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sav eN E W S PAPER NAME HERE | | 2009 Issue No. 1y o u r w a l l e t | | y o u r w o r l d | | y o u r l i f eSIMPLE STEPS TO SAVE ENERGY, CURB WASTE, SP END WISELY ANDGETT HE MOSTFROM WH ATYOU BUY AT H OME AND WOR K .MAKE ITLASTI N S I D E | |T H E CO UPO N Q U E E N S H A R E T H E R I D E G U I LT- F R E E E AT I N G2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Call 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


save || b o d yFACE THE FOODBy D AWN KLINGENSMITHCTW FEAT U R E SGot puffy eyes? Pa rched skin? While go i n gto a pri c ey spa to perk up your complex i o ni s n ’t a daily luxury most people can affo rd ,at rip to the superm a rket could be just asgo o d .M a ny of the foods we eat also doubl eas homemade skin care pro d u c t s .“ You can save a lot of money by shoppingthe produce section instead of the cosmeticsa i s l e ,”s ays Donna Maria Coles Jo h n s o n ,fo u n d e rof Make Yo u r C o s m e t i c s . c o “A m . lot of fo o d scontain re a l ly great ingredients for topical skinc a re ,so why not raid the re f ri ge rator andp a n t ry and make your own beauty re m e d i e s ? ”Jo h n s o n ’s Web site fe a t u res hundreds ofrecipes and an ingredient encyclopedia thatexplains the beauty benefits of diffe re n tfo o d s .For ex a m p l e ,egg whites and coffee actas astri n gents to tame oily skin; avocados andbananas moisturi z e ;pineapples and applescontain alpha hy d roxy acids that slough awaydead skin cells for a smoother complex i o n .CUCUMBER SLICES ARE AN AGE-OLD REMEDY FOR PUFFY EYES, BUT HIDDENSKIN BENEFITS EXISTS IN MANY OF NATURE’S FINEST CROPS. TRY THESEHOME REMEDIES TO GET BETTER SKIN THE NATURAL – AND EDIBLE – WAY• Honey, a natural humectant, helps skina t t ract and retain moisture ,s ays Je n n i fe rM a s t e rson of the National Honey Board .H e rrecipe for a honey mask: Purée half a papaya ,seeds re m ove d ,and a half cup of dicedpineapple in a blender or food pro c e s s o r.Pour the fruit into a bowl and adding twot ablespoons each of honey and steepedgreen tea. Mix we l l ,a p p ly to your face for 10or 15 minu t e s .Rinse with tepid wa t e r.• Combine one tablespoon each of wholeo a t s ,fi n e ly pow d e red almonds and amara n t hseeds (ava i l able in health food store s ) ,p l u sone teaspoon each of all-natural apple juice,grape juice and pineapple juice.Add twot ablespoons of whipping cream and stir we l l .Add a half cup of brewed chamomile tea a littleat a time until a loose mixture fo rm s .U s eit to cleanse your skin – and it’s edibl e .• A n gelina Umansky, owner of SpaR a d i a n c e ,San Fra n c i s c o ,s ays this two - i n gre d i-ent mask helps maintain a rosy glowb e t ween pro fessional spa fa c i a l s .In a fo o dp ro c e s s o r, mix half an avocado with olive oilto create a smooth paste. S p read a thin laye ronto your fa c e ,lie down and relax for 20m i nu t e s .© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD 1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


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save || how you liveF O OT WOR KBy PATRICIA V. RIVERACTW FEAT U R E SSeattle real-estate agent Matt Wa rm a cks aw the writing on the wall the day hewa l ked past a popular dow n t own condo.Asign pro u d ly stated,Walk Score :1 0 0 .He knew that this was just the begi n n i n gof a trend in the way urban pro p e rties arem a rke t e d .“ I t ’s something that promotes thee fficiency of a commu n i t y,”he say s .Walk Score (Walk Score.com) is anonline tool that provides potential homebu ye rs and re n t e rs with an index measuringthe “ wa l k ab i l i t y ”of neighborhoods. I t sgrowing popularity means that when peoplebuy a house, t h ey ’re no longer justlooking for curb appeal.These days theywant to know a lot more about the neighborhoodand its amenities.Since launching in Ju ly 2007,Walk Scorehas become a popular tool for homebuye rsand for agents selling in a down economy.Walk Score uses online maps and businesslistings to determine a location’s wa l k ab i l i t y,LO CATION, LO CATION, LO CATION? NOT FOR TODAY’S T REK - H A P PYH OME DWELLERS. FOR T HEIR HOMES AND NEI GHB ORH O ODS,I T’S ALLA B O U TAMBULATION, AMBULATION, AMBULATI O Nl o o s e ly defined as the ease with which aresident can access eve rything from park sto gro c e ry stores to entertainment ve nu e s .A pro p e rty that has a score of 90 - 100,d u bbed a “ Wa l ke rs ’Pa ra d i s e ,” means thatmost errands can be accomplished on fo o tand residents can get by without owning ac a r.A “ D riving Only ”s c o re of 0 - 25 meansfew destinations within walking ra n ge .Although the Web site does not factor ini m p o rtant pedestri a n - f ri e n d ly ch a ra c t e ri s t i c s– street widths, bl o ck lengths,s a fe t y, t o p o g-ra p hy,p u blic tra n s i t ,f re eways or ave rageweather conditions,Walk Score has becomea popular selling tool for real-estate age n t s .S ays co-creator Matt Lern e r,“ We hope tosee more listings that read 2 bedro o m s ,1b a t h ro o m ,1,200 square fe e t ,Walk Score 90.”The Sightline Institute,a Seattle thinkt a n k ,found health benefits for re s i d e n t swho live in urban areas where the stre e tn e t wo rk is designed for wa l k i n g .T h ey areless like ly to be obese,t h ey suffer substanti a l ly fewer ch ronic illnesses and have al ower risk of dying in a tra ffic accident.C o m munities with a high wa l k ability index :• R evo l ve around a discern able center,a shopping district or public space• Be dense enough for businesses tofl o u rish and for public tra n s p o rtation to bec o s t - e ffe c t i ve• P rovide for eve ryone who wo rks inthe neighborhood• O ffer parks and public space• Fo rm a connected grid of streets thatp rovides many routes to any destination• Place buildings close to the stre e twith parking lots relegated to the back .• Include schools and wo rkplaces thatresidents can walk to© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD 1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


PART- TIME ORGANI CBy D AWN KLINGENSMITHCTW FEAT U R E SBuying eve rything organic – from milk tom a n goes – might be a healthy choice fo ryour body. But perhaps yo u ’ve found it’sl e s s - t h a n - h e a l y t hfor your household budge t .If you can’t affo rd to go all org a n i c ,c e r-tain foods take pri o ri t y, e s p e c i a l ly if yo u raim is to avoid pesticides,s ays nu t ri t i o n i s tC a rol Anne Wa s s e rman of New Yo rk City.“ Pesticides are held in the skin offo o d s ,so buy organic anything you can’tp e e l ,” she say s .“ B e rri e s ,e s p e c i a l ly strawbe rries and mu s h ro o m s ,should re a l ly beo rganic because of their porous surfa c e s .”O rganic carrots would win out ove ro rganic bananas,Wa s s e rman say s ,s i n c ebananas have a thicker pro t e c t i ve skin.And opt for organic potatoes and apples,w h i ch are known to have high pesticidec o n t e n t s ,she say s .The nonpro fit Env i ronmental Wo rk i n gG roup rev i ewed nearly 43,000 lab o ra t o rytests on produce compiled by the U. S .D e p a rtment of A gri c u l t u re (USDA) andthe U. S .Food and Drug A d m i n i s t ra t i o nand ra n ked fruits and ve ge t ables based onpesticide contamination.Topping the listof foods with the highest pesticide loadswe re peach e s ,a p p l e s , sweet bell peppers ,B ALAN C ING T HE HEALTH OF YO UR FI GURE WITH T HE HEALTHOF YO UR FINAN C ES CAN BE DIFFI C ULT, BU TNOT IMP O SSIBLE .c e l e ry, n e c t a ri n e s ,s t raw b e rries and ch e r-ri e s .Least contaminated we re onions, avoca d o s ,f rozen sweet corn ,p i n e a p p l e s ,m a n go e s ,f rozen sweet peas and asparagu s .The cri t e ria used to create the list of43 fruits and ve ge t ables takes intoaccount how people wash and pre p a rep ro d u c e ,and while washing and ri n s i n gm ay reduce pesticide leve l s ,it doesn’teliminate them. Peeling also re d u c e sex p o s u re s ,but va l u able nu t rients god own the drain with the peels.Kathleen D’Ovidio, assistant pro fessor offood science at Delawa re Va l l ey College ,D oy l e s t ow n ,Pa . ,c o u n t e rs the gro u p ’s conclu s i o n s .“The USDA makes no claims thato rg a n i c a l ly produced food is safer orm o re nu t ritious than conve n t i o n a l ly producedfo o d s ,”she say s ,adding that fe rt i l i z-e rs and synthetic pesticides wash offh a rm l e s s ly and compromise the planeto n ly when used incorre c t ly.D’Ovidio says fo o d - b o rne illnessescaused by E. coli and other micro o rg a n-isms pose a greater thre a t .“A ny fo o d ,o rganic or not, is going to carry the sameri s k ,”she say s .© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD 1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


CO U P O NS + SALES =Dollars in Your Po c k e tC O U P O NC O U P O NJILL CATALDO SAV ESHUNDREDS ON GRO C ERIESBY MA KING T HE MOST OF T HECOMMON COUPON.YOU CAN, TO OJILL CATAL D OArmed with the know l e d ge thateve ry item in the gro c e rys t o re is on sale at its lowe s tp rice just once in a 12-we e ktime span, planning your shopping tri p sa round what is on sale ve rsus what yo uneed in a particular week is the nex tstep to saving money on gro c e ri e s .For ex a m p l e , b o n e l e s s , skinless ch i ckenbreasts are a perfect example of ap ri c e - volatile item. Last week at my groce ry store , ch i cken breasts we re on salefor $1.79 per pound. This we e k , t h ey ’re$5.29 per pound. While I may not planto make a meal with ch i cken bre a s t sthis we e k , I know that because theywe re at their low price point last we e k ,it will be about 3 months befo re I seethem at that great price ag a i n . L a s twe e k , I bought enough ch i cken to lastmy fa m i ly until they ’re offe red again ata low pri c e .But I didn’t pay $1.79 per pound fo rmy ch i cke n . I paid $1.29 per pound. Iused a .50 coupon for each pack age Ip u rch a s e d , but the coupons I usedwe re n ’t offe red in this we e k ’s paper.The coupons I used we re seve ra lmonths old – not ex p i re d , just olderthan this current we e k .N ow, if you curre n t ly use coupons,let me guess how you do it: Yo u rS u n d ay newspaper arri ve s . You paget h rough the coupon insert s , cl i p p i n gout the items you want to buy thisweek … and you throw the insert away.But this is the No. 1 mistake mostcoupon users make .W hy is this a mistake? Gro c e rys t o re s ’ best sales ra re ly coincide withthe week coupons for these itemsappear in the new s p a p e r. The gro c e rys t o re knows weeks in advance whatcoupons are coming out in the paper.T h ey also know that most people whouse coupons will cut them and usethem the same week that they came inthe new s p a p e r. S o , the gro c e ry storewill typically put some of the couponp roducts on sale – just not at their lowestprice points. S h o p p e rs will thinkt h ey ’re getting a deal, but the store hasenticed you into purchasing at a higherp rice – even with your coupon. If yo uuse your coupons when the ch i cken ison sale for $3.29/pound, you wo n ’th ave them any m o re when the ch i cke n ’sp rice drops below $2 per pound.I ’ll leave you with another reason yo ushould save your coupons. Pa i ring a $1coupon with a $1 sale results in fre eitems! Now, you may be thinking,“ R e a l ly ?Is it that easy?”You be the judge .This we e k , p a s t a , c a rtons of lemonad e , instant potatoes and toothbru s h e swe re on sale at my store for $1 each . Iredeemed a $1 coupon for each ofthose items, so they we re free to me.But in each case, the coupons I usedcame from inserts published weeks ago ; ashopper wo u l d n ’t find them in the curre n twe e k ’s insert s .S h o p p e rs who cl i pcoupons the old-fashioned way might noth ave needed a toothbrush three monthsago , when the $1 coupon ran in the paper.S o , t h ey threw the insert away. S u p e r -C o u p o n e rs keep their insert s .T h ey understandthat the coupons inside may prov i d ethem with the chance to land a free itemin the future .W hy throw away money ?© CTW Features2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


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save || h o m eC LEAN IMAGEBy MICHELLE TAUTE CTW FEAT U R E SA remodeled bathroom should be easyon the eyes and the env i ro n m e n t .D O …• Help reduce air pollution by ch o o s i n gthe right paint. Look for labels that say lowor zero VOC (volatile organic compounds)A REM OD ELED BAT HRO OM SH O ULD BE EASYON T HE EYES AND T HE EN V IRO NMEN T.as you search for the perfect color.• Pick materials with a classic look.“ Yo umight want to think,‘Can I pick a stylet h a t ’s not super tre n dy ? ’ ”s ays Je n n i fe rR o b e rt s ,author of “Good Green Homes”( B i bbs Smith, 2 0 0 3 ) .“So the next peoplewho live in this house are n ’t going to go‘ Yu ck ’and rip it out.”• Choose FSC lumber. I t ’s cert i fied bythe Fo rest Stewa rdship Council as beingh a rvested in a sustainable manner.• Replace standard light bulbs with fl u-o rescent ve rsions to save energy. Look fo ra bulb with a color tempera t u re of 2,700to 3,000 degrees Kelvin for wa rmer light.• Seal the unfinished surfaces of part i cl e-b o a rd cabinets with three coats of latexpaint befo re they ’re installed.“ Pa rt i cle boardis the pri m a ry culpri tfor fo rm a l d e hyde omissi o n s ,”s ays Dav i dJo h n s t o n ,co-author ofG reen Remodeling:C h a n ging the World One Room at a Ti m e ”( N ew Society Publ i s h e rs ,2004).He says thiso ff-gassing – slowed by sealing – can tri g ge re nv i ronmental sensitivity.• Consider replacing an old wa t e r - g u z-zling toilet. S p l u rge on a new model thatwill help conserve this precious re s o u rc e .Look for a toilet that uses 1.3 gallons perflush or less,R o b e rts say s .© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD 1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


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save || eating greenDOYO UK NOWYOURFO OD ?A LOT OF WH AT AMERI CANS EAT COMES FROMOT HER CO UN T RIES. AS T HE NUMBER OF FO ODRE CALLS RISE, EX P ERTS URGE CO NSUMERS TO GETSMARTER ABOUTWHERE T HEIR FO OD ORI GINATES2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


By BEN LARRISONCTW FEAT U R E SIf you are what you eat,yo u ’rep ro b ably getting a little lessA m e rican eve ry day.The U. S .food supply hasbecome incre a s i n g ly fo reign inthe past 15 ye a rs .Fruits and ve g-e t ables are now ava i l able ye a r -ro u n d ,long after their seasons have passedl o c a l ly :bananas from Ecuador, beans fro mM ex i c o , apples from New Zealand.S h rimp comes in from T h a i l a n d ,C h i n aand Indonesia and Chinese catfish and eela re like ly to show up on your dinner plate.Chances are ,your morning beve rage alsocomes from ove rs e a s .Te re ’s Colombian coffeeand Indian tea and the sugar you add maybe from the Cari bb e a n .M o re of a juice person?We ’ve got apple juice from A rge n t i n aand ora n ge juice from Bra z i l .“ We are importing an enormous nu m b e rof food pro d u c t s ”s , ays Pa t ri ck Wo o d a l l ,a analystfor New Yo rk-based Food & Water Wa t ch .From 1983 to 1985, i m p o rts amountedfor just nine percent of fresh ve ge t able consumptionin the United States. By 2003 to2005 ,t h ey we re up to 16 percent and thatnu m b e r ’s on the ri s e .M o re than one-thirdof the tomatoes that we consume aregrown ove rs e a s ,as are nearly half of thec u c u m b e rs ,o n e - t h i rd of melons and morethan half of the garlic.The boom in food imports has bro u g h tthe luxury of a wider va riety of healthyoptions no matter the month.With benefi t scome hazard s .“The risks obv i o u s ly are thepossibility of picking up some exotic fo o d -b o rne disease,and getting sick and in somecases dy i n g ,”s ays Larry Busch ,d i rector of theInstitute for Food and A gri c u l t u ral Standard sat Michigan State Unive rs i t y,East Lansing.Pa rt of the issue is the FDA and USDA’si n ability to monitor the massive amount offood brought into the country eve ry dayon ships and planes.A c c o rding to Wo o d a l l ,less than two percent of the edible go o d sa re actually inspected, m o s t ly items thath ave a higher risk for contamination,s u chas seafood and pro d u c e .I n s p e c t o rs havefound ve g gies that are ro t t e n ,fi l t hy andcontaminated with pesticide or salmonella.Fi s h ,in part i c u l a r, has presented pro bl e m s .The U. S .i m p o rts 80 percent of its seafo o d .M i ke Doy l e ,d i rector of the Center of Fo o dEAT WELLS T A YS A F E• Based on FDA surveillance data, foodfrom certain countries tends to have a muchhigher occurrence of defects, says Mike Doyle,director of the Center of Food Safety at theUniversity of Georgia. India, Mexico and Chinaare currently among the leading countries forrejected food shipments.To get the latest updates on import refusals,go to www.fda.gov/ora, click on “ImportProgram” and select “Import Refusal Report.”From there, you can search by product orc o u n t ry for all rejected goods, including food.• Proper preparation and careful cooking offood can help to greatly reduce the chance ofcontracting a food-borne illness.• Don’t be afraid to buy foreign foods. Theinspections and regulatory practices in thep r o d u c t ’s country of origin tend to get the jobdone. “For the most part, [the system] worksextremely well,” says Larry Busch, director ofthe Institute for Food and AgriculturalStandards at Michigan State University.S a fety at the Unive rsity of Georgi a ,A t h e n s ,s ays that inspectors have found “an aw f u ll o t ”of salmonella in shrimp – up to eightto-10percent by some estimates – due tothe use of ch i cken manu re as a fe rtilizer atsome aquaculture plants. Most tuna isi m p o rted and has at times been found tocontain high merc u ry leve l s .“ We import about a billion pounds offish per ye a r, and we look at about twop e rcent of that,”Woodall say s .“980 millionpounds of fish is being imported withouteven a curs o ry glance from the FDA .”To date, o n ly seafood has been subjectto the pro gram known as COOL ( c o u n t ryof ori gin labeling.) But even know i n gw h e re food came from is not necessari ly agood clue as to its safe t y, B u s ch arg u e s .S m a rt consumers would do well to ke e pfood safety in mind.© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


save || your lifee a s yc o m e ,e a s yg oCAR - SH ARINGCOMPANIES ENA BLEURB AN DWELLERSAND CO LLEGEST UD EN TS TOSIMPLY GRAB T HEK E YS AND GO, FOR ANH O UR OR A DAY.2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


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By JEFFREY STEELE CTW FEAT U R E SSt a rt with the eve r - ri s i n gcost of ow n i n g ,i n s u ri n gand maintaining a motorve h i cl e .N ow add the fe a r-ful price of a tank of gasoli n e .Toss in the cost of ap a rking space in manyurban are a s .Fi n a l ly, stir in a pinch of env i-ronmental consciousness.Blend we l l ,and that’s a recipe for the fa s t -growing car-sharing tre n d ,best exe m p l i fi e dby the steadily rising presence of such companiesas Zipcar and I-GO Car Shari n g .T h e s ecompanies enable folks who choose not toown a ve h i cle to join a member base andgain access to conve n i e n t ly located ve h i cl e son an hourly basis.U n l i ke car rental companies,w h i ch tendto rent cars by the day,c a r - s h a ring serv i c e s ’h o u r ly rates make them ideal for those whoneed ve h i cles for short dri ves over a compa ra t i ve ly brief period of time,s ay, half ana f t e rn o o n .But that’s just the beginning of theupside vis-à-vis rental cars ,C a m b ri d ge ,Mass.-based Zipcar points out. M e m b e rsd o n ’t have to travel to a car rental location,whether at the airport or a dow n t ow nl o c a t i o n .R a t h e r, the cars offe red by carsh a ring services are often parked within afi ve - m i nute walk away.Car sharing is a 24-7,s e l f - s e rvice pheno m e n o n ,so users don’t need to re m e m-ber the hours or days of operation of a carrental location.T h ey simply go pick up andd ri ve the car when needed, whether that’sat the stro ke of noon or at midnight.F u e l ,re s e rved parking and insurance areall included in the cost.T h e re ’s no paperwork to complete, or complicated wa i ve rsto peruse and sign each time a car is needed .And car-sharing members have theo p p o rtunity to dri ve a broad assortment ofve h i cl e s ,with Zipcar, for instance, t o u t i n gits more than 25 “fun makes and models.”While I-GO is thus far limited to theC h i c ago are a ,Zipcar serves urban are a sand college campuses in 26 states.C a r - s h a ring services make it easy fo ru s e rs to re s e rve ve h i cl e s ,as well as dri veand re t u rn them.The steps invo l ved inusing ve h i cles from I-GO Car Sharing aret y p i c a l .Once becoming a member of thes e rv i c e ,a user can re s e rve a car online orby calling a phone number and prov i d i n ga membership identification number andZ I P CARW W W . Z I P CA R . C OMMore than 200,000 members5,500 vehicles in more than 50 cities inNorth America and the U.K.120 college campusesThe company estimates that each Zipcartakes more than 15 personally owned vehiclesoff the road.pin nu m b e r.All it takes then is a trek to an e a r by parking spot to pick up the car.Auser enters the ve h i cle by holding an I-GOS m a rt Card over a card reader on the windshielduntil a green light appears on thec a rd reader and the doors unlock .He or she then opens the glove b ox andre m ove the key and a bl a ck key fob from thekeypad to start the car.The key has to bet a ken with a user eve ry time he or she park sand leaves the car,for it’s the key,not theS m a rt Card ,that locks and unlocks the car.Upon re t u rning the car, a user insert sthe bl a ck fob with the attached key intothe keypad in the glove b ox ,w h i ch signalsto I-GO the rental is complete.The user exits the car and holds theS m a rt Card over the card reader until a re dlight on the card reader appears and thecl i ck of the doors locking is heard .C a r - s h a ring organizations stri ve to offe rplans tailored to people’s diffe rent dri v i n gn e e d s .For instance,an occasional Zipcard ri ver could sign up for a plan involving a$50 annual fe e ,no monthly commitmentand costs that start at $9.25 an hour and$69 a day.Those prices stack up nicely against ve h i-cle ow n e rship costs. Fa c t o ring car payme n t s ,finance ch a rge s ,i n s u ra n c e ,g a s ,l i c e n s e ,re gi s t ra t i o n ,t a xe s ,maintenance andp a rk i n g ,Zipcar estimates a San Fra n c i s c oresident will pay an ave rage of $769 amonth to own a car.That equates to morethan 100 hours or 13 days of Zipcar dri v i n g .By contra s t ,a heavy Zipcar user driving several trips a week will pay $322 a month, am o d e rate Zipcar user driving two trips aweek $167 a month and a light user of fo u rone-hour re s e rvations just $37 a month.Among I-GO members ,25 perc e n tre p o rted walking more and 17.6 perc e n ttaking additional public transit use duri n gtheir members h i p .And almost 50 perc e n tg ave up or postponed the purchase of ave h i cl e ,or considered selling a ve h i cl e .© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD 1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


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save || your lifedPoOWER-DOWN,g o o d eS AV ING ENERGY IS EASY TO DO ONCEYOU REALI ZE HOW MUCH YOU WASTEUNNE C ESS ARILY. FROM LEAV INGCOMP U TERS ON TO KEEPING YO UR TVPLU G GED IN TO T HE LI TTLE T HINGSYOU’VE NE V ER T H O U GH TO , FFIND OUTH OW TO CUTYO UR ENERGY CO STSAND REDUCE EMISSI O NS WI T H O U TCOMP ROMISING YO UR COM FORTBy JEFF SCHNAUFERCTW FEAT U R E SFrom “ va m p i re powe r ”d rained byhome entertainment systems to outdatedre f ri ge ra t o rs that go bble upm o re than just your leftove rs ,A m e rican bank accounts are ge t t i n gs u cked dry by wasteful energy hab i t s .“ We estimate that in a typicalh o u s e h o l d ,if people did a ra n ge of things over time,t h ey could save up to 40 percent of their total heating,cooling and electricity costs for things like lighting,appliances and electro n i c s ,” s ays Bill Pri n d l e ,d e p u t yd i rector for communications for the A m e rican Councilfor an Energy Efficient Economy,Wa s h i n g t o n ,D. C .A m e ricans enjoy a high standard of living, w h i chc o n t ributes to our gratuitous energy use.And it costsu s .A c c o rding to the Wa s h i n g t o n ,D. C .based non-pro fi tAlliance to Save Energy (www. a s e . o rg ),U. S .h o u s e-holds will spend close to $2,200 for home energycosts in 2008.Cutting those costs takes less energy than you mightex p e c t .In fa c t ,it can be as easy as flipping a sw i t ch whenyou leave the house.A c c o rding to the U. S .D e p a rtment of Energy, t u rning offjust one 60-watt incandescent bulb that would otherwiseb u rn eight hours a day can save about $15 per ye a r.A n dreplacing your fi ve most fre q u e n t ly used light fi x t u res orthe bulbs in them with ENERGY STAR qualified lights cans ave more than $65 a year in energy costs.Consider another sw i t ch to save energy :f rom hot wa t e rto cold.The DOE says hot water heating accounts fo rabout 90 percent of the energy used by your wa s h i n gm a ch i n e ;yet only 10 percent goes to electricity used bythe washer motor. Depending on the clothes and hard n e s sof your wa t e r, m a ny A m e ricans can do laundry ex cl u s i ve ly2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


with cold water by using cold-water laundry deterge n t s .S w i t ching to cold wa t e rcan save the ave rage household more than$40 annu a l ly with an electric water heater,and more than $30 annu a l ly with a gaswater heater.Your dryer may have two fe a t u res tohelp save energy.The fi rst is a moisture orhumidity sensor that shuts off the heatwhen clothes are dry. If you don’t have thisfe a t u re ,t ry to match the cycle length tothe size and weight of the load.A drye rthat runs an ex t ra 15 minutes per load cancost you up to $34 per ye a r.Lint traps on your dryer can also helpyou save energy. Just cleaning the lint tra pb e fo re each and eve ry load allows thed rye r ’s heated air to circulate more effici e n t ly through wet cl o t h e s .This can saveyou up to $34 per ye a r.Then there ’s the wasted energy you neve reven see.“The other area that people don’tthink about is the energy used by all theappliances we have plugged in,”P rindle say s .“ E ven when they ’re not in use,t h ey consumephantom loads or va m p i re energy.”This may include televisions that havea c t i ve circuits that maintain intern a lcl o ck s .It may also include CD and DV Dp l aye rs ,s t e re o s , and ch a rge rs for cellphones and laptops, as well as computersthat run on “ s l e e p ”mode instead of shuttingoff completely.B e t ween fi ve and 15 percent of your energybill is estimated to be wasted on va m p i rep owe r.That number may rise to as mu ch as20 percent by 2010.Yet the solution can alsobe as simple as flipping a sw i t ch .“A lot of people use power supply stri p sto protect their appliances from vo l t ages u rge s ,but you can also use those powe rs t rips to turn off that whole bank of homee n t e rtainment products when they ’re notbeing used,”P rindle say s .“If yo u ’re going tobed or leaving for wo rk ,w hy not turn it off ? ”Flat screen telev i s i o n s ,for instance, c a nuse more energy than a re f ri ge ra t o r. In asign of how far tech n o l o gy has come, t h em o d e rn re f ri ge rator uses one quarter ofthe energy it used 30 ye a rs ago .An oldermodel can cost, on ave rage , $90 or moreper year to opera t e ,so consider buying anENERGY STAR re f ri ge ra t o r, i n s t e a d .M o rei n fo rmation on energy - s aving appliancescan be found at www. e n e rgy s t a r. gov.In places like Wa s h i n g t o n ,D. C . ,M a ryland and Vi rgi n i a ,40 percent of alle n e rgy consumption in the ave rage householdis for heating. Ronnie J.K we l l e r,deputy director of communications for theAlliance to Save Energy, s ays this nu m b e rc an be slashed in a number of way s .“If you have a guest room that is not inu s e ,or you have a home office but yo ud o n ’t use the rest of the house during thed ay,you may just want to use a space heaterin the home offi c e .Or close the guest ro o muntil you have a guest,”K weller say s .“A n dopen the drapes or blinds on the sunny sideof the house to heat up the house duri n gthe day, then close them at night.”C o n s i d e r, t o o ,s i m p ly plugging air leaksto outside doors and windows by usingfoam sealants, caulking and weather stri p-p i n g .T h i s ,combined with adequate insulationthroughout the home,“can cut dow nyour heating bills by as mu ch as 20 percentand will make your home more comfort able because you wont have dra f t s ,”K weller say s .K weller suggests ch e cking outw w w.insulate.com and www. e ffi c i e n t w i n-d ow s . o rg for more tips on cutting dow non your heating bills.Want more ideas how to power dow n ?Tune into www. gre e n e n e rgy t v. c o m ,a we b-site that fe a t u res videos uploaded by energy-consciousorg a n i z a t i o n s ,i n d i v i d u a l s ,i nve n t o rs and even celebri t i e s .“Ben A ffl e ck has one on conserving energyby downloading music instead of buyingC D ’s,”s ays Craig Zamary, founder ofG re e n E n e rgy T V. c o m “Then . there ’s a neatvideo from Ed Begley,J r. about a wire l e s shome energy management system.We havev i ewe rs from 120 diffe rent countries thath ave gone on to our site.I think a lot of peopleare interested in what’s going on aro u n dthe world and ways they can conserve energyand what’s new in altern a t i ve energy.”Because powe ring down not only cans ave us a little gre e n ,it helps keep ourplanet that way, t o o .“ With the growing awa reness and conce rn about climate ch a n ge ,I think peoplewant to know they are doing their part fo rf u t u re ge n e ra t i o n s ”s , ays Kwe l l e r.“ With theless energy you use,t h a t ’s less pollutionyour are cre a t i n g .It does end up benefi t i n gyour commu n i t y, the nation and the planet.”© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


save || your lifel ove is1/4 PAGE ADE CO - FRIENDLY WED D ING FAVORS CREATE LESS WASTE1/4 PAGE ADBy K ATE SULLIVAN CTW FEAT U R E SSomething old, something new,something borrowe d ,s o m e-thing green? It’s time toe m b race the env i ronment onyour wedding day.After thankingthe bridesmaids and gro o m s m e n ,fa m i-ly and fri e n d s ,d o n ’t fo rget to kick back toMother Nature .You don’t have to don a hemp dress oruse solar power to make an impact.Choosing one area in which to go gre e nm a kes a significant diffe re n c e .G i ve a nod to nature with eco-fri e n d lyfavo rs .Not only will you earn points fo rthe env i ro n m e n t ,but your small ge s t u rewill send a subtle sense of awa reness to ac a p t i ve audience.To d ay ’s guests take va rious modes oft ra n s p o rtation to witness couples tie thek n o t ,but all this traveling can take a tollon fresh air. So when socially consciousM a rk Mirabito of Fa i r fi e l d ,C o n n .,tied thek n o t ,he pitched a green gift for guests tohis fi a n c é e ,A n d re a .M i rabito chose carbono ffsets to counteract all the travel to his St.Louis we d d i n g .Carbon offsetting is the act of mitigatinggreenhouse gases (sometimes byplanting trees).This newly popular practicemeans linking up with an organizationthat funds alternative energy programs.“Carbonoffsets were something Iwas aware of for some time but neverhad the opportunity to employ,” Mirabitosays.So with a little re s e a rch from terrapass.comand teaming up with ClimateC a re ,M i rabito calculated that for ab o u t2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


g re e nAND HELP O FFSET ENERGY CO STS OF YO UR BIG DAY1/4 PAGE AD$ 6 0 0 ,he and A n d rea could offset the carbonemissions for their 200 guests.“All ina l l ,it was an easy and not too ex p e n s i veway to make our wedding a little gre e n e r.”WHITE WEDDING GONE GREENWhen it comes to embracing eco-fri e n d-ly, the sky ’s the limit. H e re are a few othera i ry options.Fo rget the ri c e ,w h i ch can be harm f u lto local bird s .Toss env i ro n m e n t a l ly safec o n fetti instead. Look for water solubl e ,b i o d e gra d able color specs to make asplash during your post vow walk dow nthe aisle. Or add fragrance to the tra d i t i o n-al toss by choosing all-natural lave n d e rwedding ri c e .S ow the seeds of love with a packet ofbuds for guests. C reate customized lab e l sto personalize the sacks of soon to befl owe rs .M a ke sure to print labels on re c y-cled paper. Looking for something longe rlasting? Check out Arbor Day Fo u n d a t i o n( a r b o rd ay. o rg) to purchase two - ye a r - o l dseedlings for guests – talk about lay i n gd own ro o t s .G i ve a little luck when you use bambooplace card holders that double as a part i n gfavo r.The plant is known for stre n g t h ,resilience and bri n ging good fo rt u n e .When adding a green touch to yo u rwedding day, be sure to explain your causeto your guests. M a rk and A n d rea opted toi n clude a short note highlighting the donationthat was made in the guest’s nameand where to go for more info rm a t i o n .When you share your love for each otherand for the env i ro n m e n t ,i t ’s a cause fo rc e l e b ra t i o n .© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


save || your lifeg re e p nr i d eCOMPANIES IN TEN TON HIRING T HE BEST AND BRI GH TEST YO UNG WOR K ERS ARE BUSY BUIL D ING T HEIR ECO CREDBy D AWN KLINGENSMITH CTW FEAT U R E SThe Phelps Group marke t i n gage n c y, Santa Monica,C a l i f. ,“ greened up”its building byc rowning the roof with thel a rgest commercial solarpanelsystem in the city.The company alsocut back on paper use, sw i t ched to nontoxic cleaning products and got seri o u sabout re c y cl i n g ,all with longevity in mind– its own as well as the planet’s .To maintain a competitive edge ,“ We ’rec o n s t a n t ly on the lookout for talented, c reat i ve people, and fra n k ly, m a ny of them areGen X’ers and Millennials,”s ays Kri s t e nT h o m a s ,who leads the age n c y ’s env i ro n-mental task fo rc e .In her ex p e ri e n c e ,M i l l e n n i a l s ,a l s ocalled Generation Y, place a high value onthe env i ronmental ethics of pro s p e c t i vee m p l oye rs .I n d e e d ,re s e a rch made public in Au g u s ts u g gests that college students and re c e n tgraduates pre fer to wo rk for companiesthat take active measures to protect thee nv i ro n m e n t .A survey of 2,774 college studentsand recent graduates from across the2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


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nation found that 81 percent believe it isi m p o rtant to wo rk for a green company,and 79 percent re p o rt they would be morel i ke ly to join the greener of two companieswhen comparing similar offe rs ,a c c o rd i n gto Experience Inc., an Intern e t - b a s e dc a reer services prov i d e r.“Gen Y candidates see wo rking for agreen company as one of their top conce rns when applying for a job, a n de m p l oye rs are taking action,”s ays Je n nyF l o re n ,founder and CEO.“Companies areo p e n ly touting their green credentials toa t t ract the best and brightest wo rke rs .”Case in point:The Phelps Group wo nover Jason Yo ff y, 2 9 , who took a job thereas an art director last spring – but notb e fo re he’d done some re s e a rch to gaugewhether the company ’s values we re in linewith his ow n .“The picture of the office ontheir Web site shows a giant roof full ofsolar panels. I knew they we re seri o u sabout the env i ronment when I saw thati m age ,”he say s .Higher up on the food ch a i n ,M BA gra d-uates are willing to sacri fice a signifi c a n tp a rt of their salaries to wo rk for employe rsHOW GREEN IS YOUR EMPLOYE R ?At job fairs and during interviews, look for companies that emphasize their eco-accomplishmentsand have solid evidence to back them up.R e c e n t l y, companies have begun signaling their commitment to the environment byposting job descriptions encouraging “eco-minded” individuals to apply.Look for third-party endorsements, such as CRO (Corporate Responsibility Officer)m a g a z i n e ’s annual Best Corporate Citizen rankings.Check to see if the company is listed in socially responsible investment funds (SRIs).Companies deeply committed to being green tend to make eco-innovation a major topicof discussion during the interview process.S O U R C E : Tim Sanders, author of “Saving the World at Work” (Doubleday, 2008).who seri o u s ly consider the env i ro n m e n t a land social impact of their business decisi o n s ,re s e a rch e rs at the Unive rsity ofC a l i fo rn i a ,Santa Barbara ,h ave fo u n d .I n c re a s i n g ly,M BA pro grams are incorporatinginto their curricula the concept of“ c o r p o rate social re s p o n s i b i l i t y,”or CSR,w h i ch takes into account how a company’s activities affect people and the planet.Banishing Styro foam coffee cups from theo ffi c e ,though a good start ,p ro b ably wo n ’ti m p ress MBA graduates schooled in CSR.“When we ’re talking about major corporat i o n s ,t h ey can talk all they want ab o u tvolunteer pro grams and donations theym a ke ,but the real questions concern howthe company thinks about the way it doesbusiness eve ry day, not just the half-daye m p l oyees go out and paint a sch o o l ,” s ay sR i ch Leimsider of the Aspen Institute,Wa s h i n g t o n ,D. C . ,a nonpro fit org a n i z a t i o nthat promotes values-based leadership andp u blishes “The Aspen Institute Guide toS o c i a l ly Responsible MBA Pro gra m s ”( B e rre t t - Koehler Publ i s h e rs 2008).Though fresh on the scene, young jobs e e ke rs know what those “ real questions”a re ,and they ’re demanding answe rs .“ R e c ru i t e rs are telling me over and ove ragain that they ’re surprised by the questionsthat are coming up. Companies arebeing asked about their climate ch a n gep o l i c i e s ,” Leimsider say s .Reductions in greenhouse gas emissionsand sustainability through eve ry stage ofthe supply chain are also being aske dab o u t ,and candidates expect hard ev i-d e n c e ,s ays Tim Sanders , author of “ S av i n gthe World at Wo rk ”( D o u bl e d ay 2008).“When companies emphasize beinggre e n ,t h ey must be ve ry specific ab o u ttheir accomplishments to be cre d i bl e ,”h es ay s .“ S m a rt job candidates are spendingh o u rs re s e a rching potential employe rs .”F l o ren says fa ke or flimsy cre d e n t i a l swo n ’t fly.“Gen Y was brought up in theI n t e rnet age and, as a re s u l t ,t h ey havebecome ex t re m e ly savvy when it comes tore s e a rch ,” she say s .“ T h ey are more ex p e riencedin determining whether companiesa re just ‘ gre e n wa s h i n g ’t h e m .”© CTW Features1/4 PAGE AD 1/4 PAGE AD2009 Content That Works – All Rights Reserved • Contact us at 866-6CONTENT or CONTENTTHATWORKS.com for licensing information


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