Weekly Word - June 18, 2013 - ifapa

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Weekly Word - June 18, 2013 - ifapa

JUNE 18, 2013Openness in AdoptionBuilding Relationships BetweenAdoptive and Birth FamiliesThe Child Welfare Information Gatewayrecently released the publication “Openness inAdoption: Building Relationships BetweenAdoptive and Birth Families”. This factsheet isdesigned to support adoptive families who areconsidering and/or maintaining open adoption. Itdescribes open adoption and various levels ofopenness, trends towards increasing openness,and the potential benefits of open adoption. Italso offers strategies to build and maintainrelationships with their children’s birth families.ACCESS THE FACTSHEETAdoption Magazine Focuses onAttachment and TraumaAdoption Today is a magazine that covers theissues and answers surrounding international anddomestic adoption. Adoption Today has made theentire online version of their June editionFREE. This issue focuses on attachment andtrauma and contains the following articles: Connecting with Compassion Don't Wait: Signs of When to Get Help What’s the Best Therapy for MyTraumatized Child? Reactive Attachment Disorder is a Lot Likea Bowl of Bad Soup How to Avoid Being Emotionally Triggeredby Your Child 10 Tips for Stressed Out Parents The Legacy of Attachment: How Our OwnAttachment Histories Impact Our ChildrenVIEW THIS PUBLICATIONIFAPA’s Appreciation Day for Iowa’sFoster, Adoptive & Kinship Families!Saturday, August 24, 2013ORDER TICKETS VIA MAILORDER TICKETS ONLINECaring for ChildrenWho Have Experienced TraumaEducational ForumsMany children in the foster care system have lived through traumatic experiences.Understanding how trauma affects children can help you to make sense of your child’ssometimes baffling behavior, feelings, and attitudes. This two-day educational forumwill better prepare you to help your child cope with the effects of trauma.CEDAR RAPIDSDES MOINESFriday & SaturdayFriday & SaturdayJuly 19 & 20, 2013 August 2 & 3, 2013(8:30am-5:00pm)(8:30am-5:00pm)Best Western LongbranchPolk Co. DHS River PlaceREG. DEADLINE IS JULY 5 REG. DEADLINE IS JULY 19HOW DOES TRAUMA AFFECT THE CHILD IN MY CARE?Young children who experience trauma are at particular risk because their rapidlydeveloping brains are very vulnerable. Early childhood trauma has been associatedwith reduced size of the brain cortex which is responsible for many complexfunctions including memory, attention, perceptual awareness, thinking, language, andconsciousness. These changes may affect IQ and the ability to regulate emotions.Children who have experienced trauma may exhibit the following: Avoidance Attention/concentration issues Numbing Impulsivity Arousal Oppositional behaviors Attachment issuesWHAT WILL I LEARN?Participants will cover a wide range of information during the two day educationalforum including trauma’s effects on cognitive and physical development, what parentscan do to promote safety and help children cope with trauma reminders and ways todeal with problem behaviors caused by trauma. Participants will also have theopportunity to explore important steps they can take to be advocates for thechildren in their care and learn ways to take care of themselves to reduce the impactof compassion fatigue.CREDITWorth 14 hours of foster parent training credit/social worker CEUs. All participants must attend both days of the educational forum. Certificates will not be provided until the second day. No partial credit will be given.COSTParents: $15 per person (includes attendance to forum and lunch for both days).Social workers: $40 per person (includes lunch for both days and CEU fees).REGISTRATIONhttps://ifapa.ejoinme.org/2013TraumaEducationalForumifapa I 6864 NE 14th St., Suite 5 - Ankeny, IA 50023 I 800.277.8145 I 515.289.4567 I www.ifapa.org


The Sex Talk with Foster YouthWhether extended family or foster parents, there is no uniformity intraining on how caretakers should address sex with youth who growup in foster care. No one is responsible for teaching these teensabout safe sex practices, healthy relationships, and the value of love.This lack of comprehensive sexual education for youth in foster carehas a significant correlation with high pregnancy rates and contractionof sexually transmitted diseases, among many other negativeoutcomes. In response to this, Fostering Media Connectionspresents, “Let’s Talk About Sex with Foster Youth,” a series of“webisodes” aimed at improving the sexual education of foster youth.Each webisode consists of interviews with foster youth, the adults intheir lives and experts on a range of topics covering sexual health,family planning and the psychological issues associated with sexuality.Watch segment 1, “Why We Need the Talk”.Watch segment 2, “The Sex Talk”.Watch segment 3, “The Talk in Action”.Are You Raising Your Grandchild?Helping Grandchildren Stay in Contact with ParentsTaking on the responsibility of raisinggrandchildren is not easy, but it alsomay not be easy for the parent togive up that responsibility. Visitswith their parents may help yourgrandchildren adjust to the changesin their lives. But every family isdifferent. Visits may be helpful insome cases, but may cause stress inothers. You and the children’sparents need to decide how to best handle the visits. For visitsto go well, both you and the parent have to be flexible andpatient. Accepting that the children love you both is essential.Here are some guidelines to help your grandchildren maintain arelationship with their parents.http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/chfd/CHFD-E-59-02.pdfWhat Do We Know About the High School Class of 2013?Imagine a senior class of 100. They’re the product of their genetic predispositions, their families, their communities, and all of theopportunities (or lack of opportunities) they’ve encountered since birth. They’ve made both good choices and not-so-good ones. They’re onthe threshold of adulthood. But what do we really know about them and what does their future hold? Child Trends, a nonprofit, nonpartisanresearch center on children and youth issues, examined a range of available statistics to provide this portrait of the high school class of 2013: 89 are covered by health insurance. 71 have experienced physical assault; 28 have been victimizedsexually; 32 have experienced some form of child maltreatment. 68 will go on to a college or university. 64 have had sexual intercourse. 56 participated in school sports in the past year. 54 are white; 23 are Latino; 15 are African American; 8 aresomething else. 53 have parents who say their neighborhood is “always safe.” 51 used no alcohol, cigarettes, or illicit drugs during the past 30days. 48 are sexually active. 27 of them used a condom and 25 wereon birth control pills the last time they had sex. 45 get the recommended amount of physical activity. 45 watch television for one hour or less on weekdays; 20 watchfour hours or more. 39 participated in school music or other performing arts in thepast year. 39 have ever been bullied, physically or emotionally; 16 havebeen bullied in the past year. 38 have a reading achievement-test score that puts them in the“proficient or above” category. 35 volunteered in the past year. 35 eat meals together with their families 6 or 7 days a week; 35do so on three or fewer days. 34 are overweight; of these, 18 are obese. 29 felt “sad and hopeless” continuously for at least two weeksduring the past year. 28 attend religious services at least once at week; 26 say religionplays a very important role in their lives. 28 rode in a car during the past year with a driver who had beendrinking. 27 were in a physical fight last year. 27 have a writing achievement-test score that puts them in the“proficient or above” category. 26 have a mathematics achievement-test score that puts them inthe “proficient or above” category. 24 were binge-drinking in the past two weeks. 23 smoked marijuana in the past 30 days. 22 are living in poverty; 10 are living in deep poverty. 21 had a sexually transmitted infection in the past year. 18 have special health care needs. 17 are current cigarette smokers. 17 are employed. 16 carried a weapon in the past year. 14 thought seriously about attempting suicide in the past year; 6went through with the attempt; and 2 required medical attentionafterward. 12 have ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). 12 had unintentional injuries in the past year that requiredattention in a hospital emergency room. 11 have asthma. 10 have at some time been diagnosed by a professional withhaving a learning disability. 10 report they were victims of dating violence in the past year. 10 report they have been raped. 8 used an illicit drug other than marijuana in the past 30 days. 8 have unmet dental needs. 7 smoke marijuana every day, or nearly every day. 6 were victims of hate speech during the past six months. 4 have an eating disorder where they’ve vomited or takenlaxatives to lose weight. 3 were victims of violent crime in the past year. Of the females, 3 or 4 have been, or are, pregnant. One has hadan abortion. 1 used steroids in the past year. 1 or two are in foster care.ifapa I 6864 NE 14th St., Suite 5 - Ankeny, IA 50023 I 800.277.8145 I 515.289.4567 I www.ifapa.org

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