofalmonds in mainstream, premium chocolate products within priority geographic markets.The strategy aims to make almonds essential to chocolate by highlighting the globalappeal of almonds and the healthy link between dark chocolate and almonds.Patisserie Strategy: Almonds are a key ingredient in many traditional French pastries, and asFrench patisserie gains in popularity and growth around the world, the Almond Board will strive toestablish California Almonds as truly essential to this category. In combination with the artisanendof the chocolate confectionery sector, and patisserie as a subset of the bakery sector, theAlmond Board has developed a program named Amanderie.This term stems from two words: amande (almond in French)and patisserie. The purpose of Amanderie is to communicatealmonds’ historical usage in classic French patisserie, as well asto encourage future innovation with almonds in this category.Looking ahead to the 2008–2009 fiscal year, the AlmondBoard will begin to implement the Global ConfectioneryStrategy and Amanderie through PR efforts, key global tradeshows, and highly targeted communication vehicles. Researchefforts will also focus on further understanding the bakeryand patisserie markets to identify messaging opportunitiesto protect and grow almond usage in these categories.Snacking Strategy: Once these strategies are fully definedand being executed, the Almond Board will turn to the thirdcategory, snacking, which is currently being addressed throughprograms in individual markets. As with the other globalcategories, snacking will be thoroughly researched to identifyopportunities that are high-impact and truly global in reach.


Global Health StrategyAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacThe Almond Board of California’s strategic health outreach programs are focused onopportunities to engage and educate healthcare professionals who gather for regionaland global health forums.Dietitians at ICD learn aboutalmond portion size and receivea container for a 28 gram/1 ounceportion of almonds at the AlmondBoard of California booth.World Congress of Cardiology: The Almond Board of California attended the World Congress ofCardiology (WCC) in Buenos Aires, Argentina on May 18–21, 2008. The World Congress of Cardiologyconvenes every two years on behalf of the World Heart Federation (WHF), an organization dedicated tothe prevention and control of cardiovascular disease around the world. The conference brings togethercardiologists and healthcare professionals from more than 100 countries, providing an opportunityto learn about various approaches to the management of heart disease. The focus at this year’sconference was “Prevention of Heart Disease,” which aligns well with the Almond Board’s strategic goalsand heart-health messages. Attendance was over 14,500 health professionals.Since the Almond Board’s first participation in the 2006 WCC, almond heart-health research hasexpanded to include additional support for almonds’ heart-health story. At the 2008 WCC, the AlmondBoard had the opportunity to share the latest almond nutrition research with global influencers.Participation enabled the Almond Board to strengthen existing relationships and forge new contacts withleaders in cardiology from all major world markets.International Congress of Dietetics: The International Congressof Dietetics is held once every four years by the InternationalConfederation of Dietetic Associations and brings togetherdietitians and nutritionists from around the world to report theirresearch findings and exchange opinions about issues, policies,and education concerning nutrition and activities of dietitians.At the 2008 congress in Yokohama, Japan, the Almond Boardhosted a booth in the exhibit hall, sponsored an almond luncheonseminar, and hosted an almond cooking demo on the kitchenstage. The luncheon seminar focused on “Addressing LifestyleDiseases: The Role of Dietitians in the US and the Latest AlmondNutrition Research Findings from the US and Asia,” and was wellattended, filling the room to capacity with over 300 dietitians.In the 2008–2009 fiscal year, the Almond Board will beginto explore priorities, messages, and programs to earn therecommendation of health professionals on a global basisand leverage work done in North America and Europe onalmonds’ role in dietary guidelines.13


Nutrition ResearchNutrition Research Projects Overview 2007–2008Published Papers NR 2006–2010 Strategic Priority Area Ongoing Projects New Projects5 Heart Health and Related (i.e., inflammation) 4 31 Diabetes and Prediabetes 2 14 Weight Management, Satiety, and Gut Health 4 12 Composition and Allergy 1 + 1 1 compositionTotal 12 12 6For the past 13 years, the Almond Board of California hasinvested in nutrition research*. The program has evolvedto explore different aspects of heart health. In fiscal year2007–2008 the Almond Board nutrition research programcontinued to support these long-term strategic goals. Thisyear, 12 papers were published on almond research. Belowis a sample of the papers published in the last fiscal year.Abstracts of all almond-related research papers can befound on AlmondsAreIn.com.Published Papers in 2007 and 2008Dr. Sarah Berry from Kings College in London published a paperon “Manipulation of Lipid Bioaccessibility of Almond SeedsInfluences Postprandial Lipemia in Healthy Human Subjects,”in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. This preliminaryresearch found that the bioaccessibility of lipid in almonds, whichis regulated by the structure and properties of cell walls, playsa primary role in determining postprandial lipemia. Additionalresearch is needed to confirm the results.Dr. David Jenkins from the University of Toronto continuedresearch on the Portfolio Eating Plan and published a paper inthe European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, “Long-Term Effects ofa Plant-Based Dietary Portfolio of Cholesterol-Lowering Foodson Blood Pressure.” Dr. Jenkins also published a paper in theJournal of Nutrition, “Almonds Reduce Biomarkers of LipidPeroxidation in Older Hyperlipidemic Subjects.”14Dr. Giuseppina Mandalari of the Institute of Food Research inEngland published a study in the Journal of Agriculture & FoodChemistry, “Release of Protein, Lipid, and Vitamin E from AlmondSeeds during Digestion.” This in vitro study quantified the releaseof lipid, protein, and vitamin E from almonds during digestion andexplored the role played by cell walls in the bioaccessibility ofintracellular nutrients.Additionally, Dr. Mandalari published a paper, “PotentialPrebiotic Properties of Almond (Amygdalus communis L.)Seeds,” in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Almondswere subjected to a combined model of the gastrointestinaltract. The resulting mixture was used to test bacterial growth.Finely ground almonds significantly increased the populationsof bifidobacteria and Eubacterium rectale, resulting in a higherprebiotic index (4.43) than was found for the commercialprebiotic fructooligosaccharides (FOS, 4.08).The year ahead is equally exciting with weight research to bepublished, more antioxidant data, and potentially more in the gutfunction field. This strategic direction will continue to strengthenthe case for the heart-health benefits of almonds and will provideadditional opportunities to communicate the role of almonds asan essential part of the daily diet.*Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove, that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, suchas almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.


Global Technical and Regulatory AffairsAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacTrade development, including market access and tradeeducation, are important components to enable continuedmarket growth. These efforts ensure that both current andfuture almond customers worldwide have access to safe,nutritious, and high-quality California Almonds.With 70 percent of California Almonds exported, the AlmondBoard works closely with almond industry and governmentrepresentatives to identify and recommend effective resolutionof issues, which could impact almond shipments. In 2007,European concerns over aflatoxin rejections could havehalted shipments to our largest export destination. Instead,the proactive development and implementation of a VoluntaryAflatoxin Sampling Plan (VASP) demonstrated industrycommitment to quality, resulting in fewer rejections in Europeanports. Consequently, authorities in Europe now have greaterconfidence in US aflatoxin procedures. It is anticipated thatmandatory controls could be eased or eliminated during thecoming year. The cooperative industry and US Department ofAgriculture (USDA) strategy to respond to the aflatoxin situationin Europe has in fact been recognized to receive a 2008 USDAHonor Award, the highest level of recognition given by the USDA.Equally crucial is the harmonization of standards and tolerances.With greater food safety concerns, agricultural sectors faceincreasing pressure to minimize pesticide residues anddemonstrate traceability of production. Like the US, a numberof other countries around the world are reviewing establishedMaximum Residue Levels (MRLs) for pesticides and harmonizingtolerances with international standards such as Codex. Thisresults in global customers requiring more information on whatpesticides are used in the orchard, as well as documentationdemonstrating traceability throughout the supply chain.Unfortunately, MRLs in other countries are not necessarilyconsistent with US tolerances. Working through severalagricultural coalitions and international organizations that discussJoint USDA/Almond Board team accepting the USDA Honor Award for the quality initiativefor California Almonds exported to the EU.residue tolerances, the Almond Board’s efforts are focused ondemonstrating that the industry is applying pesticides responsibly,and that MRL harmonization must be scientifically based.In addition to negotiations under the World Trade Organization(WTO), government trading partners continue to discussagreements on a bilateral basis. Staying engaged with US officialsand key policymakers is critical to ensure that unimpeded accessfor California Almonds is maintained. Whether it is a labelingissue in Chile, new inspection requirements in China, or pesticidetolerances in Russia, the Almond Board works closely with almondleaders to identify and resolve issues as they arise.15


Food Quality and Safety ProgramAlmond consumers throughout the world demand a safeand wholesome food product. Food quality and safety programsemployed in the orchard and throughout the manufacturingprocess are designed to identify and resolve issues that canimpact not only the high quality of California Almonds, but alsothe safety that consumers and customers have come to expect.Over the last year, growers and handlers made significantheadway in dealing with one of the industry’s leading foodsafety concerns, aflatoxin. The Voluntary Aflatoxin SamplingPlan (VASP), implemented in 2007, has resulted in fewer rejectionsin European ports in 2008. In addition, Almond Board-fundedresearch has identified effective practices to reduce aflatoxin inthe orchard and through processing. For example, research hasshown that aflatoxin levels are associated with damaged kernels.Managing navel orangeworm in the orchard through sanitationpractices and normal courses of sorting during processing helpsto reduce insect damage and the incidence of aflatoxin. Progressmade in 2008 to reduce aflatoxin rejections is a prime example ofthe industry’s commitment to providing practical solutions to foodquality and safety issues.The chart to the right depicts aflatoxin mass as a percentage oftotal weight by grade type; twelve 1,000g samples were takenfrom fifty lots during the 2007–2008 crop year. Damaged kernels,particularly from insects, had the highest levels of aflatoxin massas a percentage of weight.Microbial contamination remains top-of-mind. The ActionPlan calling for pasteurization of almonds prior to reaching theconsumer market was implemented without any significantdisruptions to trade. New pasteurization technologies, validatedthis year, provide more options to comply with the Action Planwhile increasing available processing capacity for almondhandlers. Currently, capacity exceeds demand. The almondindustry has taken the initiative to provide the safest food productpossible through the Action Plan, Good Agricultural Practices, andGood Manufacturing Practices, which remain critical componentsof the complete food safety system from orchard to table. Movingforward, the Food Quality and Safety Program will continue tosupport research and practical solutions to ensure consumers arereceiving the safest food product possible.16Average Aflatoxin by Grade Percent massMechanical 8%Other Defects 12%High Quality 3%Mold 1%Insect 76%Source: Andrew Slate, Biological and Agricultural Engineering,NC State University.


Industry RelationsAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacAlmond growers and handlers are faced with the ever-increasing challenge to produce aplentiful, healthful, and safe food product while growing and processing almonds usingpractices that are economically viable and motivated by a respect for the environment andneighboring communities.Environmental stewardship, the foundation of economic and social responsibility, is a theme thatencompasses all aspects of our almond farming and processing—from production and environmentalpractices to food safety and trade regulations. Along with solutions, the Almond Board providesvaluable, timely, and practical information to almond growers, huller/shellers, handlers, and otherindustry stakeholders to assist in their response to these complex and diverse challenges.The Industry Relations program is committed to providing tools and resources necessary to produceand market quality California Almonds and almond products.Examples of resources available to the industry include:Timely “news you can use”: The Almond Board continues to insert its California Almondsnewsletter in the Pacific Nut Producer (PNP) magazine. This year, a more comprehensive onlineand email version has been added with more detailed feature-articles and links. The Handle, anelectronic publication released monthly in conjunction with the Position Report and Global Update,contains information on issues of immediate concern for handlers.Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs): A Quick Start Guideand Bilingual GAP Training Guide. These materials providetools and resources to educate and train industry members onfood quality and safety programs.Industry Research Overview: This publication highlightsAlmond Board-funded research in the areas of production,environment, and food safety.Weekly Planner: This handy tool provides a collection ofpractical information and practices in a daily calendar format,with information tailored to the proactive pursuit of sustainablefarming.Finally, the Industry Relations and Diversity Committeehas initiated a leadership program. This program offers anopportunity for personal and professional growth, as well ascomprehensive industry education with the objective of preparingalmond-invested individuals for future leadership roles.The California Almonds newsletter.17


Environmental ExcellenceDr. Ken Giles explains a Smart Sprayer atthe 2008 Environmental Stewardship Tour,hosted by Dick Braden of Braden Farms.Below, measuring relative dust emissionsinside an orchard from pick up operations.18To address the complex environmental and regulatoryconcerns for the almond industry, the EnvironmentalCommittee (EC) funds approximately $500,000 annuallyin research and education, including research projectsaddressing air quality, water quality, and pest management.The Almond Board continues to seek practical solutions throughalliances with growers, academic, and government agencies aswell as participation in state and national committees. One recentalliance is the participation in a California Department of PesticideRegulation (DPR) funded Pest Management Alliance II project withCommunity Alliance with Family Farmers (CAFF) and UC Extensionfocusing on extending integrated pest management (IPM). TheAlmond Board has received national recognition for its proactivework on environmental issues and this past year the Almond PestManagement Alliance was again recognized by DPR with an IPMInnovator Award.2008 Environmental Program HighlightsAir Quality: Developing and promoting industry practices andcollection of objective data to comply with current and futureair quality regulations are top priorities. 2007–2008 projectsfocused on dust (particulate matter—PM10 and PM2.5) reductionmeasures during harvesting. Air quality regulators are reviewingthe data submitted to revise the PM10 emission factor from almondharvesting. DPR is required to reduce Volatile Organic Compounds(VOC) emissions from pesticides. The Almond Board’s ongoingsoil fumigant research projects are developing methods to reduceemissions thereby reducing contributions to VOCs and reducingrisks from off-gassing. The newest air quality issue is greenhousegases, which include carbon dioxide (CO 2), nitrous oxide (N 2O),and methane (NH 4). This year the EC funded projects in conjunctionwith a Production Research Committee project on nutrientmanagement to monitor off-site nitrogen movement in air and water.Water Quality: The Almond Board continues to sponsor theWatershed Coalition News, which is published three times ayear and provides information to growers about state regulationsgoverning water runoff and groundwater, as well as tips to preventrunoff and spray drift. This successful partnership with the Coalitionfor Urban/Rural Environmental Stewardship (CURES) helps growers


Environmental ResearchAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond Almanacin irrigated land coalitionscomply with state requirementsfor submitting reports on waterquality monitoring, croppingpatterns, pesticide and nutrientuse, as well as advisinggrowers on managementpractices that can protectwater quality from farm inputs.Project Leader Project Title BudgetStewardship/Crop ProtectionLooker/Heintz Environmental Stewardship Campaign $149,200Brandology Develop Positioning for Sustainability $30,000SureHarvest Explore Sustainability Program Options for Almond Industry $50,000Environmental StewardshipProgram: A key componentBrown (UCD) Dev. of Nutrient Budget Approach to Fertilizer Mgt. $25,000of the Almond Board’senvironmental programactivities this past year was aWater QualityKlassen (CURES) Linking ABC to Irrigated Lands Coalitions (CURES) $21,000successful tour that educatedstate environmental regulators Stoltz (CAAA) Aerial Spray Drift Management $5,000about environmentallyresponsible orchard practices.The Stewardship Programpublicizes information fromAir QualityGiles/Downey (UCD) Evaluating Dust Generation from Nut Harvesting Equipment $49,947Almond Board-funded research,such as dust from harvest andCapareda (TAMU) PM10 Emission Factors from Nut Harvest $81,183how to reduce spray drift.Timely environmental newsUpadhyaya/Browne (UCD/ARS) Site-specific Applications of Soil Fumigants $35,774clippings, a searchable onlinedatabase, and almond-specificSmart (UCD) Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Almond Soils $52,300environmental research can befound on the Almond Board’sOther Itemswebsite.Wells VOC Ag. Coalition $12,000In response to consumers’increasing demands forOutreach VOC Issue Outreach $30,000sustainably grown food,the Almond Board’sSubtotal $541,404Stewardship ProgramNew Opportunities $20,000initiated the development ofa sustainability effort focusedTOTAL $561,404on practical measures as wellas relevant audiences. 19


Production ResearchThe Production Research Committee oversees AlmondBoard-funded agricultural research. Started in 1973 toaddress navel orangeworm, the program has expandedsubstantially. The long-term effort has increased productionefficiency, improved quality, and developed environmentallyresponsible orchard and pest management practices.2008 Production Research HighlightsHorticulture: Balancing production efficiency andenvironmental stewardship, projects on tree nutritionconstitute an interdisciplinary approach being co-fundedwith the Environmental Committee. A nutrient budget approachthat will guide nutrition decisions throughout the growing20Numberof Projects2007–2008 2008–2009*BudgetNumberof ProjectsBudgetHorticulture 9 $219,189 12 $296,725Pollination 10 $185,678 8 $155,945Entomology 8 $206,186 9 $244,909Plant Pathology 9 $288,512 10 $271,630Subtotal 36 $899,565 39 $969,209NewOpportunities— $435 — $133,000 †Total — $900,000 — $1,102,209season is being developed. Also, these studies are conductingair and water monitoring in light of current regulatory concernsand doing this in a manner that represents our fertility practicesin a balanced fashion. Other priorities include breeding forself-compatible varieties to reduce reliance on honeybeesand addressing water shortages by updating and extendinginformation on irrigation management.Pollination: The Bee Task Force, a subcommittee, addressesbee health and transportation challenges and oversees AlmondBoard-funded pollination research. The focus of this research ishoneybee health and nutrition, including varroa mite control andColony Collapse Disorder. Research complements other efforts,including research funded by USDA and other private groups.Entomology: Research on monitoring, management,and control of insect pests: navel orangeworm, spider mites,peach twig borer, leaffooted bug, and ten-lined June beetle.The Almond Board’s participation in a USDA-ARS area-wideproject for orangeworm reflects current priorities: updatingguidelines on orchard sanitation; implementing pheromonemating disruption; and developing bio-rational insecticideoptions to replace older, broad-spectrum sprays.Plant Pathology: Research encompasses a wide rangeof diseases: alternaria leaf spot, scab, brown rot, shothole,anthracnose, lower limb dieback, band canker, almond leafscorch, and almond replant issues in light of soil fumigationrestrictions. Efforts include countering fungicide resistance todiseases through resistance management fungicide programsand registering fungicides with different modes of action.Another key effort is developing rapid identification of soilorganisms as a future diagnostic tool to monitor soil conditionsand determine best pest management practices for replant.*View the complete program at AlmondBoard.com, Almond Board Programs,Production Research. † Includes earmark projects for field-oriented aflatoxin research.


California Almond Industry OverviewAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacAlmonds are California’s number one tree nut crop.During the 2007–2008 crop year, approximately six thousandgrowers located throughout the Central Valley of Californiaproduced 1.383 billion pounds of almonds on 615,000 bearingacres. In the same year, 100 handlers shipped a record-breaking1.261 billion pounds of almonds, an 18 percent increase over theprior year. California produces more than 80 percent of the world’salmonds and virtually 100 percent of the domestic supply.2007: 100 Handlers# of Handlers % of Crop Handled30M Pounds 10 54%2002: 116 HandlersDistribution of Crop by Handler Size30M Pounds 6 44%California Production by CountyGlennColusaYoloSolanoSanJoaquinMercedFresnoKingsTehamaButteYubaSutterMillion pounds10050 –991–49StanislausMaderaTulareKern21


Farm price50%40%30%20%10%220%Historical Shipments60% Carry-In as Percent of Prior Year Shipments 1989–2009*1989–901990–911991–921992–931993–941994–951995–961996–971997–98$3.00 Historical Shipments vs. Farm Price† 1988–2008Farm price Domestic Export$2.50$2.00$1.50$1.00$0.501988–891989–901990–911991–921992–931993–941994–951995–961996–971998–991997–981999–001998–992000–011999–002001–022000–012002–032001–022003–042002–032004–052003–042005–062004–052006–072005–062007–082006–072008–09*2007–081,5001,2009006003000Million poundsRising demand coupled with a larger crop contributed to domestic,export, and total worldwide shipments reaching all-time recordsduring 2007–2008. Total shipments climbed to 1.26 billion poundsin 2007–2008, an 18 percent increase over the 1.07 billion poundsshipped in 2006–2007. The US remained the largest singlemarket, growing 7 percent over the previous year to a newrecord of 395 million pounds and accounting for 31 percent oftotal shipments. The remaining 69 percent was destined for over80 international markets, which resulted in record-breaking exportshipments that rose 24 percent over the prior year to reach 866million pounds. These record shipments accompany the industry’slargest crop ever, 1.38 billion pounds of almonds.Western Europe and Asia remained the top two regionalexport destinations, with shares of 54 percent and 23 percent,respectively. Exports to Western Europe grew 24 percent whileexports to Asia grew 20 percent. This was driven by strongdemand in markets such as India, China, and Korea, wherenew all-time shipment highs were recorded. In terms of individualmarkets, the top five export destinations were Spain, Germany,India, Japan, and China.Valued at $1.9 billion, almonds remain first on the list of top tenUS specialty crop exports and the largest agricultural export ofthe state of California. Almonds account for about a fifth of thestate’s total agricultural exports, exceeding the combined valueof grape-related products, including wine, table grapes, raisins,and grape juice. Almonds also rank as California’s top agriculturalexport to the EU and India, as well as the second largest to Japanand China. ‡The NASS farm price of $1.55 per pound, illustrated in the graphshown to the right, represents the average price paid to growersthroughout the 2007–2008 crop year.Source: Almond Board of California, Bureau of Census, US Department of Commerce.*Projected. † USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service, California Field Office(NASS/CFO). ‡ Agricultural Issues Center, University of California, Davis, 2006.


Top Ten Exports by ValueAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacTop Ten US Specialty Crop Exports by Value 2007 In millionsAlmondsWine and WineProductsApples$640$873$1,879GrapesFrozen Potato Fries$552$549WalnutsLettuce$410$445OrangesStrawberries$301$277Raisins$213Source: Bureau of Census, US Department of Commerce.0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000AlmondsTop Ten California Agricultural Exports by Value 2006 In millions$1,899WineDairy andDairy ProductsCottonTable Grapes$499$554$604$736WalnutsOranges$365$359PistachiosTomatoes,ProcessedStrawberries$287$286$273Source: Agricultural Issues Center, University of California.0 500 1,000 1,500 2,00023


Position Report of California Almonds* Million poundsCrop YearRedeterminedMarketableCarry–InLessReserveTotal SalableSupplyDomesticShipmentsExportShipmentsTotalShipmentsSalableCarryover1988–89 564.5 227.9 141.1 651.3 161.2 364.0 525.2 126.11989–90 457.2 270.1 N/A 727.3 177.3 342.4 519.7 203.11990–91 615.7 203.1 43.1 775.7 173.9 360.5 534.4 241.31991–92 463.2 241.3 0.0 704.5 178.6 377.8 556.4 148.11992–93 516.0 148.1 N/A 664.1 186.0 349.9 535.9 128.21993–94 470.0 133.6 N/A 603.6 162.0 336.5 498.5 102.61994–95 713.3 102.6 0.0 815.9 160.6 448.1 608.7 204.81995–96 352.3 204.8 N/A 557.1 132.8 335.1 467.9 92.81996–97 489.3 92.8 N/A 582.1 137.5 395.8 533.3 48.31997–98 736.8 48.3 N/A 785.1 159.6 452.4 612.1 172.01998–99 492.4 172.0 N/A 664.4 167.0 405.5 572.5 91.81999–00 795.5 91.8 0.0 887.3 209.6 503.0 712.6 174.72000–01 672.4 174.7 0.0 847.1 211.2 528.7 739.8 107.32001–02 794.8 107.3 N/A 902.1 239.3 581.8 821.1 80.92002–03 1,063.5 80.9 N/A 1,144.4 291.7 690.6 982.4 162.02003–04 1,011.1 162.0 N/A 1,173.1 312.2 712.1 1,024.3 148.92004–05 972.8 148.9 N/A 1,121.7 331.6 652.5 984.1 137.72005–06 888.7 137.7 N/A 1,026.4 303.9 610.4 914.2 112.22006–07 1,087.8 112.2 N/A 1,200.0 368.3 697.8 1,066.1 133.92007–08 1,358.3 133.9 N/A 1,492.2 394.8 866.4 1,261.2 231.22008–09 † 1,455.0 231.2 N/A 1,686.2 425.0 935.0 1,360.0 326.224 Source: Almond Board of California. *Total may not add precisely due to rounding. † Forecast.


Destination Overview of California AlmondsAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacEastern Europe 4% Other 3%Canada/Mexico 6%Middle East10%Exports by Region 2007–2008WesternEurope 54%Exports by Product Type 2007–2008Inshell 11%Manufactured 14%Shelled 75%Asia 23%China 4%Japan 4%India 6%Germany 8%Top Ten Destinations 2007–2008France 3%Canada 3% Netherlands 2%Italy 3%United States31%Million pounds200Top Ten Export Markets 2007–2008Spain150 15710050Germany105India73JapanChinaUnited Arab EmiratesItaly47 47 45 43CanadaFrance39 38Netherlands29Spain 13%Rest of World23%0Combined, these markets represent 72% of total export shipments.25


Almond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacWorld Region Market 2007–08 2006–07 2005–06 2004–05 2003–04Middle East Bahrain 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3Israel 6.2 4.2 9.1 5.1 7.6Jordan 5.1 3.7 1.8 1.8 2.2Kuwait 2.1 1.8 1.4 0.9 1.7Lebanon 3.8 2.7 1.9 2.7 3.5Qatar 0.2 0.2 * * 0.0Saudi Arabia 6.2 5.4 3.3 3.4 6.9Turkey 16.2 8.6 4.7 4.8 5.9UAE 45.0 30.4 19.1 24.5 24.4Others 0.8 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.1Total 86.2 57.7 41.8 43.8 52.6Asia China/Hong Kong 46.6 32.3 16.7 17.1 23.5India 72.8 58.5 40.0 52.7 47.3Indonesia 1.0 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6Japan 47.1 48.7 42.9 52.5 60.2Malaysia 3.3 2.6 1.9 2.9 2.4Pakistan 1.8 1.2 0.3 0.2 0.5Philippines 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.2Singapore 2.4 2.1 1.7 2.1 1.7South Korea 16.8 11.6 10.1 11.7 12.3Taiwan 5.2 5.6 4.5 5.3 5.1Thailand 2.0 2.3 1.7 2.0 1.7Vietnam 2.1 1.3 0.1 * 0.1Others 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.1Total 201.2 167.5 121.0 147.3 155.7New Zealand Total 1.6 2.1 1.5 1.9 1.9Australia Total 2.2 4.1 3.8 3.7 4.8Africa Algeria 3.8 3.6 2.0 1.0 3.2Canary Islands 0.0 0.6 0.2 0.1 0.3Egypt 3.9 3.7 2.1 1.8 1.5Libya 0.8 0.2 * * *Mauritius * * 0.1 0.0 0.0Morocco 0.9 0.9 0.5 * *South Africa 2.7 3.0 2.9 2.1 2.0Tunisia 0.0 * 0.2 0.0 0.7Others 0.3 0.0 0.4 0.3 0.0Total 12.4 12.0 8.4 5.3 7.7Others Total 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0Total Deliveries 866.4 697.8 610.4 652.5 712.1Source: Almond Board of California. Note: Totals may not add precisely due to rounding. *Received almonds from less than three handlers.†Table revised in 2007 to report shipments to European Union and Other Europe; Cyprus is no longer reported in Middle East.27


World Almond ProductionCommercial Production of Almonds in Major Producing Countries Million pounds (shelled basis)Crop Year Australia California China Chile Greece India Italy Spain Turkey Total1988–89 — 590.0 — — 41.9 — 30.9 88.2 30.9 781.8 75%1989–90 — 488.5 — — 37.8 — 39.7 176.4 33.1 775.5 63%1990–91 — 656.2 — — 34.2 — 41.9 137.8 33.1 903.1 73%1991–92 — 485.9 — — 24.3 — 24.3 142.2 33.7 710.3 68%1992–93 — 545.9 — — 35.3 — 39.7 158.7 34.6 814.2 67%1993–94 — 488.2 — — 44.1 — 33.1 185.2 35.3 785.8 62%1994–95 — 732.9 — — 35.3 — 30.9 154.9 34.6 988.5 74%1995–96 — 366.1 — — 28.7 — 33.1 99.9 30.2 557.9 66%1996–97 — 507.5 — — 28.2 — 13.2 132.3 31.5 712.8 71%1997–98 — 756.5 — — 32.0 — 24.3 165.3 24.3 1,002.3 75%1998–99 — 517.0 — — 26.5 — 19.8 66.1 26.5 655.9 79%1999–00 — 829.9 — — 37.5 — 37.5 145.5 30.9 1,081.2 77%2000–01 18.9 698.4 — — 34.2 — 22.0 116.8 34.2 924.5 76%2001–02 20.2 824.1 — — 28.7 2.2 39.7 125.7 30.9 1,071.5 77%2002–03 20.6 1,083.7 — — 37.5 2.4 19.8 145.5 30.9 1,340.4 81%2003–04 22.3 1,032.9 — — 22.0 2.2 11.0 97.0 30.2 1,217.6 85%2004–05 25.3 998.0 — 16.5 37.5 2.4 26.5 57.7 27.1 1,191.0 84%2005–06 35.7 911.7 2.2 9.3 30.9 2.5 26.5 140.0 33.1 1,191.7 77%2006–07 35.1 1,116.7 0.4 14.6 33.1 2.6 13.2 182.0 31.7 1,429.5 78%2007–08 58.5 1,383.0 3.6 14.6 30.9 2.2 26.5 149.9 34.2 1,703.3 81%CA %of Total28Sources: Almond Board of California, Almond Board of Australia, USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service. Note: Reported countries account for nearly 100% of world production.


World Almond ProductionAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond Almanac2,000California’s Share of World ProductionOtherCalifornia1,500Million pounds1,0005000Crop year1988–891989–901990–911991–921992–931993–941994–951995–961996–971997–981998–991999–002000–012001–022002–032003–042004–052005–062006–072007–08Sources: Almond Board of California, Almond Board of Australia, USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service.Note: Reported countries account for nearly 100% of world production.29


Competing Strategic Priorities Nuts and ABC ProgramsAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond Almanac1.51.2Domestic Per Capita Consumption of Competing Nuts1.151.081.061.261.33Almonds*PecansWalnutsPounds per capita0.90.6PistachiosHazelnuts0.30.0Crop year 2003–042004–052005–062006–072007–082007–2008 Competing Nuts Marketable Production †Hazelnuts 1% Other Nuts 1%Pecans 9%Almonds 66%Pistachios 10%Walnuts 13%Source: USDA, Economic Research Service, Fruit & TreenutSituation and Outlook. *Almond Board of California. † 2007-2008Competing Nuts Marketable Production.31


Almond Production by County Million poundsSouthern Valley CountiesNorthern Valley CountiesCrop Year KernFresno Stanislaus Merced MaderaSanJoaquinTulare Kings Butte Colusa Glenn Tehama Yolo Sutter Others Total1988–89 130.1 50.6 96.9 85.2 42.4 53.4 12.0 3.2 59.9 15.7 14.4 6.8 5.3 3.4 7.6 586.81989–90 114.1 46.6 82.1 82.0 42.7 34.8 10.6 2.7 33.3 12.6 12.5 4.3 4.1 2.2 2.4 487.11990–91 112.4 55.5 122.3 113.2 51.5 58.0 11.0 3.8 66.4 19.7 19.6 8.6 5.8 3.8 3.7 655.21991–92 103.1 44.4 90.3 63.5 40.1 34.4 9.9 2.1 51.7 15.1 12.9 5.4 5.3 2.8 3.2 484.01992–93 98.5 54.2 102.6 76.2 49.6 44.8 8.5 3.8 48.7 14.1 17.7 6.9 6.2 2.4 10.6 544.81993–94 93.6 48.5 93.5 71.2 39.3 39.1 7.9 1.8 44.9 15.7 14.3 4.0 4.1 3.7 2.0 483.71994–95 142.2 77.8 138.8 107.7 61.0 54.2 13.2 2.4 62.9 20.4 23.7 7.4 6.1 3.8 4.0 725.61995–96 76.1 46.1 61.9 49.2 33.5 25.3 5.2 1.7 29.3 14.0 10.9 3.4 3.2 1.7 1.2 362.71996–97 101.0 58.1 84.9 78.8 48.6 33.8 9.1 1.8 39.5 21.1 16.9 4.6 4.6 2.8 2.3 507.91997–98 131.0 93.8 150.3 118.0 68.5 55.4 11.3 3.1 53.4 30.2 22.6 6.8 4.8 4.0 2.8 756.01998–99 102.9 75.6 84.6 71.0 51.6 32.0 8.7 2.6 30.9 24.9 18.1 4.7 4.1 2.4 1.7 515.81999–00 162.2 125.8 147.2 125.8 85.0 55.8 15.6 3.1 45.3 23.5 22.5 3.9 4.1 3.9 2.3 826.02000–01 137.0 95.2 125.5 95.2 68.1 43.2 11.0 3.2 44.3 30.4 27.1 7.2 5.2 3.2 1.9 697.72001–02 167.0 131.5 139.3 110.6 80.5 46.3 15.8 5.8 49.1 31.8 29.3 5.7 4.3 4.1 2.2 823.32002–03 221.0 173.0 193.5 152.9 106.3 57.2 20.7 8.2 59.3 28.4 41.5 8.6 5.2 4.5 2.6 1,082.92003–04 205.9 176.9 169.3 129.3 94.5 55.3 18.5 12.3 50.0 55.0 42.3 8.0 6.6 5.7 4.1 1,033.62004–05 215.8 173.5 163.9 127.6 93.4 51.0 20.4 13.0 45.0 38.0 37.2 6.9 4.7 4.6 2.9 997.92005–06 210.1 160.1 132.2 102.1 82.4 41.8 15.9 12.0 50.4 40.3 42.6 8.4 5.6 4.6 2.7 911.42006–07 247.8 232.7 163.6 124.6 100.1 55.6 21.5 17.7 41.8 50.8 38.4 7.7 6.3 4.9 3.8 1,117.32007–08 271.0 253.8 223.3 172.9 125.3 75.2 26.7 17.9 66.7 66.2 51.8 11.4 10.0 5.6 5.1 1,383.632Source: USDA Form FV193, Report of Inedible Content of Almond Receipts.


Receipts by County and Variety 2007–2008Almond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacCounties % Crop Nonpareil Carmel Butte Butte/Padre Monterey Fritz All Others All VarietiesMonterey 0.02% 87,858 47,705 0 32,019 0 5,124 49,071 221,777CoastalSan Luis Obispo 0.00% 645 0 0 0 0 0 0 645Coastal Totals 0.02% 88,503 47,705 0 32,019 0 5,124 49,071 222,422Butte 4.82% 26,077,724 6,537,991 8,051,712 2,533,893 464,687 231,311 22,848,297 66,745,615Colusa 4.78% 26,722,772 8,338,214 11,100,331 305,445 2,701,350 3,704,109 13,281,401 66,153,622Glenn 3.74% 22,730,850 6,383,376 8,036,151 578,770 686,915 340,582 12,999,322 51,755,966Sacramento 0.01% 34,256 16,044 0 0 0 1,026 33,665 84,991North ValleySolano 0.31% 2,214,719 346,719 878,733 22,833 75,831 8,020 712,759 4,259,614Sutter 0.40% 1,214,729 696,232 596,533 687,266 25,360 56,570 2,304,609 5,581,299Tehama 0.83% 5,001,721 1,300,827 1,970,413 400,359 148,248 0 2,616,400 11,437,968Yolo 0.73% 3,713,234 1,127,397 1,917,431 162,967 131,752 8,384 2,972,280 10,033,445Yuba 0.08% 484,330 17,396 54,149 0 0 6,881 601,069 1,163,825North Totals 15.70% 88,194,335 24,764,196 32,605,453 4,691,533 4,234,143 4,356,883 58,369,802 217,216,345Fresno 18.35% 93,739,162 30,233,210 21,694,716 24,614,653 36,169,208 10,142,530 37,236,286 253,829,765Kern 19.59% 97,499,150 17,032,830 31,480,232 24,281,026 33,077,467 22,007,085 45,661,763 271,039,553Kings 1.29% 7,431,077 1,235,946 1,661,682 647,116 2,257,004 1,889,257 2,785,528 17,907,610Madera 9.05% 45,442,342 17,833,576 6,890,168 15,817,611 11,626,418 3,910,854 23,753,049 125,274,018South ValleyMerced 12.50% 61,989,674 31,608,356 12,199,861 12,801,185 11,044,174 6,920,164 36,325,574 172,888,988San Joaquin 5.43% 30,614,736 16,081,891 4,002,974 8,427,055 1,535,977 4,686,646 9,802,766 75,152,045Stanislaus 16.14% 87,542,870 43,200,195 12,089,291 20,676,694 10,116,463 9,146,795 40,556,197 223,328,505Tulare 1.93% 10,719,147 1,430,387 3,052,564 2,076,475 2,993,257 2,109,238 4,360,554 26,741,622South Totals 84.28% 434,978,158 158,656,391 93,071,488 109,341,815 108,819,968 60,812,569 200,481,717 1,166,162,106YTD Totals 100.00% 523,260,996 183,468,292 125,676,941 114,065,367 113,054,111 65,174,576 258,900,590 1,383,600,873Source: USDA Form FV193, Report of Inedible Content of Almond Receipts.33


Top Producing CountiesAlmond Acreage Standing by Variety 2007–2008Padre 7%Monterey 8%Nonpareil 37%Butte 12%Carmel 15%All Others 21%Source: USDA, National Agricultural StatisticsService, California Field Office (NASS/CFO).Top Producing Counties 1987–1988Butte 9%Top Producing Counties 2007–2008Madera 9%San Joaquin 9%All Others 28%All Others 25%Merced 12%Merced 15%Stanislaus 19%Kern 20%Stanislaus 16%Kern 20%34Fresno 18%


Almond Acreage Planted by Variety*Almond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacVariety1998 &EarlierNon-Bearing Years Acres Standing in 20071999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 BearingNon-BearingAldrich 5,226 895 891 617 369 410 1,424 987 680 246 9,852 1,894 11,745Butte 48,844 5,125 3,527 1,834 1,060 1,171 2,692 5,650 4,031 2,072 64,254 11,753 76,006Carmel 70,739 2,505 2,838 2,816 2,609 2,319 4,047 2,637 2,002 914 87,873 5,552 93,426Fritz 14,047 2,040 928 1,059 881 1,132 2,470 4,014 2,524 1,105 22,557 7,642 30,200Livingston 1,758 189 52 35 13 7 38 40 41 58 2,092 139 2,231Merced 882 — 3 12 — 6 — — — — 903 — 903Mission 15,039 339 263 52 47 43 52 5 25 2 15,834 32 15,867Monterey 19,273 3,854 1,980 2,046 1,466 2,114 5,983 8,377 7,064 2,136 36,716 17,578 54,293Neplus 3,210 73 132 4 16 15 20 32 6 17 3,470 55 3,525Nonpareil 147,398 12,153 8,023 8,007 6,946 7,840 15,721 17,430 12,870 4,698 206,088 34,998 241,086Padre 24,628 3,505 2,256 996 665 708 1,534 4,525 3,596 1,637 34,292 9,758 44,050Peerless 6,139 291 126 69 66 64 72 81 62 35 6,827 178 7,005Price 15,796 439 404 322 354 294 244 505 174 160 17,854 839 18,692Ruby 3,575 49 217 28 20 25 10 — 5 — 3,924 5 3,929Sonora 11,167 1,456 642 532 557 411 380 274 163 60 15,144 498 15,642Thompson 1,298 — — 1 4 — — — 9 — 15,834 9 1,312Wood Colony 4,268 598 508 341 166 264 403 583 577 165 6,549 1,324 7,873All Others 6,620 257 415 579 618 818 1,130 4,142 1,679 1,077 10,440 6,896 17,335TOTAL 399,907 33,767 23,200 19,348 15,857 17,639 36,220 49,281 35,486 14,381 545,970 99,147 645,118TotalSource: USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service, California Field Office (NASS/CFO).Note: This detailed data by variety and year planted is voluntarily reported by almond growers and is maintained in the NASS/CFO database; therefore,these totals do not match the estimated almond acreage annually forecasted by NASS/CFO. * Totals may not add precisely due to rounding.35


California Almond Acreage and Farm ValueCrop YearAcreage Yield Value in DollarsBearing Non-Bearing Total New PlantingsBearing AcreYield (Lbs.)Production*(Million Lbs.)Farm PriceFarm Value($1,000)Value PerBearing Acre1988–89 419,000 35,000 454,000 15,407 1,410 590.0 $1.05 $600,075 $1,4321989–90 411,000 44,000 455,000 16,041 1,190 488.5 $1.02 $480,930 $1,1701990–91 411,000 53,000 464,000 22,981 1,610 656.1 $0.93 $597,990 $1,4551991–92 405,000 50,000 455,000 13,377 1,210 485.9 $1.19 $564,179 $1,3931992–93 401,000 45,000 446,000 13,229 1,370 545.9 $1.30 $691,340 $1,7241993–94 413,000 33,400 446,400 19,084 1,190 488.2 $1.94 $930,618 $2,2531994–95 433,000 46,500 479,500 31,672 1,700 732.9 $1.34 $965,202 $2,2291995–96 418,000 65,700 483,700 36,081 885 366.7 $2.48 $880,896 $2,1071996–97 428,000 72,400 500,400 35,063 1,190 507.5 $2.08 $1,018,368 $2,3791997–98 442,000 63,000 505,000 38,225 1,720 756.5 $1.56 $1,160,640 $2,6261998–99 460,000 120,000 580,000 47,827 1,130 517.0 $1.41 $703,590 $1,5301999–00 485,000 115,000 600,000 33,767 1,720 829.9 $0.86 $687,742 $1,4182000–01 510,000 100,000 610,000 23,585 1,380 698.4 $0.97 $666,487 $1,3072001–02 530,000 75,000 605,000 19,348 1,570 824.1 $0.91 $740,012 $1,3962002–03 545,000 65,000 610,000 15,857 2,000 1,083.7 $1.11 $1,200,687 $2,2032003–04 550,000 60,000 610,000 17,639 1,890 1,032.9 $1.57 $1,600,144 $2,9092004–05 570,000 70,000 640,000 36,220 1,760 998.0 $2.21 $2,189,005 $3,8402005–06 580,000 110,000 690,000 49,281 1,580 911.7 $2.81 $2,525,909 $4,3552006–07 585,000 145,000 730,000 35,486 1,920 1,116.7 $2.06 $2,258,790 $3,8612007–08 615,000 125,000 740,000 14,381 2,260 1,383.0 $1.55 $2,127,375 $3,45938Source: USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service, California Field Office (NASS/CFO). Note: The Almond Board does not track prices. *Production numbers provided by the Almond Board of California.


California Almond Acreage and Farm ValueAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacCrop value per acre$5,000 Crop Value Per Bearing Acre$4,000$3,000$2,000$1,0000Crop year1988–891989–901990–911991–921992–931993–941994–951995–961996–971997–981998–991999–002000–012001–022002–032003–042004–052005–062006–072007–08Source:USDA,NationalAgriculturalStatisticsService,CaliforniaField Office(NASS/CFO).Note: TheAlmond Boarddoes nottrack prices.*Productionnumbersprovided bythe AlmondBoard ofCalifornia.1,5001,200Production vs. Farm Price*Farm Price$3.00$2.50Million pounds9006003000Crop year1988–89 590.0488.51989–90656.11990–91485.91991–92545.91992–93488.21993–94732.91994–95366.71995–96507.51996–97756.51997–98517.01998–99829.91999–00698.42000–01824.12001–021,083.72002–031,032.92003–04998.02004–05911.72005–061,116.72006–071,383.02007–08$2.00$1.50$1.00$0.50Farm price39


Crop Size History vs. Inedible PercentageCrop size (million pounds)1,5001,200900600300Crop Size History vs. Inedible PercentageInedible Gross Percentage3.0%2.5%2.0%1.5%1.0%Inedible gross percentage00.5%Crop year1998–991999–002000–012001–022002–032003–042004–052005–062006–072007–0840


UC Farm AdvisorsAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacButte CountyJoe Connell, UCCE Office2279 Del Oro Ave., Ste. BOroville, CA 95965530.538.7201 Fax: 530.538.7140email: jhconnell@ucdavis.eduColusa CountyJohn Edstrom, UCCE OfficeP.O. Box 180,100 Sunrise Blvd., Ste. EColusa, CA 95932530.458.0570 Fax: 530.458.4625email: jpedstrom@ucdavis.eduFresno CountyMark Freeman, UCCE Office1720 South Maple Ave.Fresno, CA 93702559.456.7265 Fax: 559.456.7575email: mwfreeman@ucdavis.eduGlenn CountyBill Krueger, UCCE OfficeP.O. Box 697821 E. South St.Orland, CA 95963530.865.1107 Fax: 530.865.1109email: whkrueger@ucdavis.eduKern CountyDarlene Liesch, UCCE Office1031 S. Mt. Vernon Ave.Bakersfield, CA 93307661.868.6200 Fax: 661.868.6208email: dgliesch@ucdavis.eduKings/Tulare CountyBob Beede, UCCE Office680 N. Campus Dr., Ste. AHanford, CA 93230559.582.3211, ext. 2737Fax: 559.582.5166email: bbeede@ucdavis.eduMadera CountyBrent Holtz, UCCE Office328 Madera Ave.Madera, CA 93637559.675.7879, ext. 209Fax: 559.675.0639email: baholtz@ucdavis.eduMerced CountyDavid Doll, UCCE Office2145 Wardrobe Ave.Merced, CA 95341209.385.7403 Fax: 209.722.8856email: dadoll@ucdavis.eduSan Joaquin CountyPaul Verdegaal, UCCE Office420 S. Wilson WayStockton, CA 95205209.468.2085 Fax: 209.462.5181email: psverdegaal@ucdavis.eduSolano/Yolo CountiesCarolyn DeBuse, UCCE Office501 Texas St.Fairfield, CA 94533707.784.1320email: cjdebuse@ucdavis.eduStanislaus CountyRoger Duncan, UCCE Office3800 Cornucopia Way, Ste. AModesto, CA 95358209.525.6800 Fax: 209.525.6840email: raduncan@ucdavis.eduSutter/Yuba CountiesFranz Niederholzer, UCCE Office142-A Garden Hwy.Yuba City, CA 95991530.822.7515 Fax: 530.673.5368email: fjniederholzer@ucdavis.eduTehama/Shasta CountiesRick Buchner, UCCE Office1754 Walnut St.Red Bluff, CA 96080530.527.3101 Fax: 530.527.0917email: rpbuchner@ucdavis.edu41


USDA Standards for GradesShelled AlmondsEffective March 24, 1997. For information only. For a complete copy of the grades, contact the Almond Board of California.USDA GradesWholeKernelsMin.Diameterin InchesDissimilarDoublesChip andScratchForeignMaterialParticlesand DustSplit andBrokenOtherDefectsSeriousDefectsUndersizeUS Fancy – – 5% 3% 5% .05% .1% 1% 2% 1% –US Extra No. 1 – – 5% 5% 5% .05% .1% 1% 4% 1.5% –US No. 1 – – 5% 15% 10% .05% .1% 1% 5% 1.5% –US Select Sheller Run – – 5% 15% 20% .1% .1% 5% 3% 2% –US Standard Sheller Run – – 5% 25% 35% .2% .1% 15% 3% 2% –US No. 1 Whole & Broken 30% 20/64, UOS 5% 35% X .2% .1% X 5% 3% 5%US No. 1 Pieces X 8/64 X X X .2% 1% X 5% 3% 5%x No limit established. Also included in “Other Defects.”Includes maximum 2% under 20/64 inch.Includes maximum 5% under 20/64 inch. Percentage also included in “Chip and Scratch.”42Measurement Sample Sizes PoundsLot Size Grams Drawn Grams Analyzed10,000 10–44,000 +44,0002,000 4,000 6,0001,000 2,000 3,0001 US ton = .907 metric tons. 1 metric ton = 2204.6 pounds.1 pound = 453.6 grams. 10 ounces = 283.5 grams.DefinitionsWhole Kernels: Less than1/8 kernel chipped off.Chip and Scratch: More than1/4 inch in diameter, except US fancywith 1/8 inch in diameter.Split and Broken: 7/8 or less ofcomplete whole kernel at least1/8 inch in diameter.Serious Defects: Includes decay,rancidity, insect injury, and damageby mold.Insect: Insect, web, frass present,or definite evidence of feeding.Other DefectsGum: More than 1/4 inch in diameter.Shriveling: Less than 3/4 ofpellicle filled.Brown Spot: More than1/8 inch in diameter.Discoloration: More than1/2 of surface.UOS: Unless otherwise specified.


USDA Standards for GradesAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacGrades for Almonds in the ShellUSDAGradesMediumExternalDefectDissimilar UndersizeForeignMaterialInternal(Kernel)DefectUS No. 1 28/64 10% 5% 5% 2% 10%US No. 1Mixed28/64 10% – 5% 2% 10%US No. 2 28/64 10% 5% 5% 2% 10%US No. 2Mixed28/64 10% – 5% 2% 10%Additional 20% for discoloration of shell.Includes maximum 1% less than 24/64 by weight. All others by count.Includes maximum 5% serious; no live insects in shell.DefinitionsUS No. 1: Similar varietalcharacteristics. Free from loose,extraneous, and foreign material.Shells are clean, fairly bright, fairlyuniform in color, and free fromdamage caused by discoloration,adhering hulls, broken shells, orother means. Kernels are well dried,free from decay, rancidity, damagecaused by insects, mold, gum, skindiscoloration, shriveling, brownspots, or other means.Loose Foreign Material: 2%, including1% passing through a 24/64 inchscreen (this is also by weight).Internal Defects: 10% including 5%serious damage.US No. 1 Mixed: US No. 1 grade,except that two or more varietiesare mixed.US No. 2: Consists of almonds inthe shell that meet the requirementsof US No. 1 grade, except that anadditional tolerance of 20% shallbe allowed for almonds with shellsdamaged by discoloration.US No. 2 Mixed: Consists of almondsin the shell that meet the requirementsof US No. 2 grade, except that two ormore varieties of almonds are mixed.Size: Unless otherwise specified, 28/64inch in thickness.43


Almond Board Websites44The AlmondsAreIn.com website provides a wide range ofinformation for almond lovers and industry members alike.• Health professionals, such as dietitians and nurses, can finda section that contains education, nutrition research, and foodsafety information.• Consumers and foodservice professionals can view valuablefacts on almond forms, varieties, and nutrition. In addition, theyhave access to a vast collection of recipes for the home chef orfoodservice operation.• In fiscal year 2007–2008, the Almond Board launched aneStore that offers one-ounce perfect-portion almond tins at cost toour website visitors.Almond industry members and trade professionals can accessAlmondBoard.com. Here they can view production statistics, thelatest industry news, online learning modules, and Almond Boardprogram summaries. On the next page, more information is listedon the many resources mentioned in this article. Visit today to stayup-to-date on the work of the Almond Board’s various projects tocreate a rewarding environment for the production, processing,and marketing of California Almonds.Global WebsitesTwo-thirds of California Almonds are shipped out of the UnitedStates making our global marketing reach important. The AlmondBoard hosts websites for Japan, Korea, Russia, China, theUK, France, and Germany. In 2007–2008, the Almond Boardrevamped the Japanese-language website to promote moreinteractivity with consumers. Each website reflects the diverseculture of the region. Global websites can be accessed from theAlmondsAreIn.com homepage.During 2008–2009, the Almond Board’s main websites willundergo a major redesign to bring more interactivity andincreased ease-of-use in finding relevant information. Theredesigned sites will incorporate the new global image forCalifornia Almonds.


ResourcesAlmond Board of California | 2008 Almond AlmanacThe Almond Board provides a wide range of educational tools and resources for both industry and consumers.Please log on to www.AlmondsAreIn.com today to use or request any of these valuable resources.Growers, Handlers, and Trade ProfessionalsRight Type for the Right UseAn eLearning module that explains the key considerations forselecting California Almonds.Technical Information KitA trade resource, including almond varieties, forms, and USDAstandards for grades.Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Training MaterialsA bilingual (English/Spanish) guide to train employees onthe importance of GAPs is available. Also, earn two continuingeducation units towards your pesticide application license bycompleting the GAP eLearning course.Almond Industry Research Overview BookA publication summarizing industry research andpractical solutions to challenges that range from regulatoryrequirements and pest problems to environmental issuesand food safety.Voluntary Aflatoxin Sampling Plan (VASP) Bilingual VideoAn instructional video, in both English and Spanish, outliningand explaining various VASP sampling procedures from startto finish.California Almonds NewsletterThe newsletter is now distributed via Pacific Nut Producermagazine, which is available through a free subscription.The newsletter is also available electronically on theAlmond Board website.Market Research Overview BookAn annual publication summarizing the marketingresearch gathered by the Almond Board regarding the globalconsumption of almonds. The report is published each spring.Health ProfessionalsNutrition InformationA variety of resources, from the nutrient compositionof an almond to nutrition research studies demonstratingthe benefits of eating almonds.Educational ResourcesProvides a variety of printable teaching tools designed toprovide health professionals with resources they can usewith their clients.Consumers and Foodservice ProfessionalsAlmond RecipesAn extensive list of delicious recipes for both consumersand foodservice professionals.45


1150 9th Street, Suite 1500Modesto, CA 95354 USA209-549-8262 Fax: 209-549-8267www.AlmondsAreIn.com© 2008 Almond Board of CaliforniaPrinted in USA Document #5418

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