Fall 2011 Gallery Guide - Miami University School of Fine Arts

arts.muohio.edu

Fall 2011 Gallery Guide - Miami University School of Fine Arts

significant impact. Krasner andde Kooning both struggled to findtheir own style and recognition, astheir work was overshadowed bythe work of their famous husbands,Jackson Pollock and Willem deKooning.Helen Frankenthaler and LouiseNevelson changed the direction,method, and outcome in artproduction during the 1950s.Frankenthaler quickly developedher own style that offered freshnessto the often heavy paintingapplication of other AbstractExpressionist painters such as HansHofmann. In the early 1950s, sheexperimented with a techniqueknown as “soak-stain,” thinningoil paint with turpentine to producea watercolor-like effect when theapplication soaks into the whitecanvas ground. Nevelson, on theother hand, created sculpturalpieces painted in monochromaticfinishes to convey a sense ofvolume and solidity. Usingfound pieces of wood, Nevelsoncreated compositions bound withinboxes, which were stacked orjoined together. These “walls” ofalternating depths, angles, curvesand lines appear like cabinets ofcuriosities.By the 1960s, abstraction wasmoving towards a greaterunderstanding of the relationshipbetween picture plane, color, lightand the illusion of shapes. Nowknown as Op Art, the idea ofrepresenting depth of field andvariations of the picture plane hasbeen explored for many years.Artists of the 1960s introduced aninteractive environment in whichviewers observe movement andchanges in depth based partly ontheir position before the work.Popular examples of Op Art consistof two-dimensional works onpaper, board or canvas, includingthose by Victor Vasarely, JulianStanczak, Richard Anuskiewicz,Bridget Riley and Rene Parola.Helen Worrall, faculty emerita,Miami University Departmentof Art, produced her Op Artwork Trompe L’Oeil in enamel,intricately organized to blend theoptical illusion of depth of fieldthrough geometric rhythm.Contemporary Polish artist AnnaTrochim began exploring Op Artin the 1990s through the lens ofSonia Delaunay’s approach to colortheory.The early 1970s brought about anew energy in art. The Women’sLiberation Movement in theUnited States inspired femaleartists to express subject matteroriginating from personalexperience. Most feministworks of art produced duringthe 1970s consist of figurativeimagery drawing a connectionto the female body. However,artists such as Hanna Hannah,Corrine “Michael” West, VivianKline, Jennifer Bartlett, JodyHines, Judy Chicago and BettyParsons did not fit into the mold offeminist art. Some of these artistscontinued to push the boundariesof Abstract Expressionism, whileothers explored Color Field orMinimalism.During the late 1970s and into theearly 1980s, sculptors were takinga minimalist approach to space andcolor, as seen in the work of JudyPfaff, Elizabeth Murray, NancyGraves, Sasha Kolin, MaryroseCarroll, Jenny Holzer and NancyHolt. Although the styles of thesewomen are distinctly different,their deconstruction of forms,Louise Nevelson (American, b. Russia, 1899-1988)Rain Garden Zag IX, 1978Found wooden objects and paint; 45 1/2” x 71 1/2” x 9”Gift of the Western College Alumnae Association1980.3714

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