Heavy Weather: How Climate Destruction Harms Middle - Center for ...

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Heavy Weather: How Climate Destruction Harms Middle - Center for ...

MethodologyThis Center for American Progress analysis compiled data from multiple sources.Extreme weather events data were from the National Oceanic and AtmosphericAdministration’s National Climatic Data Center, or NCDC. 199 The NCDC 2011database includes fatalities, estimated damages, and states affected by these events.The NCDC 2012 is still unpublished, so the information about the human andeconomic impacts of these events were gathered from government websites, likethe U.S. Department of Agriculture, or news sources. A full list of sources by eventcan be found in the appendix. 200Counties affected by each event were compiled from the Federal EmergencyManagement Agency’s Declared Disasters database. 201 If the agency has notyet declared the event an emergency, the counties affected were either foundin the “Storm Prediction Center” or the “Summary of Weather Events across aFour State Region,” both available from the National Oceanic and AtmosphericAdministration’s National Weather Service. 202In order to assess income levels for the most affected counties, we used medianhousehold income (2006–2010) data and number of households (2006–2010)data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s State and County QuickFacts. 203 The 2006–2010 values are an average over the five-year period. We compared the percentdifference between the average annual median household incomes for the affectedcounties in each weather event to the U.S. median—$51,914. We accounted forthe population of each county when calculating these values. The cost per householdwas calculated by taking the cost of the event divided by the total number ofhouseholds for each event.37 Center for American Progress | Heavy Weather: How Climate Destruction Harms Middle- and Lower-Income Americans

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