Heavy Weather: How Climate Destruction Harms Middle - Center for ...

climateaccess.org
  • No tags were found...

Heavy Weather: How Climate Destruction Harms Middle - Center for ...

drought is expected to persist and possibly expand westward into ski country inIdaho, Montana, and elsewhere. Deke Arndt, chief of climate monitoring for theNational Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration’s Climatic Data Center, says “Itis likely that 2012 will be the warmest of the 118-year record for the contiguousUnited States.” 105Tornadoes and severe stormsTornadoes and severe stormsMedian household income for counties affected by billion-dollar extreme weatherevents in 2011-2012Fast facts• Joplin, Missouri, which experienced the deadliesttornado in U.S. history in May 2011, has a poverty rateof 19.6 percent• Half of tornado deaths nationwide occur to residentsof mobile homes• A warming climate helped fuel the fierce, early seasonof tornado outbreaks in 2012, according to WeatherUnderground meteorologist Dr. Jeff Masters$0-$20,000$20,000-$40,000$40,000-$60,000$60,000-$80,000More than $80,000The relationship between tornadoes and a warming climate is less clear than forother extreme weather events, but Kevin E. Trenberth of the National Center forAtmospheric Research does believe that there is a connection. As he told ClimateProgress: “What we can say with confidence is that heavy and extreme precipitationevents often associated with thunderstorms and convection are increasingand have been linked to human-induced changes in atmospheric composition.” 106Harold Brooks, a research meteorologist at the National Oceanic andAtmospheric Administration, agreed that a warmer climate increases storm energyand therefore expects that “there will be more environments that are favorable forsevere thunderstorms.” 10718 Center for American Progress | Heavy Weather: How Climate Destruction Harms Middle- and Lower-Income Americans

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines