Graduate course catalog 2010-2012 - Molloy College

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Graduate course catalog 2010-2012 - Molloy College

Founded by theDominican Sisters of Amityville2010-2012Graduate Programs3


Table of ContentsA Message from the President ...............................................6Letter from the Vice President for Academic Affairs............. 7At Molloy.................................................................................9Admissions.............................................................................14Expenses................................................................................15Financial Aid, Scholarships and Awards...............................19Academic Support Services...................................................20Academic Support Facilities..................................................21Suffolk Center.......................................................................21International Education - Formerly Global Learning.........22Student Affairs.......................................................................23Special Molloy Programs, Centers and Institutes................24Academic Policies and Procedures........................................27Honor Societies.....................................................................34Honors, Awards, Graduation and Beyond............................35Division of Business Programs of Study...............................37Welcome to the MBA Programs from the Deanof the Division.......................................................................38Welcome to the MBA Programs from the AssociateDean and Director.................................................................39Business Program..................................................................40Business Course Descriptions...............................................44Division of Education Programs of Study............................47Welcome to the Division of Education from theDean of the Division.............................................................48Welcome to the Education Master’s and Post Master’sPrograms from the Associate Dean and Director................49Education Master’s Programs...............................................50Graduate Education Course Descriptions............................85Post-Master’s Advanced Certificate ProgramsIn Education........................................................................101Division of Humanities Programs of Study........................103Welcome to the Division of Humanities from theDean of the Division...........................................................104Welcome to the Music Therapy Program from theChairperson of the Music Department...............................105Welcome to the Music Therapy Program from theDirector...............................................................................106Music Therapy Program.....................................................107Program of Study leading to M.S. Degrees inMusic Therapy....................................................................109Graduate Music Therapy Course Descriptions.................111Division of Nursing Programs of Study.............................113Welcome to the Graduate Nursing Programs from the Deanof the Division.....................................................................114Welcome to the Nursing Master’s and Post Master’s Programsfrom the Acting Director of Graduate Nursing......115Nursing Master’s Program..................................................116Nursing Master’s and Post Master’s Course Descriptions.123Nursing Post Master’s Advanced Certificate Programs.....130Programs of Study - Nursing Education,Administration or Clinical Practice....................................132Nurse Practitioner Specialities...........................................133Welcome to the Nursing Doctoral Program fromthe Associate Dean and Director........................................135Nursing Doctoral Programs...............................................136Nursing Doctoral Course Descriptions..............................141Division of Social Sciences Programs of Study..................143Welcome to the Division of Social Sciences from theDean of the Division...........................................................144Welcome to the Criminal Justice Program from theAssociate Dean and Director..............................................145Criminal Justice Program....................................................146Graduate Criminal Justice Course Descriptions................148Graduate Program in Social Work.....................................150Board of Trustees................................................................153Offices of Administration....................................................154Professors Emeriti...............................................................159Faculty - Full Time.............................................................160Faculty - Part Time.............................................................163Nursing Learning Laboratory Coordinators andInstructors............................................................................165Rehabilitation Act Campus Coordinators..........................165Academic Calendar 2010–2011...........................................166Academic Calendar 2011–2012...........................................173Index....................................................................................1805


A Message from the PresidentWelcome! We are so pleased that you have decided to continue your educationwith a graduate degree from Molloy College.Your pursuit of an advanced degree shows your belief in the power of education.We share that point of view and believe that education can tangibly change lives.Our first commitment is to you, the student, and we will provide you all the toolsyou need to further your career goals.We are also dedicated to serving our communities.We believe that service to others is animportant part of a Molloy education, and youwill find numerous opportunities to help theless fortunate and to “give back” in a variety ofways.Congratulations on your decision to continueyour education. You have come to a very specialplace and I would like to officially welcomeyou to the Molloy community.Drew Bogner, Ph.D.President6


Letter from theVice President for Academic AffairsDear Student:Welcome to graduate studies at Molloy College. Whetheryou are pursuing studies in Business, Education, Nursing,Criminal Justice, or Music Therapy, you are embarking on aprocess that will enhance your personal and professional opportunities.This Catalog is intended to provide you with critical informationyou will need throughout your course of studies. It isimportant that you familiarize yourself with the informationincluded within these pages. Not only does the Catalog containinformation on the specific requirements for your program,it also provides necessary information on progression criteria,grading policies and services available to all Molloy students.Molloy is proud of its advisement process. I encourage youto take full advantage of this opportunity by coming to advisement appointments prepared to reviewyour progress, plan future coursework and discuss issues that concern you.In addition to meeting with your assigned advisor each semester, Dolores Parry, Associate Deanfor Academic Support Services and Sister Margaret Kavanagh, O.P., Ed.D., Associate Dean forAcademic Affairs are available to answer your questions. The Dean and Graduate Director of yourDivision are also excellent resources.Know that you are welcome at Molloy and that our faculty, administration and staff will do all wecan do to make your time with us as productive as possible.Valerie Collins, Ph.D.Vice President for Academic Affairsand Dean of the Faculty7


At MolloyMolloy College is an independent, comprehensive college withundergraduate and graduate programs located on a 30-acrecampus in Rockville Centre, Long Island, forty minutes by train fromthe heart of New York City. A variety of courses are offered duringthe day-time, evenings and on weekends, depending upon thedepartment and the program of study. The curriculum reflects theCollege’s commitment to tradition and its openness to creativeinnovation.Molloy offers the Associate in Arts degree for liberal arts andsciences. Students may also pursue the Associate in AppliedScience degree in the areas of Nuclear Medicine Technology,Cardio-vascular Technology and Respiratory Care.Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees are offered inmore than 50 areas of concentration, in such diverse fields asBusiness Management, Accounting, Sociology, English, Nursing,Biology, Psychology, Music, Interdisciplinary Studies, ComputerStudies, Music Therapy, Speech-Language Pathology and CriminalJustice. The College also offers Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelorof Social Work degrees. Teaching certification is available forChildhood Education, Childhood/Special Education, AdolescenceEducation and Adolescence/Special Education.The College offers Masters’ Degrees in Nursing, Education, Business,Criminal Justice and Music Therapy. Several of these disciplinesoffer a range of concentrations that serve a variety of student needsand interests. In Fall 2010, the College launched its first doctoralprogram, a Ph.D. in Nursing.Over 15,000 Molloy College alumni have benefited from thiscombination of traditional, liberal studies and practical, professionalcoursework. Their personal development and professional successare a testimony to the tradition of Dominican education at MolloyCollege.Located off the Southern State Parkway, between exits 19 and 20,the College is easily accessible from all parts of Long Island, Queens,Manhattan and Brooklyn by bus, LIRR or automobile.History of MolloyMolloy College has grown steadily since its foundation by theDominican Sisters of Amityville over fifty years ago. Thanks to theencouragement and support of Archbishop Thomas E. Molloy,Bishop of Brooklyn, the Sisters welcomed their first class of fortyfourfreshmen in 1955. The College was originally chartered asMolloy Catholic College for Women.Prior to moving to the current campus, the College was located ina Victorian home at 915 North Village Avenue in Rockville Centre.As noted in the history of the College, Mother Anselma Ruth, O.P.,Prioress of the founding community of Dominican Sisters and thefirst President of Molloy, and Sister Rose Gertrude Hoenighausen,O.P., first Academic Dean, led the fledgling institution through itsearliest years with tremendous faith and dedication. The Collegemoved first into Monsignor Quealy Hall and then, in 1958, intoBishop Kellenberg Hall, named for the first Bishop of RockvilleCentre. The Dominican sisters lived in Quealy Hall until Maria ReginaHall was finished in 1964. Quealy remains the College gymnasiumand currently houses the bookstore as well as the Offices of theRegistrar, the Bursar and the Office of Admissions.In 1980, the Adelaide B. Wilbur Arts Center, connected toQuealy Hall, was completed. It houses the Hays Theatre and thedepartments of Communication Arts and Sciences, Music and Art.The Chapel of the Sacred Heart, highlighted by beautiful stainedglass windows, was erected in 1983 at the south end of the campus.In the fall of 1992, the William J. Casey Center was opened. This twostorybuilding, erected between Kellenberg Hall and the Wilbur ArtsCenter, now includes the Divisions of Business and Nursing, AlliedHealth Sciences, and Social Work Departments, as well as StudentSupport Services which encompasses the writing/computer lab,tutorial services and the office for students with disabilities. Overthe years, the College has acquired three houses adjacent tothe campus, two of which house the academic departments ofPhilosophy and Sociology; the third is the Alumni House. In theFall of 2005, Siena Hall, the College’s most recent building wasdedicated. It houses the academic departments of Criminal Justice,English, Psychology, and Theology and Religious Studies, as well asthe Office of Financial Aid and the Office of Continuing Educationand Professional Development. In Fall 2009, the Graduate NursingFaculty were housed in newly created offices in Maria Regina Hall.Molloy College was first accredited by the Middle States Associationof Colleges and Schools in 1967. In 1992 the first Masters’ degreeswere awarded. Currently, undergraduate enrollment is over 3,000students, and graduate students number more than 900.Molloy College has continued to grow in both form and functionover more than a half century. Plans are currently underway forcontinued growth and expansion.Mission Statement of MolloyMolloy College, an independent, Catholic college, rooted in theDominican tradition of study, spirituality, service, and community,is committed to academic excellence with respect for each person.Through transformative education, Molloy promotes a lifelongsearch for truth and the development of ethical leadership.Mission of the Office ofAcademic AffairsIn the Judeo-Christian framework, Molloy College is committed tothe Dominican ideals of truth, academic excellence and opennessto diverse world-views. The College provides a value-centerededucational experience which enhances intellectual, ethical,spiritual and social development.In an environment where academic freedom, a spirit of inquiry andrespect for each individual’s worth and dignity prevail, studentsacquire the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the challengesof modern life. Undergraduate programs, based on a strong liberalarts core curriculum, offer wide choices in professional and careerpreparation.Molloy College promotes campus diversity by welcoming menand women of different ages, races, religious beliefs and culturalbackgrounds. Dedicated to excellence in teaching and scholarship,faculty encourage their students to search for truth through criticalthinking, reflection and dialogue, to strive for personal moralgrowth and to develop a sense of social, economic and political9


esponsibility. The Molloy community seeks to assist studentsthrough responsible academic advisement, sensitive personaland career counseling and a multifaceted on-campus programof student services. Through its extensive Continuing EducationProgram, Molloy College services the life-long educational andcultural needs of surrounding communities.A Molloy College education challenges students to maintainhigh personal and professional standards, to be aware of theirresponsibilities to preserve and protect the environment and toimprove the quality of life for themselves and their neighbors in anever-changing global society.Goals of Molloy CollegeMolloy College is committed to:• Being Catholic and Dominican in philosophy andoutlook• Student-centered learning• Academic quality• Leadership through service• Engagement with the wider community• Maintaining stewardshipGoals for the Graduate Curriculum:Molloy College offers graduate programs in Business, CriminalJustice, Education, Music Therapy and Nursing. Goals for thegraduate programs are found within each discipline’s section.Dominican Liberal Arts HeritageThe Dominican Order, founded by St. Dominic de Guzman in1216, adopted for its motto “Veritas” or “Truth.” From the verybeginning its members were sent to the medieval universities fortheir education.Shortly thereafter, Dominicans occupied chairs of learning in allthe great European universities. Among them Albert the Great andThomas Aquinas were recognized as outstanding scholars.In their early study and propagation of the truth, St. Dominic andhis followers allowed no area of human affairs to escape scrutiny.Dominicans, besides being great preachers and educators, werenoted for their concern for refugees, prisoners and captives. St.Martin de Porres, a Dominican brother, worked among the poor,outcasts and African slaves of the Americas. He is the patron saintof social justice. Dominicans also cared for the dying, especiallythe victims of plagues. St. Catherine of Siena, one of those whoministered to the sick and poor, is the universal patroness of nurses.Saint Thomas Aquinas is universally acclaimed as the patron ofteachers and students. As Europe experienced an influx of Nearand Far Eastern students, Dominicans responded by establishingforeign language schools.Molloy College inherits this Dominican tradition, wherein allstudents are taught to seek truth, to promote human dignity andto alleviate social ills. Molloy College maintains a strong liberalarts curriculum, providing the foundation for progress in any fieldand a solid core of learning for personal, intellectual and cultural10


development. All students must complete credits in philosophy,theology, ethics, English, modern or classical languages,mathematics, history, the natural sciences, fine arts and the socialsciences in order to fulfill the curriculum’s general educationrequirements.AccreditationsMolloy is accredited by:Board of Regents of the University of the State of New YorkThe State Education DepartmentAlbany, New York 12230The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools3624 Market StreetPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-2680Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health EducationPrograms515 North State Street—Suite 7530Chicago, Illinois 60610-4377Joint Review Committee on Education Programs in NuclearMedicine Technology1144 West 3300 SouthSalt Lake City, Utah 84119-3330Joint Review Committee on Education in CardiovascularTechnology3525 Ellicott Mills DriveEllicott City, MD 21043-4547American Health Information Management Association919 No. Michigan Avenue—Suite 1400Chicago, Illinois 60611-1683Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care1248 Harwood RoadBedford, Texas 76021Council on Social Work Education (at the Baccalaureate level)1600 Duke StreetAlexandria, Virginia 22314-3421Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (Graduate andUndergraduate)One Dupont Circle NW, Suite 530Washington, DC 20036-1120National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education(NCATE) (Graduate and Undergraduate)2010 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 500Washington, D.C. 20036MembershipsMolloy is a member of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences• American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education• American Association of Colleges of Nursing • AmericanAssociation of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers •American Association for Higher Education • American MusicTherapy Associates • American Association of Teachers of Spanishand Portuguese • American Council on the Teaching of ForeignLanguages • American Library Association • American Probationand Parole Association • Association for Childhood EducationInternational • Association of American Colleges and Universities •Association of Departments of English • Association of Gerontologyin Higher Education • Association of Governing Boards • Associationof Physical Plant Administrators • Association for ChildhoodEducation International • Association for Student Judicial Affairs• Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development •Catholic Campus Ministry • Catholic Library Association • Centerfor Academic Integrity • College Art Association • College EntranceExamination Board • Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education •Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities • Council forthe Advancement and Support of Education • Council of AcademicPrograms in Communication Science and Disorders • Center forAcademic Integrity • Council of Deans of Nursing of New York State• Council for Exceptional Children • The Council of IndependentColleges • Council on Social Work Education • Deans and Directorsof Nursing of Greater New York • International Association forLanguage Learning Technology • International Federation ofCatholic Universities • International Police Executive Symposium• Long Island Council of Student Personnel Administrators • LongIsland Library Resources Council • Long Island Regional AdvisoryCouncil on Higher Education • Metropolitan Catholic CollegeLibrarians • Modern Language Association • Nassau CountyLibrary Association • National Art Education Association • NationalAssociation of Campus Activities • National Association of CollegeAdmission Counselors • National Association of College andUniversity Business Officers • National Association of IndependentColleges and Universities • National Association of Social Workers •National Association of Student Personnel Administrators • NationalCollegiate Honors Council • National Council for the Accreditationof Teacher Education • National Council of Teachers of English •National Council of Teachers of Mathematics • National Council forthe Social Studies • National Science Teachers Association • NewYork State Association of Colleges for Teacher Education • NewYork State Association of Foreign Language Teachers • New YorkState Association of Teacher Educators • New York State LibraryAssociation • Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools • TheNortheast Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages •Professional and Organizational Development Network • Teachersof English to Speakers of Other Languages • Westchester AcademicLibrary Directors OrganizationCompliance with FederalRegulationsNondiscrimination PolicyMolloy College admits students without regard to age, race, color,sex, religion, national or ethnic origin or physical and/or learningdisability to all the rights, privileges, programs and activitiesgenerally accorded or made available to students at the College. Itdoes not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, sex, religion,national or ethnic origin or physical and/or learning disability inthe administration of its educational policies, admissions policies,scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other Collegeadministeredprograms.Inquiries concerning the College’s nondiscrimination policies maybe referred to the Office of Human Resources.11


Molloy College has available auxiliary aids which satisfy therequirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.Those who qualify and wish to participate, please notify theDisabilities Support Services office at 516.678.5000, Ext. 6381,immediately upon admission. Supporting diagnostic tests mustbe supplied. Students requesting services beyond that whichis provided by Section 504 may obtain these services throughSTEEP Program (Success Through Expanded Education Program).Brochures describing all services are available in the DSS/ STEEPOffice in C011 Casey Center.Molloy College is an equal opportunity employer and does notdiscriminate on the basis of age, race, color, sex, religion, nationalor ethnic origin or physical and/ or learning disabilities in theadministration of its employment practices, educational policies,admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs and athleticand other College administered programs. Inquiries concerningthese policies may be referred to the Office of Human Resources, inRoom K112 Kellenberg Hall, 516.678.5000, Ext. 6312.ADA Coordinator— Room C011, Casey Center, 516.678.5000, Ext.6381.Title IX Coordinator—Lisa Miller, Human Resources Director, RoomK112, Kellenberg Hall, 516.678.5000, Ext. 6312.FERPA Rights NotificationFERPA, or the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974,as Amended, affords students certain rights with respect to theireducation records. These rights include:12• The right to inspect and review the student’s educationrecords within 45 days of the day Molloy Collegereceives a request for access.• A student should submit to the registrar, dean,head of the academic department or otherappropriate official, a written request thatidentifies the record(s) the student wishes toinspect. The Molloy College official will makearrangements for access and notify the studentof the time and place where the records maybe inspected. If the records are not maintainedby the Molloy College official to whom therequest was submitted, that official shall advisethe student of the correct official to whom therequest should be addressed.• The right to request the amendment of the student’seducation records that the student believes areinaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of thestudent’s privacy rights under FERPA.• A student who wishes to ask Molloy Collegeto amend a record should write the MolloyCollege official responsible for the record,clearly identify the part of the record thestudent wants changed and specify why itshould be changed.• If Molloy College decides not to amend therecord as requested, the College will notifythe student in writing of the decision andthe student’s right to a hearing regardingthe request for amendment. Additionalinformation regarding the hearing procedureswill be provided to the student when notifiedof the right to a hearing.• (College policies and contact persons aredescribed further under “Grade Appeals” and“Complaint Procedures” and in the MolloyCollege Student Handbook.)• The right to provide written consent before MolloyCollege discloses personally identifiable informationfrom the student’s education records, except to theextent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without con• Molloy College discloses education recordswithout a student’s prior written consentunder the FERPA exception for disclosure toschool officials with legitimate educationalinterests on a “need to know” basis in order tofulfill his/her official responsibilities. A schoolofficial is a person employed by the Collegein an administrative, supervisory, academic orresearch, or support staff position (includinglaw enforcement unit personnel and healthstaff); a person or company with whom theCollege has contracted as its agent to providea service instead of using College employeesor officials (such as an attorney, auditor orcollection agent); a person serving on theBoard of Trustees; or a student serving on anofficial committee, such as a disciplinary orgrievance committee assisting another schoolofficial in performing his or her tasks.• A school official has a legitimate educationalinterest if the official needs to review aneducational record in order to fulfill his or herprofessional responsibilities for the college.• Upon request, the College also discloseseducation records without consent to officialsof another school in which a student seeks orintends to enroll.• The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Departmentof Education, concerning alleged failures by MolloyCollege to comply with the requirements of FERPA. Thename and address of the Office that administers FERPAis:Family Policy Compliance OfficeU.S. Department of Education400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.Washington, D.C. 20202-5901• Molloy College’s public notice on directory informationis provided under “Confidentiality Policy”.Confidentiality and DirectoryInformationThe Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a Federallaw, requires that Molloy College, with certain exceptions, obtaina student’s written consent prior to the disclosure of personallyidentifiable information from the student’s education records.However, Molloy College may disclose appropriately designated


“directory information” without written consent, unless the studenthas requested non-disclosure. Directory information is defined asthat information which would not generally be considered harmfulor an invasion of privacy if disclosed. It can be disclosed to outsideorganizations without prior written consent. Designated directoryinformation at Molloy College includes the following:• Student’s name• Address (see policy)• Telephone listing (see policy)• Electronic mail address (see policy)• Photograph• Date and place of birth• Major field of study• Dates of attendance• Grade level or classification• Enrollment status (e.g., undergraduate or graduate, fulltimeor part-time, withdrawn or on leave)• Participation in officially recognized activities and sports• Weight and height of members of athletic teams• Degrees, honors and awards received• The most recent educational agency or institutionattendedMolloy College does not give student home addresses or phonenumbers to outside callers (family, friends, prospective employers,etc.), but Molloy may use this information to contact the student,to distribute college information for outside organizations and asneeded for governmentally mandated institutional reporting tofederal and state agencies. Email addresses are available to thecampus community through the Novell Groupwise directory.Everything not included in directory information is consideredconfidential. Items such as a student’s social security number, GPA,specific disciplinary actions, health status, financial aid awards,billing information, test scores, specific grades received, race,gender or country of origin are confidential. A student must signa release to have this confidential information given out. Letters ofrecommendation may only include the student’s GPA or grades inMolloy classes if the student has signed a release. Students maywaive their right to review confidential letters and statements ofrecommendations under FERPA subject to not being required todo so as a condition of admission to or for receipt of a service orbenefit from the institution. The documents that students havewaived their rights to access may only be used for the designatedpurpose. The waiver must be in writing, dated, state the purpose ofthe disclosure, specify the record to be released, identify the partyor class of parties to whom disclosure may be made and signed bythe student. All transcripts must similarly be requested by a signedrelease. Transcript requests will be processed if the student has nofinancial and/or other outstanding college obligations. (Contactthe specific campus office for instructions on how to request therelease of other information.)Any student who does not want even the standard directoryinformation released without prior written consent, must sign andsubmit the “Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information”at the Registrar’s Office prior to the second week of the Fall term.The request will be honored until the end of the academic year. Anew form for non-disclosure must be completed each academicyear. A “Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information”prevents release of all elements of directory information. MolloyCollege does not apply a “no release” request differentially to thevarious directory information elements. (Students should notethat the request to withhold directory information may preventsome Molloy College mailings from reaching the student and maydelay honor societies or potential employers from gaining essentialinformation needed for background checks. Regardless of theeffect upon the student, Molloy College assumes no liability forhonoring student’s instructions that information be withheld.)For health or safety emergency situations, Molloy College Securityshould be contacted and provided a description of the situationand satisfactory justification for contacting the student. If thesituation warrants, Molloy College Security may try to intercedeby locating and notifying the student of an emergency. At thediscretion of College officials, a limited amount of information maybe made to appropriate parties in connection with an emergency,when the information is necessary to protect the health and safetyof the student or other persons.On July 1, 2001, the NY State Education Law, Section 2-B (Chapter214 of the Laws of 2000) became effective, restricting the use ofsocial security numbers from being provided to faculty and staffon identification cards, in student directories and class lists, unlessspecifically authorized or required by law. Molloy College compliesinternally with this law to protect students against the invasion ofprivacy and identity theft.The only other information that will be released without priorwritten consent is under those circumstances specified by federallaw, such as requests for information governed by the Solomon Actor the Patriot’s Act and by court orders or subpoenas. Disclosureof personally identifiable information to the Immigration andNaturalization Service (INS) is allowed with the student’s consenton the Form I-20.Requests for viewing and challenging the student’s file shouldbe made in writing directly to the appropriate administrativeoffice. Examples of offices maintaining educational records forsuch inspection are as follows: Office of Admissions, Office of theRegistrar, the Financial Aid Office and Academic Support Services.Students are not allowed access to financial statements of theirparents or guardians, confidential statements to which the student13


has waived access rights or records containing information aboutanother student. Students may challenge the contents of theireducational records in accordance with College procedures, as setforth in Molloy College’s Procedure for Compliance and throughappeals as described in this catalog and the Molloy College StudentHandbook.AdmissionsAdmissions ApplicationProceduresSee specific program for procedures.International StudentsInternational students must follow the regular admissionsprocedure including the submission of secondary school and anyprevious college transcripts. Either Globe Language Services, Inc.or World Evaluation Services must complete English evaluationsof these transcripts. Evaluations from other agencies will not beaccepted. For students whose native language is not English theTOEFL exam will be required, with a minimum score of 500. MolloyCollege has no residence halls, however, students may contact theOffice of Student Affairs for information regarding local privatehousing.International students who will be applying for an I-20 (certificate ofeligibility for F-1 status) must provide documentation of availablefunds and support. Affidavits providing evidence of funds fortuition, fees, books, housing and personal expenses are required.International students may contact the Office of EnrollmentManagement for a more detailed informational packet.An I-20 will be issued after the student has been accepted and hasconfirmed his or her acceptance by forwarding the $200 tuitiondeposit. Additionally, all supporting financial documentation mustbe on file and approved by the Office of Enrollment Management.Molloy is authorized under Federal law to enroll non-immigrantalien students.Readmission/Re-Entry PoliciesStudents who stop attending college are recorded as withdrawnfrom the college whether or not they officially withdraw, andwhen they do not return after an approved Withdrawal Leavefor one semester off. Students, who are recorded as withdrawnfrom the college and wishing to return to Molly, must apply forreadmission by submitting a Readmission Application with a$30.00 application fee to the Admissions Office.Prior records are kept by the Registrar’s Office and will be retrievedand processed accordingly. Any outstanding transcripts must beforwarded to the Admissions Office for evaluation. Students whohave been withdrawn from Molloy for more than 7 years mustresubmit all their credentials, as the original documents are nolonger on file. Molloy coursework history and grades earned arekept permanently.14


Readmitted Students: Readmitted students must be in goodacademic and financial standing in order to return to Molloy.Readmitted students are required to meet existing admissionstandards and program requirements at the time of re-application.The statute of limitation for previously completed courseworkwhich is accepted for re-admission may not exceed six (6) years(five years for the Graduate Education program).Readmitted students must pursue and satisfy the currentgraduate catalog requirements when readmitted. These catalogrequirements include the current course requirements, academicstandards for progression and graduation, as well as any conditionsset by the department.Withdrawal Leave Students: Students returning as approvedfrom a one semester Withdrawal Leave must complete a Re-EntryForm with approval of the Associate Dean for Academic SupportServices in order to be advised and registered for the scheduledterm of return. There is no fee for this form. These students willcontinue pursuing their same program requirements. Studentswho do not return from their one semester Withdrawal Leave asscheduled, will be considered withdrawn from the college andmust apply to be readmitted should they desire to return. Reenteringstudents returning from an approved Withdrawal Leaveshould further refer to “Academic Policies and Procedures” sectionof the catalog.Additionally, the Graduation Requirements section of the cataloglimits the number of years that a student is allowed to completea degree.ExpensesThe College and its Board of Trustees reserve the right to adjustthese charges to reflect economic conditions. All costs for tuitionand fees, including course fees, are for the 2010-2011 academicyear. The Business Office can supply information on the changes incosts for 2011-2012 academic year once it becomes available inMay of 2011.Liability and Student ResponsibilityIt is the responsibility of the student to ensure that Molloy Collegehas a correct mailing address at all times. Failure to receive aStudent Statement of Account will not exempt the student fromthe responsibility to pay the balance on the assigned due date,nor will it exempt the student from late penalties, neither fromMolloy Collection Policies and Procedures, nor from having a BursarHold. Students are responsible for the payment of all financialobligations: this includes all costs associated with the collection ofthis debt, which, on a past due account can include collection fees,court costs and legal fees.Health and Accident InsuranceClinical Students: All students attending a clinical program arerequired to carry professional liability and long-term disabilityinsurance under a group plan sponsored by Molloy.International Students: International students, who requireinsurance coverage in excess of the limits provided by thestudent accident and sickness plan, can request enrollment in aplan tailored to the international student. International students,who wish to participate in the International Plan, must obtain anEnrollment Card from the college’s Student Health Services Office.The cost of the annual coverage will vary depending on the planchosen. This plan is not underwritten by Combined Life InsuranceCompany of New York.*All full-time undergraduate students of Molloy College areautomatically charged for this coverage. Part-time students with atleast 6 credits can request enrollment in the insurance plan. Parttimestudents who wish to participate in the plan must obtain anEnrollment Card from the Health Services Office. The cost of theannual coverage is $415.00. The cost to enroll only for the SpringSemester is $275.00. (cost subject to change.) You can go to www.ajfusa.com for complete details regarding the coverage, benefits,limits, and exclusions.Confirmation DepositsPrior to the General Registration all first-time students, new Transferand Readmitted students are required to pay a $200.00 nonrefundableConfirmation Deposit, which will be applied to thestudent’s tuition charges. This is a one-time payment. Continuingstudents and students returning within the limits of the permittedleave are excluded from making a deposit.NOTE: Payment of the Confirmation Deposit does notguarantee eligibility for registration.Bursar HoldsContinuing students need a zero balance in order to participatein subsequent registrations, to have transcripts released and tograduate. Bursar Holds will be placed on those accounts whichhave an unpaid balance.Expenses for Master’s and Post Master’sProgramsStudents may view tuition and the schedule of fees at www.molloy.edu/bursar/tuition.htm.2010 - 2011:TUITION (Payable Each Semester)Per credit $810.00GENERAL FEE (Payable Each Semester)1 to 4 credits 85.005 or more credits 155.00REGISTRATION FEE(Payable Each Semester) 85.00APPLICATION FEE(non-refundable) 60.00TECHNOLOGY FEE(Payable Each Semester) 175.00NOTE: Fees are non-refundable. Students failing to meettuition payment deadlines (as per billing mailer) will be subjectto a penalty.15


SUMMER NOTE: Students registering for Summer sessionsare charged the General Fee and the Registration Fee for eachsession (or summer subterm) for which the student registersinto Summer courses. See the “Course Descriptions” section ofthe Catalog for the fees schedule per session.2011 - 2012:Tuition and fees are subject to adjustment annually by the MolloyCollege Board of Trustees. Any changes for 2011-2012 will beannounced in May 2011.Expenses for Doctoral ProgramStudents may view tuition and the schedule of fees at www.molloy.edu/bursar/tuition.htm.2010 - 2011:TUITION (Payable Each Semester)Per credit $950.00GENERAL FEE (Payable Each Semester)1 to 4 credits 85.005 or more credits 155.00REGISTRATION FEE(Payable Each Semester) 85.00APPLICATION FEE(non-refundable) 75.00TECHNOLOGY FEE(Payable Each Semester) 175.00Fees are based upon the student’s current division and programof study. Students who have graduated are considered graduatelevelwhether they are matriculated or non-matriculated.Special FeesFees for individual courses are noted within their coursedescriptions and are applied to registrations for courses in allterms.Application Fee for Master’s and Post Master’s Programs: Anon-refundable fee of $60.00 (or Reapplication Fee of $60.00)is payable to the Office of Admissions when the Application forAdmission is filed.Application Fee for Doctoral Program: A non-refundable fee of$75.00 (or Reapplication Fee of $75.00) is payable to the Office ofAdmissions when the Application for Admission is filed.FEES AND COSTS:Confirmation Deposit:(New and readmitted students nonrefundablefee)$200.00Graduation Fee:Payable upon filing application:By deadline: $200.00After deadline: $225.00Diploma Replacement Fee: $ 50.00NOTE: Fees are non-refundable. Students failing to meettuition payment deadlines (as per billing mailer) will be subjectto a penalty.SUMMER NOTE: Students registering for Summer sessionsare charged the General Fee and the Registration Fee for eachsession (or summer subterm) for which the student registersinto Summer courses. See the “Course Descriptions” section ofthe Catalog for the fees schedule per session.2011 - 2012:Tuition and fees are subject to adjustment annually by the MolloyCollege Board of Trustees. Any changes for 2011-2012 will beannounced in May 2011.Undergraduate-Level Expenses PolicyGraduate students registering for undergraduate-level courseswill be charged at the undergraduate per credit tuition forundergraduate courses taken as prerequisites for the master’sdegree programs needed for admission to the graduate programor for certification eligibility with the state.Undergraduate students registering for graduate-level courseswill be charged at the graduate per credit tuition rate for graduatecourses. (Dual degree students in business and nursing will beallowed to complete two to three graduate-level courses asallowed in the major requirements for Molloy’s dual degreeprograms at the undergraduate tuition rate.)16


Late Registration Fee:(After late registration ends—an$100.00additional charge is applied)Returned Check Fee: $ 25.00Special Payment Arrangement Fee: $ 75.00Change of Major/Minor/Cert. Fee: $ 15.00Distance Learning Fee:Determined by department.(Refer to specific distance learningcourse in current Course OfferingsBooklet.)Student Teaching Fee:Fees vary(See course descriptions for fees)OTHER FEES AND COSTS:AuditSee “Academic Policies andProcedures”Alumni Lifetime Scholarship forAuditors (All non-tuition fees arecharged) See “Scholarships”Transcript Fee for All Students:(The fee for all transcriptsOfficial, student copy or additional$5.00copies sent to any address is $5.00 percopy.)Molloy College reserves the right to revise fees asnecessary.*For further details contact the Director of Financial Aid.Tuition, fees or other student expenses billed to Molloy Collegeby independent college programs or institutes, other educationalinstitutions or outside agencies are not covered by any tuitionremission or scholarship programs granted by Molloy College.Collection Policies and GuidelinesStudents are responsible for the payment of tuition bills by the duedate as stated on the Student Statement of Account invoice. Thefollowing information includes the billing process and proceduresregarding student account balances.It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the billingaddress is correct.The exact due date will be printed on the initial billing invoice. Thisdate is linked to the General Registration date. On or after this date,any student who registers for Fall or Spring semesters must pay infull upon registration.Payment for the Fall Semester is due mid-August.Payment for the Spring Semester is due mid-January.Students who fail to comply with the statement due date willreceive monthly past due invoices for a minimum of three invoicesper semester. Students are financially responsible for payment of allcharges in connection with their registrations. In the case of default,this may include collection fees, attorney’s fees, late fees, fines orinterest charges due to Molloy College.After an account is 60 days past due, account holders may expectto receive Molloy College reminder letters. Late penalties may beattached at this time.An invoice that is 120 days past due may be turned over to acollection agency. This action may affect a student’s personalcredit rating and will add additional collection costs to the past duebalance.IMPORTANT: No student will be allowed to register for a newacademic semester owing money from a previous semester.Payment MethodsOn-line Secure PaymentsElectronic check and credit card (Mastercard/Visa) paymentsmay be made online through CASHNET by using your Lion’s Denaccount.Payments by Mail or In-PersonPayment may be made by the following methods: Cash, check/money order, Visa or MasterCard (A downloadable form is availablefor credit card payments on the Molloy website in Quick Links underBursar)—Monthly Budget Plan or through Financial Aid eligibility.All checks should be made payable to Molloy College and includethe student identification number on the check. The studentaccount ID number is located in the upper left-hand corner of theStudent Statement of Account.By submitting a check for payment of a bill, Molloy College willbe authorized to convert that check into an Automated ClearingHouse (ACH) debit transaction.Checks returned to Molloy College for insufficient funds will besubject to a $25 transaction fee. Immediately upon notification ofthe returned check, the amount must be replaced with cash, creditcard or money order. Any student having a second check returnedfor insufficient funds will not be allowed to use a personal check inthe future.Payment for summer classes is due on or before April 8th. Studentsregistering after the April 8th due date are required to pay at thetime of registration. There are no payment plans for summerclasses. If students register by mail, payment must accompany theregistration form.Monthly Budget PlanMolloy College participates in a deferred payment plan throughTuition Management Systems. This is an independent agency.Students who elect to use this method of payment must contactTuition Management Systems directly. It is the responsibility ofthe account holder to accurately determine the monthly paymentaccount. A formula for determining this payment is included in theinformation from Tuition Management Systems.Tuition Management Systems171 Service AvenueWarwick, RI 028861.800.722.4867www.afford.com/molloyPlease be aware that payments made from June through Octoberare applied to the fall semester. The October payment is the final17


payment for the fall semester and must result in a zero balance.Failure to do so will result in the student being excluded from earlyregistration.Payments made from November through March are appliedto the spring semester account. The March payment is the finalpayment for the spring semester and must result in a zero balance.Failure to do so will result in the student being excluded from earlyregistration.Third Party Employer BillingFor students whose employers offer an education benefit, MolloyCollege will send a bill directly to the employer for paymentprovided that the Office of the Bursar receives written authorizationto bill the employer. The authorization must indicate that paymentwill be made upon receipt of the bill and that proof of paymentand/or satisfactory grades are not required for payment. Thisauthorization form must be sent to the Office of the Bursar forprocessing each semester that the student is requesting employerbilling. The Office of the Bursar must receive documentation priorto payment due dates as noted in this section under “CollectionPolicies and Guidelines.”Tuition Deferment VouchersStudents receiving any type of tuition deferment voucher mustpresent the completed/authorized voucher form at the time ofregistration to the Office of the Bursar. All charges not covered bythe voucher must be paid by the due dates listed previously.Office of the Bursar’s Contact InformationBills are required to be paid in full by the due date. The paymentdue date for the fall semester is mid-August and spring semesteris mid-January.Mail payments directly to:Molloy CollegeOffice of the BursarP.O. Box 1110Rockville Centre, NY 11571-1110Students may contact the Office of the Bursar by calling516.678.5000, Ext. 6222 or Ext. 6223, and/or emailingofficeofthebursar@molloy.edu with questions about bills.For in-person service the office is located in W235 Wilbur ArtsCenter.Students may also visit the Molloy College website at www.molloy.edu and on the homepage click on “Online Student Access” to loginto the Lion’s Den portal, and click on the “My Finances” tab toview billing and payment information online.RefundsWhen a student withdraws from any course or courses by filinga written formal withdrawal notice with the Registration Office,refunds will be granted for TUITION ONLY (Fees are nonrefundable)as follows:DUE MOLLOY REFUNDBefore the beginning ofthe semester 0% 100%Within the first week 0% 100%Within the second week 25% 75%Within the third week 50% 50%After the third week 100% No RefundThe above refund policy is based on 100% payment. If a studenton the Deferred Payment plan withdraws owing a part payment,the student is responsible for the balance due up to the time ofwithdrawal. Unofficial withdrawals will be calculated using the lastdate of the semester.Special fees are not refundable. The effective date of withdrawalfor refund, if any, will be the date when formal written noticeis filed with the Vice President for Academic Affairs or, in thecase of withdrawal by mail, the official postmarked date of thecorrespondence.The College reserves the right to change the requirements, tuitionand fees whenever the proper authorities deem such changesnecessary. Special fees may be announced for special coursesas need arises. Transcripts, degrees and related documents willbe withheld until all financial obligations are settled. Studentdeclaration of bankruptcy is not a condition which releases thesedocuments.Unofficial withdrawals will be calculated using the last date of thesemester as noted in the Academic Calendar.Students are liable for all costs in the collection of delinquentaccounts and all applicable late fees.NOTE: Deadlines for specific semesters are listed in theRegistration Guides. Also, information regarding tuition andpayments is available on the Molloy website at www.molloy.edu/bursar/index/htm.18


Financial Aid,Scholarships and AwardsFederal Aid - GraduateA Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or RenewalFAFSA application must be filed annually to apply for financial aid.Direct Subsidized Student Loans• Maximum Annual Amounts: $8,500 per year• Combined undergraduate and graduate totalcannot exceed $65,000• Based on at least 6 half-time status (6cr.)Direct Unsubsidized Student Loans• Maximum Annual Amount: $12,000 per year• Combined Undergraduate and Graduate totalcannot exceed $138,000• Based on registration for at least 6 credits as amatriculated student.Direct Plus Loans for Graduate and Professional DegreeStudentsThe terms and conditions applicable to the Direct Parent PLUSLoan also apply to Graduate/Professional PLUS loans. Theserequirements include a credit history, repayment beginning onthe date of the last disbursement of the loan, and a fixed interestrate of 7.9%. Applicants must first complete the Free Applicationfor Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), then they must have applied fortheir maximum annual loan eligibility under the Direct Subsidizedand Unsubsidized Loan Program before applying for a Graduate/Professional PLUS loan.NURSING FACULTY LOANThe Nursing Faculty Loan is a loan cancellation program witha service obligation. To be eligible for the maximum 85%cancellation, the borrower must agree to serve as a full-time facultymember at a School for Nursing for a consecutive four-year periodfollowing graduation from the program.To be eligible to receive a Nursing Faculty Loan, the student mustbe:• A. U.S. citizen or national of the U.S.• Be enrolled full-time (9 credits) in an eligibleprogram• Be in good academic standing (GPA - 3.00) in anadvanced nurse education program to prepareNursing faculty to teachTo apply, contact the Graduate Nursing Department.TEACH GRANTFull-time or part-time students who are completing or plan tocomplete coursework that is needed to begin a career in teaching,and who agree to serve for at least four years as a full-time teacherin a high-need field, in a school serving low-income students.Amounts are up to $4,000 per year. Renewal is contingent uponfull-time or part-time status, a 3.25 GPA and FAFSA renewal. Inaddition, students must renew the Teach Grant agreement andcomplete the Entrance Interview each academic year and studentsmust continue to be enrolled in eligible degree programs.Tuition Discount - EducationIn recognition of candidates’ contribution to religious education,Molloy College offers a 30% tuition reduction in graduateeducation courses to those who are employed as full-time teachersin religious-affiliated schools. There is also a 30% tuition discountfor any courses taken at the Extension sites in Douglagston orSmithtown. Contact the Graduate Admissions Recruiter for moredetails.Graduate Assistant ProgramThe Graduate Assistant program provides opportunity forqualified graduate students to participate as research assistantsor as graduate assistants. To apply for a graduate assistantship/graduate research assistantship, candidates should complete theApplication for Graduate Assistantship available in the HumanResource Office. Applications must include two personal referencesand approval by the department in which the student is enrolled.Applications and appropriate documentation are to be returned tothe Human Resources office. Each applicant, selected as a graduateassistantship recipient, must be enrolled in the college uponcommencement of the position. Graduate assistants/researchassistants work 10 hours per week during a semester and receive a3 credit voucher and a $500 stipend.Graduate FellowshipsDR. KATHLEEN KILKELLY GRADUATE NURSING FELLOWSHIPAWARD: Partial tuition scholarship awarded to Graduate Nursingstudents. Applicants must have minimum 3.5 GPA. Award amountsvary, one-time scholarship. Recipients are selected by the NursingDepartment. Student must file the Free Application for FederalStudent (FAFSA) every year to be eligible for this award.GRADUATE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP *The Molloy College Department of Nursing has been awardeda grant for Advanced Nursing Education Traineeship by theDepartment of Health and Human Services. This Grant enables theNursing Department to award scholarship monies for tuition toenrolled Graduate Students.For application and eligibility requirements, contact the GraduateNursing Department.* The availability of this grant is based on the approved budgetfrom the Department of Health and Human Services.19


Kiran and Anil Chaturvedi MBALeadership AwardThis award is given annually at Graduate Class Night to a studentgraduating from Molloy’s MBA Program. The recipient will havedemonstrated strong leadership skills and a desire to become anoutstanding leader in his/her chosen business field, and will havemaintained a minimum GPA of 3.7.Academic SupportServicesMolloy Academic Support Services assist students in academic skillsdevelopment, writing skills improvement, accommodations fordisabilities or special needs and attainment of degrees for theeconomically disadvantaged.AcE—Academic EnrichmentProgramThe Academic Enrichment Program (AcE) assists all students inachieving their academic potential in math, science and modernlanguages. Assistance in other disciplines is provided according tothe student’s individual needs.Clients receive two kinds of assistance:When failing a course or below “C” in aRemedialmajor field.When passing a course but in need ofSupplemental reinforcement or clarification in particularaspects of the course work.Academic Coaches fall into three categories:Professional: Active/semi-retired individuals certified in thecourses they will be coaching.Graduate: Individuals who have a graduate or undergraduatedegree from Molloy or another college or university.Peer: Students who have or are taking the course they willbe coaching.DSS—Disability SupportServicesMolloy College is in compliance with section 504 of theRehabilitation Act and offers aids and services for postsecondarystudents who present with a documented disability.Comprehensive documentation from a qualified professional mustbe provided. A list of acceptable documentation can be obtained20from the Disability Office.Students who desire accommodations must submit appropriatedocumentation of their disability to the Coordinator of the DSSOffice. Once the documentation has been evaluated and accepted,the student will meet with the Coordinator for an “Intake Interview”at which time appropriate accommodations will be discussed.At the start of each new semester the student participating inthe program will submit his/her schedule to the DSS Office.A confidential letter will be provided to the student, for eachfaculty member on the schedule, noting the necessary academicaccommodations. Both the student and the Coordinator will signthese letters and the student will be responsible for distributingthe letters and discussing accommodations with professors. Pleasenote: the nature of your disability does not have to be discussedwith your professor, only accommodations. However, withouta letter from the DSS Office, accommodations cannot beprovided.STEEP—Success ThroughExpanded Education ProgramA self-directed program designed to assist students with adocumented disability work towards academic success. Studentswho are having difficulties with their work are encouraged to make


an appointment with a disability counselor to review the workand to determine the appropriate steps needed to complete theirassignments. Assistance is no more than one hour a week and mustbe generated by the student. All services are based upon individualneed.Services are designed to equalize opportunities, not to lower theacademic standard for these students or alter the essential natureof the degree requirements.Writing Resource CenterThe Molloy Writing Resource Center supports the development ofwriting skills for Molloy undergraduate and graduate students. Fulltimeprofessional tutors assist students by reviewing with themtheir papers in the various subject areas, emphasizing organizationand development, grammatical correctness and appropriate use ofresearch documentation styles (MLA, APA, CBE). Appointments aregiven priority, but walk-ins are welcome when tutors are available.Academic SupportFacilitiesAdditional information regarding facilities associated with differentdepartments is described under the related program in the catalog.Academic Computer LabsA total of 70 WinXP and 21 Mac computers are available to studentsin the Academic Computer Labs located on the second floor ofthe Wilbur Arts Center. The entire Molloy community utilizes thisacademic resource area. The labs are Novell networked and houseperipherals including laser printers, color printers and scanners.The lab personnel provide a supportive, positive environment forstudents to learn, practice and improve their computer skills. Fortyping term papers and for computer assignments, the AcademicComputer Labs offer open access to students 12 months a year for83 hours a week. Technical assistance is always available during theposted hours.Software packages available include Microsoft Office Professional,internet and email. The Macintosh applications available are Adobe(Illustrator, PhotoShop, Persuasion and Premier), QuarkExpress,Fractal Painter and Microsoft Office. The Programming languagesused in the labs are Visual Basic.To enhance the educational experience, students are requiredto have a Molloy College email account and are automaticallyassigned one upon registering. Questions pertaining to emailaccounts can be addressed by calling Ext. 6282 or by visiting theAcademic Computer Lab in Wilbur 205. Students may arrangefor an account by signing an email agreement obtained from theAcademic Computer Lab in W205 Wilbur Arts Center, from MediaServices in K211 Kellenberg Hall, from the Library in K212 KellenbergHall or from Student Services in K006 Kellenberg Hall. Computeruse policies can be found in the Molloy College Handbook, whichexplains the responsibilities of users of computer technology andthe internet.LibraryThe James Edward Tobin Library, located on the second floorof Kellenberg Hall, is open to all members of the Molloy Collegecommunity. The College ID serves as the Library borrowing card.Library hours for the Fall and Spring Semesters are: Monday–Thursday 8 am–10 pm; Friday 8 am–8 pm; Saturday 10 am–6 pm;and Sunday 11 am–6 pm. Reference librarians are available duringall Library hours for assistance with research. Please contact thelibrary for hours during intersession and summer semesters.There are 12 computer workstations in the Main Reference Roomof the library. Students have access to the internet and a varietyof online, electronic databases, both from the computers in thelibrary, as well as remote access from off-campus.Two Academic Labs with a total of 38 computers are available foruse by students in the Library.A Reference library is available to students taking courses at theSuffolk Extension Center. Both libraries are wireless. Students accessfrom both on and off campus an extensive collection of electronicdatabases including, but not limited to EBSCO’s Academic SearchPremier, ERIC, Health Source Nursing Academic Edition, ProquestDirect, ABI Inform Global, OCLC’s First Search, CINAHL Plus with Full-Text, LEXIS-NEXIS, CCH, Standard and Poor’s, Medline, and DOCLINE.The Library’s catalog is run on “Voyager” software. Faculty useDocutek’s “E-Reserves” to place periodical articles on electronicreserve. Faculty and students may borrow books and obtainarticles that are unavailable at Molloy through inter-library loan.There is also an extensive collection of over 600 print journals andperiodicals in the library. The Media Services Department, Ext. 6237,offers a wide range of educational videos and DVDs, as well asproviding video and audio equipment for students and faculty use.Suffolk CenterThe Molloy College Suffolk Center is located just off Route 110 onthe grounds of Republic Airport. Graduate courses are offered atthe site throughout the year in Education and Nursing. ContinuingEducation (non-credit) programs are also offered in MedicalRecords, Human Resources, Addiction Studies (CASAC training),Nursing, Fundraising Management and Bookkeeping. The MolloyInstitute for Lifelong Learning (MILL) also meets at the center.In addition to classroom space, the center has a student lounge,library facilities, computers with internet and library access forstudent use and office space for faculty and staff. The building alsohas a large attractive atrium space that is used for special events.The office is open:Mondays through Thursdays from 9:00 am to 7:00 pmFridays from 9:00 am to 5:00 pmThe phone numbers are:631.755.5509/5510 or 516.678.5000, Ext. 7509/7510The fax number is:631.752.815521


The web address for the extension site is:www.molloy.edu/suffolk.eight days to one month, are held during Winter, Spring andSummer breaks and are taught and led by Molloy College faculty.The address is:7180 Republic Airport (Grumman Lane)Farmingdale, NY 11735-3930.Travel Directions:From the West:Southern State Parkway East to Exit 32N (Route 110 N towardHuntington). Proceed north on Route 110 for approximately1.5 miles. Look for signs pointing to Republic Airport, which isGrumman Lane - turn right at the light. * Molloy is the fourthbuilding on the left-hand side of the road, 7180 Republic Airport(Grumman Lane).From the East:Southern State Parkway West to Exit 33 (Route 109 W towardFarmingdale). Take ramp right to merge onto Route 110 N. Lookfor signs pointing to Republic Airport, which is Grumman Lane -turn right at the light. * See above.From the North:Long Island Expressway to Exit 49S (Route110). Proceed south onRoute 110 for approximately 3.5 miles. Look for signs pointing toRepublic Airport, which is Grumman Lane - turn left at the light. *See above.International Education- Formerly Global LearningThe Office of International Education of Molloy College offersstudents the opportunity to spend a few weeks, a semester, or afull academic year studying abroad either through some ofMolloy’s own extensive overseas programs or through affiliatedprograms around the world.Committed to the belief that a true liberal arts education shouldexpose students not only to diverse ideas, but also to differentcultures and ways of life, Molloy encourages all of its students toconsider the possibility of foreign study at some point during theircollege years.Molloy is also committed to keeping its study abroad programsamong the most affordable in the country, so that as manystudents as possible can avail themselves of this great opportunity.So whether a student wants to spend Spring Break in sunny Italy,a month during the summer studying the Spanish language inNorthern Spain, or a semester studying at several of Europe’s mostrespected universities, Molloy has a global-learning program tomeet student’s needs and interests.International Education Short-TermProgramsMolloy’s Short Term Study Abroad Programs vary in length fromFall 2010Fall 2010Fall 2010Fall 2010Fall 2010Spring 2011Spring 2011Spring 2011Spring 2011Spring 2011Summer 2011Summer 2011Summer 2011Fall 2011Fall 2011Fall 2011Spring 2012Spring 2012Spring 2012Spring 2012Spring 2012Summer 2012Summer 2012Fall 2012Fall 2012Fall 2012Spring 2013Spring 2013Spring 2013Spring 2013Spring 2013Summer 2013Summer 2013Summer 2013Healthcare In MadridGotham - Freshman Learning CommunityDestination Ireland: Cork, Dublin andGalwayService Learning - Puerto RicoBusiness Honors - Growth, Modernizationand Economy - ChinaFreshman Learning Community: Rome,ItalyVienna and Prague: The Hapsburg DynastyHonors Learning Community: TheMedieval World - FranceService Learning - New OrleansService Learning - Lakota Nation: TheDakotas - Repairing the American HeritageLeon, Spain: Spanish Language ImmersionUrbino, Italy: Italian Language ImmersionInternational InternshipsBusiness Honors - Growth, Modernizationand Economy - IndiaGotham - Freshman Learning CommunityService Learning - Puerto RicoFreshman Learning Community: Florence,ItalyDestination: IrelandHonors Learning Community: TheMedieval World - FranceService Learning - New OrleansService Learning - Lakota Nation: TheDakotas - Repairing the American HeritageLeon, Spain: Spanish Language ImmersionInternational InternshipsGotham - Freshman Learning CommunityService Learning - Puerto RicoBusiness Honors - Growth, Modernizationand Economy - IrelandFreshman Learning Community: Rome,ItalyDestination: 20th Century GermanyHonors Learning Community: TheMedieval World - FranceService Learning - New OrleansService Learning - Lakota Nation: TheDakotas - Repairing the American HeritageLeon, Spain: Spanish Language ImmersionUrbino, Italy: Italian Language ImmersionInternational Internships22


International EducationThe Office of International Education of Molloy College has beenestablished to provide students with the information, guidanceand resources they need to successfully pursue a program of studyoverseas. Students who are interested in participating in any of theCollege’s study abroad programs should make an appointment tosee Professor Kathy Reba, Director of International Education in theGlobal-Learning Office, Kellenberg 207 at 516.678.5000, Ext. 6672,or go to www.global@molloy.edu as soon as possible in order tobegin planning for an overseas experience. Further information isposted on the website at www.molloy.edu/global.Student AffairsTo enrich the college experience and to help students develop totheir fullest potential emotionally, intellectually, socially andspiritually, the college makes possible participation in a variety ofco-curricular activities and organizations. The most important ofthese organizations is the Molloy Student Association (MSA) whosemembership includes the entire student body. The executivepower of this association rests with the Molloy Student Government(MSG) whose members are elected from the general student bodyand whose jurisdiction extends to all other student organizationson campus. By joining the Molloy Community, each studentsignifies an agreement to uphold the goals and philosophy of thecollege. The Administration of the College strongly supports theMSA, which makes possible, by membership and/or leadership,many campus organizations and clubs.The Vice President for Student Affairs, in conjunction with a staffof full-time personnel, serves and challenges Molloy students todevelop as whole persons. The Vice President for Student Affairs,Student Health Services Nurses, Career Development Center,Director of Campus Life, Director of Athletics, Director of CampusSafety, Coordinator of Student Publications and the StudentPersonal Counseling are easily accessible to all students.Disease Control and Prevention), recommend all students enteringcollege receive two doses of MMR vaccine, (measles, mumpsand rubella), a current tetanus-diptheria vaccine, the hepatitis Bvaccine series, meningococcal vaccine, chicken pox vaccine (ifnot immune), and influenza vaccine. All entering students areencouraged to have a complete physical exam and Tuberculin test.*Molloy College has arranged to make available a Student Accident andSickness Insurance Plan. Graduate students taking and maintaining aminimum of six credits can request enrollment in the insurance plan.To enroll, you must complete the enrollment form, found on the Allen J. FloodCompanies, Inc. website at: www.ajfusa.com. Once on the webpage, go to “Toolsfor Students, Participants & Policyholders,” and choose the link for “College &University Students.” After selecting “Molloy College,” click on the enrollmentform. Enrollment can be done online by completing the enrollment form andpaying with a credit card, or you can print out the enrollment form, complete it,and mail it with your payment directly to the insurance company. Payment forthe insurance plan is the responsibility of the student. Please call the insurancecompany to verify that they received your email enrollment, or your paymentand enrollment form in the regular mail.Email instructions regarding the Student Accident and SicknessInsurance Plan are sent out frequently. You can always call theStudent Health Services office for any questions at 516.678.5000,Ext. 6247.College Athletes may not waive the Student Accident andSickness Insurance Plan.Student Health ServicesThe Student Health Services office is located on the third floorof the Kellenberg Building, Room 310. A nurse is available dailyfor student needs. In an emergency, dial 11 for Public Safety.Information sessions regarding healthier lifestyles are offeredthroughout the year.Student Health Services collects immunization records andmeningitis waiver forms from all incoming students.As mandated by New York State Public Health Law #2165, allgraduate students, full-time, part-time, matriculated, and nonmatriculated, attending classes on or off campus, born on or afterJanuary 1, 1957, are required to provide documentation of proof ofimmunity to measles, mumps and rubella. New York State PublicHealth Law # 2167 requires the College to distribute informationto all students about meningococcal disease and the availability ofvaccination. The immunization records and acknowledgment formconcerning meningitis must be presented before registration.The American College Health Association and the CDC, (Centers for23


Career Development CenterThe comprehensive services of the Center are designed to helpstudents successfully manage important decisions that integrateacademic studies with their career aspirations. The Centermaintains a full range of services including:• Career counseling• Vocational interest testing• Internship opportunities for all majors• Professional development workshops• Resumé, interviewing and job hunt workshops• Job opportunities (full-time and part-time)• Employment reference resources• Scholarship resources• Career job fairs highlighting Molloy College’s majors• Career related journals, newspapers and magazinesContact the Center at 516.678.5000, Ext. 6246 or at our website,www.molloy.edu/career. The Center is located in K003 KellenbergHall. Office hours are Monday through Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pmand Wednesday until 7:00 pm. Individual appointments may bearranged at the student’s convenience.Student Personal CounselingServiceThe Student Personal Counseling Service offers short-term solutionfocused mental health counseling to the students of MolloyCollege. All services are free and are completely confidential. Thecounseling service also offers a variety of psychoeducational needsfor the students that include on-campus workshops and trainings,self-help library, and referrals to outside agencies and providers.Counseling is conducted in a one-on-one setting or as a group.Some issues that are common in a college setting are:• Stress Management• Time Management• Alcohol/Drug Use• Other Addictions• Self-Esteem• Relationships• Bereavement• Family Issues• Balancing School/Work/Life• Academic Performance• And MoreThe mission of the Personal Counseling Service is to help studentsenhance their academic potential and personal well-being. The24student and counselor will develop strategies to address specificgoals and then determine the length of time necessary to resolvethese concerns.The Center is located in Kellenberg 003A. Appointments areavailable Monday-Friday, 9:00 am–5:00 pm. Evening appointmentsare available upon request. “Walk-in-Hours” are during the day,everyday from 12 noon–1:00 pm, where the counselor is availableto answer questions about the service or provide quick informationto the students.For additional information and appointments, call 516.678.5000,Ext. 6545.Campus MinistriesHOPE: Hospitality -OP: the Dominican Way—for Everyone is thehome of Campus Ministries at Molloy College. Located in K006 inKellenberg Hall, all are welcome to come and relax in the loungeand to unwind and take a breath.Campus Ministries has a wide range of activities including Mass,prayer groups, service and volunteering, retreats and socialactivities. Students, faculty, staff and administrators all take part inthe life of Campus Ministries. Campus Ministries is also there to helppeople through the tough times in life. All are welcome to cometo Campus Ministries for help. Campus Ministries offers people thechance to live out their faith life and to enjoy the company of themany other good people at the College.Sacred Heart Chapel is located at the southwest end of thecampus near the water tower. It is open so that people can stop inand pray and reflect for a time during their day. Liturgy is celebratedMonday through Friday at 12:15 pm. Proud of and devoted toMolloy College’s Catholic roots, Campus Ministries welcomes allpeople of good will to take part in chapel activities.Special MolloyPrograms, Centers andInstitutesCenter for Social and Ethical ConcernsUnder the auspices of the Philosophy Department, the Centerfor Social and Ethical Concerns is dedicated to critical analysis ofissues affecting peaceful and just relations between people ona local, national and global scale. The Center provides a forumand a research resource for the community, faculty and studentscommitted to the study of ethical issues, the formation of socialpolicy and direct engagement in the resolution of local andinternational conflict and injustice.The Center sponsors two academic programs: The Minor in Peaceand Justice Studies and the Minor in Applied Ethics. Recipients,upon completion and award of the Minor in Applied Ethics, areguaranteed acceptance to the Masters in Applied Ethics Programat the Catholic University at Leuven in Belgium. Special projectssponsored by the Center include the Lecture Series in AppliedEthics and symposia on social and ethical topics. The Center also


serves as the Headquarters for HAVEN: The Molloy College/BethanyHouse Coalition for the Homeless and it houses the S. KatherineGee Library for Social and Ethical Concerns.Continuing Education and ProfessionalDevelopmentMolloy College has a strong commitment to provide education andtraining for adult learners.Regardless of whether an individual needs to attend coursesto enhance job skills, train for a new career or simply enjoyslearning, the Division of Continuing Education and ProfessionalDevelopment at Molloy College offers courses and certificateprograms specially designed with the adult student in mind.Certificate and professional programs are available in thefollowing disciplines: Accounting, Addiction Studies (CASACtraining), Business, Child Care, Computer Graphics, ComputerSkills, Education, Elder Care Management, Floral Design, HumanResource Management, Interior Design, Medical Records,Fundraising Management, Nursing, Supervisory/Management,Home Inspection, Financial Planning, Insurance and Real Estate.Courses in computers, English as a Second Language (ESL), foreignlanguages, music, theology and writing skills are available forpersonal enrichment. In addition, programs for children and highschool students are offered throughout including the summer.Day, evening and weekend classes are available. For a completelisting of course offerings and schedules, please contact theDivision of Continuing Education and Professional Development at516.678.5000, Ext. 6206 or at the website at www.molloy.edu/ce.Institute for School LeadershipThe Molloy College Institute for School Leadership is the repositoryof the best thinking concerning the essential position of Curriculum/Development Leader. Recognizing that this role is one of the mostunique and important in the school, the Institute has designedactivities to extend various skills and abilities of educational leaders,to assist in the preparation of new leaders to meet the challengesof department supervision, and to provide ongoing professionaldevelopment for veteran supervisors.The Molloy College Institute for School Leadership recognizes andsupports school leaders and designs professional developmentprograms that are a direct result of research-based practices andschool district needs. Simultaneously, the Institute creates learningopportunities that cultivate talented teachers who aspire to therole of school administrators.An Advisory Committee of highly qualified school districtadministrators, chairs of the Molloy College Advisory Boardsincluding Special Education, English Language Arts, Mathematicsand Science and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages(TESOL), and administrators from within Molloy College designs25


programs and steers Institute practices.Summer institutes, conferences, website connections, mentorsand resources are offered to participants of this unique program.Questions of evaluation, the implementation of standards for staffdevelopment and the rationale for effective decision-making areaddressed.Institute for Interfaith Dialogue(Formerly called the Institute for Christian/Jewish Dialogue)The Institute, in keeping with the mission of Molloy College,provides a forum for the community to share beliefs, to expressconcerns, to discover similarities, and to respect differences. Theprograms are presented to celebrate diversity and build a roadtowards fellowship between all faiths. We invite the communityto hear distinguished speakers from far and wide, as well as fromMolloy College. They will present provocative insights and aplatform for diverse opinions. All programs bring knowledge offaiths other than one’s own in order to diminish prejudice andmisunderstanding.There is no charge for most of the events and all are welcometo learn in this intellectual, spiritual, ecumenical and friendlyenvironment.For further information and a brochure, please call MarionLowenthal, Director, Special Programs 516-678-5000, Ext. 6880 or6162 or email at mlowenthal@molloy.edu. You can find us on theMolloy College website at www.molloy.edu and go to the links.Institute of GerontologyThe Institute of Gerontology began in 1974 and was the forerunnerof the Gerontology Program at Molloy. The Institute servesorganizations, professionals, laypersons and students who sharean interest in the field of aging.The Institute is committed to meeting research and training needsto enhance the well-being of older adults in our communities.Presentations, in-service training and collaborative developmentof grant proposals and services to the aging are offered toorganizations serving the older adults of Long Island. For completeinformation, call: The Institute of Gerontology, Molloy CollegeGerontology Program at 516.678.5000, Ext. 6628.MILL - Molloy Institute for LifelongLearningThe Institute is based on active and personal involvement of itsparticipants in educational and social pursuit on the campus. TheInstitute is affiliated with the national movement of the ElderhostelInstitute Network. Learning is conducive to self fulfillment forpersons who may be retired and have time to pursue new goals.An affiliation with the Molloy Institute for Lifelong Learning, alsocalled “MILL”, means that the member does not have to travel fromhome to continue to learn, to make new friends and experiencenew interests.The membership fee entitles the member/student to enroll intwo college level credit classes on an auditing basis, to participatein trips to destinations decided upon by the group and to joincommittees or teach peer led classes of their choice. Molloy Collegefaculty are often hired to teach classes for the group.Membership is not dependent on past educational and professionalbackground. Group size is limited for positive interaction. Onegroup meets on Tuesdays (MILL I) and another group meetson Fridays (MILL II); a third group, (MILL III), meets at the MolloyCollege Suffolk Center, on Wednesdays. Information is available bycontacting Marion W. Lowenthal, Director of Special Programs, at516.678.5000, Ext.6880.ROTC—Reserve Officer’s Training CorpQualified full-time Molloy College students may elect to participatein the Army ROTC Program at St. John’s University or HofstraUniversity on a cross-enrolled basis. Molloy students may electAir Force ROTC on a cross-enrolled basis with New York Instituteof Technology. Students may enter the ROTC program at anytime prior to completing their sophomore year of studies. Thereis no obligation to complete the ROTC program until the start ofthe junior year. Undergraduate participants may compete for fullscholarships which include tuition, books, fees and a monthlystipend. ROTC courses normally take three to four hours a week.Fees are nominal. Navy ROTC (Nursing Program only) is alsoavailable on a cross-enrolled basis at S.U.N.Y. Maritime College. TheRegistrar can provide direction on further information regardingthe Reserve Officer Training Corps.Science and Math Education InstituteThe Science and Math Education Institute was established to servethe K–12 science and mathematics education community onLong Island. Given that the ever-changing nature of today’s globalsociety demands that learners of all ages search for truth throughcritical thinking, reflection and dialogue, the Institute:• Serves in an advisory capacity to make the servicesprovided by higher education programs ever congruentwith the changing needs of the K–12 science and matheducation community.• Encourages diverse K–12 science and math educatorsto apply and participate in formal and informalprograms, coursework and conferences.• Promotes Molloy College as a way to meet pre-service,in-service and professional development goals.Further information, including a schedule of Institute workshops,conferences and special events, may be obtained at 516.678.5000,Ext. 6883.Service-Learning ProgramIn keeping with Molloy’s long tradition of service to those in need,the Program is committed to developing programs and projectsthat enable students to participate fully in community life.Community Outreach: The Program has placed hundreds ofMolloy Students in non-credit volunteer service in over fortycommunity agencies on Long Island.Siena Women’s CenterThe Siena Women’s Center, guided by an executive board offaculty, administrators and students, promotes awareness ofissues concerning women in today’s world and serves as Molloy’sresource center for research by and about women. It houses the26


Women’s Studies library, which contains an impressive collectionof scholarly and popular books and periodicals.The Center offers a variety of lectures, discussions and symposiaexploring topics of interest and importance to women. Eachspring, an academic symposium, “Voices of Women,” sponsoredby the Siena Women’s Center, brings notable scholars to speak atMolloy. Each fall, the Center sponsors the annual Catherine of SienaLecture. The Florence Levenson Memorial Lecture Series featuresprominent speakers addressing subjects of contemporary interestand concern.Throughout the academic year, discussions on issues pertinent towomen are sponsored by the Center and moderated by Molloyfaculty members. The Center also supports Molloy’s minor inWomen’s Studies. Information concerning discussion topics andpresentations are available from the Siena Women’s Center officein K017A Kellenberg Hall, Ext. 6302.Academic Policies andProcedures”In an environment where academic freedom, a spirit of inquiry andrespect for each individual’s worth and dignity prevail, studentsacquire the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the challenges ofmodern life.” Graduate education fosters a higher level of scholarlyinquiry for expansion of knowledge, self-enrichment andachievement of personal and professional goals. (Mission of theOffice of Academic Affairs)In addition, graduate and post-graduate education providesinnovative courses which allow students to engage in life-longlearning experiences and to build upon the knowledge andfoundation achieved in undergraduate education. Dual degreeprograms are available for undergraduate students in Business,Education and Nursing, who desire to accelerate progress tograduate-level studies. Specially designed graduate programsfacilitate career changes and accommodate the needs of theadvanced or returning student.Before advisement/registration, students must have nooutstanding balances or Bursar Holds. Students who have failed tomeet their financial or other obligations to the College or who haveStudent Health Restrictions will not receive permission to registeruntil the hold is removed or a written clearance is issued by theoffice concerned.For matriculated students the advisor approves the selectionof courses. It is incumbent upon the student to read the catalogcarefully, noting all major and other related requirements and toplan his/her program with care. The student is responsible for thefinal choice of courses.Advisement into a course by an advisor does not constituteregistration into that class. Students are responsible for registeringfor coursework to gain placement in a class or maintainingmatriculation each semester until the degree is awarded. Thegraduate-level courses at Molloy are numbered from 500–599.Registration for all students requires the payment of tuition andfees when due. Students not paying their bill will be preventedfrom registering for subsequent semesters and from receivingofficial transcripts and diplomas. See the current Course OfferingsBooklet for specific instructions. No student may report for anycourse and section for which he or she has not registered. Studentsmust attend the course and section for which they are registered. Astudent may not register for a course unless all prerequisites havebeen satisfied. The College reserves the right to cancel any course,as deemed necessary.Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses:Undergraduates in the dual degree and 5 year programs may enrollin graduate courses with permission of the Director of the GraduateRegistration and AdvisementNew Students: New students will be scheduled for registrationby the Office of Admissions.Continuing Students: The Advisement and Registration datesfor each semester are shown in the Academic Calendar locatedin this catalog. Before the Advisement and Registration Period,registration material will be available to all continuing students.This material will provide instructions on how to register and theexact dates and times based upon the student’s classification orcredits earned.All students will meet with an assigned Graduate Programadvisor or with the Director of the relevant Graduate Programfor program planning and academic counseling. Students areresponsible for contacting and meeting with the faculty advisoror the Director at least once a semester.27


Program. The number of undergraduate students may not exceed10% of the total class enrollment. Master’s courses that are creditedto the baccalaureate degree may not be applied toward theMaster’s Degree. Undergraduates are requested to register duringlate registration.Schedule Changes/Late Changes: Students may change theirstudent schedule for the upcoming semester after they haveregistered, with their advisor on the web or by completing theAdd/Drop Form and presenting it in the Office of the Registrar. Thesignature of each student’s advisor, or, if not available, the AssociateDean for Academic Support Services is also required.After the last day of the Late Change of Program Period, no changeswill be permitted without the signature of each instructor, theDirector of Financial Aid and the advisor. Refund Policy informationis covered under “Expenses.’’ Changes at this time are consideredwithdrawals and generate a grade of “W”.Late Registration: After the scheduled early registration periodfor continuing students each semester, students may registeron a continuous basis each business day during normal workinghours. Late registration ends on the last day of the Late Change ofProgram Period. Students will be held responsible for all absencesresulting from Late Registration and may be required to obtainadditional consent when registering late.Matriculation in Programs: Students are not permitted tomatriculate in two (2) graduate programs in different Divisions atthe same time (e.g., Division of Nursing and Division of Business).In consultation with the academic advisor and/or the ProgramDirector, students may be permitted to take elective credits in adifferent graduate program.Full-time/Part-time/Half-time Status for Graduate-LevelStudents:Full-time Study: Nine (9) credits per semester constitute full-timestudy.Part-time Study: Part-time study ranges from one (1) to eight (8)credits per semester.Half-time Study: Half-time study is six (6) or more credits persemester, for purposes of reporting for loan deferments.Program, five (5) years for the Graduate Education program, ten(10) years for Graduate Business, five (5) years for Graduate MusicTherapy, or 10 (ten) years for Graduate Criminal Justice.SUMMER SESSIONSMolloy College offers courses during several summer sessions oncampus. A student may take a maximum of three credits duringthe one-week Summer Institutes. During each of the two five-weeksessions, Summer Session Long I and Long II run by the GraduateEducation Program, a student may take up to six credits. During theseven-week session in Summer Session Long III that is scheduledby the Division of Business, a student may take up to six credits.Graduate Nursing courses are offered throughout the summer inSummer Session Long. The dates vary. Nursing students are limitedto a maximum of two courses or six to eight credits in any session oroverlapping time period in the summer, as long as the sessions donot overlap. Music Therapy students may take courses in SummerI and Summer II. Criminal Justice students may take courses inSummer I and Summer Long. Criminal Justice students may take atotal of six (6) credits in summer sessions.Permission to exceed these limits must be obtained from theVice President for Academic Affairs. The maximum credit load forSummer Session Long will vary and will be based on the particularrequirements and limitations of the individual courses offered.Problems or questions regarding summer session will be resolvedor answered by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.Molloy College courses and credits are ordinarily accepted astransfer credits by other accredited colleges and universities.Students wishing to transfer credits to another graduate programare advised to confirm with the other institution the grade neededand that the credits can be accepted before attending Molloy.Attendance and Religious ObservancesPolicy of Responsible Attendance: Students are expected toattend all classes regularly and punctually. Penalties for excessiveabsences are noted in course outlines.Religious Observances: A student who is to be absent fromclass because of a religious obligation or practice should informthe instructor in writing at least one week before the day. Thestudent has the right to make up any examination, study or workrequirements which may have been missed because of religiousobservances.Transfer PolicyStudents who have completed graduate-level courses atanother institution may transfer six (6) credits with a grade of “B”or better if the courses are judged equivalent to those requiredin Molloy’s Graduate Program, and if they have been completedwithin the last six (6) years for Graduate Nursing Master’s28


Summer courses are the equivalent in content and credit to thecourses offered during the regular academic semesters. Summersession courses are billed at the per credit rate, and under nocircumstances can they be considered as part of the tuition chargesand fees of another semester.Independent StudyPermission to pursue Independent Study must be obtained fromthe student’s advisor, the faculty sponsor who will oversee thestudy and the director of the program involved. The student mustobtain the necessary approvals for the Independent Study at thetime of registration.The student should choose the topic in conjunction with thefaculty sponsor. The quantity and depth of content studied willdetermine the credits allocated for the course. The quality of thefinal presentation will determine the grade for the IndependentStudy. Appropriate forms are available in the Office of AcademicAffairs.Auditing CoursesGraduate students will be permitted to audit courses on a spaceavailablebasis and with permission of the Director of the GraduateProgram of the department and the instructor. The student musthold a bachelor’s degree to be considered for auditing.Full-time matriculated graduate students (9 or more credits)may audit any two additional courses to the maximum of 6 creditsfree of additional charges and exclusive of the summer session.Part-time graduate students may audit one course to themaximum of 3 credits free of additional charges and exclusive ofthe summer session.Non-matriculated graduate students will pay one-half thegraduate tuition and appropriate fees to audit a course. Studentswill be required to pay any special fee that may be attached to thecourse.Payment information: Payment for audited courses must bemade in full. The deferred payment plan is not available for use foraudited courses.Refund information: A student withdrawing from a course that isbeing audited will be granted a refund for tuition only if applicable,in accordance with the refund policy stated in the college catalog.If the status of a student changes at any time during the semester,the policy that relates to the current status of the student will beadhered to, (i.e., students dropping from full-time to part-timestatus will be required to follow the policy of a part-time student).Policy on academic credit: At no time will credit be granted foran audited course. However, the student may repeat the course forcredit during another semester. Any change from audit status tocredit or vice versa may be made up to the last day of the Add/DropPeriod. (Consult the Academic Calendar for exact dates.) Records ofcourses that have been audited are part of the student’s academicrecord and appear with the academic coursework on the transcript.Transcripts will be issued upon written request and submission ofappropriate fee. The grade of “AU” is assigned for audited courses.Final ExaminationsWritten examinations or their equivalent are held at the end ofeach Fall and Spring semester, and Summer Sessions. Studentsare required to attend the final examination, which is also themandatory last class meeting for Molloy’s classes at the hoursannounced on the official Final Examination Schedule. In the caseof absence from the final examination, the students will be held tothe grading policy on “Incompletes.”Waiver/Substitution CoursesA Waiver/Substitution Form may be submitted by the student’sadvisor and program director for approval by the Vice President ofAcademic Affairs. These requests are reviewed and are subject todenial. If approved, an acceptable course may be substituted for arequired course, or a requirement may be waived.ClassificationFor the purposes of tracking and identifying students in Molloy’sgraduate programs the following classifications are used:• Master’s: Matriculated into a MS or MBA program.• Post Master’s: Matriculated into an AdvancedCertificate program.• Doctoral: Matriculated into a Ph.D. program.• Non-degree Graduate: Not matriculated into agraduate-level program of study. (The approval of theDean or Associate Dean of the Division, subject to areview of a student’s qualifications, is required to takecourses at the graduate-level. )Grading PolicyThe following grading system is used in the Graduate Programs:(Effective Fall 2008)GradesQuality PointIndexA 93.0–100 Superior 4.0A- 90.0–92.9 Excellent 3.7B+ 87.0–89.9 Very Good 3.3B 83.0–86.9 Good 3.0B- 80.0–82.9Lowest acceptablegrade in Business,Criminal Justice,Nursing2.7Not accepted forcredit in Educationor Music TherapyC+ 77.0–79.9Not acceptedfor credittoward degree2.3requirementsC 73.0–76.9Not acceptedforcredittoward degreerequirements2.0F Failure 0.0AUAudit (Audit requires permission of ProgramDirector and the Instructor. No credits earned andno quality points)29


IWWAWFWIPPNA**Incomplete (Computed as Failure: Somerequirement of the course is lacking. Automaticallybecomes an “F” if requirement is no met within aspecified time)Withdrawn - Passing (no credits earned and noquality points)Withdrawn-Absent from the last class meeting orfinalWithdrawn-Failing (Computed as a failure)Work-in-ProgressPass (Represents competency in meeting courserequirements. “Pass” is not a letter grade and doesnot count in the GPA. Courses taken with Pass/Fail grading cannot be used to meet a degreerequirement, where the program requirementsmust be satisfied with a minimum letter grade.)Never Attended (No credits earned and no qualitypoints)** “NA” is no longer available as a final grade, effective Fall 2004.Repeating CoursesA course in which the student receives a grade below: “B” inEducation or “B” in Music Therapy, “B-” in Nursing, “B-” in Businessor “B-” in Criminal Justice programs may be repeated once. Theoption to repeat a course may not be used more than two times.30Students are permitted to repeat two courses, once each. A thirdgrade that is not accepted for credit toward degree requirementswill result in dismissal from the program.The most recent letter grade earned is the grade that countstowards the cumulative GPA, earned credits and towards thedegree requirements. Prior grades are forgiven but remain onthe transcript and as part of the term GPA for the term they wererecorded.IncompletesA grade of incomplete “I” will be granted only in case of hardship(circumstances, which, in the judgment of the instructor warrantspecial consideration). If all coursework is not completed by the lastday of class, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructorwithin 24 hours after the final examination. If the student fails tofollow the above procedures, the instructor will grade accordingly(as per course outline).The grade of “I” is earned in a course when the student has notcompleted all course requirements. It is a substitute grade givenonly with the approval of the Instructor and Graduate ProgramDirector at the specific request of the student prior to the end of thecourse. Approval is granted only when the student demonstratescircumstances beyond his/her control which temporarily preventscompletion of the coursework. All “Incompletes” must be resolvedby the dates indicated in the Academic Calendar for each semester(usually within thirty days of the last class meeting). Any extensionbeyond the published dates of the Academic Calendar requires


written approval of both the instructor, the Director of the GraduateProgram, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.Students with “Incompletes” cannot be approved for graduation.Pending graduates must have all grades recorded prior to thedegree award date in the Academic Calendar or be deniedapproval for graduation.The instructor will determine the appropriate amount of timerequired to complete and change the grade of “I”. An “I” will remainon the record for five class days into the following semester. (Referto the Academic Calendar for actual deadlines.) If by that timethe instructor has not notified the Registrar that the “I” has beenchanged to a letter grade, the “I” becomes an “F”.Honor Pledge and Academic HonestyThe college maintains and affirms a strong policy of academichonesty. Every member of the academic community has a dutyneither to cheat nor to condone cheating, fabrication, plagiarismor facilitation of academic dishonesty. Any member of theMolloy community may report a violation of Academic Integrityto the Associate Dean for Academic Support Services in K119Kellenberg Hall. Academic infractions are subject to disciplinaryaction as described in the Department of Nursing Graduate andPost-Graduate Nursing Student Handbook, Graduate EducationOrientation Manual/Candidate Handbook and the Molloy CollegeGraduate Handbook and Calendar.Academic Integrity StatementMolloy College is dedicated to the Catholic and Dominican idealsof truth and academic excellence. As such, every member of thecommunity shares in the responsibility for protecting the academicintegrity of the institution. The commitment to academic honorreaffirms the high ethical standards that are fundamental to themission of Molloy. By signing an honor pledge, students takepersonal responsibility to uphold the standards of truth and freeinquiry, while sharing in the common commitment to protectthese principles and the value of a Molloy Degree.Academic Honor Pledge“As a member of Molloy College, Catholic and Dominican in tradition,I dedicate myself to the ideals of truth, scholarship and justice. I pledgeto demonstrate personal and academic integrity in all matters. Ipromise to be honest and accountable for my actions and to upholdthe Honor System to better myself and those around me. I will refrainfrom any form of academic dishonesty or deception.’’Grade ReportsFinal grades, mid-semester reports and student course history maybe found through www.molloy.edu. On the homepage access“Online Student Services’’ in Quick Links to login to the secureLion’s Den student account.TRANSCRIPTSStudents wishing to have an official or student transcript sentdirectly to a prospective employer or school must submit a signedrequest form to the Office of the Registrar along with the requiredfee by mail, fax or in-person. Forms are available from the Officeof the Registrar or can be down-loaded from the website at www.molloy.edu.Transcript requests are filled as soon as possible after receipt, butstudents should allow up to a week for processing during busyperiods. The College reserves the right to withhold a student’stranscript until all financial and/or other obligations are fulfilled.Grade AppealsWhen a student raises a question concerning a grade and failsto resolve the problem with the instructor, the director andchairperson concerned, he/she may appeal through channels to theVice President for Academic Affairs. The procedure to be followedis described in the Department of Nursing, Graduate and Post-Graduate Student Handbook, the Graduate Education OrientationManual/Candidate Handbook and the Academic Calendar. It isthe responsibility of the student to obtain the instructions and toobserve the deadline for filing an appeal.Progression PolicyMatriculation is maintained by attending Fall and Spring semestersin each academic year unless the student has obtained anauthorized semester withdrawal. A semester withdrawal is limitedto a total period of one standard semester.Probation PolicyMaintenance of Academic Standards: The quality point indexrequirement is 3.0. If the academic average falls below 3.0, underordinary circumstance the student will be permitted one semesterin which to raise the GPA to 3.0. Extraordinary circumstancesnecessitating additional time to raise the GPA will be determined inconsultation with the academic advisor and the program director.Failure to raise the GPA to the required 3.0 will result in dismissalfrom the program.Maintenance of Program Standards: Each program hasstandards for progression and academics. Students may be askedto leave the program or removed from classes if dismissed by adepartment.Dismissal From ProgramsStudents who do not meet the program standards for progressionin their area of study may be dismissed by the Director or AssociateDean of their Division. Dismissed students should drop theircourses at the Registrar’s Office to assure a correct bill prior to thestart of the term. The Registrar’s Office will be authorized to dropdismissed students’ classes prior to the start of the term to provideadequate classroom space.Withdrawal from CoursesWithdrawal from a course or courses is made at the Registrar’sOffice in W235 of the Wilbur Arts Center and requires signaturesof the instructor, the Director of Financial Aid and the academicadvisor.Students will be permitted to withdraw from a course with a gradeof “W” approximately 5 days before the mid-semester appraisaldate. Withdrawal from a course after this date can be made up tothe last academic day of class (refer to Academic Calendar for exactdates) with a grade of “W” or “WF” as determined by the instructorand based on the student’s work up to that time. “WF” grades will31


e equivalent to “F” and computed in the student’s index.Withdrawing from courses may change the student’s full-time orhalf-time standing and may require the return of Title IV financialaid funds and could affect the grace or deferment period forrepayment of loans, such as Federal Stafford Loans, Federal PerkinsLoans and Federal PLUS Loans. Loan grace periods use the last dateof attendance. Future eligibility for aid programs such as TAP maybe affected by not progressing toward the degree as planned. (Forrefunds and policies, see catalog section on “Expenses’’.)Students wishing to take off for one academic semester or exit thecollege completely should apply for either a “Withdrawal - Leavefor One Semester Off” or “Withdrawal - Exit Officially from College”.Withdrawals - Leave for One Semester OffCurrently matriculated students may request a “Withdrawal -Leave for One Semester Off” if they plan to return to the collegethe following academic semester. The Withdrawal Applicationwith Financial Aid’s approval signature must be submitted to theRegistrar’s Office. Withdrawal Applications are available onlineand at the Registrar’s Office in W235 of the Wilbur Arts Center.Approval for one semester off maintains a student’s matriculatedstatus. Students requesting a “Withdrawal - Leave for One SemesterOff” after the Add/Drop Period ends and during the WithdrawalPeriod must also complete the Withdrawal Form, which requiresthe signature of the advisor, the instructor for each class withthe last date attended and the approval signature of FinancialAid. Students experiencing extenuating circumstances meritinghardship consideration should provide documentation for thefollowing types of circumstances: military leave, jury duty and anyconditions covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993.Only one “Withdrawal - Leave for One Semester Off” may begranted within a 12 month period.32All returning students from the “Withdrawal - Leave for OneSemester Off” must have the Re-Entry Form approved by theAssociate Dean for Academic Support Services in K119 KellenbergHall and submit it to the Registrar’s Office in order to be advisedand registered into the returning term.Students who do not return from an approved “Withdrawal - Leavefor One Semester Off” will be considered to have left the Collegeand will be “Withdrawn Administratively” retroactive to the datethey last attended.Taking any time off from college may require the return of Title IVfinancial aid funds and will affect the grace or deferment period forrepayment of loans, such as Federal Stafford Loans, Federal PerkinsLoans and Federal PLUS Loans. Loan grace periods use the last dateof attendance. Future eligibility for aid programs such as TAP maybe affected by taking a term off.Newly admitted students attending Molloy for their first semesteror readmitted students returning after being “Withdrawn” shouldnotify the Admissions Office in W226 of Wilbur Arts Center if theyplan to cancel or defer their enrollment to the next term.For refunds and policies, see the “Expenses” section of thiscatalog.Withdrawal - Exit Officially From CollegeWithdrawal from the College before the completion of thecoursework for a degree, with the intention of not returningrequires that the student file a Withdrawal Application with theRegistrar’s Office in W235 of the Wilbur Arts Center. WithdrawalApplications are available online and at the Registrar’s Office.Students requesting “Withdrawal - Exit Officially from College”after the Add/Drop Period ends and during the Withdrawal Periodmust also complete the Withdrawal Form, which requires the


signature of the advisor, the instructor for each class with the lastdate attended, and the approval signature of Financial Aid.Students experiencing extenuating circumstances meritinghardship consideration should provide documentation for thefollowing types of circumstances: military leave, jury duty and anyconditions covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993.Taking any time off from college may require the return of Title IVfinancial aid funds and will affect the grace or deferment period forrepayment of loans, such as Federal Stafford Loans, Federal PerkinsLoans and Federal PLUS Loans. Loan grace periods use the last dateof attendance. Future eligibility for aid programs such as TAP maybe affected by taking a term off.Newly admitted students attending Molloy for their first semesteror readmitted students returning after being “Withdrawn” shouldnotify the Admissions Office in W226 of Wilbur Arts Center if theyplan to cancel or defer their enrollment to the next term.Students who discontinue their studies and do not notify thecollege will be Withdrawn Administratively. Students whohave left the college for two consecutive academic semestersand wish to return to Molloy College must apply to be readmittedwith Admissions. For refunds and policies, see the “Expenses”section of this catalog.Complaint ProceduresAny individual, who believes that Molloy College has actedcontrary to its published standards or believes that conditions atthe institution appear to jeopardize the quality of the institution’sinstructional programs or the general welfare of its students, mayfile a complaint. Complainants may seek advice about procedurefrom the Vice President for Academic Affairs or from the AssociateDean for Academic Support Services or from the StudentDevelopment Center.Informal ProcedureAll persons concerned should first make every effort to resolve thematter through informal consultation with involved individuals.Should this fail to resolve the issue, the complainant may meet withthe individual’s immediate supervisor. If the problem is unable tobe resolved at either of these levels, the formal procedure shouldbe initiated.Formal ProcedureThe formal procedures to be followed for students are either theDue Process Procedure for Student Discipline in Non-AcademicAreas or the Due Process Procedure for Student Discipline inAcademic Areas or the Grade Appeal Policy as stated in the StudentHandbook.Institutional Review BoardMolloy College has established an Institutional Review Board toreview research proposals and related activities which involvethe use of human subjects. Applicants must apply in writingfor approval and be prepared to explain in person all aspects ofthe proposal which affect human subjects. Further informationconcerning the Institutional Review Board and all appropriateforms are available in the office of the Vice President for AcademicAffairs.Course Numbering System(Effective Fall 2000)Non-credit college preparatory and remedial001–099— courses. Courses below the 100-level are notcounted towards degree requirements.Introductory studies, normally on Freshmanlevel.Course assignments require or reinforce100–199—basic competency in speaking, writing andcritical thinking.Intermediate studies, normally on Sophomorelevel.Courses may require prerequisites on200–299— the 100-level. Course assignments require orreinforce speaking, writing and critical thinkingskills at a level above basic competency.Advanced level studies, normally on Junior- orSenior-level, taken especially by majors in thedepartments offering the courses. Courses300–399—may require pre- or corequisites. Courseassignments require and reinforce maturespeaking, writing and critical thinking skills.390–399-Selected Topics: In-depth study of topics notincluded in detail in the regular curriculumcycle.Specialized studies, seminars, capstonecourses, normally on Senior-level and designedespecially for majors in the departments400–499— offering the courses. Course assignmentsrequire and reinforce excellent speaking,writing and critical thinking skills, responsibilityand initiative.460–469-Internships.470–479-Independent Study.480–499-Senior Seminars and Capstone Studies.Graduate courses, master’s and advanced500–599—certificates or post master’s.600–800— Graduate courses, doctoral.Semester Hours/Credit HoursMolloy’s academic year is based upon standard terms of a fall anda spring semester. The fall and spring semesters are designedwith a minimum length of 15 weeks. The fall semesters run for15 weeks and the spring semesters run for 16 1/2 weeks. Withineach semester, there are scheduled holidays and breaks built intothe term. Courses meet on a scheduled basis for an appropriatenumber of meetings per term designed to achieve or exceed theminimum number of minutes of instruction per semester hour asrequired by the state.Shorter, non-standard terms, such as the Summer Sessions orIntersessions, have more frequent and/or longer class meetingsand include supplementary instruction to meet the minimummandated meeting time regulations.33


The last week of the standard semester has a final/last classmeeting for all courses, which is a mandatory meeting scheduledfor 120 minutes for every graduate-level course. The regularweekly class meetings along with the final/last class meeting andsupplementary assignments and/or coursework are combinedto meet the appropriate total minutes for instruction andoutside assignment time as mandated by the New York StateCommissioner’s Regulations.Graduate-level courses meet as published in the “Course Search”and in the “Final Exam/Last Class Meeting Schedule”. In someprograms, various courses also have clinical, laboratory andfieldwork components built into the curriculum with meetingtimes, instruction and outside assignment requirements.(Graduate-level courses may vary from the formula for classmeeting times for fewer hours of instruction only when approvedby the Commissioner of Education of New York State as part of aregistered curriculum, or when the commissioner has granted priorapproval for the institution to maintain a statement of academicstandards that defines the considerations which establishequivalency of instruction and study as adopted in statements bythe institution.)This description of “Semester Hours/Credit Hours” is presentedfor a quick insight into college policy. For further information on aparticular class in a division concerning meeting times, instructionand supplementary assignments as shown in the “Course Search”,“Final Exam/Last Class Meeting Schedule” and specific courseoutlines or syllabi, please contact either the Office of the Registraror the Division Dean of the program.Honor SocietiesAlpha Phi SigmaThe Zeta Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Sigma, the NationalCriminal Justice Honor Society, is open to the graduate studentswho maintain a minimum of 3.4 overall grade point average and a3.4 in their criminal justice courses. A student must have completedat least four (4) graduate courses before application. Application formembership is made through the Department of Criminal Justice.Kappa Delta PiKappa Delta Pi is an International Honor Society in Education.Founded in 1911, the goals of this society are to promoteexcellence in and to recognize outstanding contributions to thefield of education. Its aim is to foster high standards of preparationfor the teaching profession. Membership in Molloy College ChiEpsilon Chapter is open to those education students who havemaintained a cumulative index of at least 3.75 and completedthe Pre-Professional semester (undergraduates) or 3.85 andcompleted a minimum of 15 credits (graduates). Candidatesmust also complete a pre-candidacy period in which the memberattends a minimum of one KDP workshop or meeting prior toinduction. Additionally, teacher candidates must complete awritten statement highlighting volunteer service in an educativeenvironment.Sigma Beta DeltaIn September 2005 a chapter of Sigma Beta Delta was installed atMolloy College. The purposes of Sigma Beta Delta are to encourageand recognize scholarship and achievement among students ofbusiness, management and administration, and to encourageand promote personal and professional improvement and a lifedistinguished by honorable service to humankind.Membership in Sigma Beta Delta is the highest internationalrecognition a business student can receive at a college. A businessstudent must be invited to membership by the faculty officers to beeligible for membership.Sigma Theta Tau, Epsilon Kappa ChapterSigma Theta Tau, the International Honor Society of Nursing,invites students who have demonstrated a commitment to nursingexcellence and academic achievement. The society promotesleadership and scholarship in practice, education and research toenhance the health of all people. Candidates for membership inEpsilon Kappa Chapter in the undergraduate programs must havea cumulative index of at least 3.0 on a four-point scale, have a 3.0in nursing and be in the top 35% of their class. Graduate students34


who have completed half of the Molloy College graduate programand attained a cumulative index of 3.5 on a four-point scale maybe eligible. Faculty recommendation is required of all candidates.Honors, Awards,Graduation and BeyondGraduation RequirementsStudents must submit an approved Application for Graduationwith all required signatures and an application fee, according tothe deadlines in the Academic Calendar.Degree Requirements Include:• Completion of minimum program credit hours andspecific department requirements:• Business: All required coursework and prerequisites.• Criminal Justice: All required coursework andprerequisites.• Education: Initial Certification Programs require fieldplacement hours and student teaching.• Music Therapy: All required coursework andprerequisites.• Nursing: All required coursework and clinical hours.Academic Years Allowed for Completion of a Program:• Nursing: Seven (7) years• Music Therapy: Seven (7) years• Education: Five (5) years• Business: Five (5) years• Criminal Justice: Five (5) yearsAcademic Standards for Programs:• Education: Maintenance of 3.0 cumulative average.Grades below “B” are not applicable to this degree• Music Therapy: Maintenance of 3.0 cumulative average.Grades below “B” are not applicable to this degree• Nursing: Maintenance of 3.0 cumulative average.Grades below “B-’’ are not applicable to this degree• Business: Maintenance of 3.0 cumulative average.Grades below “B-’’ are not applicable to this degree• Criminal Justice: Maintenance of 3.0 cumulativeaverage. Grades below “B-’’ are not applicable to thisdegreeProgram Requirements:• Successful completion of a research proposal suitablefor the conducting of research, or a completed thesis.• Compilation of a Professional Portfolio in all GraduateEducation Programs. Evidence of successful completionof all benchmark performances must be included in thisportfolio.Application for Graduation:• Completion of an application for the degree and theexit interview form not later than the deadline shownin the Academic Calendar.• Diplomas and certifications will be held if the studenthas outstanding holds on his/her accounts, unreturnedequipment or obligations to the college.Note: Students should make certain that their academicrecords are in proper order at the time they makeapplication for the Master’s degree. If they are unablefor any reason to take a prescribed course in the regularsemester, it is their responsibility to take the course lateron. They should not request a waiver for the course at asubsequent date nor should they expect the course tobe offered at any unusual time to meet their personalconvenience.Departmental Honors at GraduationDepartmental Honors are awarded at Graduate Class Night tostudents of outstanding scholarship in their discipline.Diploma NamesA graduate’s name as it appears on a diploma must be a legalname. The following guidelines will apply:• First names may be complete or initialed, but mustmatch student’s name on the college records. Omissionof the first name is not acceptable.• Middle names may be complete or initialed, but mustmatch the college records. Omission of the middlename is acceptable.• Last names must match the college records exactly.• Suffixes, such as Sr., Jr., III, etc., may be used if includedin the student’s record and documented in the studentfolder on the student’s original application, a transcriptfrom another school or a Certificate of Birth.• Hispanic maternal surnames may be included ifdocumentation is provided to the Registrar’s Office for35


the student folder. Proper documentation is a copy ofa Certificate of Birth showing the maternal surname, oron the student’s original application.• Hyphenated “maiden-married” last names may beused, provided the student’s file has documentationto verify both names. A Student Information Sheetform accompanied by a Certificate of Marriage will berequired if a name change for marriage has not beenprocessed in the records, since the marriage.• Married students wishing to use their birth name on thediploma must provide a copy of the Certificate of Birth ifthe birth name is not part of the student’s record.• Court ordered legal name changes, if not part of thestudent’s record or folder, must be documented for useon the diploma.• Special accent marks may be requested, and should beindicated on the Application for Graduation. Specialpunctuation will be put on the diploma as the studentindicates on the form, if possible.• Neither titles or degrees previously earned will beincluded as part of a graduate’s name on a diploma.• A diploma may be replaced with a new name withsupporting documentation through the Registrar’sOffice. Any re-printing of diplomas will be charged tothe student.CommencementThe commencement ceremony held annually in May, is managedby the Office of Student Affairs. Special dates are planned for thedistribution of caps and gowns, celebrations, commencementrehearsals, hooding and class night and ceremonies. Each Decembera “Guide to Graduation” is mailed to the potential graduate’s homefrom the Office of Student Affairs. Announcements for specialgraduation events are posted on the College website.Commencement Ceremony ParticipationGraduate Education and Criminal Justice: Students who arewithin three (3) credits of program completion and have registeredfor these credits to be taken at Molloy College during the summersession are permitted to participate in the commencementceremonies held in May. The names of these students will notappear in the Commencement Brochure.Graduate Business, Music Therapy and Nursing: Students whoare within six (6) credits of program completion and have registeredfor these credits to be taken at Molloy during the summer sessionare permitted to participate in the commencement ceremoniesheld in May. The names of these students will not appear in theCommencement Brochure.Alumni Association Mission StatementThe Molloy College Alumni Association promotes the educationalpurposes, interests and general welfare of Molloy College;encourages the alumni to provide financial and volunteer supportto the College; responds with a strong sense of commitment toalumni recruitment and programming; develops and maintainsintegrated relationships with the college community; and fostersalumni involvement with current and prospective students. TheMolloy College Alumni Association affirms the honor and intrinsicreligious, educational, ethical and cultural values established bythe Founding Sisters and is dedicated to fostering a diverse andinclusive learning community that focuses on respect for eachperson and leadership through service.36


DivisionofBusinessPrograms of Study37


Welcome to the MBA Programs from theDean of the DivisionCongratulations on your decision to pursue graduate businesseducation at Molloy College. We started the MBA Program inSpring 2004 and offer the degree in Management, Accounting,Finance and Personal Financial Planning. Our first MBA studentsgraduated in Summer 2005 and we presently have slightly lessthan 100 students.Our success is based on the dual foundation of an effectivecurriculum and experienced faculty. Courses are designed to givestudents the knowledge and skill base to handle ambiguity anduncertainty. Students are encouraged to challenge assumptionson which management and management teachings are based. Thekey issue of ethics is incorporated in all management, accounting,finance and personal financial planning courses. In short,the MBA curriculum exposes students to the business world andequips them with the skill sets to analyze complex situations andmake effective and ethical decisions. Our faculty members havethe ideal combination of highly successful professionals and academicswith terminal degrees and business experience.We encourage our students to participate in department-sponsored international business trips thatexpose them to the global business environment. Regular exposure to business executives in networkingevents sponsored by the department assists students in discussing, planning and executing careerchanging and career enhancing strategies. We measure our success by the future achievements of ourstudents. The Molloy chapter of Sigma Beta Delta, an international business honor society, provides anopportunity for our graduate students to excel in their personal and professional lives.Last, but not least, the MBA Program builds upon Molloy’s Catholic and Dominican traditions,fostering a high level of integrity, scholarly inquiry for expansion of knowledge, self-enrichment and theachievement of personal and professional goals. Our small class sizes, smart classrooms, wireless campus,personal advisement and quality teaching make the MBA Program at Molloy an exciting and challengingjourney in achieving our mission of serving, achieving and leading.Thanks for your interest in our Program. Please learn more about it within these pages.Graduate Business ProgramsEd Weis, J.D., Ph.D., CPA, CFADean of the Division of Business38


Welcome to the MBA Programs from theAssociate Dean and DirectorMolloy College’s MBA Program provides a unique experience inbusiness education based on three key levels of differentiation: Molloy’sExecutive-based faculty; Molloy’s principled-based curriculum;and Molloy’s job-based focus.Molloy’s MBA faculty—who all hold MBA’s, PhD’s, and/orJD’s--have executive experience as the CEO’s, CFO’s, ManagingDirectors, and Partners of major Investment Banks, CommercialBanks, Big-Four Accounting firms, Management Consulting Firms,Law firms, Global Insurance firms, Private Equity/Venture Capitalfirms, Central Banks, and the SEC. This MBA faculty brings ourstudents “Executive-Based Learning”: practical, focused, flexible,fast-track instruction intended to launch our students’ careers byproviding them with the competitive advantage that comes fromdeep and constant exposure to real-world issues, risks, markets, anddecisions. Molloy’s MBA executive faculty—including its Deans,all of whom teach in the program—work closely with each student,know every student’s name, provide access to professional networks,and provide advice, guidance, and direction both to students and toalumni.Molloy’s MBA curriculum continuously teaches and demonstrates the principle of “doing well by doinggood”: a moral personal character and an ethical code of business conduct always produce the greatestlong-term, sustainable value in business. We teach business ethics in three ways: as a required MBA course,as a component of every course across the MBA curriculum, and by the Deans and the faculty continuously“role-modeling” the behavior in all that we do. Molloy’s MBA curriculum also receives input, guidance, anddirection from the Business Division’s Advisory Board, whose members are nationally and internationallyknown business leaders and educators. Molloy’s MBA curriculum further benefits from the business networksof its executive faculty and Advisory Board in creating both domestic and international opportunities for businesstravel, study, and research.Molloy’s MBA Program job-based focus is built on the idea of “begin with the end in mind”: if the “end”is powerful careers in management, finance, accounting, and marketing, then the MBA program needs tofocus on all of the knowledge, experiences, tools, and skills that will provide Molloy’s MBA’s competitiveadvantage in winning those jobs. Our constant and on-going focus on extending and expanding our networksto identify for our students internships and jobs testifies to our commitment to their success.We look forward to welcoming you to the Molloy MBA Program: something distinctive and unique.Raymond Louis Manganelli, PhDAssociate Dean and Director of the MBA ProgramDivision of Business39


Business ProgramC103-Casey Center516.678.5000, Ext. 6370C. Ed Weis, J.D., Ph.D., CPA, CFA, Dean of the Division ofBusinessRaymond L. Manganelli, Ph.D., Associate Dean and DirectorGraduate Programs in BusinessProfessor: Daniel CillisAssociate Professor: Ronald T. CarmanAssistant Professors: Robert Biolsi, Raymond L. Manganelli, S.Judy Olsen, O.P.Auxiliary Part-Time Instructor: Stephen Bier, Michael Cheah, J.Peter GarrityAdjunct Instructor: Michael L. Betzag, James C. Cullen, PeterGiacone, Richard L. Klass, Humera Qazi, Ira Stolzenberg, JamesWerner, Wayne F. Wilhelm, Diane WilkieBusiness Division ProgramPhilosophyThe Molloy College Mission Statement establishes the frameworkfor the Masters Program in Business. It states that in anenvironment where academic freedom, a spirit of inquiry andrespect for each individual’s worth and dignity prevail, studentsacquire the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the challengesof modern life. The MBA Program builds on Molloy’s Catholic andDominican tradition. Graduate education fosters a high level ofscholarly inquiry for expansion of knowledge, self-enrichmentand achievement of personal and professional goals. The BusinessDivision is committed to the preparation of knowledgeable,creative and effective business leaders.The Business Division believes it has three key competitivestrengths:• A talented faculty that features an ideal blend ofexperienced educators with the highest degree in theiracademic field and highly successful business leadersthrough their professional endeavors;• Small class size that leads to personalized instruction;and• Close faculty advisement.The MBA program prepares students to perform with distinction intheir professional careers.Business Division MBA ProgramGoalsGraduates of the MBA program will:• Demonstrate mastery of management or accountingtheory and practice, or personal financial planning• Integrate ethical concepts as they apply to businessdecisions• Employ logical and critical reasoning, the capacity foranalysis and judgment and action-oriented strategicplanning• Use written and oral communication skills effectively,emphasizing professional presentation and teamparticipation• Demonstrate an understanding of organizationaltheory as it applies to decision-making, leadership andchange• Use quantitative skills to analyze and evaluate currentbusiness issues and problems• Demonstrate respect for others in our global society.Admissions RequirementsRequirements for admission and matriculation into the Master ofBusiness Administration Program include the following. Applicantsmust:• Possess an appropriate Baccalaureate Degree from anaccredited college or university. Students who do nothave a Bachelor’s degree in business must completethe prerequisite courses listed under Programs of StudyLeading to Master of Business Administration Degree.• Submit an official transcript of all undergraduatework and any prior graduate courses taken. MolloyCollege will accept a maximum of six graduate transfercredits having a grade of “B” or better from anotheraccredited college or university. These credits musthave been completed within the last ten years andmust correspond in content to courses offered inMolloy’s MBA Program. Foreign documents must beaccompanied by a certified English translation andevaluation by WES or GLOBE. Students found to bedeficient in the English language may be required tocomplete a College sponsored English placement examprior to the start of their studies.• Complete the graduate degree program application,including an essay detailing personal academic andprofessional goals.• Have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scaleoverall grade point average in undergraduate workor 450 on the Graduate Management Admission Test(GMAT). (Students showing promise and having a GPAbelow 3.0 may be accepted on a probationary status.Completion of six graduate credits in this program withan average grades of “B”or better is required to stay inthe program.)• Possess basic computer skills related to applicationsoftware and information processing.• Submit three letters of recommendation from formercollege professors and/or professional associates.• Provide evidence of appropriate business experience.• Schedule a personal interview with the ProgramDirector and the Graduate Admissions Counselor.• Students will have five years to complete the program.40


Provisional Academic Status: Students who have been acceptedinto the MBA program, but have not fully met the GraduateAdmissions criteria, may register for courses and must receivea grade of “B” in the first six (6) credits taken. Re-evaluation forcontinued matriculated status will follow completion of thesecourses. Failure to achieve a grade of “B” or better in the first six(6) credits taken will result in either being placed on academicprobation or dismissal from the program.Note: The Division of Business reserves the right to makenecessary changes in programs and courses in response toregulations received from the New York State EducationDepartment and/or New York State Office of the Professions.These changes become effective according to dates specifiedby New York State. Students are responsible for meeting allprogram requirements.Programs of Study for MBADegrees:Accounting - M.B.A.New York State Registered Program Code: 28054New York State Registered Program Code: 28055 (Dual BS/MBA)HEGIS Code: 0502.00 {Accounting}Prerequisites:Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting or any Bachelor’s Degree andPrerequisite Undergraduate courses:Total Credits Required: 30 creditsCore Courses (12 credits required):CreditsBUS 511 Organizational Behavior 3Business Ethics andBUS 5153Professional ResponsibilityBUS 520 Financial Statement Analysis 3BUS 521Corporate FinancialManagement3Accounting Concentration (15 credits):BUS 503 Accounting Theory 3BUS 505 Accounting Research 3BUS 507 Computer Auditing 3BUS 580 Managerial Economic Analysis 3Quantitative AnalysisBUS 585Supporting Managerial3DecisionsCapstone Course (3 credits required):Entrepreneurship/BUS 595Intrapreneur-ship 3Total Credits Required: 30Prerequisite Undergraduate Courses for those who do nothave a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting:Students who hold a bachelor’s degree that is not in Accountingmust complete the following prerequisite courses with a grade of“C” or better before completion of the Graduate Program.Accounting Prerequisite Undergraduate Courses (54 credits):CIS 102Computer Applications andCIS (Can test out)3ECO 251, 252Macroeconomics,Microeconomics 641


MAT 115 Elementary Statistics 3BUS 240, 241 Business Law I, II 6BUS 260, 261 Accounting I, II 6BUS 301 Principles of Management 3BUS 350 Corporate Finance 3BUS 362, 363Financial Accounting I, II(Intermediate Accounting) 6BUS 364 Cost Accounting 3BUS 366, 367 Taxation I, II 6BUS 368 Advanced Accounting 3BUS 369 Auditing 3BUS 370Government/NonprofitAccounting3Prior coursework will be evaluated on an individual basis. Studentsmay be awarded credit for prerequisite requirements based uponprior academic work completed. Coursework must have beencompleted within the last ten years.Management - M.B.A.New York State Registered Program Code: 28066New York State Registered Program Code: 28067 (Dual BS/MBA)HEGIS Code: 0506.00 {Business Management and Administration}Prerequisites:Bachelor’s Degree in Business or any Bachelor’s Degree andPrerequisite Undergraduate Courses.Total Credits Required: 33 creditsCore Courses (12 credits required):CreditsBUS 511 Organizational Behavior 3BUS 515Business Ethics andProfessional Responsibility3BUS 520 Financial Statement Analysis 3BUS 521Corporate FinancialManagement3Management Concentration (18 credits):BUS 501Managerial Accounting andReporting3BUS 540 Leadership in Organizations 3BUS 550 Perspectives on Strategy 3BUS 570 International Business 3BUS 585Quantitative AnalysisSupporting Managerial3DecisionsComplete either BUS 500 or BUS 510: 3BUS 500Information Systems forManagers*orBUS 510 Marketing Management *Capstone Course (3 credits required):Entrepreneurship/BUS 5953IntrapreneurshipTotal Credits Required: 33NOTE: BUS 500 (Information Systems for Managers) or BUS 510(Marketing Management) are both 3 credit courses for the MBA inManagement that can be taken interchangeably toward the MBA inManagement degree.Prerequisite Undergraduate Courses for those who do nothave a Bachelor’s Degree in Business:Students who hold a bachelor’s degree that is not in Business mustcomplete the following prerequisite courses with a grade of “B” orbetter in each course within one year of being accepted into theGraduate Program.Management Prerequisite Undergraduate Courses (24credits):CIS 102Computer Applications andCIS (Can test out) 3MAT 115 Elementary Statistics 3BUS 240 Business Law I 3BUS 260 Accounting I 3BUS 301 Principles of Management 3BUS 330 Principles of Marketing 3BUS 350 Corporate Finance 3AND - One of the following*: 3ECO 200 Introductory Economics, or *ECO 251 Macroeconomics, or *ECO 252 Microeconomics *Prior coursework will be evaluated on an individual basis. Studentsmay be awarded credit for prerequisite requirements based uponprior academic work completed. Coursework must have beencompleted within the last ten years.Personal Financial Planning - M.B.A.New York State Registered Program Code: 28066New York State Registered Program Code: 28067 (Dual BS/MBA)HEGIS Code: 0506.00 {Business Management and Administration}Prerequisites:Bachelor’s Degree in Business or any Bachelor’s Degree andPrerequisite Undergraduate Courses.Total Credits Required: 33 creditsCore Courses (12 credits required):CreditsBUS 511 Organizational Behavior 3BUS 515Business Ethics andProfessional Responsibility3BUS 520 Financial Statement Analysis 3BUS 521Corporate FinancialManagement3Personal Financial Planning Concentration (18credits):BUS 525Financial Planning andProcess Insurance342


BUS 530 Investment Planning 3BUS 535 Income Tax Planning 3BUS 543Retirement Planning andEmployee Benefits3BUS 545 Estate Planning 3BUS 560 Advanced Topics in Finance 3Capstone Course (3 credits required):BUS 595Entrepreneurship/Intrapreneurship3Total Credits Required: 33Prerequisite Undergraduate Courses for those who do nothave a Bachelor’s Degree in Business:Students who hold a bachelor’s degree that is not in Business mustcomplete the following prerequisite courses with a grade of “C” orbetter before completion of the Graduate Program.Personal Financial Planning Prerequisite UndergraduateCourses (24 credits):Computer Applications andCIS 1023CIS (Can test out)MAT 115 Elementary Statistics 3BUS 240 Business Law I 3BUS 260 Accounting I 3BUS 301 Principles of Management 3BUS 330 Principles of Marketing 3BUS 350 Corporate Finance 3AND - One of the following*: 3ECO 200 Introductory Economics, or *ECO 251 Macroeconomics, or *ECO 252 Microeconomics *Prior coursework will be evaluated on an individual basis. Studentsmay be awarded credit for prerequisite requirements based uponprior academic work completed. Coursework must have beencompleted within the last ten years.Programs of Study for MBADegrees:Only one M.B.A. degree will be awarded for two concentrations43


upon completion of all requirements in both concentrations. Thetotal credits needed will include all courses and prerequisites forboth concentrations.Accounting and Management - M.B.A.Business CourseDescriptionsTotal Credits Required: 45 creditsStudents wishing to achieve the M.B.A. degree with both theAccounting and the Management concentrations must haveapproval of the Program Director. Prior coursework will be evaluatedon an individual basis. All the prerequisites and concentrationrequirements for both programs of study must be met. Only oneM.B.A. degree will be awarded for both concentrations uponcompletion of all requirements in both concentrations. Completionof both concentrations in Accounting and Management will benoted on the student’s academic record. Students who havealready earned the M.B.A. from Molloy College may not return fora second M.B.A. in another business concentration at a later date.Accounting and Personal FinancialPlanning - M.B.A.Total Credits Required: 48 creditsStudents wishing to achieve the M.B.A. degree with both theAccounting and the Personal Financial Planning concentrationsmust have approval of the Program Director. Prior courseworkwill be evaluated on an individual basis. All the prerequisitesand concentration requirements for both programs of studymust be met. Only one M.B.A. degree will be awarded for bothconcentrations upon completion of all requirements in bothconcentrations. Completion of both concentrations in Accountingand Management will be noted on the student’s academicrecord. Students who have already earned the M.B.A. from MolloyCollege may not return for a second M.B.A. in another businessconcentration at a later date.Management and Personal FinancialPlanning - M.B.A.Total Credits Required: 51 creditsStudents wishing to achieve the M.B.A. degree with both theManagement and the Personal Financial Planning concentrationsmust have approval of the Program Director. Prior courseworkwill be evaluated on an individual basis. All the prerequisitesand concentration requirements for both programs of studymust be met. Only one M.B.A. degree will be awarded for bothconcentrations upon completion of all requirements in bothconcentrations. Completion of both concentrations in Accountingand Management will be noted on the student’s academicrecord. Students who have already earned the M.B.A. from MolloyCollege may not return for a second M.B.A. in another businessconcentration at a later date.BUS 500 INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR MANAGERSThis course gives the student an overview of the various typesof information systems available in business and their role incrafting business strategy and in effective decision-making.Exposure will be given to transactions processing systems,decision support systems, executive support systems, expertsystems, with special emphasis on management informationsystems. In addition to covering emerging technologies,the course will also address ethical concerns related toadvancements in information technology. Prerequisite: CIS 102.3 creditsBUS 501 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND REPORTINGThis course equips the student with the essential managementaccounting tools that enhance a manager’s ability to understandhow the numbers are computed, what they mean, and howmanagers and finance professionals can work together to usethem to improve an organization’s competitive stance. Topicsinclude costing, budgeting, capital budgeting and productcosting. Prerequisite: BUS 260. 3 creditsBUS 503 ACCOUNTING THEORYStatements and pronouncements of the Financial AccountingStandards Board, the American Institute of Certified PublicAccountants, the American Accounting Association, theSecurities and Exchange Commission and the GovernmentAccounting Standards Board are analyzed. Advanced theoryin mergers, acquisitions and bankruptcies are studied.Prerequisites: BUS 363, BUS 368. 3 creditsBUS 505 ACCOUNTING RESEARCHKnowledge of applied research is expected of accountinggraduates. This course takes the position that an integrationof real world events and ideas and the use of unstructuredproblems in the curriculum are needed for students to besuccessful in the accounting profession in today’s volatileglobal business environment. Students develop a foundation ofapplied accounting research and skills in handling applicationissues. Prerequisites: BUS 368, BUS 503. 3 creditsBUS 507 COMPUTER AUDITINGThis course examines auditing theory and concepts and theirrelationship to management advisory services, electronicdata processing and computerized management informationsystems. Prerequisites: BUS 369, CIS 102. 3 creditsBUS 510 MARKETING MANAGEMENTThis course provides a managerial view of the marketingprocess in a customer-driven organization. The course examinesstrategies and decision making as they relate to the design andimplementation of marketing programs and the marketingmix. The critical role of marketing in strategic planning will be44


explored, as well as important international and ethical issues.Topics covered include gathering market and competitiveintelligence; opportunity analysis; segmenting, targeting andpositioning strategies; the role of marketing research; thenew product development process; understanding consumer& business behavior; and developing integrated marketingcommunications. The course also studies emerging trends inboth theory and business marketing practices. 3 creditsBUS 511 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIORThis course is a study of individual and group behavior inorganizational settings. The foundations, realities and challengesof the discipline are examined. Topics include motivation,team building, group dynamics, leadership, communication,decision-making, power and politics, negotiation and conflictmanagement. Interpersonal and multicultural skills will beincorporated into the micro and macro perspectives of thecourse to help the graduate student operate effectively in aglobal environment. Prerequisite: BUS 301. 3 creditsBUS 515 BUSINESS ETHICS AND PROFESSIONALRESPONSIBILITYThis course explores ethical concepts and issues importantto business decisions. Students will discuss current businessethics issues such as executive compensation, corporate socialresponsibility and the challenges business managers face fromall constituencies - shareholders, employees, communities,environmental interests and similarly situated groups. Studentswill explore how ethics can be integrated into strategic businessdecisions. Business cases will be analyzed to prepare studentsfor ethical dilemmas they may face in their business careers.Prerequisite: Program Director’s Approval. 3 creditsBUS 520 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSISAs managers and users, students must understand themeasurement issues underlying financial statements beforethey can interpret and meaningfully use them. This coursepresents financial accounting in an economic context to helpstudents make effective managerial decisions. Prerequisites:BUS 260, ECO 200. 3 creditsBUS 521 CORPORATE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENTThis course examines theoretical principles and analyticaltechniques used in corporate decision making, including:capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy decisions,international financial management, corporate acquisitions,financial statement analysis and working capital management.Prerequisites: BUS 350, BUS 520. 3 creditsBUS 525 FINANCIAL PLANNING PROCESS ANDINSURANCEThis course provides the basics that will form the foundation ofknowledge needed as a working financial services professional.The financial planning process, as well as the legal, ethical andregulatory issues affecting financial planners, and time valueof money concepts are covered. The course continues with adiscussion of the principles of risk management and insurance,allowing the student to identify a client’s risk exposure andselect appropriate risk management techniques. 3 creditsBUS 530 INVESTMENT PLANNINGThis course surveys a wide variety of investment vehiclesthat may be included in a client’s portfolio, as well as clientassessment, tax considerations, economic factors, valuationmethods, asset allocation techniques, portfolio performanceevaluation and more. Prerequisite: BUS 525. 3 creditsBUS 535 INCOME TAX PLANNINGThe course emphasizes fundamentals of individual incometaxation, the tax implications of various types of businesses,tax-advantaged investments, employee compensation issuesand planning alternative minimum tax, tax traps and more.Prerequisite: BUS 525. 3 creditsBUS 540 LEADERSHIP IN ORGANIZATIONSThis course is a study of leadership in business organizationsfrom the perspective of the importance of effective leadershipin meeting organizational challenges and achieving results. Thecourse focuses on building the students’ conceptual skill andinsight bases in the sphere of leadership to assist them in movinginto leadership positions in organizations. Topics includeeffective leadership behaviors and attitudes, influence tacticsof leaders, motivation and coaching skills, communication andconflict resolution skills, strategic leadership and internationaland culturally diverse aspects of leadership. Prerequisite: BUS301. 3 creditsBUS 541 ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE ANDDEVELOPMENTThis course focuses on the process by which managers sense andrespond to change. Emphasis is on both the natural, emergentdynamics and the change that results from consciously setgoals and planned interventions. Topics include organizationalassessment and diagnosis and strategies for organizationalchange that increase organizational effectiveness and enhanceorganizational choice and self-renewal. Prerequisite: BUS 511.3 creditsBUS 543 RETIREMENT PLANNING AND EMPLOYEEBENEFITSThe course covers all the major retirement-related issues:retirement savings need analysis, qualified retirement plandesign, social security, Medicare and more. In addition, grouplife, health and disability insurance; non-qualified deferredcompensation; and other commonly provided employeebenefits are examined. Prerequisites: BUS 525, 530, 535. 3creditsBUS 545 ESTATE PLANNINGThe course introduces the process of developing an estateplan. Topics covered include federal, estate and gift taxationtechniques that reduce the size of a gross estate, wills, intestacy,probate, trusts and more. Prerequisites: BUS 525, 530, 535. 3creditsBUS 546 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT(also NUR 546) 3 credits45


BUS 547 HEALTH CARE FINANCE AND BUDGETING(also NUR 547) 3 creditsBUS 550 PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGYThis course gives the student an integrative perspective onstrategy. It provides the opportunity to sharpen analyticalskills by exploring, in detail, selected concepts in managementand marketing and by introducing additional frameworksspecifically addressing strategic decisions. Topics includethe concept of strategy, industry and competitor analysis,identifying and sustaining competitive advantage, developingand analyzing strategic options and crafting and implementingstrategies. Prerequisites: BUS 301, BUS 330. 3 creditsBUS 559 iNVESTMENT MANAGEMENTThis course describes the role of financial assets in the economy.It also evaluates the optimal way to combine financial assetsinto a portfolio given the trade-off between risk and return.Finally, this course describes a brief overview of securitiesmarkets. 3 creditsBUS 560 ADVANCED TOPICS IN FINANCEThe course is an intensive review of how returns on investmentscan be maximized. Topics, such as asset allocation, analysis ofstock and bond market cycles, technical and analysis, behavioralanalysis of investors, option and hedging strategies, advancetopics in mutual funds, fixed income securities and portfolioconstruction are addressed. Prerequisite: BUS 530. 1-3 creditsBUS 561 FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONSThis course provides an overview of the various securitiesmarkets. It also describes depository institutions, insurancecompanies, investment banks, mutual funds and pension funds.3 creditsBUS 562 VALUE INVESTINGThis course is built on the investment philosophy of WarrenBuffett. Value investing teaches students how to determinethe fundamental value of a company and how to capitalize onpotential mispricings in the market. 3 creditsBUS 570 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESSThis course introduces the graduate student to the fieldof international business management. The focus is oncomprehending the new global strategic imperatives and thenew transnational organizational demands. A variety of topicswill encompass understanding one’s host country environment,being sensitive to cross-cultural differences and being ableto manage operations separated by the barriers of distance,language, time and culture. Prerequisites: BUS 301, BUS 330. 3creditsBUS 580 MANAGERIAL ECONOMIC ANALYSISThis course in managerial economics equips accountingstudents with the knowledge and skills required to useeconomic analysis to make business decisions involving thebest use of an organization’s scarce resources. Prerequisites:ECO 251, ECO 252. 3 creditsBUS 585 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS SUPPORTINGMANAGERIAL DECISIONSThis course provides the students with an overview ofthe methods and logic behind the quantitative tools andmeasurement techniques employed in a modern businesssetting. Topics include game theory, probability concepts andapplications, decision trees, linear programming and simulationmodeling. Prerequisites: CIS 102, MAT 115 and ProgramDirector’s Approval. 3 creditsBUS 590 TOPICS IN BUSINESSSpecial topics designed to explore current issues in business toexpand the knowledge and skill base of graduate students. Titleof the course will be announced in the Course Schedule listing.This course is an elective, and may be applied towards the MBAdegree. Prerequisite: Program Director’s Approval. 1-3 creditsBUS 595 ENTREPRENEURSHIP/INTRAPRENEURSHIP(CAPSTONE)This is the capstone course that integrates the learning acquiredin all the other courses. Specifically, students are encouragedto be entrepreneurial in their outlook, whether starting a newbusiness venture, or being creative in an existing businesssetting. Topics include: preparing a business plan, accountingand financial matters, legal issues, technology considerationsand successful marketing. Prerequisites: BUS 240 and ProgramDirector’s Approval. 3 credits46


DivisionofEducationPrograms of Study47


Welcome to the Division of Education from theDean of the DivisionDear Teacher Candidate:Welcome to the Professional Education Unit at MolloyCollege! By choosing to pursue graduate study in Education atMolloy, you have selected a rigorous program, which will lead toa rewarding career. Our Professional Education Unit is made upof educators with vast experience at the childhood and adolescentlevels who are ready to share their expertise with you and mentoryou along your career path. Additionally, our programs are accreditedby the prestigious National Council for Accreditation ofTeacher Education (NCATE).Over the past ten years, Molloy’s Graduate Education Programshave become well respected throughout the educationalcommunity. Our programs lead to initial or advanced certificationin areas including early childhood, childhood, adolescence, specialeducation and Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages(TESOL). We also offer Post Master’s Degree Programsin TESOL and Special Education. Opportunities for classroom-based action research are an excitingcomponent of our professional certificate programs. Initial certificate programs include supervised fieldexperiences, which will help you to put your theoretical knowledge into practice in actual classrooms.Molloy faculty mentors will guide you along every step of the way. I am confident that you will finda stimulating academic environment in all of our graduate classes, which will help you to further yourprofessional growth.I wish you every success as you embark upon or continue your professional training in our GraduateEducation Program.Sincerely,Maureen T. Walsh, Ed.D.Dean of the Division of EducationGraduate Business Programs48


Welcome to the Education Master’s and Post Master’sPrograms from the Associate Dean and DirectorDear Teachers and Teacher Candidates:Welcome to the outstanding Graduate Education Programat Molloy College! Congratulations on your choice of a career inwhich you can change the world-- one student at a time.The fact that you are perusing this catalog indicates that youare interested in our most noble profession, one which will allowyou to truly make a difference. Founded by the Dominican Sistersof Amityville in 1955, Molloy College has from its beginningenjoyed an outstanding reputation for educating teachers who areeffective leaders in schools throughout Long Island and surroundingareas.Molloy’s Master of Science Degree offers twelve differentprograms including Early Childhood Education, ChildhoodEducation, Adolescent Education in biology, English, mathematics,social studies and Spanish, Special Education on both childhoodand adolescent levels, and Teaching English to Speakers ofOther Languages in grades PreK-12, which provide you with theopportunity to match your special interests and talents to the needsof the students whom you will teach. You also have the opportunity to combine courses and receivedual certification or to extend your existing certification through our Post Masters Advanced CertificatePrograms.Graduate Education professors possess the highest academic credentials, are experienced in researchand publishing, and bring many years of classroom and administrative experience to enhance their teaching.They have your individual success as their goal. Your personal advisor will be a full-time facultymember with expertise and experience in your certification area. Class size is limited to facilitate interactivelearning and personal attention.We are extremely proud of our graduates who represent us as an outstanding quality program,accredited not only by Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, but also by theNational Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. If you are seeking a challenging andrewarding life, be it your initial position or a career change from another field, I invite you to take thatfirst exciting step on your successful journey here at Molloy College. I welcome you to the Dominicanheritage of excellence in a values centered teacher education program.Sincerely,Bernadette Donovan O.P., Ph.D.Associate Dean and DirectorGraduate Education Programs49


Education Master’sProgramsK326 Kellenberg Hall516.678.5000, Ext. 6280Maureen T. Walsh, Ed.D., Dean of the Division of EducationBernadette M. Donovan, O.P., Ph.D., Associate Dean andDirector Graduate Programs in EducationVincent Tumminello, M.S., Coordinator of Graduate Programsand Certification Officer for Graduate Education CandidatesProfessor Emerita: Karen A. EdwardsProfessors: Audrey Cohan, Bernadette M. Donovan, O.P., MarjorieSchieringAssociate Professors: Samuel W. Carpentier, Michelle Chamblin,Vicky Giouroukakis, Patricia Hinds-Mason, Andrea Honigsfeld,Charles Howlett, Peter K. Lynch, Allen G. Rauch, Laura Shea-Doolan,Susan A. Smith, Alexandria Wolochuk, O.P.Assistant Professors: Audra Cerruto, Evelyn Connolly, Maria Dove,Jacqueline Nenchin, Kevin SheehanInstructor: Margaret BlairAdjunct Assistant Professors: Maureen Connolly, MargaretIppolito, Gerardine Johnson-Carpenter, Margaret Renner, Janice M.Sawyer, Angela Sullivan, Thalia VendittiAdjunct Instructors: Donna Banek, Stephen Bongiovi, PetronellaCellura, Danielle Colby, Lauren DeSilva, Robin Fruman, GloriaGrosso, Debra LoVerde, Rickey Moroney, Salvatore Rizzo, PatriciaRoberts, Linda Scalice, David Smith, Donna Sowerby, LeslieWecklserSuffolk Center and Extension SitesMolloy College Graduate Education programs are offered at MolloyCollege Suffolk Center on Route 110 in Farmingdale.A select number of courses are also offered at the followingextension sites:St. Anthony’s High School, South Huntington (Suffolk County), TheImmaculate Conception Center, Douglaston (Queens County)These credit bearing courses are included in the degreerequirements for the Master of Science Degrees and are taught byprofessors who teach at Molloy College following the same syllabias courses taught at the main campus.Division of Education —Philosophy and ConceptualFrameworkMissionFounded in the Catholic tradition and committed to the Dominicanideals of truth, academic excellence and openness to diverseworld-views, the Professional Education Unit of Molloy Collegeprovides a value-centered experience that embraces intellectual,ethical, spiritual and social development in an environmentwhere academic freedom, a spirit of inquiry and respect for eachindividual’s worth and dignity prevail. The Professional EducationUnit at Molloy College is committed to the preparation ofoutstanding teaching professionals with the dispositions, skills andknowledge required to meet the needs of all students they havethe privilege to teach. It is the responsibility and goal of the facultyto guide students through pedagogically valid and intenselychallenging learning and service experiences that empowerteacher candidates to serve as leaders in schools and communities.Faculty recognize that effective teachers have a solid foundationin the liberal arts and sciences, aligned with national, state andinstitutional teaching and learning standards.This Conceptual Framework relates directly to Molloy College’sStrategic Plan and is supported by the four pillars of Dominican life:prayer, study, preaching and community that we interpret as:• Spirituality and Reflection• Research and Teaching• Service• CommunityCore Values and Dispositions50


The Molloy College Teacher Education faculty has derived its visionfor the exemplary teacher from the College’s mission statement, thefour pillars of the Dominican tradition (spirituality and reflection,research and teaching, service, and community), comments andinput from the Professional Education Unit’s Advisory Boards.The teaching professionals who complete Molloy’s teacherpreparation programs are distinguished by their ability to exemplifyand promote core values in their own teaching. The Molloy TeacherCandidate:• Believes that all children can learn• Embraces and celebrates differences in learning styles,and values diversity and personal identity• Embraces responsibilities and duties associated withdemocracy• Evaluates and reflects on professional practice to makeinformed decisions regarding the use of technology insupport of student learning and considers the social,ethical, legal and human issues surrounding the useof technology in the PK-12 schools and applies thoseprinciples in practice• Approaches intellectual pursuits with integrity andopen-mindedness, and values educational theory andresearch to reflect productively on one’s own practice• Celebrates pluralism and independence, and reflectsupon and evaluates the effects of social justice andinjustice• Values and nurtures students’ intellectual and socialgrowth, and the pursuit of wisdom• Assumes appropriate risk in advocating for studentsand others, and reflects on professional practice tomake informed decisions regarding the support ofstudent learning• Demonstrates enthusiasm and passion for teachingand learning, and commitment to students and theirlearning• Values assessment, which includes analysis andreflection, as a means to improve effective practice• Celebrates respect for self, family, educative institutionsand community, values and encourages independenceand community including a spirit of cooperation and,embraces and sustains a safe and nurturing learningenvironment• Appreciates personal and professional empowermentand sense of self efficacy and values skepticism, inquiryand higher order thinkingFor the Molloy community, teaching, when performed withintegrity and compassion, is both spiritual and transformative.Molloy teachers are characterized by their depth and breadth ofknowledge in the academic content areas and in professionaleducation, their ability to engage others as a community of learners,their enthusiasm for teaching and their commitment to becomereflective practitioners, as well as life-long learners. Therefore, theMolloy graduate can be described as a values-based professionalhelping students or groups of students to:• Clarify for themselves the nature of their ownquestions, in terms they can pursue• Interpret their findings, in relation to otherknowledge they have generated• Pursue a course of action grounded in study,contemplation and reflectionTo meet the vision of the Education Program, Molloy seeks to:• Identify, recruit and retain faculty who are eager torepresent, support and promote the shared vision andpurpose of the professional education program• Collaborate with arts and sciences faculty, who arecommitted to these proficiencies, in developing astrong content foundation for teacher candidates• Partner with PK-12 schools to design collaborativelyteacher education programs, coursework and fieldexperiences• Develop comprehensive opportunities for ourcandidates to assimilate the core values as theybecome exemplary teachers of knowledge, skills andvalues/dispositions• Regularly assess core values and the programs basedon them for continued growth and excellence• Utilize the appropriate technology for data collectionand strategic planning• Embrace diversity and the quest for social justice• Integrate relevant and responsible technology into allprofessional activitiesThe program goals of the Division of Education are categorized asthe knowledge, skills and dispositions which impact on studentlearning outcomes. Molly College Division of Education benchmarkperformances and assessments are aligned with New York StateEducation Department Standards for teacher performance as wellas the specific standards of the following professional associations:Association for Childhood Education International, NationalCouncil for Social Studies, National Council of Teachers of English,National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, National Council forSocial Studies, National Science Teachers Association, Council forExceptional Children, and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers ofOther Languages).For candidates who are new to the teaching profession andwho are enrolled in programs leading to initial certification, aninnovative course of study which is sufficiently flexible to benefitthe adult learner is provided. These candidates who are changingcareers or returning to teaching acquire a pedagogical knowledgebase on which to continuously build effective teaching skills andstrategies and learn how to become effective classroom facilitatorswho meet students’ diverse needs. This program encourageslearning from observation, participation and research in order toascertain “best practices.” Field experience culminating in full timestudent teaching is the capstone of this program.The Division of Education views the candidates and faculty asinteractive, supportive and has as its primary mission the success ofcandidates. A student-centered philosophy is the key to the Masterof Science Programs. This includes a one-on-one advisementprocess and closely monitored, individualized, in-depth field51


supervision which includes placement in diverse settings and inhigh-needs schools.The Molloy College Mission Statement directly impacts the Divisionof Education and provides the rationale for the Masters Programs.The philosophy of the College states, “In an environment whereacademic freedom, a spirit of inquiry and respect for eachindividual’s worth and dignity prevail, students acquire theknowledge and skills necessary to meet the challenges of modernlife. Graduate education fosters a high level of scholarly inquiryfor expansion of knowledge, self-enrichment and achievementof personal and professional goals.” Based upon this philosophy,Molloy College has an established and well-respected Divisionof Education committed to the preparation of knowledgeable,creative and challenging teachers.The Molloy Learning ObjectivesThe spiritual development of students is fostered in the MolloyCollege environment, where academic freedom, the process ofinquiry, and respect are modeled. Teacher candidates at MolloyCollege are challenged to meet high personal and professionalexpectations and goals and to meet the Molloy Learning Objectiveslisted below:• Master the teaching requirements and content areasof the elementary school curriculum and the specificsubject areas of the secondary school curriculum asevidenced by successful completion of the requiredNew York State Education Department certificationrequirements so as to ensure maximum learning for allstudents• Demonstrate in unit planning and lesson delivery theincorporation of adapted teaching methods, materialsand procedures which address the varied cultural,socio-economic and diverse learning styles of allstudents including those with special needs and thosefor whom English is a second language• Evidence the ability to advocate for social justiceissues and students’ needs through student centeredteaching and re-teach analysis of social concerns whichaffect student learning• Integrate into lesson planning and delivery the use oftechnology which will enhance students’ knowledge,skills and dispositions• Utilize appropriate technology in designing andconducting action research, thesis compilation andposter presentation• Formulate and revise personal philosophy of educationwhich evidences integrity and commitment to ethicaland social justice issues• Evidence appreciation for students’ intellectual andsocial growth through lesson planning and includingcooperative learning experiences• Document students’ intellectual and social growththrough data collection and documentation duringaction research• Reflect upon personal professional practice asevidenced by advocating for ethical treatment ofstudents and families• Demonstrate enthusiasm and passion for teaching andlearning as evidenced by well-developed unit plans andlesson plans which motivate and challenge students• Design and utilize various types of formative andevaluative assessments to improve curriculum andmeasure students’ progress though lesson planningand delivery• Collaborate with parents, school administrators andother teachers and professionals to impact students’learning• Research and evaluate contemporary scholarlyresearch and theories of best practices which producestudent learning as demonstrated by action researchdocuments• Investigate new and proven educational theories andpractices• Design classroom procedures to create a community oflearnersAdmissions Requirements forDivision of Education ProgramsFor admission to graduate education programs:• Applicants for admission and matriculation are requiredto possess an appropriate Baccalaureate Degree froman accredited college or university.• Candidates who wish to pursue a program leading toprofessional certification must possess initial New YorkState Teaching Certification and have the prerequisitesrequired by New York State Education Department forthe professional certification. (Specific pre-requisitesare listed under each program description.)• Candidates who are entering the teaching professionand seeking initial certification must have takenappropriate major courses in content areas and liberalarts concentration to satisfy the requirements of theNew York State Education Department for teachercertification and must have attained a minimum gradeof “C+” in these courses. Any candidate who needs tocomplete prerequisite courses is required to do so assoon as possible, but definitely prior to completing 12credits in the Graduate Program.• No credit is given for life experience.• CLEP examinations may not substitute for course work.In addition, applicants must:• Submit an official transcript of all undergraduate workand any prior graduate courses taken. Transcripts willbe evaluated according to New York State EducationDepartment regulations and upon approval of theProgram Director, Molloy College will accept up toa maximum of six graduate transfer credits having agrade of “B” or better from another accredited collegeor university. These credits must have been completedwithin the last five years and must correspond in52


content to courses offered in the Molloy CollegeGraduate Education Program.• Complete the graduate degree program applicationincluding an essay regarding personal academic goals.• Have achieved a minimum of 3.0 overall grade pointaverage in undergraduate work. (Candidates havinga GPA between 2.8 and 3.00 may be accepted onprobationary status and may be required to take theGraduate Record Examination or fulfill additional basicentry requirements.) Applicants whose GPA is below2.8 are required to successfully complete prescribedundergraduate courses to improve their GPA beforeany graduate level courses may be taken.• Possess computer skills related to application software,information processing and internet access.• Submit three letters of reference from former collegeprofessors and/or professional associates.• Participate in a personal interview with the ProgramDirector.• Evidence appropriate dispositions necessary forbecoming a professional educator who can successfullyteach all students in inclusive classrooms. Applicantswho lack necessary dispositions may be counseled tochoose another profession.• Attend a mandatory orientation session.• Submit an acceptable writing-on-demand sample. Ifthe sample does not meet the acceptable criteria, thecandidate is required to attend remedial sessions in theWriting Lab.• Provide proof of immunization. Candidates who havenot fulfilled this requirement cannot be admitted toclass.• Students are not permitted to take more than six (6)credits before achieving permanent matriculation.Nine (9) credits per semester is considered full-time ingraduate programs.Education Program ProgressionPoliciesCandidates who have not fulfilled the progression requirementsof the program may not be admitted to subsequent classes.Any student receiving a grade of Incomplete is required to fulfillthe course requirements by the date specified in the AcademicCalendar. A grade of “I” automatically becomes a grade of “F” afterthis time. After the completion of six (6) credits, non-matriculatedstudents cannot be permitted to register without having madeformal application to the program and received a letter ofacceptance.Progression for Initial CertificationPrior to full time student teaching, it is required by New YorkState Education Department that the candidate spend 100 hoursobserving and participating in classroom experiences in a fieldsetting. At least 20 of these hours must be spent in a “High-Needs”area. Candidates must register for the program specific section ofEDU 500 Apprentice Field Experience Phase I and also submit theApplication to Apprentice Experience Form to the Field PlacementOffice. Candidates may not begin field observations until contactedby their field advisor and scheduled for two seminars. A reflectiveformat is required. Arrangements for the initial 40 hours ofobservation time is coordinated through the Director of FieldPlacements. Candidates may observe in an elementary, secondaryor middle school of their choice or may be placed by the MolloyCollege Education Department. Successful completion of theApprentice Field Experience is required for progression to the Pre-Professional phase.Candidates must register for the program specific section of EDU550 (Childhood Programs) or EDU 554 (Adolescent Programs)Pre-Professional Field Experience Phase II and also submit the Pre-Professional Field Placement Application to the Field PlacementOffice. Sixty additional hours of observation/participation arenecessary prior to student teaching. Candidates are periodicallysupervised by a Molloy College Professor during these hours ofobservation/participation in a field school experience. Successfulcompletion of the observation/participation phase is requiredprior to admittance to student teaching. Requests for all phases offield experience must be submitted to the Field Placement Officeaccording to the following schedule:March 1 for Fall Placement, October 1 for SpringPlacement.Failure to observe this deadline may result in lackof placement until the following semester. Anycandidate who does not demonstrate the requiredknowledge, skills and dispositions necessary forsuccessful student teaching, may be required towithdraw from the Program or to repeat the Pre-Professional Experience. This determination ismade by the Graduate Program faculty with inputfrom the field supervisors and co-operating teacherand approved by the Director of Field Placementsand Clinical Experiences and the Director of theGraduate Education Program. If field experienceneeds to be extended because the candidate hasfailed to successfully demonstrate the knowledge,skills and dispositions required, this will negativelyaffect the candidate’s final grade.Student Teaching is the culmination of the Programs leading toInitial Certification. Candidates are required to student teach forone college semester; half of the semester is spent in grades 1–3 or7–9 and the other half in grades 4–6 or 10–12. Candidates pursuingEarly Childhood and Childhood Dual Certification are required tohave experience in birth–grade 2 and in grades 3–6. Candidates inthe TESOL or Special Education Programs are required to engage infield experiences and student teach in these areas. Application forstudent teaching must be submitted to the Field Placement Office.In addition to submitting the proper form to the Field PlacementOffice, candidates are required to register for the proper sectionof Phase III at the time of advisement. Molloy College EducationDepartment places candidates for the student teaching experienceand appoints a college professor as the candidate’s field supervisor.Candidates engaged in student teaching are required to participatein weekly seminars.Pedagogical and content knowledge is a prerequisite for studentteaching. It is expected, therefore, that candidates will havesuccessfully completed the Liberal Arts and Sciences Test (LAST),53


The Assessment of Teacher Skills Written (ATSW) and the ContentSpecialty Test (CST) prior to student teaching. Candidatespreparing for Dual Certification need to successfully complete theContent Specialty Test (CST) in both areas.When taking NYSED examinations, candidates are required tolist Molloy College as a recipient of their scores. Candidates alsoare required to provide their advisor with printed evidence oftheir scores immediately upon accessing them via the internet.Candidates for initial teaching certification are required by mandateof New York State Education Department to have placementexperience in a high needs district.Teacher candidates who are already teaching without NYSEDCertification are required to register for all field experiencesincluding student teaching. These candidates will fulfill their fieldexperiences and student teaching and will be observed in theclassroom in which they are teaching. These experiences must bein the area and grade(s) of the certification to be attained. In theevent that only one of these required levels (1-3, 7-9) and (4-6,10-12) can be observed in the candidate’s position, the candidateand Molloy College Field Placement Office will arrange for theadditional experience in order to fulfill NYSED requirements forTeacher Certification.Progression for Professional CertificationCandidates in programs leading to professional certification arerequired to possess initial certification. These candidates areguided by faculty advisors in course selections leading to additionalcertification areas if so desired. The writing and presentation ofan action research thesis is the culmination of these programs.Preparation for this capstone experience is provided in EDU547 which should be taken during the next to last semester andimmediately preceding EDU 549 which is the final research course.Progression through programs leading to professional certificationrequire the approval of the candidate’s advisor at the completion ofspecific stages in the Program. Candidates engaged in 1-12 creditsare considered in Stage I, candidates engaged in acquiring 13-30credits are considered in Stage II. Successful completion of StagesI and II are necessary to apply for admission into Stage III Thesispreparation (EDU 547) and Thesis completion (EDU 549) which aretaken in sequence over two semesters. Approval by Molloy CollegeInternal Review Board (IRB) is required before a candidate maybegin research data collection.Advisor approval to progress to the next stage requires successfulcompletion of specific benchmark performances which need tobe documented in the candidate’s electronic portfolio. Thesebenchmarks and other criteria need to reflect the candidate’sgrowth in knowledge, skills, disposition and impact on students’learning. Any candidate who does not successfully complete theresearch requirements of EDU 547 cannot be permitted to advanceto EDU 549 and must repeat EDU 547 prior to progression.Progression for Special Education—Initial DualCertificationCandidates who are in a dual certification programs need tohave field experiences in both areas of the certificate. During theApprentice Experience, candidates observe in classrooms whereinclusion of students with special needs is practiced and alsoobserve across the continuum of special education placements.Journal entries and reflections should evidence observation ofregular education and special education practices.54Pre-Professional Experience should reflect attention in classroomobservation and participation which addresses the needs ofstudents with special needs as well as those students in regulareducation programs.Professional Student Teaching Experience requires twoplacements (1–3, 4–6 Childhood; 7–9, 10–12 Adolescence). One ofthese placements must be in a setting in which the candidate hasdirect experience with students with special needs. Any teachercandidate who fails to demonstrate the proper knowledge, skillsand dispositions required to successfully complete the programand become a professional educator may be counseled out of theProgram and encouraged to pursue another career.Progression for Special Education ProfessionalCertification ProgramCandidates who possess initial teaching certification in childhood1–6 or adolescence 7–12 (biology, English, mathematics, socialstudies, Spanish), and have engaged in a student teachingexperience in that area need to complete a Practicum of at least20 days in a special education setting. This Practicum experienceis arranged during summer sessions so as not to interfere withthe regular teaching schedule of the candidate. Candidates arerequired to attend seminars during their Practicum experience.Candidates who possess initial teaching certification in childhoodor adolescence 7–12 (biology, English, mathematics, social studies,Spanish) but who had student teaching waived because ofprevious teaching experience need to engage in student teachingexperience in special education. This special education studentteaching is equivalent to the semester experience and is arrangedduring summer session long. Candidates engaged in studentteaching or in Practicum experience are placed by Molloy CollegeField Placement Office and are supervised by Molloy College FieldSupervisors.Candidates who possess initial teaching certification in specialeducation take an additional 3 credit course in special education inplace of the Practicum experience.Progression for TESOLCertification in TESOL includes grades PK–12. Therefore, it isrequired that the candidate have experience in all areas of thecertificate. This experience is addressed during the entire fieldexperience with special emphasis during the Professional studentteaching experience in the areas of dual certification whereapplicable.Candidates who already possess certification in a specific area/content will have the opportunity to be exposed to TESOLexperiences in areas other than their present or previous teachingexperience. Candidates for TESOL certification are required tomeet with the TESOL Coordinator to plan their field experiencesimmediately upon admission to the program.Education Master’s and PostMaster’s Program Policies andPracticesMolloy College Graduate Programs in Education adhere strictly toNew York State Education Department requirements for teachercertification and include the required field experiences. No credit is


granted for learning derived from life experience.NOTE: The Division of Education reserves the right to makenecessary changes in programs and courses in response toregulations received from the New York State EducationDepartment regarding teacher certification policies. Thesechanges become effective according to dates specified by NewYork State Education Department. Students are responsiblefor meeting all program requirements.In accordance with New York State Education Department andMolloy College regulations, all candidates working toward initialteacher certification must attend workshops in the training forIdentification of Child Abuse and Neglect, Principles of ChemicalDependency and School Violence Prevention/Intervention. Theseworkshops are held on the Molloy College campus several timeseach semester. Candidates are also required to be fingerprintedupon acceptance into the Program.Prior to student teaching, students must demonstrate an acceptablelevel of written and oral English language skills and receive asatisfactory evaluation from field supervisors and course professorsand have completed the required number of hours observingand participating in field school classrooms. All prerequisitecourses needed for New York State Teacher Certification must becompleted prior to student teaching.Education students are responsible for all transportation to andfrom their field school placements.New York State Education Department mandates successfulcompletion of three teacher examinations in order to be initiallycertified (LAST, ATS-W, and CST). Candidates who graduated priorto February 2004 were not required to complete the CST for initialcertification. These candidates must successfully complete theCST for professional certification. Completion of the Child AbusePrevention Workshop, Chemical Dependency Workshop andViolence Prevention Workshop is also necessary. A copy of thenotification of successful completion of these tests and workshopsmust be submitted to the Graduate Education Office for inclusionin the candidate’s file.Teacher candidates are admitted with full acceptance, provisionalacademic acceptance or are given non-matriculated statusdepending upon their fulfillment of admission requirements.In order to guide candidates in assessing their areas of strengthand possible deficits and to guide them in remediating areas inwhich prerequisite knowledge may be lacking, the departmentmay utilize potential diagnostic tools that will enable the divisionto assist candidates to meet the standards set by New York StateEducation Department (NYSED) for teacher certification.Graduate Education Program Faculty advisors discuss withcandidates the potential diagnostic tools that could be used toascertain their ability to meet the standards set by New York StateEducation Department. For example, successful completion of thefollowing diagnostic tools, LAST and CST, will ensure mastery ofcontent necessary to achieve NYSED teaching certification.Molloy College Division of Education will guide candidates inidentifying areas where additional knowledge is needed so thatthey will be successful in attaining a Masters’ Degree and teachercertification. Because content knowledge is prerequisite for55


classroom teaching, candidates are required to meet the contentareas for certification prior to student teaching. Candidates whosuccessfully complete the required courses and field experienceswill be recommended by Molloy College for certification. MolloyCollege reserves the right to deny recommendation for Certificationto any candidate who fails to successfully complete all programrequirements or who does not evidence the knowledge, skills, anddispositions required by the teaching profession.Candidates are responsible for ascertaining and fulfilling allrequirements necessary to obtain New York State TeacherCertification. These requirements and information re: New YorkState Education Department can be found at www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/. Assessment of Teaching Skills Performance(AST-P) is needed for professional certification. This requirement ismet after completing course requirements and having secured ateaching position.Molloy College Passing Rate for 2008-2009 on New York StateCertification Examinations is as follows: LSAT 100%, ATSW 100%.As of February 2004, candidates seeking initial certification arerequired to successfully pass the Content Specialty Test in theirspecific area.Non-matriculated candidates may not exceed twenty percentof the total enrollment in any graduate course and will beaccommodated on a space-available basis.Academic IntegrityThe college maintains and affirms a strong policy of academichonesty. Every member of the academic community has a dutyneither to cheat nor to condone cheating, fabrication, plagiarism,or facilitation of academic dishonesty. Academic infractions aresubject to disciplinary action.Plagiarism, defined as a “failure to document the direct words ofanother or the rephrasing of another’s work so as to representthem as one’s own,” is inconsistent with the values and dispositionsrequired for teaching and with the philosophy of Molloy College.Incidents of suspected plagiarism will result in the following:• Conference with the course professor• Conference with the Program Director• 0% grade and no credit for the assignment whichcontains plagiarized material• Possible course failure and repetition of the course.Dispositions for TeachingAccording to the National Council for the Accreditation of TeacherEducation (NCATE), Dispositions for Teaching are defined as:“The values, commitments, and professional ethics that influencebehaviors toward students, families, colleagues, and communitiesand affect student learning, motivation, and attitudes relatedto values such as caring, fairness, honest, responsibility, andsocial justice.” Dispositions for teaching are assessed at the initialinterview for acceptance into the Graduate Programs. Candidatesare periodically assessed during each of the three phases of thePrograms.Candidates who evidence a lack of proper dispositions for teachingmay be counseled out of the teacher education program andadvised to investigate other careers. If necessary, candidates willbe required to meet with the Program Director, the Division Deanand ultimately with the Dispositions Committee. Candidates maynot invite additional persons to this meeting. The decision of theDispositions Committee is final. Candidates who consistentlydemonstrate a lack of dispositions needed for teaching, will berequired to withdraw from the teacher education program. Acandidate who has failed to successfully complete the MolloyCollege Undergraduate Program cannot be admitted to theGraduate Education Program.Professional Portfolio RequirementsPortfolio compilation is an assessment requirement of allcandidates in Programs in Graduate Education. Evidence ofsuccessful completion of all Benchmark Performances with theappropriate rubric, artifacts from coursework, reflections fromfield experiences and evidence of dispositions for teaching mustbe included in the Electronic Portfolio, which is discussed andapproved by the candidate’s advisor each semester.G-mail AccountsMolloy College faculty communicate with candidates personallyand via e-mail. It is mandatory that every candidate utilize a MolloyCollege e-mail account assigned upon initial registration into theprogram.Summer CoursesCourses are offered during a five-week period in May-June andanother five-week period in July-August. These courses meet twicea week for three hours duration. Course content, goals, objectivesand assignments are the same as those required during the fall andspring semesters of fifteen weeks duration. Therefore, candidatesare advised to take no more than one three credit course in each ofthese summer sessions. Candidates are expected to be present forevery class session. Absence from a class may result in lowering ofthe course grade or the necessity of repeating the course.AdvisementMolloy College assigns a personal advisor to each candidateto facilitate his/her progress through the programs. It is theresponsibility of the candidate to schedule an appointmentwith this advisor each semester prior to registering for courses.Candidates are required to submit their portfolio, includingbenchmarks and rubrics, at advisement each semester. Ultimatelyit is the responsibility of the candidate to select the requiredprogram courses.Grading PolicyTeacher candidates must attain a grade of B or better in all courses.Any candidate who receives a grade lower than B in any course,must repeat that course in the following semester. A course may berepeated only once. Failure to maintain a grade of B when takinga course for the second time necessitates withdrawal from theProgram. Failure of more than one course necessitates withdrawalfrom the Program. Candidates who have been withdrawn dueto academic failure may not be readmitted to the Program.Candidates may withdraw from the same course no more than twotimes.Students must maintain GPA of 3.0 or better in order to beginstudent teaching.BenchmarksIn order to receive a passing grade in a course, a candidate mustachieve a minimum score of “2” for each benchmark in that course.No more than two opportunities to achieve the required score of56


“2” will be permitted. It is expected that benchmarks that are notsatisfactorily met will be repeated immediately.Provisional Academic StatusStudents who have been accepted into the M.S. Program, buthave not fully met the Graduate Admission criteria, may registerfor courses and must receive a minimum grade of “B” in the first 6credits taken. Re-evaluation for continued matriculated status willfollow completion of these courses. Failure to achieve a grade of“B” or better in the first 6 credits taken will result in dismissal fromthe Program.Graduate Education Commencement and HonorsGraduate Education Program honors are awarded to candidates ofoutstanding scholarship in their area of concentration on GraduateHooding and Class Night. To be eligible for consideration, acandidate must have a cumulative grade point average of 4.0 andhave demonstrated outstanding disposition for teaching. In theevent that several teacher candidates are eligible for honors, thefinal decision will be made by the Graduate Program Faculty.Exceptional student teaching experience is considered in awardingGraduate Program Honors and Honorable Mention in the InitialCertification Program. Outstanding thesis completion andpresentation is considered in awarding Honors and HonorableMention in the Professional Certification Program.December and May graduates are eligible for Honors. Teachercandidates who complete degree requirements during thesummer and graduate in August are not eligible for honors whichare conferred at Graduate Hooding and Class Night in May.Note: Graduate Education students who are within three (3)credits of program completion and have registered for thesecredits to be taken at Molloy College during the summersession are permitted to participate in the commencementceremonies held in May. The names of these students will notappear in the Commencement Brochure.Attendance PolicySince the classroom experience consists of an exchange of ideas anddiscussion which cannot be replicated, candidates are expected toattend all classes punctually and regularly. Attendance and classparticipation represent a portion of a candidate’s final grade in allgraduate education courses. Students who are absent more thanTHREE times during the course of a semester may be required torepeat the course or may be assigned an incomplete grade until themissed time and work is completed. It is the student’s responsibilityto contact the professor if there are any problems.RetentionAn exit interview with the candidate’s advisor and the ProgramDirector is required for candidates who choose to change theirprogram or withdraw from Molloy, as well as for students whosegrades or dispositions do not meet program requirements.Incomplete PolicyThe grade of “I” is applied in a course when the candidate has notcompleted all course requirements. It is a substitute grade given onlywith the approval of the instructor and Graduate Program Directorat the specific request of the candidate prior to the end of thecourse. Requests for an incomplete need to be made in writing anddemonstrate need other than incomplete coursework. Approvalis granted only when the student demonstrates circumstancesbeyond his/her control which temporarily prevents completionof the coursework. All “Incompletes” must be resolved by thedates indicated in the Academic Calendar for each semester. Anyextension beyond the published dates of the Academic Calendarrequires written approval of both the instructor, the Director of theGraduate Program and the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Anygrade of “I” which is not converted to a letter grade within the timeallotted, automatically becomes an “F”.Exit InterviewsAn exit interview with an advisor is required prior to applying forgraduation. Candidates are to bring their completed portfolio tothis interview. At the completion of all coursework, candidatesagain meet with their advisor to finalize their recommendations forcertification.Attendance at Professional Workshops and ConferencesParticipation in professional workshops and conferences isan integral part of being a well-informed teacher. All teachercandidates are required to attend one Molloy College sponsoredworkshop/conference each semester. These conferences areusually held on the Molloy College Campus and are presented byNassau Reading Council, Phi Delta Kappa, Molloy Chapter of KappaDelta Pi, Council for Exceptional Children, etc. A Conference ReportForm needs to be submitted for each conference attended.FacilitiesAn Education Technology Lab, located in K222 Kellenberg Hall,is equipped with hardware and software reserved for educationteacher candidates. In addition, graduate students may utilizecomputer labs located in the Wilbur Arts Building and at the SuffolkCenter in Farmingdale.Kappa Delta Pi—KDPKappa Delta Pi is an International Honor Society in Education.Founded in 1911, the goals of this society are to promoteexcellence in and to recognize outstanding contributions to thefield of education. Its aim is to foster high standards of preparationfor the teaching profession. Membership in Molloy College ChiEpsilon Chapter is open to those education candidates who havemaintained a cumulative index of 3.85 and have completed aminimum of 15 credits in the Graduate Education Program atMolloy College. Candidates must also complete a pre-candidacyperiod in which the member attends a minimum of one KDPworkshop or meeting prior to induction. Additionally, teachercandidates must complete a written statement highlightingvolunteer service in an educative environment and are required toattend the Induction Ceremony.Phi Delta Kappa—PDKStudents accepted into Molloy College Graduate EducationPrograms qualify for membership in the Molloy College Chapterof Phi Delta Kappa, the International Professional Organization forEducators.Council for Exceptional Children—CECThe Council for Exceptional Children includes professionalsinvolved in the education of students with special needs.Membership is also open to qualified regular education teachersthrough Molloy’s inclusive programs for teacher preparation.57


Association for Childhood Education International—ACEIThe Association for Childhood Education International promotesand supports optimal education and the development of childrenin a global community. ACEI influences the professional growthof educators and the efforts of others who are committed to theneeds of children in a changing society. ACEI membership is opento any individual concerned for the education and well-being ofchildren.Education Master’s and PostMaster’s ProgramsThe New York State Education Department has final authorityto establish criteria for teacher certification. The MolloyCollege Education Department adheres to all New YorkState Education Department criteria for teacher certification.Candidates are required to fulfill the requirements in allprograms leading to teacher certification as stated in theMolloy College Catalog.The following programs have been approved and accreditedby New York State Education Department and The NationalCouncil for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE):Programs Leading to Initial Certification:Teacher of Childhood Education (Grades 1–6)Teacher of Adolescent Education (Grades 7–12) in thefollowing subject areas: Biology, English, Mathematics,Social Studies, SpanishPrograms Leading to Dual Initial Certification:Teacher of Childhood Education (Grades 1–6)/ Teacher ofEnglish to Speakers of Other Languages TESOL (PK–12)Teacher of Childhood Education (Grades 1–6)/ EarlyChildhood (Birth - Grade 2)Teacher of Adolescent Education (Grades 7–12)/ Teacherof English to Speakers of Other Languages TESOL(PK–12)—Adolescent subject areas: Biology, English,Mathematics, Social Studies, SpanishChildhood Education/Teaching Students with Disabilitiesin Childhood Education grades 1–6Adolescent Education (Grades 7–12)/Teaching Studentswith Disabilities in Adolescent Education in thefollowing subject areas: Biology, English, Mathematics,Social Studies, SpanishPrograms Leading to Professional Certification for Those AlreadyPossessing Initial (Provisional) Certification:Teacher of Childhood Education (Grades 1–6)Teacher of Adolescent Education (Grades 7–12) in thefollowing areas: Biology, English, Mathematics, SocialStudies, SpanishPrograms Leading to Professional Certification and Adding anAdditional Initial Certification*:Teacher of English to Speakers of Other Languages TESOL(PK–12)Childhood Education (Grades 1–6)/Teaching Students withDisabilities in Childhood EducationTeacher of Childhood Education (Grades 1–6)/ EarlyChildhood (Birth - Grade 2)Adolescent Education (Grades 7–12)/Teaching Studentswith Disabilities in Adolescent Education in thefollowing subject areas: Biology, English, Mathematics,Social Studies, Spanish*For candidates possessing Initial Certification in Childhood 1–6,Adolescence 7–12, Special Education or TESOL, and wishing tohave additional certification in Special Education or TESOL, theseprograms will result in Professional Certification in the area ofcurrent Initial Certification and in Initial Certification in SpecialEducation, TESOL or Early Childhood.Post-Master’s Certificate Programs:Teacher of English to Speakers of Other Languages TESOL(PK-12)Teacher of Students with Disabilities in ChildhoodEducation 1-6Teacher of Students with Disabilities in AdolescenceEducation 7-12 in the following subject areas: Biology,English, Mathematics, Social Studies, SpanishMiddle School Extension:Extension of Childhood Education Certification to Grades7–9 in the following subject areas: Biology, English,Mathematics, Social Studies, SpanishExtension of Adolescent Education Certificate to Grades 5and 6Middle School Extension requires that the candidate have 30credit hours in the specific academic area for which the extensionis sought, take the additional courses necessary, successfullycomplete the Content Specialty Test in the area for which theextension is sought and engage in field experience in the specificgrade and content area for which Middle School Extension issought.Mandated Workshops:The following New York State Education Department and MolloyCollege mandated Workshops are offered at Molloy Collegethrough the Continuing Education Division. These Workshops arenecessary for teacher certification:Training in the Identification and Reporting of Child Abuseand NeglectSchool Violence Prevention and InterventionPrinciples of Chemical DependencyPrograms of Study Leading toM.S. in Education DegreesPrograms leading to M.S. degrees are listed according to thecertification areas of childhood or adolescent. For the adolescentprograms, the listings are separated by the content areas ofBiology, English, Mathematics, Social Studies and Spanish.TESOL (PK-12) for professional certification or additional initialcertification is listed separately (following Childhood andAdolescent).Programs leading to certification in Special Education are listedin the sections on Childhood or Adolescent Education. EarlyChildhood/Childhood Dual Initial Certification Degree programsare listed in the Childhood section.58


EDU 506AIntegrated Language Arts andReading for the InclusiveClassroom of Diverse6Learners in Early Childhoodand Childhood SettingsEDU 509Curriculum and Methods ofTeaching Social Studiesin Birth - Grade 2 and3Childhood 1-6 in InclusiveClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 526Current Issues in EarlyChildhood Education, Birth- Grade 2: Assessment ofProgress, Relationships,3Families, Legal andCommunity IssuesEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 550EPre-Professional EarlyChildhood/Childhood FieldExperience, Nursery, PK,0Kindergarten, Grades 1-2EDU 551EStudent Teaching EarlyChildhood: Nursery, PK,3Kindergarten, Grades 1-2EDU 552AStudent Teaching Childhood(Grades 4-6)3EDU 553AStudent Teaching Seminar -Childhood (Grades 1-6)0Total Credits Required: 39A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.Candidates other than Molloy College enrollees may need 1 additionalcourse in Early Childhood Education: EDU 525 Curriculum, Strategies,Methodology and Materials in Early/Childhood Education (Birth-Grade 2).All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Teacher candidates who possess 30 credits in a specific content areamay extend their teaching certification to include Grade 7-9 by takingEDU 567 Psychological and Social Needs of Adolescents.Childhood Education (1-6)/TESOL (PK-12) -Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 27035HEGIS Code: 0899.00 {Education, Other}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in ChildhoodEducation/Teacher of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).Prerequisite for this program: 12 credits or equivalent in the study ofa language other than English.Required Courses (48 credits):CreditsEDU 500DApprentice Field Experience inChildhood TESOL Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 503Science Curriculum andMethods for DiverseLearners Birth - Grade 2,3Childhood 1-6EDU 505Advanced Methods of TeachingMathematics in InclusiveEarly Childhood, Childhood,3and Middle ChildhoodClassroomsEDU 506AIntegrated Language Arts andReading for the InclusiveClassroom of Diverse6Learners in Early Childhoodand Childhood SettingsEDU 509Curriculum and Methods ofTeaching Social Studiesin Birth - Grade 2 and3Childhood 1-6 in InclusiveClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive ClassroomTeachers*60


EDU 537EDU 540EDU 541EDU 542EDU 543EDU 544EDU 537 Diverse Abilitiesand Needs of Students inInclusive Classrooms Birth -Grade 2, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12Introduction to Linguistics forTESOL ProfessionalsSecond Language Acquisitionand TESOL: Theory andPracticeStructure and Application ofAmerican EnglishInterdisciplinary TeachingMethods and EnglishLanguage Arts for PK-12English Language LearnersPK-12 TESOL Teaching Practicesand Assessment in theContent AreasEDU 545TESOL Student TeachingPK–6, 7– 123EDU 548TESOL Student TeachingSeminar PK–6, 7–120EDU 550DPre-professional Childhood/TESOL PK–12 FieldExperiences in Inclusive0ClassroomsComplete either EDU 551A or EDU 552A*: 3EDU 551AorEDU 552AStudent Teaching Childhood(Grades 1–3)Student Teaching Childhood(Grades 4–6)Total Credits Required: 48A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Childhood Education (1-6)/TeachingStudents with Disabilities (1-6) - DualInitial - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26604HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in ChildhoodEducation/Special Education.Required Courses (48 credits):CreditsEDU 500BApprentice Field Experiencein Childhood/SpecialEducation InclusiveClassroom0333333**EDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 503Science Curriculum andMethods for DiverseLearners Birth - Grade 2,3Childhood 1-6EDU 504Interdisciplinary Birth - Grade2, Childhood 1-6, andMiddle Childhood Teaching3Methods for DiverseLearnersEDU 505Advanced Methods ofTeaching Mathematics inInclusive Early Childhood,3Childhood, and MiddleChildhood ClassroomsEDU 506AIntegrated Language Arts andReading for the InclusiveClassroom of Diverse6Learners in Early Childhoodand Childhood SettingsEDU 509Curriculum and Methods ofTeaching Social Studiesin Birth - Grade 2 and3Childhood 1-6 in InclusiveClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 550BPre-Professional Childhood/Special Education FieldExperiences in Inclusive0ClassroomsEDU 551BStudent Teaching Childhood(Grades 1–3, Regular and3Special Education)EDU 552BStudent Teaching Childhood(Grades 4–6, Regular andSpecial Education)361


EDU 553BStudent Teaching Seminar–Childhood/Special0Education (Grades 1-6)EDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays or Autism Spectrum3DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 572Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingChildhood students with3DisabilitiesEDU 574Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issues forTeaching Childhood Students3with DisabilitiesTotal Credits Required: 48A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.EDU 530EDU 531EDU 532EDU 533EDU 537EDU 547AEDU 549AAdvanced MathematicsCurriculum and Methodsfor Childhood and MiddleChildhood Diverse LearnersAdvanced English LanguageArts Curriculum andMethods for InclusiveClassrooms of ChildhoodDiverse LearnersAdvanced Science ContentAnd Methodology ForChildhood Diverse LearnersAdvanced Curriculum andMethods of TeachingSocial Studies in ChildhoodInclusive ClassroomsDiverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade2, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12Developing Action Research forDiverse ClassroomsTeacher as Researcher inDiverse Classrooms3333333Childhood Education (1-6) - ProfessionalCertification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25664HEGIS Code: 0802.00 {Elementary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in ChildhoodEducation.Required Courses (33 credits):EDU 513EDU 515Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms inBirth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Curriculum Assessment andDevelopmentCreditsComplete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521orEDU 522EDU 523Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive ClassroomTeachersTeacher as the EducationalLeader in Partnerships forCollaborative Education33**3Total Credits Required: 33Childhood Education (1-6)/TeachingStudents with Disabilities (1-6) -Professional Certification in Areaof Initial Certification and InitialCertification in Special Education - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26602HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in areaof currently held Initial Certification (Childhood 1-6) and for InitialCertification in Special Education 1-6. (Candidates in possession ofInitial Childhood Education Certification will achieve ProfessionalCertification and have Initial Certification in Special Education added.)Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 362


EDU 521orEDU 522EDU 537EDU 547BEDU 549BEDU 570EDU 571EDU 572EDU 574Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive ClassroomTeachersDiverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade2, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12Developing Action Researchfor Special Education andInclusive Classrooms inChildhood EducationTeacher as Researcher in SpecialEducation and InclusiveClassroom in ChildhoodLearnersCharacteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays or Autism SpectrumDisordersAssessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students withDisabilitiesStrategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingChildhood students withDisabilitiesCurriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching ChildhoodStudents with DisabilitiesCandidates choose one of the following options:Candidates who are initially certified in another area andhave completed student teaching, need to take practicum(scheduled during the summer) in special education (3credits):Special Education SummerEDU 576PracticumStudent Teaching Seminar- Childhood andEDU 579Adolescence/SpecialEducationorCandidates who have had formal student teachingexperience waived need to student teach in specialeducation (3 credits):Special Education: StudentEDU 577Teaching Childhood (Grade1–6)and**3333333303EDU 579Student Teaching Seminar:Special Education0Childhood (Grades 1–6)orCandidates who are initially certified in special educationtake an additional special education course in place of fieldexperience (3 credits):EDU 569Autism and Asperger inInclusive Classrooms3Total Credits Required: 33Adolescent Education - BiologyProgramsAdolescent Education Biology (7-12) -Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25665HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Initial Certification in Biology 7-12.Required Courses (36 credits):CreditsEDU 500AApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent InclusiveClassroomTheoretical Foundationsand Teaching PracticesEDU 502of Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writing,and Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive ClassroomTeachers*063


Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveEDU 537Classrooms Birth - Grade2, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12Pre-Professional AdolescentEDU 554AField Experience in InclusiveClassroomsStudent Teaching inEDU 555AAdolescence (Grades 7–9)Student Teaching inEDU 556AAdolescence (Grades10–12)Student Teaching Seminar–EDU 557ASecondary LevelCurriculum and Methods Course:EDU 507Methods of Teaching Sciencein Inclusive Classroomsfor Middle School and3Adolescent LearnersComplete two courses (6 Credits): 6Content/Pedagogy Courses:EDU 580*Evolutionary Ecology andAnthropogenic Effects onBiodiversity for AdolescentClassroomsEDU 581Molecular Genetics withApplications to InheritedDisease, Human*Development and EvolutionEDU 582*Advanced Research Techniques:The Modern LaboratoryExperience as anInvestigative Strategy to*Enhance Scientific Inquiryfor the Adolescent LearnerEDU 583History of Biology and the 21stCentury: Social Ethical and*Technological ConcernsTotal Credits Required: 36*Preferred Content/Pedagogy Course for this program.Teacher candidates who possess 30 credits in a specific content areamay extend their teaching certification to include grades 5–6 bytaking EDU 567– Psychological and Social Needs of Adolescents (3credits) and by engaging in field experiences in these grades.A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Adolescent Education Biology (7-12)/TESOL(PK-12) - Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 27036HEGIS Code: 0899.00 {Education, Other}6430330*Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in Biology7-12 and TESOL PK-12.Prerequisite for this program: 12 credits or equivalent in the study ofa language other than English.Required Courses (45 credits):CreditsEDU 500EApprentice Field Experience inAdolescent TESOL Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writing,and Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 540Introduction to Linguistics forTESOL Professionals3EDU 541Second Language Acquisitionand TESOL: Theory and3PracticeEDU 542Structure and Application ofAmerican English3EDU 543Interdisciplinary TeachingMethods and EnglishLanguage Arts for PK-123English Language LearnersEDU 544PK-12 TESOL Teaching Practicesand Assessment in theContent Areas3


EDU 545EDU 548TESOL Student Teaching PK–6,7–12TESOL Student TeachingSeminar PK– 6, 7–12Pre-Professional Adolescence/EDU 554DTESOL PK–12 FieldExperiences in InclusiveClassrooms 0Complete either EDU 555A or EDU 556A*: 3EDU 555AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 7-9)*orEDU 556AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 10-12)*Content Area Course:Methods of Teaching ScienceEDU 507in Inclusive Classroomsfor Middle School and3Adolescent LearnersTotal Credits Required: 45A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds’’school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.30Adolescent Education Biology (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities (7-12) -Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26603HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in Biology7-12 and Special Education 7-12.Required Courses (48 credits):CreditsEDU 500CApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent/SpecialEducation Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for InclusiveClassrooms of DiverseLearners665


EDU 582Advanced Research Techniques:The Modern LaboratoryExperience as anInvestigative Strategy to3Enhance Scientific Inquiryfor the Adolescent LearnerEDU 583History of Biology and 21stCentury: Social, andEthical and Technological3ConcernsTotal Credits Required: 33Adolescent Education Biology (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities(7-12) - Professional Certification inArea of Initial Certification and InitialCertification in Special Education - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26605HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in area ofInitial Certification and Initial Certification in Special Education 7-12.Candidates in possession of Initial Adolescent Education Certificationwill achieve Professional Certification and have Initial Certificationin Special Education added. (Candidates in possession of InitialCertification in Special Education will achieve Professional Certificationin Special Education.)Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade2, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-123EDU 547CDeveloping Action Researchfor Special Education andInclusive Classrooms in3Adolescence EducationEDU 549CTeacher as Researcher in SpecialEducation and InclusiveClassrooms of Adolescent3LearnersEDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays or Autism Spectrum3DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 573Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingAdolescent Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 575Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Adolescent3Students with DisabilitiesCandidates choose one of the following options:Candidates who are initially certified in another area andhave completed student teaching, need to take practicum(scheduled during the summer) in special education (3credits):EDU 576Special Education SummerPracticum3andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who have had student teaching experiencewaived need to student teach in special education (3 credits):Special Education: StudentEDU 578Teaching Adolescent3(Grades 7–12)andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who are initially certified in special educationtake an additional special education course in place of fieldexperience (3 credits):EDU 569Autism and Asperger inInclusive Classrooms3Total Credits Required: 3367


Adolescent Education - EnglishProgramsAdolescent Education English (7-12) -Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25665HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Initial Certification in English 7-12.Required Courses (36 credits):CreditsEDU 500AApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent InclusiveClassroomTheoretical Foundationsand Teaching PracticesEDU 502of Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 554APre-Professional AdolescentField Experience in Inclusive0ClassroomsEDU 555AStudent Teaching inAdolescence (Grades 7–9)3EDU 556AStudent Teaching inAdolescence (Grades10–12)30EDU 557AStudent Teaching Seminar–Secondary Level0Curriculum/Methods and Content/PedagogyCourses (Select three courses - 9 credits*):9EDU 588Writing Techniques for DiverseAdolescent Learners*EDU 589Literary Genres for DiverseAdolescent Learners*EDU 590Mythology, Fiction, Film and theTeaching of ContemporaryIssues to Diverse*Adolescent LearnersEDU 591Teaching Creative Writingto Diverse Adolescent*LearnersTotal Credits Required: 36Teacher candidates who possess 30 credits in a specific content areamay extend their teaching certification to include grades 5–6 bytaking EDU 567– Psychological and Social Needs of Adolescents (3credits) and by engaging in field experiences in these grades.A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Adolescent Education English (7-12)/TESOL(PK-12) - Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 27036HEGIS Code: 0899.00 {Education, Other}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in English 7-12and TESOL PK-12.Prerequisite for this program: 12 credits or equivalent in the study ofa language other than English.Required Courses (45 credits):CreditsEDU 500EApprentice Field Experience inAdolescent TESOL Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students inInclusive Classrooms368


EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 540Introduction to Linguistics forTESOL Professionals3EDU 541Second Language Acquisitionand TESOL: Theory and3PracticeEDU 542Structure and Application ofAmerican English3EDU 543Interdisciplinary TeachingMethods and EnglishLanguage Arts for PK-123English Language LearnersEDU 544PK–12 TESOL Teaching Practicesand Assessment in the3Content AreasEDU 545TESOL Student Teaching PK–6,7–123EDU 548TESOL Student TeachingSeminar PK– 6, 7–120Pre-Professional Adolescence/EDU 554DTESOL PK–12 FieldExperiences in Inclusive0ClassroomsComplete either EDU 555A or EDU 556A*: 3EDU 555AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 7-9)*orEDU 556AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 10-12)*Content Area Course (Select one - 3 credits*): 3EDU 588Writing Techniques for DiverseAdolescent Learners*EDU 589Literary Genres for DiverseAdolescent Learners*EDU 590Mythology, Fiction, Film and theTeaching of ContemporaryIssues to Diverse*Adolescent LearnersEDU 591Teaching Creative Writingto Diverse Adolescent*LearnersTotal Credits Required: 45A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds’’school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Adolescent Education English (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities (7-12) -Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26603HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in English 7-12and Special Education 7-12.Required Courses (48 credits):CreditsEDU 500CApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent/SpecialEducation Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 515Curriculum Assessment andDevelopment3Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12or69


EDU 522EDU 537EDU 554BEDU 555BEDU 556BEDU 557BEDU 567EDU 570EDU 571EDU 573EDU 575Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive ClassroomTeachersDiverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade2, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12Pre-Professional Adolescence/Special Education FieldExperience in InclusiveClassroomsStudent Teaching Adolescence/Special Education (Grades7–9)Student Teaching Adolescence/Special Education (Grades10–12)Student Teaching Seminar–Special Education–Adolescent 7–9, 10–12Psychological, Social andSpecial Needs of theAdolescentsCharacteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays and AutismSpectrum DisordersAssessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students withDisabilitiesStrategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingAdolescent Students withDisabilitiesCurriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching AdolescentStudents with Disabilities*3033033333Content Area Course (Select one course - 3credits*):3EDU 588Writing Techniques for DiverseAdolescent Learners*EDU 589Literary Genres for DiverseAdolescent Learners*EDU 590Mythology, Fiction, Filmand the Teaching ofContemporary Issues*to Diverse AdolescentLearnersEDU 591Teaching Creative Writingto Diverse Adolescent*LearnersTotal Credits Required: 48A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated assuch by NYSED.Adolescent Education English (7-12) -Professional Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25666HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in AdolescentEnglish 7-12.Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 515Curriculum Assessment andDevelopment3Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 523Teacher as the EducationalLeader in Partnerships for3Collaborative EducationEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 547ADeveloping Action Research forDiverse Classrooms370


EDU 549ATeacher as Researcher inDiverse ClassroomsContent/Pedagogy Courses (12 credits):EDU 588Writing Techniques for DiverseAdolescent Learners3EDU 589Literary Genres for DiverseAdolescent Learners3EDU 590Mythology, Fiction, Film and theTeaching of ContemporaryIssues to Diverse3Adolescent LearnersEDU 591Teaching Creative Writingto Diverse Adolescent3LearnersTotal Credits Required: 33Adolescent Education English (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities(7-12) - Professional Certification inArea of Initial Certification and InitialCertification in Special Education - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26605HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in area ofInitial Certification and Initial Certification in Special Education 7-12.Candidates in possession of Initial Adolescent Education Certificationwill achieve Professional Certification and have Initial Certificationin Special Education added. (Candidates in possession of InitialCertification in Special Education will achieve Professional Certificationin Special Education.)Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive ClassroomTeachers*3EDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 547CDeveloping Action Researchfor Special Education andInclusive Classrooms in3Adolescence EducationEDU 549CTeacher as Researcher in SpecialEducation and InclusiveClassrooms of Adolescent3LearnersEDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays and Austism3Spectrum DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 573Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingAdolescent Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 575Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Adolescent3Students with DisabilitiesCandidates choose one of the following:Candidates who are initially certified in another area andhave completed student teaching, need to take practicum(scheduled during the summer) in special education (3credits):EDU 576Special Education SummerPracticum3andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who have had student teaching experiencewaived need to student teach in special education (3 credits):Special Education: StudentEDU 578Teaching Adolescent3(Grades 7–12)andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who are initially certified in special educationtake an additional special education course in place of fieldexperience (3credits):EDU 569Autism and Asperger inInclusive Classrooms3Total Credits Required: 3371


Adolescent Education -Mathematics ProgramsAdolescent Education Mathematics (7-12) -Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25665HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Initial Certification in Mathematics7-12.Required Courses (39 credits):CreditsEDU 500AApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent InclusiveClassroomTheoretical Foundationsand Teaching PracticesEDU 502of Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writing,and Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 554APre-Professional AdolescentField Experience in Inclusive0ClassroomsEDU 555AStudent Teaching inAdolescence (Grades 7–9)3EDU 556AStudent Teaching inAdolescence (Grades10–12)30EDU 557AStudent Teaching Seminar–Secondary Level0Curriculum and Methods Course:Methods of TeachingEDU 512Mathematics for MiddleSchool and Adolescent3Diverse LearnersContent/Pedagogy Courses:Select three courses - 9 credits*: 9EDU 584Mathematics Curriculum andPedagogy for TeachingGrades 7, 8 and Algebra*1 for Diverse Learners inInclusive ClassroomsEDU 585Mathematics Concepts andPedagogy of the Reform*Pre-Calculus and CalculusEDU 586Mathematics Curriculumand Pedagogy forProblem Solving inGeometry, Algebra 2 and*Trigonometry for theDiverse Learner in theInclusive ClassroomEDU 587Mathematics and PedagogyUsing the GraphicCalculator and Computer*ApplicationsTotal Credits Required: 39Teacher candidates who possess 30 credits in a specific content areamay extend their teaching certification to include grades 5–6 bytaking EDU 567– Psychological and Social Needs of Adolescents (3credits) and by engaging in field experiences in these grades.A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Adolescent Education Mathematics (7-12)/TESOL (PK-12) - Dual Initial Certification -M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 27036HEGIS Code: 0899.00 {Education, Other}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification inMathematics 7-12 and TESOL PK-12.Prerequisite for this program: 12 credits or equivalent in the study ofa language other than English.Required Courses (45 credits):CreditsApprentice Field Experience inEDU 500EAdolescent TESOL Inclusive0Classroom72


EDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 540Introduction to Linguistics forTESOL Professionals3EDU 541Second Language Acquisitionand TESOL: Theory and3PracticeEDU 542Structure and Application ofAmerican English3EDU 543Interdisciplinary TeachingMethods and EnglishLanguage Arts for PK-12English Language Learners3EDU 544EDU 545EDU 548EDU 554DPK-12 TESOL Teaching Practicesand Assessment in theContent AreasTESOL Student Teaching PK–6,7–12TESOL Student TeachingSeminar PK– 6, 7–12Pre-Professional Adolescence/TESOL PK–12 FieldExperiences in InclusiveClassrooms3300Complete either EDU 555A or EDU 556A*: 3EDU 555AStudent Teaching AdolescenceGrades 7-9)*orEDU 556AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 10-12)*Content Area Course:EDU 512Methods of TeachingMathematics for MiddleSchool and Adolescent3Diverse LearnersTotal Credits Required: 45A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds’’school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Adolescent Education Mathematics (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities (7-12) -Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26603HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification inMathematics 7-12 and Special Education 7-12.Required Courses (48 credits):CreditsEDU 500CApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent/SpecialEducation Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writing,and Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 515Curriculum Assessment andDevelopment3Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 373


EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 554BPre-Professional Adolescence/Special Education FieldExperience in Inclusive0ClassroomsEDU 555BStudent Teaching Adolescence/Special Education (Grades37–9)EDU 556BStudent Teaching Adolescence/Special Education (Grades310–12)EDU 557BStudent Teaching Seminar–Special Education–0Adolescent 7–9, 10–12EDU 567Psychological, Social andSpecial Needs of the3AdolescentsEDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays and Autism3Spectrum DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 573Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingAdolescent Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 575Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Adolescent3Students with DisabilitiesContent Area Course:Advanced Methods of TeachingEDU 512Mathematics for MiddleSchool and Adolescent3Diverse LearnersTotal Credits Required: 48A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated assuch by NYSED.Adolescent Education Mathematics (7-12) -Professional Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25666HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in AdolescentMathematics 7-12.Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 515Curriculum Assessment andDevelopment3Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 523Teacher as the EducationalLeader in Partnerships for3Collaborative EducationEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 547ADeveloping Action Research forDiverse Classrooms3EDU 549ATeacher as Researcher inDiverse Classrooms3Content/Pedagogy Courses (12 credits):Mathematics Curriculum andPedagogy for TeachingEDU 584Grades 7, 8 and Algebra31 for Diverse Leaners inInclusive ClassroomsEDU 585Mathematics Concepts andPedagogy of the Reform3Pre-calculus and CalculusEDU 586Mathematics Curriculumand Pedagogy forProblem Solving inGeometry, Algebra 2 and3Trigonometry for the DiversLearner in the InclusiveClassroomEDU 587Mathematics and PedagogyUsing the GraphicCalculator and Computer3ApplicationsTotal Credits Required: 3374


Adolescent Education Mathematics (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities(7-12) - Professional Certification inArea of Initial Certification and InitialCertification in Special Education - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26605HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in area ofInitial Certification and Initial Certification in Special Education 7-12.Candidates in possession of Initial Adolescent Education Certificationwill achieve Professional Certification and have Initial Certificationin Special Education added. (Candidates in possession of InitialCertification in Special Education will achieve Professional Certificationin Special Education.)Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 547CDeveloping Action Researchfor Special Education andInclusive Classrooms in3Adolescence EducationEDU 549CTeacher as Researcher in SpecialEducation and InclusiveClassrooms of Adolescent3LearnersEDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays and Autism3Spectrum DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students withDisabilities3EDU 573Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingAdolescent Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 575Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Adolescent3Students with DisabilitiesCandidates choose one of the following options:Candidates who are initially certified in another area andhave completed student teaching, need to take practicum(scheduled during the summer) in special education (3credits):EDU 576Special Education SummerPracticum3andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who have had student teaching experiencewaived need to student teach in special education (3 credits):Special Education: StudentEDU 578Teaching Adolescent3(Grades 7–12)andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who are initially certified in special educationtake an additional special education course in place of fieldexperience (3 credits):EDU 569Autism and Asperger inInclusive Classrooms3Total Credits Required: 33Adolescent Education - SocialStudies ProgramsAdolescent Education Social Studies (7-12)- Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25665HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Initial Certification in Social Studies7-12.Required Courses (36 credits):CreditsEDU 500AApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent InclusiveClassroom075


Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching PracticesEDU 502of Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writing,and Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 554APre-Professional AdolescentField Experience in Inclusive0ClassroomsEDU 555AStudent Teaching inAdolescence (Grades 7–9)3EDU 556AStudent Teaching inAdolescence (Grades310–12)EDU 557AStudent Teaching Seminar–Secondary Level0Curriculum and Methods Course:EDU 516Curriculum and Methods ofTeaching Social Studiesto Diverse Adolescent3Learners in InclusiveClassroomsContent/Pedagogy Courses:Select two courses* - 6 credits: 6EDU 592Teaching the the United Statesin the Age of Globalizationto Adolescent DiverseLearners*EDU 593Teaching Europe in the 20thCentury to Adolescent*Diverse LearnersEDU 594*Teaching the Modernizationof the Non-Western Worldto Adolescent Diverse*LearnersTeaching the Politics of Choice*EDU 595*to Adolescent DiverseLearnersTotal Credits Required: 36*Preferred courses for this program.Teacher candidates who possess 30 credits in a specific content areamay extend their teaching certification to include grades 5–6 bytaking EDU 567– Psychological and Social Needs of Adolescents (3credits) and by engaging in field experiences in these grades.A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Adolescent Education Social Studies (7-12)/TESOL (PK-12) - Dual Initial Certification- M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 27036HEGIS Code: 0899.00 {Education, Other}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in SocialStudies 7-12 and TESOL PK-12.Prerequisite for this program: 12 credits or equivalent in the study ofa language other than English.Required Courses (45 credits):CreditsEDU 500EApprentice Field Experience inAdolescent TESOL Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students inInclusive Classrooms376


EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 540Introduction to Linguistics forTESOL Professionals3EDU 541Second Language Acquisitionand TESOL: Theory and3PracticeEDU 542Structure and Application ofAmerican English3EDU 543Interdisciplinary TeachingMethods and EnglishLanguage Arts for PK-123English Language LearnersEDU 544PK-12 TESOL Teaching Practicesand Assessment in the3Content AreasEDU 545TESOL Student Teaching PK–6,7–123EDU 548TESOL Student TeachingSeminar PK– 6, 7–120Pre-Professional Adolescence/EDU 554DTESOL PK–12 FieldExperiences in Inclusive0ClassroomsComplete either EDU 555A or EDU 556A*: 3EDU 555AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 7-9)*orEDU 556AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 10-12)*Content Area Course:Curriculum and Methods ofTeaching Social StudiesEDU 516to Diverse Adolescent3Learners in InclusiveClassroomsTotal Credits Required: 45A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds’’school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Adolescent Education Social Studies (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities (7-12) - Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26603HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in SocialStudies 7-12 and Special Education 7-12.Required Courses (48 credits):CreditsEDU 500CApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent/SpecialEducation Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 515Curriculum Assessment andDevelopment3Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 554BPre-Professional Adolescence/Special Education FieldExperience in InclusiveClassrooms077


Student Teaching Adolescence/EDU 555BSpecial Education (Grades7–9)Student Teaching Adolescence/EDU 556BSpecial Education (Grades10–12)Student Teaching Seminar–EDU 557BSpecial Education–Adolescent 7–9, 10–12Psychological, Social andEDU 567Special Needs of theAdolescentsCharacteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalEDU 570Delays and AutismSpectrum DisordersAssessment, Diagnosis andEDU 571Evaluation of Students withDisabilitiesStrategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingEDU 573Adolescent Students withDisabilitiesCurriculum Content andPractices for TeachingEDU 575Adolescent Students withDisabilitiesContent Area Course:EDU 516Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Adolescent3Students with DisabilitiesTotal Credits Required: 48A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated assuch by NYSED.33033333EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 523Teacher as the EducationalLeader in Partnerships for3Collaborative EducationEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 547ADeveloping Action Research forDiverse Classrooms3EDU 549ATeacher as Researcher inDiverse Classrooms3Content/Pedagogy Courses (12 credits):Teaching the United States inEDU 592the Age of Globalizationto Adolescent Diverse3LearnersEDU 593Teaching Europe in the 20thCentury to Adolescent3Diverse LearnersEDU 594Teaching the Modernizationof the Non-Western Worldto Adolescent Diverse3LearnersEDU 595Teaching the Politics of Choiceto Adolescent Diverse3LearnersTotal Credits Required: 33Adolescent Education Social Studies (7-12)- Professional Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25666HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in AdolescentSocial Studies 7-12.Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 515Curriculum Assessment andDevelopment3Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 378


Adolescent Education Social Studies (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities(7-12) - Professional Certification inArea of Initial Certification and InitialCertification in Special Education - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26605HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in area ofInitial Certification and Initial Certification in Special Education 7-12.Candidates in possession of Initial Adolescent Education Certificationwill achieve Professional Certification and have Initial Certificationin Special Education added. (Candidates in possession of InitialCertification in Special Education will achieve Professional Certificationin Special Education.)Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 547CDeveloping Action Researchfor Special Education andInclusive Classrooms in3Adolescence EducationEDU 549CTeacher as Researcher in SpecialEducation and InclusiveClassrooms of Adolescent3LearnersEDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays and Autism3Spectrum DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students withDisabilities3Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingEDU 573Adolescent Students withDisabilitiesCurriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental IssuesEDU 575for Teaching AdolescentStudents with DisabilitiesCandidates choose one of the following options:Candidates who are initially certified in another area andhave completed student teaching, need to take practicum(scheduled during the summer) in special education (3credits):Special Education SummerEDU 576PracticumandEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who have had student teaching experiencewaived need to student teach in special education (3 credits):Special Education: StudentEDU 578Teaching Adolescent3(Grades 7–12)andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who are initially certified in special educationtake an additional special education course in place of fieldexperience (3 credits):EDU 569Autism and Asperger inInclusive Classrooms3Total Credits Required: 33Adolescent Education - SpanishProgramsAdolescent Education Spanish (7-12) -Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25665HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Initial Certification in Spanish 7-12.Required Courses (36 credits):CreditsEDU 500AApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent InclusiveClassroom3330079


Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching PracticesEDU 502of Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 554APre-Professional AdolescentField Experience in Inclusive0ClassroomsEDU 555AStudent Teaching inAdolescence (Grades 7–9)3EDU 556AStudent Teaching inAdolescence (Grades310–12)EDU 557AStudent Teaching Seminar–Secondary Level0Curriculum and Methods Course:Spanish Curriculum andEDU 518Methods for InclusiveClassroom of Adolescent3Diverse LearnersContent/Pedagogy Courses (Select two* - 6credits):6EDU 596Communicative Proficiency: TheDevelopment of Oral Skillsin the Inclusive Classroomof Adolescent DiverseLearners*EDU 597Spanish Grammar Topics,Pedagogical Applicationto the Reading and WritingProcess for the Inclusive*Classroom of AdolescentDiverse LearnersEDU 598Spanish Culture and Civilizationfor the Inclusive Classroomof Adolescent Diverse*LearnersEDU 599Latin American Culture andCivilization for the InclusiveClassroom of Adolescent*Diverse LearnersTotal Credits Required: 36Teacher candidates who possess 30 credits in a specific content areamay extend their teaching certification to include grades 5–6 bytaking EDU 567– Psychological and Social Needs of Adolescents (3credits) and by engaging in field experiences in these grades.A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Candidates may extend their 7-12 certification to teach a languageother than English to include grades 1-6 by taking EDU 539 FLESMethods - Teaching World Languages to Children.Adolescent Education Spanish (7-12)/TESOL(PK-12) - Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 27036HEGIS Code: 0899.00 {Education, Other}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in Spanish7-12 and TESOL PK-12.Prerequisite for this program: 12 credits or equivalent in the study ofa language other than English.Required Courses (45 credits):CreditsEDU 500EApprentice Field Experience inAdolescent TESOL Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writing,and Communicating in theContent Areas for InclusiveClassrooms of DiverseLearners680


EDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 540Introduction to Linguistics forTESOL Professionals3EDU 541Second Language Acquisitionand TESOL: Theory and3PracticeEDU 542Structure and Application ofAmerican English3EDU 543Interdisciplinary TeachingMethods and EnglishLanguage Arts for PK-123English Language LearnersEDU 544PK-12 TESOL Teaching Practicesand Assessment in the3Content AreasEDU 545TESOL Student Teaching PK–6,7–123EDU 548TESOL Student TeachingSeminar PK– 6, 7–120Pre-Professional Adolescence/EDU 554DTESOL PK–12 FieldExperiences in Inclusive0ClassroomsComplete either EDU 555A or EDU 556A*: 3EDU 555AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 7-9)*orEDU 556AStudent Teaching Adolescence(Grades 10-12)*Content Area Course:EDU 518Spanish Curriculum andMethods for InclusiveClassrooms of Adolescent3Diverse LearnersTotal Credits Required: 45A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds’’school setting. These schools/districts are designated as suchby NYSED.Adolescent Education Spanish (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities (7-12) -Dual Initial Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26603HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Dual Initial Certification in Spanish7-12 and Special Education 7-12.Required Courses (48 credits):CreditsEDU 500CApprentice Field Experiencein Adolescent/SpecialEducation Inclusive0ClassroomEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 506BAdolescent Reading, Writingand Communicating in theContent Areas for Inclusive6Classrooms of DiverseLearnersEDU 510Strategies and Techniques forTeaching Middle Schooland Adolescent Students in3Inclusive ClassroomsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 515Curriculum Assessment andDevelopment3Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12or81


EDU 522EDU 537EDU 554BEDU 555BEDU 556BEDU 557BEDU 567EDU 570EDU 571Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive ClassroomTeachersDiverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade2, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12Pre-Professional Adolescence/Special Education FieldExperience in InclusiveClassroomsStudent Teaching Adolescence/Special Education (Grades7–9)Student Teaching Adolescence/Special Education (Grades10–12)Student Teaching Seminar–Special Education–Adolescent 7–9, 10–12Psychological, Social andSpecial Needs of theAdolescentsCharacteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays and AutismSpectrum DisordersAssessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students withDisabilities*30330333EDU 573Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingAdolescent Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 575Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Adolescent3Students with DisabilitiesContent Area Course:Spanish Curriculum andEDU 518Methods for InclusiveClassrooms of Adolescent3Diverse LearnersTotal Credits Required: 48A total of 100 hours of observation/participation in a field schoolare required prior to beginning student teaching.All candidates are required by NYSED to have experience in a “highneeds”school setting. These schools/districts are designated assuch by NYSED.Adolescent Education Spanish (7-12) -Professional Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 25666HEGIS Code: 0803.00 {Secondary Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in AdolescentSpanish 7-12.Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 515Curriculum Assessment andDevelopment3Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 523Teacher as the EducationalLeader in Partnerships for3Collaborative EducationEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 547ADeveloping Action Research forDiverse Classrooms3EDU 549ATeacher as Researcher inDiverse Classrooms382


Content/Pedagogy Courses (12 credits):Communicative Proficiency: TheDevelopment of Oral SkillsEDU 596in the Inclusive Classroom3of Adolescent DiverseLearnersEDU 597Spanish Grammar Topics,Pedagogical Applicationto the Reading and WritingProcess for the Inclusive3Classroom of AdolescentDiverse LearnersEDU 598Spanish Culture and Civilizationfor the Inclusive Classroomof Adolescent Diverse3LearnersEDU 599Latin American Culture andCivilization for the InclusiveClassroom of Adolescent3Diverse LearnersTotal Credits Required: 33Adolescent Education Spanish (7-12)/Teaching Students with Disabilities(7-12) - Professional Certification inArea of Initial Certification and InitialCertification in Special Education - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 26605HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in area ofInitial Certification and Initial Certification in Special Education 7-12.Candidates in possession of Initial Adolescent Education Certificationwill achieve Professional Certification and have Initial Certificationin Special Education added. (Candidates in possession of InitialCertification in Special Education will achieve Professional Certificationin Special Education.)Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -3Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 547CDeveloping Action Researchfor Special Education andInclusive Classrooms in3Adolescence EducationEDU 549CTeacher as Researcher in SpecialEducation and InclusiveClassrooms of Adolescent3LearnersEDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays and Autism3Spectrum DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 573Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingAdolescent Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 575Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Adolescent3Students with DisabilitiesCandidates choose one of the following options:Candidates who are initially certified in another area andhave completed student teaching, need to take practicum(scheduled during the summer) in special education (3credits):EDU 576Special Education SummerPracticum3andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)orCandidates who have had student teaching experiencewaived need to student teach in special education (3 credits):Special Education: StudentEDU 578Teaching Adolescent3(Grades 7–12)andEDU 579Student Teaching Seminar-Special Education0(Adolescent 7–12)or83


Candidates who are initially certified in special educationtake an additional special education course in place of fieldexperience (3 credits):Autism and Asperger inEDU 5693Inclusive ClassroomsTotal Credits Required: 33TESOL (PK-12) ProgramTESOL (PK-12) - Professional Certificationin Areas of Initial Certification andAdditional Initial TESOL Certification - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 27069 (InitialChildhood)New York State Registered Program Code: 27070 (InitialAdolescent)HEGIS Code: 0899.00 {Education, Other}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in area ofInitial Certification and for Initial Certification in TESOL.Prerequisite for this program: 12 credits or equivalent in study of alanguage other than English.Teacher candidates who are not native speakers of English andwho wish to pursue TESOL certification: A minimum grade of 600on the TOFEL is required before beginning this Program.Prerequisite to student teaching: 50 hours of field experience in aTESOL setting.Required Courses (33 credits):CreditsEDU 500FApprentice Field Experience inTESOL Inclusive Classroom0EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Complete either EDU 521 or EDU 522*: 3EDU 521Technology for InclusiveClassroom Teachers Birth- Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,*Adolescence 7-12orEDU 522Advanced Design Technologyfor Inclusive Classroom*TeachersEDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 540Introduction to Linguistics forTESOL Professionals3EDU 541Second Language Acquisitionand TESOL: Theory andPractice3EDU 542Structure and Application ofAmerican English3EDU 543Interdisciplinary TeachingMethods and EnglishLanguage Arts for PK-123English Language LearnersEDU 544PK-12 TESOL Teaching Practicesand Assessment in the3Content AreasEDU 546 TESOL Summer Practicum 3EDU 547DDeveloping Action Researchfor Teaching Englishto Speakers of Other3Languages (TESOL)EDU 549DTeacher as Researcher inTeaching English toSpeakers of Other3Languages (TESOL)EDU 550FPre-Professional Summer TESOLExperiences in Inclusive0ClassroomTotal Credits Required: 33Middle School ExtensionsBy fulfilling the requirements of the teaching methods andstrategies course EDU 504 or EDU 510 and successfully completingEDU 567 Psychological, Social and Special Needs of the Adolescents,candidates can extend their 1–6 Elementary Certification to includegrades 7–9, or their 7–12 Secondary Certification to include grades5–6. Candidates wishing to extend Elementary Certificationmust have fulfilled the New York State Education Departmentrequirement of 30 credits in a content area subject which would betaught in grades 7 through 9. Candidates wishing to extend theirSecondary Certification to include grades 5–6 already possess therequired content area credits in the specific subject for which theyare certified 7–12. Candidates need to have field experience in thegrade level of the extension. Candidates are required to successfullycomplete the Content Specialty Test in the area for which they seekextended certification.Candidates who are not enrolled in the Master of Scienceprograms, or who are enrolled in programs leading to ProfessionalCertification (and therefore do not take EDU 504 or EDU 510)and have the necessary content area credits, may extend theircertification to include Middle School by taking the followingcourse and by engaging in field experiences in the appropriategrade levels:Psychological, Social and Special Needs ofEDU 567AdolescentsCandidates are required to successfully complete the ContentSpecialty Test in the area for which they seek extended certification.Candidates who are not enrolled in a program are required to applyindividually for NYSED certification.84


Graduate EducationCourse DescriptionsCONTENT/PEDAGOGY COURSES FOR ADOLESCENTAREAS (See courses numbered EDU 580 andhigher):Programs leading to Professional Certification as a teacherof adolescents in specific subject areas require 12 credits incontent/pedagogy in that specific subject area. (The content/pedagogy courses will be offered on a rotating basis and shouldbe taken by candidates when they are offered.)EDU 500 APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN EARLYCHILDHOOD/CHILDHOOD INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM (40hrs)Teacher candidates are required to participate in fieldexperiences of observation upon entry into the program. Thisobservation experience must be in the grade level and area inwhich the candidate is preparing for certification. Candidatesengage in reflection and discussion re: their observations duringseminar experiences. Successful completion of the apprenticefield experience is required before acceptance into the Pre-Professional Experience prior to Student Teaching. TeacherCandidates are required to observe a high-needs area asdetermined by NYSED. (This experience must be fulfilled priorto registering for EDU 550 Pre-Professional Field Experience). Aforty hour field experience is required. Co-requisite: EDU 504for Early Childhood and Childhood Programs. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00. 0 creditEDU 500A APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE INADOLESCENT INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM (40 hrs)Teacher candidates are required to participate in fieldexperiences of observation and participation upon entry into theprogram. This observation/participation experience must be inthe grade level and area in which the candidate is preparing forcertification. Candidates engage in reflection and discussion re:their observations and are evaluated by cooperating teachersand Molloy College faculty supervisors who are certified in thearea of the candidate’s experience. Successful completion ofthe apprentice field experience is required before acceptanceinto the Pre-Professional Experience prior to Student Teaching.Teacher Candidates are required to observe in a high-needsarea as determined by NYSED. (This experience must be fulfilledprior to registering for EDU 550 or EDU 554 Pre-ProfessionalField Experience). Co-requisite: EDU 504 for ChildhoodPrograms or EDU 510 for Adolescent Programs. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00. 0 creditEDU 500B APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE INCHILDHOOD/SPECIAL EDUCATION INCLUSIVECLASSROOM (20 hrs, 20 hrs)Teacher candidates are required to participate in fieldexperiences of observation and participation upon entry into theprogram. This observation/participation experience must be inthe grade level and area in which the candidate is preparing forcertification. Candidates engage in reflection and discussion re:their observations and are evaluated by cooperating teachersand Molloy College faculty supervisors who are certified in thearea of the candidate’s experience. Successful completion ofthe apprentice field experience is required before acceptanceinto the Pre-Professional Experience prior to Student Teaching.Teacher Candidates are required to observe in a high-needsarea as determined by NYSED. (This experience must be fulfilledprior to registering for EDU 550 or EDU 554 Pre-ProfessionalField Experience). Co-requisite: EDU 504 for ChildhoodPrograms or EDU 510 for Adolescent Programs. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00. 0 creditEDU 500C APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE INADOLESCENT/SPECIAL EDUCATION INCLUSIVECLASSROOM DUAL PROGRAM (20 hrs, 20 hrs)Teacher candidates are required to participate in fieldexperiences of observation and participation upon entry into theprogram. This observation/participation experience must be inthe grade level and area in which the candidate is preparing forcertification. Candidates engage in reflection and discussion re:their observations and are evaluated by cooperating teachersand Molloy College faculty supervisors who are certified in thearea of the candidate’s experience. Successful completion ofthe apprentice field experience is required before acceptanceinto the Pre-Professional Experience prior to Student Teaching.Teacher Candidates are required to observe in a high-needsneeds area as determined by NYSED. (This experience mustbe fulfilled prior to registering for EDU 550 or EDU 554 Pre-Professional Field Experience). Co-requisite: EDU 504 forChildhood Programs or EDU 510 for Adolescent Programs.(Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00. 0 creditEDU 500D APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE INCHILDHOOD/TESOL INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM DUALPROGRAM (20 hrs, 20 hrs)Teacher candidates are required to participate in fieldexperiences of observation and participation upon entry into theprogram. This observation/participation experience must be inthe grade level and area in which the candidate is preparing forcertification. Candidates engage in reflection and discussion re:their observations and are evaluated by cooperating teachersand Molloy College faculty supervisors who are certified in thearea of the candidate’s experience. Successful completion ofthe apprentice field experience is required before acceptanceinto the Pre-Professional Experience prior to Student Teaching.Teacher Candidates are required to observe in a high-needsarea as determined by NYSED. (This experience must be fulfilledprior to registering for EDU 550 or EDU 554 Pre-ProfessionalField Experience). Co-requisite: EDU 504 for ChildhoodPrograms or EDU 510 for Adolescent Programs. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00. 0 creditEDU 500E APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE INADOLESCENT/TESOL INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM DUALPROGRAM (20 hrs, 20 hrs)Teacher candidates are required to participate in fieldexperiences of observation and participation upon entry into theprogram. This observation/participation experience must be inthe grade level and area in which the candidate is preparing forcertification. Candidates engage in reflection and discussion re:85


their observations and are evaluated by cooperating teachersand Molloy College faculty supervisors who are certified in thearea of the candidate’s experience. Successful completion ofthe apprentice field experience is required before acceptanceinto the Pre-Professional Experience prior to Student Teaching.Teacher Candidates are required to observe in a high-needsarea as determined by NYSED. (This experience must be fulfilledprior to registering for EDU 550 or EDU 554 Pre-ProfessionalField Experience). Co-requisite: EDU 504 for ChildhoodPrograms or EDU 510 for Adolescent Programs. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00. 0 creditEDU 500F APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN TESOLINCLUSIVE CLASSROOM (20 hrs, 20 hrs)Teacher candidates are required to participate in fieldexperiences of observation and participation upon entry into theprogram. This observation/participation experience must be inthe grade level and area in which the candidate is preparing forcertification. Candidates engage in reflection and discussion re:their observations and are evaluated by cooperating teachersand Molloy College faculty supervisors who are certified in thearea of the candidate’s experience. Successful completion ofthe apprentice field experience is required before acceptanceinto the Pre-Professional Experience prior to Student Teaching.Teacher Candidates are required to observe in a high-needsarea as determined by NYSED. (This experience must be fulfilledprior to registering for EDU 550 or EDU 554 Pre-ProfessionalField Experience). Co-requisite: EDU 504 for ChildhoodPrograms or EDU 510 for Adolescent Programs. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00. 0 creditEDU 502 THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS AND TEACHINGPRACTICES OF REGULAR AND SPECIAL EDUCATION FORBIRTH-GRADE 2, CHILDHOOD 1-6, ADOLESCENCE 7-12This course offers teacher candidates an opportunity to examinethe historical, political, legal, sociological and philosophicalinfluences which impact upon regular and special education. Abroad contextual view will be the basis for exploration into past,current and possible future educational processes, practicesand issues. An awareness of the interdependence of societyand education will be developed by analyzing schools, as wellas school districts, which support education. Special emphasiswill be placed on effective methods of education for diverselearners, which includes awareness of contemporary issuessuch as multiculturalism, gender equity, inclusion and valueseducation. Teacher candidates will discuss current educationalissues for student learners birth-grade 2, grades 1-6 or 7-12,which influence identification criteria, teaching methodology,curriculum development and evaluation techniques for theexceptional learner. Major theorist and advocacy organizationswill be considered, as well as how to address the New York StateLearning Standards. As part of an ongoing learning process,teacher candidates will begin to develop their own ProfessionalPhilosophy of Teaching and Learning, formulated as a resultof research, discussion and reflection about their own schoolexperiences. 3 creditsEDU 503 SCIENCE CURRICULUM AND METHODS FORDIVERSE LEARNERS BIRTH-GRADE 2, CHILDHOOD 1-6This course is designed to provide teacher candidates witha holistic, interdisciplinary understanding of science, as wellas prepare candidates in science content. Focus is on skillsnecessary to plan and implement active investigations using thediscovery model (science learning cycle) and science processingskills. Toward this end, teacher candidates will relate science tocontemporary events, research and the daily lives of students.Teacher candidates will integrate science with literature,technology and safety, and view science as a lifelong learningexperience. Additionally, science literacy skills of listening,speaking, reading and writing for native English speakers andEnglish Language Learners, as well as methods of enrichmentand remediation, will be addressed. New York State LearningStandards for science, as well as those of the National ScienceTeachers Association and those of the Association of ChildhoodEducation International will be studied in-depth. Teachercandidates will reflect and connect science methodology tofield experiences in birth – grade 2, and grades 1-6 classrooms.Fee-$105.00 3 creditsEDU 504 INTERDISCIPLINARY BIRTH-GRADE 2,CHILDHOOD 1-6, AND MIDDLE CHILDHOOD TEACHINGMETHODS FOR DIVERSE LEARNERSThe goal of this course is to enable the teacher candidates tointegrate content areas across the curriculum through personal,content, professional and pedagogical-knowledge. These willbe evidenced through skill application and dispositions thataddress diversity in ability, culture and student competencies.Participants will design themes for curriculum integrationthat incorporate problem-based mathematics, hands-onscience, and social studies with reading, writing, listening, andspeaking. Inter-curricula assessment and the use of technologyin instruction will be addressed for the inclusion classroom anddiverse learners.Emphasis will be placed upon developing lessons’ strategies,selecting topics (themes), writing lesson objectives, classroommanagement, teaching strategies, and cognitive/metacognitiveskill development that maximize student learning andparticipation through differentiated instructional techniques.Teacher candidates will learn how to help diverse learnersin nursery, pk, kindergarten and childhood 1-6 understandthe relationships and common themes that connect content,discipline, and technology along with varied domains fordevelopment of the thematic unit in accordance with the NewYork State Learning Standards, NCATE, and INTASC.Co-requisite: EDU 500, EDU 500B, or EDU 500D. Fee-$105.00 3creditsEDU 505 ADVANCED METHODS OF TEACHINGMATHEMATICS IN INCLUSIVE EARLY CHILDHOOD,CHILDHOOD, AND MIDDLE CHILDHOOD CLASSROOMSThis course will consist of an examination of the curriculumgoals, instructional strategies and materials for teachingmathematics to the diverse learner in birth to grade 2 andgrades 1 to 6. It will emphasize teaching methods for makingmathematics meaningful to children by promoting an activelearning process. The teacher candidate will develop learningexperiences and conduct assessment reflecting the processesof growth and development of children and pre-adolescents.Attention will be given to planning and teaching mathematicaltasks and activities for students who are culturally diverse,those with limited English proficiency and those with specialneeds. Also, the teacher candidate will learn how to use86


manipulatives to develop concepts and utilize instructionaltechnology, including the calculator and computer. They willlearn and be able to discuss the current issues and problemsin math education today such as the implications of the TIMSSreport. New York State’s Mathematics, Science and TechnologyLearning Standards, Elementary Core Curriculum, IntermediateCore Curriculum (5-6) and the National Council of Teachers ofMathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics,will be studied in depth. Fee-$105.00 3 creditsEDU 506A INTEGRATED LANGUAGE ARTS ANDREADING FOR THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM OF DIVERSELEARNERS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD AND CHILDHOODSETTINGSThe goals of this course are to enable the early childhood andelementary school teacher candidates to teach effectivelythe integrated language arts as a meaningful and interwovencombination of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills asthey apply to an interdisciplinary context. Teacher candidateswill learn to select varied methodologies for inclusive instructionin accordance with the New York State Learning Standards inEnglish Language Arts (ELA). The implementation of effectivewriting processes that employ current research-based methods,technology, and assessment techniques will be addressed.Teacher candidates will be exposed to various theories ofreading instruction, including the formation of literature circles,writing workshops that involve journal and portfolio processand product construction. Through professor-classroom lessonpresentation, the teacher candidate will demonstrate theprinciples of an integrated approach to teaching literature andthe use of oral and written expression for inclusive classroomsof diverse learners. These will be with adherence to the NewYork State Learning standards, NCATE, and INTASC, as well asalignment with NCTE, CEC, and inclusive schooling with respectto course objectives, performance and assessment for childrenin early childhood, childhood and middle school settings.Fee-$105.00 6 creditsEDU 506B ADOLESCENT READING, WRITING ANDCOMMUNICATING IN THE CONTENT AREAS FORINCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OF DIVERSE LEARNERSThis course will prepare teacher candidates to utilize theintegrated language arts and reading in connection with thecontent areas taught in grades 7 through 12. The goals of thiscourse are to enable the teacher candidate to teach effectivelythe integrated language arts as a meaningful and interwovencombination of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills asthey apply to an interdisciplinary context. Teacher candidateswill learn to select varied methodologies for inclusive instructionin accordance with the New York State Learning Standards inEnglish Language Arts (ELA). The implementation of effectivewriting processes that employ current research-based methods,technology and assessment techniques will be addressed.Teacher candidates will be exposed to various theories ofreading instruction, including the formation of literature circles,writing workshops that involve journal and portfolio processand product construction. Through professor-classroom lessonpresentation, the teacher candidate will demonstrate theprinciples of an integrated approach to teaching literature andthe use of oral and written expression for inclusive classroomsof diverse learners. Fee–$105.00 6 creditsEDU 507 METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE ININCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OF MIDDLE SCHOOL ANDADOLESCENT LEARNERSThis course will consist of an examination of the curriculumgoals, instructional strategies and materials for teaching scienceto the diverse learner in grades seven to twelve. It will focus onmethods for making science meaningful by promoting an activelearning process. Teacher candidates will learn to developlearning experiences and conduct assessment reflecting theprocesses of growth and development of the adolescent.Attention is given to planning and teaching scientific conceptsand activities for students who are culturally diverse, thosewith limited English proficiency and those with special needs.Teacher candidates will learn how to develop conceptsutilizing instructional technology, including the calculator andcomputer. They will learn and be able to discuss the currentissues and problems in science education today. Finally, theNew York State’s Mathematics, Science, and TechnologyLearning Standards, the Standards of the National ScienceTeachers Association, the Intermediate Science Curriculum(7–8), and High School Science Curriculums will be studied indepth. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 509 CURRICULUM AND METHODS OF TEACHINGSOCIAL STUDIES IN BIRTH-GRADE 2 AND CHILDHOOD1-6 IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMSNew York Learning Standards in social studies will guide theteacher candidates’ work in this course. The English LanguageArts (ELA) and Arts standards will be infused with the socialstudies standards as teacher candidates are engaged indesigning and creating learning experiences that correlate withthe expectations of New York State Education Department. Theconnection between curriculum, instruction, and assessmentwill be modeled and stressed. The use of resource persons,technology, inclusion and multicultural concepts in earlychildhood and childhood settings will be integrated throughoutthe course. Fee-$105.00 3 creditsEDU 510 STRATEGIES AND TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHINGMIDDLE SCHOOL AND ADOLESCENT STUDENTS ININCLUSIVE CLASSROOMSThis course focuses on the development and application ofstrategies that will enable a pre-service teacher to plan formeaningful and effective instruction [teaching and learning]in middle and secondary schools. Emphasis is placed onunderstanding teaching and learning as they reflect educationaland pedagogical theories, addressing students’ diverse needsand integrating knowledge and needs toward the creation of ateaching and learning environment which maximizes cognitive,emotional and social growth for all students. This is the firstcourse taken by teacher candidates seeking initial certificationas a teacher of adolescents, grades 7–12. Corequisite: EDU 500A,EDU 500C, or EDU 500D. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 512 METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICSFOR MIDDLE SCHOOL AND ADOLESCENT DIVERSELEARNERSThis course will consist of an examination of the curriculumgoals, instructional strategies and materials for teachingmathematics to the diverse learner in grades seven to twelve.It will focus on methods for making mathematics meaningful87


y promoting an active learning process. The teachercandidate will learn to develop learning experiences andconduct assessments reflecting the processes of growth anddevelopment of the adolescent. Attention is given to planningand teaching mathematical tasks and activities for students whoare culturally diverse, those with limited English proficiency andthose with special needs. Teacher candidates will learn how touse manipulatives to develop concepts and utilize instructionaltechnology, including the calculator and computer. They willlearn and be able to discuss the current issues and problemsin math education today, such as the implications of the TIMSSreport. Finally, the New York State’s Mathematics, Science andTechnology Learning Standards, those of the National Councilof Teachers of Mathematics, the Intermediate Core Curriculum(7–8) and High School Core Curriculum for School Mathematics,will be studied in depth. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 513 MEETING THE NEEDS OF CULTURALLYDIVERSE STUDENTS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS INBIRTH-GRADE 2, CHILDHOOD 1-6 AND ADOLESCENCE7-12This course will initially approach multicultural education froma reflective, autobiographical, and learner-centered viewpoint,which focuses on birth through grade 2, grades 1 through 6,and grades 7 through 12. The meaning, necessity, and benefitsof multicultural education will be explored by placing it in asocio-cultural context. The interaction of home, school, andcommunity context, the teaching and learning process, as wellas the content of instructional materials also will be examinedfrom a multicultural perspective.Strategies for fostering intergroup understanding, awareness,and appreciation by students of the diverse ethnic, racial,cultural, and linguistic groups represented in schools and thegeneral population will be considered. Specific cultures will beexamined. The effects of students’ home culture, race, gender,ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic status, and exceptionalitieson the learning process will be explored utilizing case studiesand snapshots as well as participants’ own field experiences.Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 514 TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS(ELLS)The needs of ELLs are considered from the vantage point ofsecond language acquisition theory and practice. Teachercandidates are expected to demonstrate comprehension of theproblems faced by ELLs in classroom settings and to implementmethods of assisting these students to maximize their learningpotential. The course will assist participants in developing anecessary frame of reference for the education of ELLs. Thiscourse will provide an overview of the theoretical and practicalaspects of teaching speakers of other languages of all agegroups and language proficiency levels. Instructional design,evaluation and classroom management strategies tailored tothe needs of ELLs will be considered. Focus will also be placedon lesson planning and materials development to meet theneeds of ELLs and youth in sheltered content instruction.Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 515 CURRICULUM ASSESSMENT ANDDEVELOPMENTThe goals of this course are to provide participants with the skillsnecessary to evaluate existing curriculum and revise it whenapplicable, and to design and develop innovative curriculumthat will challenge students to pursue in-depth understandingof subject content. Interdisciplinary approaches to curriculumdesign, incorporation of effective questioning techniques,strategies which foster critical thinking skills in students and theuse of authentic forms of assessment will be important topics inthis course. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 516 CURRICULUM AND METHODS OF TEACHINGSOCIAL STUDIES TO DIVERSE ADOLESCENT LEARNERSIN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMSThis course is designed to provide teacher candidates with acomprehensive understanding of the interdisciplinary natureof the social studies, as well as to prepare candidates in socialstudies content. Using the New York State Learning Standardsin the Social Studies and those of the National Council for theSocial Studies as the framework, teacher candidates will focuson effective teaching and questioning strategies, unit andlesson planning for the diverse classroom and the developmentof critical thinking and literary skills. Teacher candidates willlearn methods, strategies and techniques for making the socialstudies multicultural, inclusive and activity-based, while alsoincorporating information technology and media resourcesdocument-based questions and assessments based in theUniversal Design for Teaching and Learning will be included.Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 518 SPANISH CURRICULUM AND METHODS FORINCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OF ADOLESCENT DIVERSELEARNERSThis course addresses the Spanish curriculum in acommunicative classroom including methods and techniquesuseful in the inclusive classroom of adolescents. First and secondlanguage acquisition skills as well as the creative use of a varietyof procedures will be examined. Communication activities forall four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writingwill be addressed. An in-depth study of models for the effectivemanagement of the communicative language classroom will bea major focus of this class. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 521 TECHNOLOGY FOR INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMTEACHERS BIRTH-GRADE 2, CHILDHOOD 1-6,ADOLESCENCE 7-12(formerly Advanced Technology for Inclusive ClassroomTeachers)The goal of this course is to provide teacher candidates withthe opportunity to recognize and experience the benefits oftechnology as an integrated part of the educational process forall students, including those with special needs. The potentialof technology as a tool to support instructional programs, toprovide the means for collaboration, and to enable personaland professional growth will be emphasized.Teacher candidates will be provided with hands-on instructionfor acquiring the skills for online learning utilizing multimediatechnology. As users of the most recent technology,they will be able to identify Internet resources, and recognize88


how these resources will enhance curriculum, instruction andtheir students’ learning opportunities. They will be able toexperience the benefits of collaboration with other educatorsand experts in a variety of fields. Participants will design lessonsand activities, which demonstrate the integration of technologyinto subject content area and its use with diverse studentpopulations. In particular, teachers and teacher candidates willacquire facility in utilizing various forms of assistive technologyto address the special needs of students who are learningdisabled, mildly mentally retarded or who experience impairedabilities in the regular, inclusive, or self-contained classroom orresource room. Fee-$125.00 3 creditsEDU 522 ADVANCED DESIGN TECHNOLOGY FORINCLUSIVE CLASSROOM TEACHERS(formerly Design Technology for Inclusive Classroom Teachers)The goal of this course is to provide teachers and teachercandidates with the opportunity to improve their technologicalskills and to increase their professional development in this area.The potential of technology as a tool to support instructionalprograms, to provide the means for collaboration and to enablepersonal and professional growth will be emphasized. Thiscourse is designed for candidates who have classroom teachingexperience and are knowledgable in technology. Fee–$125.003 creditsEDU 523 TEACHER AS THE EDUCATIONAL LEADER INPARTNERSHIPS FOR COLLABORATIVE EDUCATIONThrough the application of theory and practice, this coursepresents participants with an opportunity to learn conceptsand acquire skills needed to provide effective leadership at alllevels of the school community. The course will focus on theteacher in the following roles: as lead teacher, departmenthead, peer coach/ mentor, pre-service and new teacher mentor,professional growth staff developer, community collaborator,curriculum, planning and instruction leader, interdisciplinaryteam leader, union leader and action research leader. Thecourse also examines the benefits of the partnerships thatteachers form with parents, school and district administration,school boards, school and community resources and local, stateand federal agencies. Internet and e-mail, as well as personalconnections, will be utilized. Special consideration will begiven to the benefit of the collaborative model for studentswith special needs and those considered part of the “at risk’’population. Strategies for translating knowledge gainedthrough these partnerships into adaptive techniques whichpromote an effective learning environment for all students isan important focus of this course. Students will conduct offsitevisitations and relevant personnel will be invited as guestlecturers. 3 creditsEDU 524 TOPICS IN EDUCATION(formerly Post-Masters’ Workshops)Special courses to explore current topics in education, designedto meet the needs and interests of specific groups of educatorsor teacher candidates will be presented. The workshops willallow the offering of requested courses from Teacher Centersand the local School Districts’ Professional DevelopmentBoards. 1–3 creditsEDU 525 CURRICULUM, STRATEGIES, METHODOLOGYAND MATERIALS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION,BIRTH - GRADE 2This course prepares teachers and teacher candidates to planappropriate and individualized curriculum which addresses thesocial, emotional, cognitive and physical development of youngchildren ages birth to grade 2. Participants will compare andcontrast different staffing patterns for birth to grade 2 settingsand demonstrate applications of play as a source of learningthrough interest centers, play centers, spatial arrangementsand specifically designed environmental adaptations. Thepreparation of materials that foster artistic and creativeexpression in young children and the use of communityresources are addressed. Federal and state laws, the standardsof the National Association for the Education of YoungChildren and those of the Association of Childhood EducationInternational are significant components of this course.The goals of this course are to introduce teacher candidates todevelopmentally appropriate researched-based practices andthe creation of teaching materials and strategies to meet thediverse needs of early childhood students in inclusive settings.Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 526 CURRENT ISSUES IN EARLY CHILDHOODEDUCATION, BIRTH-GRADE 2: ASSESSMENT OFPROGRESS, RELATIONSHIPS, FAMILIES, LEGAL ANDCOMMUNITY ISSUESThis course focuses on teaching methodology, strategies, andcurriculum adaptations in the field of early childhood education(birth - grade 2). Course content is based on developmentallyappropriate practices reflective of research-based pedagogyand integration of technology in the classroom. Proceduresfor designing, implementing and managing the curriculumand assessments to meet the diverse needs of young childrenin inclusive settings are included. The importance of familyand community relationships, as well as ethical guidelines forearly childhood practices are discussed. Specific environmentalissues are addressed to provide maximum learning experience.This course addresses the standards of the National Associationfor the Education of Young Children as well as the Association ofChildhood Education International and other related agencies.Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 530 ADVANCED MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM ANDMETHODS FOR CHILDHOOD AND MIDDLE CHILDHOODDIVERSE LEARNERSThis course will consist of an examination of the mathematicalconcepts and teaching strategies of the mathematics in theNew York State Elementary and Intermediate Core MathematicsCurriculum and the Principles and Standards of the NationalCouncil of Teachers of Mathematics for School Mathematicsfor the diverse learner. The teacher candidates will gain anunderstanding of the axiomatic foundations as the basis for themathematics they will teach. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 531 ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTSCURRICULUM AND METHODS FOR INCLUSIVECLASSROOMS OF CHILDHOOD DIVERSE LEARNERSThis course examines the development of the English LanguageArts curriculum and a variety of strategies the teacher candidate89


may devise for use in an inclusive classroom of childhooddiverse learners and students with disabilities. Emphasis willbe placed upon the reader, listener, speaker and writer in aliteracy research-based classroom which provides enrichmentand remediation. Candidates’ field experience and contributionto a reflective portfolio will be required. The New York StateLearning Standards in the content areas, and those of theNational Council of Teachers of English, the impact of languagedevelopment on academic skills, the use of technology andcritical thinking will be incorporated throughout the course inaccordance with school literacy practice. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 532 ADVANCED SCIENCE CONTENT ANDMETHODOLOGY FOR CHILDHOOD DIVERSE LEARNERSThis course is designed to provide childhood teachers with aholistic, interdisciplinary understanding of science content andpedagogy. The focus of science education will be ways in whichteachers can foster opportunities for all children to engage inscience as inquiry. Incorporated are best practices for helpingchildren to explore and construct science knowledge, waysto arrange science classrooms for learning, skills necessaryto plan for active investigations and how to integrate theNew York State Learning Standards and those of the NationalScience Teacher’s Association. Teachers will relate science tocontemporary events and real-life applications, while learninghow to plan for performance assessment. Science will beconnected to other subject areas as well as integrated withtechnology and combined with safety. The focus of the courseis how to offer science experiences for all students, includingstudents with exceptionalities, gifted students, culturallydiverse students, native English speakers and English languagelearners. Research, science projects and effective questioningwill be considered in terms of science instruction. Fee–$105.003 creditsEDU 533 ADVANCED CURRICULUM AND METHODS OFTEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN CHILDHOOD INCLUSIVECLASSROOMSThis course is designed to provide teachers with a holisticand interdisciplinary method of teaching social studies ininclusive classrooms of diverse learners. The curriculum topicsemphasized correlate to the New York State Social Studiessyllabus and current trends in education and the standards ofthe National Council for the Social Studies. Teachers integratesocial studies education, language arts and literature andtechnology to address the needs of all students including thosefor whom remediation or enrichment is necessary. New YorkState Learning Standards for Social Studies are studied in depth.Teachers relate social studies content and methodology to fieldexperience. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 537 DIVERSE ABILITIES AND NEEDS OF STUDENTSIN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS BIRTH GRADE-2,CHILDHOOD 1-6 AND ADOLESCENCE 7-12This course examines key issues related to the education ofstudents with special academic needs; physical or emotionalchallenges; cultural, social or economic differences. Specialattention is given to teaching strategies which create andfoster environments conducive to the affective and cognitivedevelopment of all students in the regular education classroom.In particular the creation of environments conducive to usingoral and written language for effective social communicationbetween students of varying ability levels is stressed. Thiscourse examines inclusive, collaborative and mainstreammodels. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 539 FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN THE ELEMENTARYSCHOOL (FLES) METHODS – TEACHING WORLDLANGUAGES TO CHILDRENThis course addresses the needs of world language teachersinterested in teaching foreign language in the elementaryschool (FLES), incorporating a FLES program, or improvingtheir world language teaching using FLES methodologies.Participants investigate research in language acquisition andFLES instructional strategies and best practices. The creationand use of thematic units and appropriate materials for earlylanguage learners, as well as technological enhancementof language acquisition and the positive incorporation ofperformance assessments are explored. Readings are sharedfrom a core text, ListServs such as FLTeach and Nandutí, anda variety of articles from professional journals such as TheLanguage Educator, NECTFL Reports, and Learning Languages.Excerpts from the video collection: Teaching Foreign LanguagesK-12: A Library of Classroom Practices will be reviewed anddiscussed. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 540 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS FOR TESOLPROFESSIONALSThis course will provide an introduction to the scientific study oflanguage, with a specific emphasis on areas relevant for TESOLprofessionals. These areas will include phonology, morphology,syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Topics in linguistics relatedto issues of first and second language acquisition, and languagedevelopment and teaching will receive special emphasis.Theoretical and applied linguistic issues will be discussedthrough the analysis of English language output. 3 creditsEDU 541 SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION ANDTESOL: THEORY AND PRACTICEThis course will serve as an introduction to English as asecond language teaching and learning. It will providecourse participants with a (a) comprehensive overview of thetheoretical foundation of second language acquisition (SLA)and teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL)and (b) practical methodologies, approaches and techniquesnecessary for the effective instruction of English LanguageLearners (ELLs). Historical perspectives of second languagelearning research and the development of various languageteaching approaches also will be discussed. Teacher candidateswill examine the similarities and differences between first andsecond language acquisition as well as several approaches andperspectives of second language teaching. Course participantswill consider the linguistic, cognitive, affective, cultural, socialand instructional factors contributing to variations in languageacquisition among ELLs. Effective instructional techniquesand strategies and classroom management techniques willbe practiced. Current TESOL instructional materials will bereviewed and critically analyzed. 3 credits90


another. The long-range course outcome is for teachers to becomecareer-long learners, using action research to inform instruction.Both whole class instruction and individual consultations with theinstructor are scheduled. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 547C DEVELOPING ACTION RESEARCH FORSPECIAL EDUCATION AND INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS INADOLESCENT EDUCATIONThe purpose of this course is the development of a proposal forclassroom action research in an adolescent special educationsetting. Students will be expected to reflect on their classroompractice, develop action research questions and design apractical investigation. Research questions will include theimplementation of the New York State Learning Standards andshould help to answer the following: How can early interventionmeet the needs of students with special learning needs? Howcan teachers of regular and special education work as a teamto meet the needs of children? Specific topics for study mightinclude mainstreaming practices, benefits of technology,assessment of behavioral characteristics and student transitionfrom one level of school to another. The long-range courseoutcome is for teachers to become career-long learners,using action research to inform instruction. Both whole classinstruction and individual consultations with the instructor willbe scheduled. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 547D DEVELOPING ACTION RESEARCH FORTEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHERLANGUAGES (TESOL)The purpose of this course is the development of a proposalfor classroom action research. Participants will be expectedto reflect on their classroom practice, develop action researchquestions and design a practical investigation. Researchquestions will be related to the implementation of the NewYork State Learning Standards and should help to answer thefollowing: What is the relationship between methods of formalinstruction and language acquisition? What tasks and patternsof classroom organization best facilitate second languageacquisition? Specific topics for study might include topicssuch as: learner independence, listening strategies, the writingprocess, benefits of technology, the nature of speaking andcross-cultural aspects of reading comprehension. The longrangecourse outcome is for teachers to become career-longlearners using action research to inform instruction. Both wholeclass instruction and individual consultations with the instructorwill be scheduled. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 548 TESOL STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR PK–6,7– 12Weekly seminars provide TESOL teacher candidates with theopportunity to discuss field experiences and share problemsolvingtechniques. Personal reflection on teacher candidates’emerging teaching techniques is an important component ofthis seminar. Additionally, guest speakers will provide input oncurrent topics relevant to the field of TESOL. A highlight of thestudent teaching seminar is a full-day workshop which includesstudent participation in seminars and mock interviews. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00 0 creditsEDU 549A TEACHER AS RESEARCHER IN DIVERSECLASSROOMSThe goal of this course is to support teachers in using theirknowledge of action research and the research proposalswritten in EDU 547 to carry out an action research project. Theresearch will require instructor approval, will be conductedin a classroom setting and will examine questions related tothe New York State Learning Standards. Topics may includecooperative learning, special education, multi-culturalism,inclusion, multiple intelligences, technology, Teaching Englishto Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and other topics92


elated to current research and practice in the teachinglearningprocess. Candidates are expected to discuss their ongoingresearch at seminars and to reflect upon and evaluatethe findings and conclusions of other researchers. The useof technology for a variety of purposes will be essential inthe development, implementation and presentation of theresearch. Course credit is contingent upon the individualdevelopment, completion and presentation of the final fieldbasedaction research paper. Both whole class instruction andindividual consultation with the instructor will be scheduled.Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 549B TEACHER AS RESEARCHER IN SPECIALEDUCATION AND INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OFCHILDHOOD LEARNERSThe goal of this course is to support teachers in using theirknowledge of action research and the research proposalswritten in EDU 547 to carry out an action research project. Theresearch will require instructor approval, will be conductedin a classroom setting of childhood learners and will examinequestions related to the New York State Learning Standards.Research questions should focus on special education types.Students are expected to discuss their on-going research atseminars and to reflect upon and evaluate the findings andconclusions of other researchers. The use of technology fora variety of purposes will be essential in the development,implementation and presentation of the research. Course creditis contingent upon the individual development, completionand presentation of the final field-based action research paper.Both whole class instruction and individual consultation withthe instructor will be scheduled. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 549C TEACHER AS RESEARCHER IN SPECIALEDUCATION AND INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OFADOLESCENT LEARNERSThe goal of this course is to support teachers in using theirknowledge of action research and the research proposalswritten in EDU 547 to carry out an action research project. Theresearch will require instructor approval, will be conducted ina classroom setting of adolescent learners and will examinequestions related to the New York State Learning Standards.Research questions should focus on special education andinclusion. Students are expected to discuss their on-goingresearch at seminars and to reflect upon and evaluate thefindings and conclusions of other researchers. The use oftechnology for a variety of purposes will be essential in thedevelopment, implementation and presentation of theresearch. Course credit is contingent upon the individualdevelopment, completion and presentation of the final fieldbasedaction research paper. Both whole class instruction andindividual consultation with the instructor will be scheduled.Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 549D TEACHER AS RESEARCHER IN TEACHINGENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL)The goal of this course is to support teachers in using theirknowledge of action research and the research proposalswritten in EDU 547 to carry out an action research project. Theresearch will require instructor approval, will be conducted in aclassroom setting and will examine questions related to the NewYork State Learning Standards. Research questions should focuson teaching English to speakers of other languages and shouldhelp to answer the following questions: What is the relationshipbetween methods of formal instruction and languageacquisition? What tasks and patterns of classroom organizationbest facilitate second language acquisition? Examples ofspecific topics for study might include: learner independence,listening strategies, the writing process, the nature of speakingand cross-cultural aspects of reading comprehension. Studentsare expected to discuss their on-going research at seminarsand to reflect upon and evaluate the findings and conclusionsof other researchers. The use of technology for a variety ofpurposes will be essential in the development, implementationand presentation of the research. Course credit is contingentupon the individual development, completion and presentationof the final field-based action research paper. Both whole classinstruction and individual consultation with the instructor willbe scheduled. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 550A PRE-PROFESSIONAL CHILDHOOD FIELDEXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMSTeacher candidates are required to engage in field experiencesof observation and participation in inclusive classrooms in thespecific area of childhood education for which they are seekinginitial certification. Teacher candidates should register for thisexperience the semester immediately preceding the semesterin which they plan to student teach. Teacher candidates aresupervised by Molloy College Education Department professorsduring this pre-student teaching experience. Successfulcompletion of the pre-professional experiences is requiredbefore teacher candidates are permitted to student teach.(Pass/Fail) Fee—$165.00 0 creditsEDU 550B PRE-PROFESSIONAL CHILDHOOD/SPECIALEDUCATION FIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVECLASSROOMSTeacher candidates are required to engage in field experiencesof observation and participation in inclusive classrooms in thespecific area of childhood education for which they are seekinginitial certification. Teacher candidates should register for thisexperience the semester immediately preceding the semesterin which they plan to student teach. Teacher candidates aresupervised by Molloy College Education Department professorsduring this pre-student teaching experience. Successfulcompletion of the pre-professional experiences is requiredbefore teacher candidates are permitted to student teach.(Pass/Fail) Fee—$165.00 0 creditsEDU 550D PRE-PROFESSIONAL CHILDHOOD/TESOLPK–12 FIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMSTeacher candidates are required to engage in field experiencesof observation and participation in inclusive classrooms in thespecific area of childhood education for which they are seekinginitial certification. Teacher candidates should register for thisexperience the semester immediately preceding the semesterin which they plan to student teach. Teacher candidates aresupervised by Molloy College Education Department professorsduring this pre-student teaching experience. Successfulcompletion of the pre-professional experiences is requiredbefore teacher candidates are permitted to student teach.(Pass/Fail) Fee—$165.00 0 credits93


EDU 550E PRE-PROFESSIONAL EARLY CHILDHOOD/CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCE, NURSERY, PK,KINDERGARTEN, GRADES 1-2 (60 hrs)This field experience will provide teacher candidates withobservations and supervised experiences in a classroom inthe specific area of early childhood nursery, PK, kindergarten,grades 1-2 for which the teacher candidate is seeking initialdual certification. Teaching experiences in all content areasnormally taught in the early childhood/childhood classroomswith diverse student populations will be provided as well asopportunities for a gradual increase in the teacher candidate’sresponsibilities in the classroom. Early childhood/childhoodteacher candidates will be under the supervision of certifiedmaster teachers as well as a Molloy College Field Supervisor.Evaluations will be based on field performance. Successfulcompletion of the pre-professional experience is requiredbefore teacher candidates are permitted to student teach. Asixty hour field experience is required.(Pass/Fail) Fee-$165.00.0 creditsEDU 550F PRE-PROFESSIONAL SUMMER TESOL PK–12FIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMSTeacher candidates are required to engage in field experiencesof observation and participation in inclusive classrooms in aTESOL setting. Teacher candidates are supervised by MolloyCollege Education Department professors who are certified inTESOL during this pre-student teaching experience. Successfulcompletion of the pre-professional experiences is requiredbefore teacher candidates are permitted to student teach.(Pass/Fail) Fee—$165.00 0 creditsEDU 551A* STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD (Grades1–3)Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in an elementary school under the direct supervisionof a cooperating teacher from the field and the collegesupervisor. This full-time field experience will be in grades 1–3.During this student teaching experience, student teachers willutilize video taping, journaling and portfolioing techniques topromote reflective practices. Prerequisites: (same as 551B) Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 551B* STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD (Grades1–3, Regular and Special Education)Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in an elementary school under the direct supervisionof a cooperating teacher from the field, a special educationteacher and a college supervisor. This full-time field experiencewill be in grades 1–3 in special education settings. During thisstudent teaching experience, student teachers will utilize videotaping, journaling and portfolioing techniques to promotereflective practices. Prerequisites: 24 graduate education creditsincluding EDU 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 509, 537. Fee–$105.00 3creditsEDU 551E STUDENT TEACHING EARLY CHILDHOOD:NURSERY, PK, KINDERGARTEN, GRADES 1-2Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in an elementary school under the direct supervision ofa cooperating teacher from the field and college supervisor. Thisfull-time field experience will be in grades PK, K, and ChildhoodGrades 1 – 3. During this student teaching experience, studentteachers will utilize video taping, journaling and portfolioingtechniques to promote reflective practices. Prerequisites: (sameas 551B) Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 552A* STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD (Grades4–6)Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in an elementary school under the direct supervisionof a cooperating teacher from the field, and the collegesupervisor. This full-time field experience will be in grades 4–6.During this student teaching experience, student teachers willutilize video taping, journaling and portfolioing techniquesto promote reflective practices. Prerequisites: 24 graduateeducation credits including EDU 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 509,537. Fee-$105.00 3 creditsEDU 552B* STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD/SPECIALEDUCATION (Grades 4–6 Regular and SpecialEducation)Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in an elementary school under the direct supervisionof a cooperating teacher from the field, a special educationteacher and a college supervisor. This full-time field experiencewill be in grades 4–6 in special education settings. During thisstudent teaching experience, student teachers will utilize videotaping, journaling and portfolioing techniques to promotereflective practices. Prerequisites: 24 graduate education creditsincluding EDU 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 509, 537. Fee-$105.00 3creditsEDU 553A* STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR—CHILDHOOD (Grades 1-6)Weekly seminars provide student teachers with the opportunityto discuss field experiences and share problem-solvingtechniques. Personal reflection on students’ emerging teachingtechniques is an important component of this seminar.Additionally, guest speakers will provide input on current topicsrelevant to the educational field. A highlight of the studentteaching seminar is a full-day workshop which includes studentparticipation in seminars and mock interviews. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00 0 creditsEDU 553B* STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR—CHILDHOOD/ SPECIAL EDUCATION (Grades 1–6)Weekly seminars provide student teachers with the opportunityto discuss field experiences and share problem-solvingtechniques. Personal reflection on students’ emerging teachingtechniques is an important component of this seminar.Additionally, guest speakers will provide input on current topicsrelevant to the educational field. A highlight of the studentteaching seminar is a full-day workshop which includes studentparticipation in seminars and mock interviews. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00 0 credits*Teacher candidates must register for EDU 551, 552 and 553 inthe same semester.94


EDU 554A PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADOLESCENT FIELDEXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMSTeacher candidates are required to engage in field experiencesof observation and participation in inclusive classrooms in thespecific area of adolescent education for which they are seekinginitial certification. Teacher candidates should register for thisexperience the semester immediately preceding the semesterin which they plan to student teach. Teacher candidates aresupervised by Molloy College Education Department Professorsduring this pre-student-teaching experience. Successfulcompletion of the pre-professional experiences is requiredbefore teacher candidates are permitted to student teach.(Pass/Fail) Fee–$165.00 0 creditsEDU 554B PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADOLESCENT/SPECIALEDUCATION FIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVECLASSROOMSTeacher candidates are required to engage in field experiencesof observation and participation in inclusive classrooms in thespecific area of adolescent education for which they are seekinginitial certification. Teacher candidates should register for thisexperience the semester immediately preceding the semesterin which they plan to student teach. Teacher candidates aresupervised by Molloy College Education Department Professorsduring this pre-student-teaching experience. Successfulcompletion of the pre-professional experiences is requiredbefore teacher candidates are permitted to student teach.(Pass/Fail) Fee–$165.00 0 creditsEDU 554D PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADOLESCENT/TESOLPK–12 FIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMSTeacher candidates are required to engage in field experiencesof observation and participation in inclusive classrooms in thespecific area of adolescent education for which they are seekinginitial certification. Teacher candidates should register for thisexperience the semester immediately preceding the semesterin which they plan to student teach. Teacher candidates aresupervised by Molloy College Education Department Professorsduring this pre-student-teaching experience. Successfulcompletion of the pre-professional experiences is requiredbefore teacher candidates are permitted to student teach.(Pass/Fail) Fee–$165.00 0 creditsEDU 555A* STUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE(Grades 7–9)Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in a secondary school under the direct supervisionof a cooperating teacher from the field. This full-time fieldexperience will be in grades 7–9. During this student teachingexperience, student teachers will utilize video taping, journalingand portfolioing techniques to promote reflective practices.Prerequisites: 21 graduate education credits including EDU 502,510, 513, 537 and content area methods/ pedagogy course: 507or 516, or 518 or 530, or 531. Fee–$105.00 3 credits*Teacher candidates must register for EDU 555, 556 and 557 inthe same semester.EDU 555B* STUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE/SPECIAL EDUCATION (Grades 7–9)Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in a secondary school under the direct supervision of acooperating teacher from the field, a special education teacherand the college supervisor. This full-time field experience willbe in grades 7–9 and in special education settings. During thisstudent teaching experience, student teachers will utilize videotaping, journaling and portfolioing techniques to promotereflective practices. Prerequisites: 21 graduate education creditsincluding EDU 502, 510, 513, 537 and content area methods/pedagogy course: 507 or 512 or 516 or 518. Fee–$105.00 3credits*Teacher candidates must register for EDU 555, 556 and 557 inthe same semester.EDU 556A* STUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE(Grades 10–12)Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in a secondary school under the direct supervision ofa cooperating teacher from the field and the college supervisor.This full-time field experience will be in grades 10–12. Duringthis student teaching experience, student teachers willutilize video taping, journaling and portfolioing techniquesto promote reflective practices. Prerequisites: 21 graduateeducation credits including EDU 502, 510, 513, 537 and contentarea methods/ pedagogy course: 507 or 512 or 516 or 518. Fee-$105.00 3 credits*Teacher candidates must register for EDU 555, 556 and 557 inthe same semester.EDU 556B* STUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE/SPECIAL EDUCATION (Grades 10–12)Student teachers are required to follow a full-time teachingschedule in a secondary school under the direct supervision of acooperating teacher from the field, a special education teacherand the college supervisor. This full-time field experience willbe in grades 10–12 in special education settings. During thisstudent teaching experience, student teachers will utilize videotaping, journaling and portfolioing techniques to promotereflective practices. Prerequisites: 21 graduate education creditsincluding EDU 502, 510, 513, 537 and content area methods/pedagogy course: 507 or 512 or 516 or 518. Fee-$105.00 3credits*Teacher candidates must register for EDU 555, 556 and 557 inthe same semester.EDU 557A* STUDENT TEACHING SEMINARADOLESCENT (GRADES 7–12)Weekly seminars provide student teachers with the opportunityto discuss field experiences and share problem-solvingtechniques. Personal reflection on students’ emerging teachingtechniques is an important component of this seminar.Additionally, guest speakers will provide input on current topicsrelevant to the educational field. A highlight of the studentteaching seminar is a full-day workshop, which includes studentparticipation in seminars and mock interviews. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00 0 credits*Teacher candidates must register for EDU 555, 556 and 557 inthe same semester.EDU 557B* STUDENT TEACHING SEMINARADOLESCENT/ SPECIAL EDUCATION (GRADES 7–12)Weekly seminars provide student teachers with the opportunity95


to discuss field experiences and share problem-solvingtechniques. Personal reflection on students’ emerging teachingtechniques is an important component of this seminar.Additionally, guest speakers will provide input on current topicsrelevant to the educational field. A highlight of the studentteaching seminar is a full-day workshop, which includes studentparticipation in seminars and mock interviews. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00 0 credits*Teacher candidates must register for EDU 555, 556 and 557 inthe same semester.EDU 565 STRATEGIES AND TECHNIQUES FORTEACHING MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS IN INCLUSIVECLASSROOMSThis course focuses on the development and application ofstrategies and techniques necessary to teach middle schoolstudents most effectively. Emphasis is placed on methodsaddressing the diverse needs of adolescents and enhancingtheir cognitive abilities. Topics include: effective questioningtechniques, student involvement in classroom decision-making,motivational techniques for students to be self-directed life longlearners, successful transition practices, collaborative planning,interdisciplinary teaching and the teaming of students andfaculty to maximize learning.Participants will develop and present lesson and unit plansthat incorporate methods and practices specifically designedfor middle school students. Special consideration will begiven to developing curriculum and planning lessons whichincorporate the goals of New York State Learning Standards, therecommendations of the National Middle School Associationand the National Council For Accreditation of TeacherEducation, and which utilize technology as integral to studentlearning. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 567 PSYCHOLOGICAL, SOCIAL AND SPECIALNEEDS OF ADOLESCENTSThis course focuses on the special cognitive, psychological,social and developmental needs of adolescents in order toprepare teachers to teach this population more effectively.Emphasis is given to all maturational factors, psychosocialcomponents and cultural aspects which affect learning. Specialconsideration is given to classroom adaptations necessary tothe unique developmental patterns of middle school studentswith special needs and those with limited English proficiency.Attention will be focused on the components necessary tothe formation of classroom communities, which are inclusive,value fostering and emotionally supportive for adolescentsof all ability levels within a multicultural and diverse socialenvironment. 3 creditsEDU 569 AUTISM AND ASPERGER IN INCLUSIVECLASSROOMSThis course is designed to develop a knowledge base of theautistic spectrum and to enable teachers and teacher candidatesto match methodology to the needs of the student with autismor Asperger syndrome. Teachers and teacher candidates will beprepared to focus on the social, psychological and academicneeds of the student with autism or Asperger syndrome in aninclusive elementary or secondary programs, as well as thosewhose individual educational program provides for alternateassistance and placements. 3 creditsEDU 570 CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS WITHDISABILITIESThis course will examine the varied learning, behavioral andsocial characteristics of students with disabilities. Prevalence,diversified etiologies, medical factors and psychologicalcharacteristics will be explored. In terms of New York StateLearning Standards, No Child Left Behind Legislation and thereauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities EducationAct, current inclusionary techniques and specific curricularapproaches (including assistive technology) that are empiricallybased will be assessed as they benefit students with specificlearning disabilities, developmental delays or autism spectrumdisorders. Additional proactive strategies will include currentand pragmatic behavior modification vehicles. Teachercandidates will also have an opportunity to design a learningenvironment for individuals with disabilities. Prerequisite: EDU537 Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 571 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF STUDENTSWITH DISABILITIESThis course will provide teachers and teacher candidates withthe conceptual background necessary to assess and evaluatestudents with disabilities. Participants will survey, diagnoseand interpret frequently used assessment tools and informalassessment procedures. The assessment process will considermethods of managing student data and recognizing areas ofbias. This course will emphasize matching the New York StateLearning Standards and those of the Council for ExceptionalChildren to frequently used assessment instruments. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 572 STRATEGIES, METHODS AND ENVIRONMENTSFOR TEACHING CHILDHOOD STUDENTS WITHDISABILITIESThe goal of this course is to enable teacher candidates toutilize effective teaching methodologies and create learningenvironments to promote success for childhood students withdisabilities. This course will examine the behavioral, psychoeducational,social, environmental, and developmental needsof the child with disabilities, grades 1-6. The psychologyof the learner with special needs will be presented. Selfesteem,behavioral management, learning styles and multipleintelligences theory will be studied. This course will alsoemphasize how to develop strategies and continue to measureprogress in social, behavioral, and psycho-educational areas.All necessary developmental skills will be taught as part ofNew York State Learning Standards and curriculum, and theStandards of the Council for Exceptional Children, as they relateto the elementary school program. Fee- $105.00 3 creditsEDU 573 STRATEGIES, METHODS AND ENVIRONMENTSFOR TEACHING ADOLESCENT STUDENTS WITHDISABILITIESThe goal of this course is to enable candidates to utilize effectiveteaching methodology, strategies and environments to promotesuccess for adolescent students with disabilities. This course willexamine psycho-social, psycho-educational, and behavioralneeds of the adolescent, with special needs grades 7-12. Thepsychology of the learner with special needs with equal emphasison psycho-social issues will be presented. Self-esteem, behaviormanagement and learning styles will be studied. This course96


will also emphasize development, modification and continuedmeasurement of progress in social, behavioral, educational andenvironmental areas. These continued measurements will betaught as they relate to New York State Standards, Standards ofthe Council for Exceptional Students, New York State EducationDepartment assessments, regents examinations and all curriculaissues. Fee- $105.00 3 creditsEDU 574 CURRICULUM CONTENT, PRACTICES ANDENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES FOR TEACHING CHILDHOODSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIESThis course of study is designed to introduce reading, writingand mathematics methods and programs for children withdisabilities. Instruction will focus on using test data andstudent observation to determine the best method of teachingthese subjects. This course will foster an understanding of theway in which methodology, materials and practices must becoordinated to meet the specific needs and address the deficitsof each student. Particular attention will be given to basal anddevelopmental programs and meeting New York State LearningStandards, as well as those of the Council for ExceptionalChildren. The mandates of No Child Left Behind Legislation,as well as the provisions of the reauthorized Individuals withDisabilities Act, will be reviewed. Commonly used diagnosticinstruments and state assessments will be reviewed. Clinicalmethods of teaching reading and writing to students whocannot benefit from the basal programs will be surveyed.Developing and implementing New York State mandatedacademic intervention services (AIS) will be presented. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 575 CURRICULUM CONTENT, PRACTICES ANDENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES FOR TEACHING ADOLESCENTSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIESThis course is designed to review curriculum in reading,mathematics and written composition in grades 7–12. It willenable participants to develop strategies for secondary studentsto access state curriculum. In an all regents program, studentswith disabilities need to be exposed to parallel curriculum andapply reading, writing and mathematics strategies to contentareas. New York State assessments necessitate that studentswith disabilities be able to transfer strategies learned to theassessment environment. Standards and practices of theCouncil for Exceptional Children, as well as the provisions ofNo Child Left Behind Legislation, will be incorporated into thiscourse. Fee–$105.00 3 creditsEDU 576 SPECIAL EDUCATION PRACTICUMThis experience engaged in by classroom teachers who alreadypossess initial teaching certification is completed in a fieldsetting under the supervision of a special education teacher.This field experience is under the direct supervision of a collegesupervisor with special education expertise and includesexperience in teaching students with disabilities in eitherchildhood or adolescent settings. Fee-$105.00 3 creditsEDU 577 SPECIAL EDUCATION: STUDENT TEACHINGCHILDHOOD (GRADES 1–6)Student teachers for childhood students with disabilities arerequired to follow a 20 day full-time teaching schedule in anelementary school under the direct supervision of a cooperatingteacher from the field and the college supervisor. This full-timefield experience will be in grades 1–3, 4–6. During this studentteaching experience, student teachers will utilize video taping,journaling and portfolioing techniques to promote reflectivepractices. Fee-$105.00 3 creditsEDU 578 SPECIAL EDUCATION: STUDENT TEACHINGADOLESCENCE (GRADES 7–12)Student teachers for adolescent students with disabilities arerequired to follow a 20 day full time teaching schedule in asecondary school under the direct supervision of a cooperatingteacher from the field and the college supervisor. This full-timefield experience will be in grades 7–9 and 10–12. During thisstudent teaching experience, student teachers will utilize videotaping, journaling and portfolioing techniques to promotereflective practices. Fee-$105.00 3 creditsEDU 579 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR—CHILDHOODAND ADOLESCENCE/SPECIAL EDUCATIONWeekly seminars provide student teachers with the opportunityto discuss field experiences and share problem-solvingtechniques. Personal reflection on students’ emerging teachingtechniques is an important component of this seminar.Additionally, guest speakers will provide input on current topicsrelevant to the educational field. A highlight of the studentteaching seminar is a full-day workshop which includes studentparticipation in seminars and mock interviews. (Pass/Fail) Fee–$105.00 0 creditsCourses EDU 580 through EDU 599 include content andpedagogy in accordance with the New York State LearningStandards for each subject area, as well as the specificstandards of each of the content subject areas. {NationalCouncil of Teachers of English (NCTE), National Councilof Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), National Councilfor the Social Studies (NCSS), National Science TeachersAssociation (NSTA) and American Council on the Teachingof Foreign Languages (ACTFL).}EDU 580 EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY ANDANTHROPOGENIC EFFECTS ON BIODIVERSITY FORADOLESCENT CLASSROOMSIn this course, science educators will examine the process ofevolution from two perspectives: its interaction with ecology andwith genetics. Evolutionary ecology focuses on the evolution ofbehavior, species interaction and spatial distribution patternsof organisms. Evolutionary genetics focuses on the nature andorigin of variation, on factors that influence variation such asselection and drift, and on the ultimate result of these factors:adaptation and speciation. Human influences that modify thenatural development of biodiversity are integrated throughout.A variety of techniques, experiments and simulations,used to study evolution are designed to engage and teachthe adolescent learner. The teacher candidate will masterpedagogical objectives that include the following: acquire skillsnecessary to plan and implement empirical processes, correlatescientific data with contemporary issues, learn how to integratethe use of technology as it relates to scientific inquiry anddifferentiate instructional methods to complement the needsof diverse learners. New York State’s Learning Standards will bestudied and applied in-depth. 3 credits97


EDU 581 MOLECULAR GENETICS WITH APPLICATIONSTO INHERITED DISEASE, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ANDEVOLUTIONThis course will examine the current state of knowledge inthe developing field of molecular genetics. It will providethe science educator with the opportunity to understandthe structure and function of the gene and comprehend theworkings of the genome as a whole through critical thinkingactivities. Lectures and class discussions will integrate theseconcepts of molecular genetics with our documentedunderstanding of inherited human disorders, which explores:how these genetic disorders are inherited, how the diseasegenes are identified and how mutations result in the observeddisorders. Equipped with this knowledge, the student educatorwill survey a variety of simulations and techniques designed tocommunicate these concepts to the adolescent learner. Theteacher candidate will further acquire skills necessary to designempirical processes, implement the use of technology to fosterscientific inquiry among secondary students and developmethods of instruction supportive of diverse learner. New YorkState’s learning Standards relative to molecular genetics will bestudied and form the basis of appropriate instructional skills inthis area. 3 creditsEDU 582 ADVANCED RESEARCH TECHNIQUES:THE MODERN LABORATORY EXPERIENCE AS ANINVESTIGATIVE STRATEGY TO ENHANCE SCIENTIFICINQUIRY FOR THE ADOLESCENT LEARNERAdvanced Research Techniques will introduce the prospectivescience educator to a wide variety of state-of-the-art laboratorytechniques used throughout the world in leading researchinstitutions. The subject content will cover advanced researchtechniques in three main areas: 1) cell culture and biochemicalanalysis; 2) subcellular localization of genes and gene products;and 3) microscopy and cellular structural analysis. Historicalrelevance behind the development of novel analyticaltechniques will be reviewed. Modern methods of genomicdatabase analysis in relation to gene and gene product isolationprotocols will be examined. There will be several laboratoriesincorporated into the syllabus to provide an integrated “handson’’ collaborative experience in modern laboratory techniquesand laboratory safety. The teacher candidate will developpedagogical skills that include empirical interpretation andanalysis, acquisition of modern biotechnological skills forscientific evaluation and classroom implementation andcultivation of instructional methods to complement the needsof diverse learners in concordance with current New York StateLearning Standards. 3 creditsEDU 583 HISTORY OF BIOLOGY AND 21ST CENTURY:SOCIAL, ETHICAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL CONCERNSThis course is designed to give the teacher candidate anoverview of the history of biology from medieval time throughthe advances of the 21st Century in order to delineate theantecedent relationship of early scientific thought to appliedscience and modern technology. The historical tenets of Aristotle,Hooke, Pasteur, Darwin and others will bridge the historic andcontemporary philosophies of science with our present body ofscientific knowledge. Twenty-first century concepts in geneticengineering, genetic screening and various modern day diseaseswill provide a basis to discuss contemporary controversiesin bioethics and genetic counseling which will prepare theteacher candidate to integrate scientific, technological andsocial mores into the adolescent science curriculum. Thecontemporary topics to be theoretically investigated include:gene therapy, bioengineering, reproductive cloning, futureresearch interests including HIV and Ebola vaccines and the useof human stem cell products in transplantation. These topicswill be experientially approached to illustrate the relevance andimportance of science to the personal lives of the adolescentlearner. New York State’s Learning Standards for Science andTechnology will be studied and applied in-depth. 3 creditsEDU 584 MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGYFOR TEACHING GRADES 7, 8 AND ALGEBRA 1 FORDIVERSE LEARNERS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS(Formerly Mathematics Curriculum and Pedagogy for MiddleChildhood and Adolescent Diverse Learners)This course will consist of an examination of the mathematicscontent and teaching strategies from the New York StateLearning Standards for Seventh Grade, Eighth Grade andAlgebra 1. It will include the mathematics from both theContent and Process Strands. Unifying themes of problemsolving,writing and reading of mathematics, as well as realworldapplications will be presented. Mathematical topics thatuse technology (graphing calculator and computer) and thoseuseful in teaching to a diverse and multicultural populationwill be explored, including developmentally appropriatepresentations of the topics. Guided by the New York StateStandards, a content item analysis of the mathematics andquestion formats of the Grade 7, Grade 8 and Algebra 1assessments will be reviewed. 3 creditsEDU 585 MATHEMATICS CONCEPTS AND PEDAGOGYOF THE REFORM PRE-CALCULUS AND CALCULUSThis course will focus on the concepts of Precalculus andCalculus relevant to topics and courses taught at thesecondary level. Following the reform approach, topicsare studied geometrically, numerically, analytically andverbally as appropriate. Topics include review of differenttypes of functions and their representations, limits andcontinuity, derivatives, integrals, series and applications. Useof the graphing calculators, applications and modeling andpedagogical techniques such as cooperative learning strategieswill be emphasized throughout the course. Developmentallyappropriate presentations of the topics for the diverse learnerwill be explored. 3 creditsEDU 586 MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGYFOR PROBLEM SOLVING IN GEOMETRY, ALGEBRA 2AND TRIGONOMETRY FOR THE DIVERSE LEARNER INTHE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM(Formerly Modern Mathematics Topics and Pedagogy forContextual Problem Solving)This course will consist of an examination of topics in Geometry,Algebra 2 and Trigonometry from the revised New York StateLearning Standards, that can be used to illustrate “real Life”applications for problem solving at the secondary-level. Thetopics presented originate in the disciplines of statistics,probability, geometry and mathematical modeling. Teachercandidates will learn how to incorporate these applicationsinto the every day teaching of the content of the New YorkState Learning Standards. Developmentally appropriate98


presentations of the topics for the diverse learner in theinclusive classroom will be explored, including use of thegraphing calculator and the internet. 3 creditsEDU 587 MATHEMATICS AND PEDAGOGY USINGTHE GRAPHING CALCULATOR AND COMPUTERAPPLICATIONSThis course will consist of an examination of mathematics andteaching strategies developed by using the graphing calculatorand computer application. The mathematics content found inNew York State’s revised curriculum standards is first developedinductively using graphing calculators and the Geometer’sSketchpad, and then proved analytically or in ““statementreason’’methods. The course will develop units of study acrossall levels of secondary mathematics. Units in geometry includeangle relationships, triangles, parallel and perpendicularlines, polygons, similarity and locus. Similar triangles andthe unit circle will be used to introduce trigonometric ratiosand functions. Units in Statistics include basic plots, meansand standard deviations, to regression models. Algebra andanalytic geometry will be covered by graphing linear and nonlinearequations and systems of equations. Tangent lines andrate of changes will be studied with the graphing calculator.Developmentally appropriate presentations of the topics forthe diverse learner will be explored. 3 creditsEDU 588 WRITING TECHNIQUES FOR DIVERSEADOLESCENT LEARNERSThis course involves instruction in teaching, in accordance withthe New York State Standards in English Language Arts, theliteracy skill of writing in the areas of grammar usage, the writingdomains, structure, research, letters, debate, vocabulary andcritique of various publication forms, to native English speakersand students who are English-language learners. Methods ofwriting enrichment and remediation for diverse learners andstudents with disabilities needs are included in the course.The course provides multiple methods for teaching sentencestructure, paragraphing, varied essay formats, outlining, formatsof correspondence, techniques and strategies of debate, typesof diction and manipulation of language in advertisement andpropaganda. Teacher candidates will learn a multi-dimensionalapproach through participation in each of the aforementionedareas. This includes utilization of multimedia technology inauthoring through presentation slide and/or hypermedia/nonlinear programs for classroom demonstrations. 3 creditsEDU 589 LITERARY GENRES FOR DIVERSE ADOLESCENTLEARNERSThis inclusive course for teacher candidates emphasizesvarious methods of instruction for diverse adolescent learnersin the areas of the major literary genres. Instruction will focusspecifically on poetic forms, short fiction, comedy, tragedy andthe novel. Methods of analysis of the styles and structures ofeach genre, effective teaching techniques of those methodsand remediation/enrichment approaches for student learnerswill be addressed for student centered and technology richclassrooms. 3 creditsEDU 590 MYTHOLOGY, FICTION, FILM AND THETEACHING OF CONTEMPORARY ISSUES TO DIVERSEADOLESCENT LEARNERSIn this course, pre-service teachers are invited to explore howselected mythological themes are employed in modern films,novels and short stories to teach social concerns. The techniques,approaches and impact of the genres are analyzed, synthesized,compared and contrasted, with particular emphasis on how theadolescent diverse learner experiences and learns from thesegenres. Technology components are addressed as an applicablestrategy for instruction. 3 creditsEDU 591 TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING TO DIVERSEADOLESCENT LEARNERSA course presenting the pre-service teacher with effectivetechniques and strategies for stimulating student learners toexpress their views and reflections through the genres of thepersonal essay, poetry and short fiction with varied mediatechniques. 3 creditsEDU 592 TEACHING THE UNITED STATES IN THE AGE OFGLOBALIZATION TO ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERSThe course involves instruction in teaching, in accordancewith the New York State standards in Social Studies, the majormovements and events in American history from 1945 to thepresent. The United States today is a nation of extraordinarydiversity, but also one whose people share a common politicalsystem and public culture. In order to make informed judgmentsabout the present and enrich the student’s understandingof America and its place in the world today, it is necessary tograsp its multi-faceted history. This course provides multiplemethods for teaching the origins, character and developmentof the Cold War including McCarthyism and the Vietnam War;the political and social movements of the 1960s and 1970s; theemergence of conservatism in the 1980s; the end of the ColdWar, and America today. Teacher candidates will learn a multidimensionalapproach through participation in each of thesesubject areas as well as through the use of technology. 3 creditsEDU 593 TEACHING EUROPE IN THE 20TH CENTURY TOADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERSThis course will offer teachers and/or teacher candidates anopportunity to learn the complex historical content surroundingthe many events involved in the integration and fragmentationof Europe. This course will appropriately focus on certainportions of the New York State Education Department SocialStudies Standards of World History, Geography and Economicsby including an examination of important connections andinteractions of people and their differing views of the sameevents; an analysis of significant turning points in world history;a study of the major European social, political, economic andmilitary developments and the influence of geography on thesemovements; an explanation of the major economic systems ofEurope and investigation of decision making that determinedeconomic changes within Europe. 3 creditsEDU 594 TEACHING THE MODERNIZATION OF THE NON-WESTERN WORLD TO ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERSThis course will provide teacher candidates with an overviewof the process of modernization in the non-Western world and99


focus on the role of technology in changes. Teacher candidateswill examine three countries, representing Asia, the MiddleEast and Africa. Case methodology will be used to study theexperience of each in relation to their efforts to modernize,and the obstacles, impact and challenges associated with thisprocess. Included in this course is an integrative approach totechnology, methodology, techniques, resources and activitiesdesigned to enhance the effectiveness of the teacher candidatein the classroom. The New York State Social Studies corecurriculum for Global History and Geography and the state’sSocial Studies Learning Standards 2, 3, 4, and 5 will be reflectedin this course. 3 creditsEDU 595 TEACHING THE POLITICS OF CHOICE TOADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERSThis course will provide the teacher candidate with anintroduction to U.S.A. social and economic policymaking andits importance to our society. The official and unofficial inputsin policymaking, with an emphasis on the role of citizens inthe process, will be studied. The development of U.S. socialand economic policies and their impact will be explored andthe major challenges facing contemporary U.S. society will beanalyzed. The 12th grade New York State Social Studies corecurriculum and Learning Standards for history, government andeconomics will be the foundation of this course. 3 creditsBased on cultural understanding of the Spanish people,candidates will demonstrate the impact of such understandingto enhance communication. 3 creditsEDU 599 LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATIONFOR THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM OF ADOLESCENTDIVERSE LEARNERSThis course will provide the Spanish teacher with a studyof the history, geography, literature, music, social andpolitical characteristics of Latin America. Candidates willdevelop methodologies to promote cross-cultural skillsand understandings of the Latin-American culture in theirclassrooms. Based on cultural understanding of the LatinAmerican people, candidates will demonstrate the impact ofsuch understanding to enhance communication. Teachers willhave the opportunity to present lessons which integrate thecontributions of Latin American culture to daily life. 3 creditsMAT 525 TOPICS: MATHEMATICS EDUCATIONSpecial topics designed to explore current topics in mathematicsand to meet the needs and interests of specific groups ofmathematics teachers. This course will satisfy requestedmathematics help from local teacher center’s and area schooldistrict’s professional development boards. 3 creditsEDU 596 COMMUNICATIVE PROFICIENCY: THEDEVELOPMENT OF ORAL SKILLS IN THE INCLUSIVECLASSROOM OF ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERSIn this course strategies and techniques for teaching Spanishpronunciation will be addressed. Opportunities for expandingknowledge of the various dialects of Spanish will be providedto increase understanding of how the sound system functionsand how the sounds of Spanish contrast both physically andconceptually. Practice sessions and exercises will enhance preserviceteachers’ ability to relate the sounds of the language toits spelling symbols. 3 creditsEDU 597 SPANISH GRAMMAR TOPICS, PEDAGOGICALAPPLICATION TO THE READING AND WRITING PROCESSFOR THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM OF ADOLESCENTDIVERSE LEARNERSThis course will provide pre-service Spanish teacher with an indepthexamination of Spanish grammar topics. Students willhave opportunities to select effective strategies and techniquesfor the application of the rules of grammar to enhancecommunicative proficiency. Emphasis will be placed on thecorrection of errors in structure and syntax that interfere withthe reading and writing processes. Current Spanish grammarpedagogical materials will be examined and students will berequired to produce devices for the teaching and assessment ofSpanish grammar. 3 creditsEDU 598 SPANISH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION FORTHE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM OF ADOLESCENT DIVERSELEARNERSThis course will provide the Spanish teacher with a study ofthe history, geography, literature, music, social and politicalcharacteristics of the Iberian Peninsula. Candidates willdevelop methodologies to promote cross-cultural skills andunderstandings of the Spanish culture in their classrooms.100


Post-Master’s AdvancedCertificate Programs InEducationPost-Master’s Advanced Certificate Programs in TESOL PK-12 and inTeaching Students with Disabilities 1-6 or 7-12 lead to NYSEDCertification in TESOL PK-12 or to NYSED Certification in TeachingStudents with Disabilities 1-6 or 7-12.The Post-Master’s Certificate Programs in Special Education andTeaching English to Speakers of Other Languages are designed toprovide advanced study for teachers who hold a Master’s degreeand New York State Education Department Teaching Certificationin another area. These Post-Master’s Programs were developed tomeet the special needs of students in inclusive classrooms and toaddress the career goals of classroom teachers.Admission Requirements for Post-Master’s CertificatePrograms:Requirements for admission to the Post-Master’s CertificatePrograms Include:• Master’s degree from a professionally accreditedprogram• Minimum graduate GPA of 3.0• New York State Education Department TeachingCertification• Three letters of reference• Personal interview• Completed program applicationPost-Master’s CertificateProgram - Teaching English toSpeakers of Other LanguagesPK-12New York State Registered Program Code: 31329 (TESOL)HEGIS Code: 1508.00 {Teaching of English as a Foreign Language}Certification with NY State is for Professional Certification in area ofInitial Certification and for Initial Certification in TESOL.Prerequisite for this program: 12 credits or equivalent in study of aspoken foreign language.Teacher candidates who are not native speakers of English andwho wish to pursue TESOL certification: A minimum grade of 600on the TOFEL is required before beginning this Program.Required Courses (24 credits):CreditsEDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 540Introduction to Linguistics forTESOL Professionals3EDU 541Second Language Acquisitionand TESOL: Theory and3PracticeEDU 542Structure and Application ofAmerican English3EDU 543Interdisciplinary TeachingMethods and EnglishLanguage Arts for PK-123English Language LearnersEDU 544PK-12 TESOL Teaching Practicesand Assessment in the3Content AreasEDU 548TESOL Student TeachingSeminar PK-6, 7-120Complete either EDU 545 or EDU 546*: 3EDU 545TESOL Student Teaching PK-6,7-12*orEDU 546 Practicum *Total Credits Required: 24Post-Master’s CertificateProgram - Teaching Studentswith Disabilities in Grades 1-6New York State Registered Program Code: 31330HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Initial Certification in Special Education1-6.Required Courses (24 credits):EDU 502Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12Credits3101


EDU 513Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms in3Birth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12EDU 537Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade32, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12EDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays or Autism Spectrum3DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 572Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingChildhood students with3DisabilitiesEDU 574Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Childhood3Students with DisabilitiesEDU 576 Special Education Practicum 3Total Credits Required: 24EDU 570Characteristics of Students withDisabilities, DevelopmentalDelays or Autism Spectrum3DisordersEDU 571Assessment, Diagnosis andEvaluation of Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 573Strategies, Methods andEnvironments for TeachingAdolescent Students with3DisabilitiesEDU 575Curriculum Content, Practicesand Environmental Issuesfor Teaching Adolescent3Students with DisabilitiesEDU 576 Special Education Practicum 3Total Credits Required: 24Post-Master’s CertificateProgram - Teaching Studentswith Disabilities in Grades 7-12New York State Registered Program Code: 31330HEGIS Code: 0808.00 {Special Education, General}Certification with NY State is for Initial Certification in Special Education7-12.Required Courses (24 credits):EDU 502EDU 513EDU 537Theoretical Foundationsand Teaching Practicesof Regular and SpecialEducation for Birth -Grade 2, Childhood 1-6,Adolescence 7-12Meeting the Needs of CulturallyDiverse Students inInclusive Classrooms inBirth - Grade 2, Childhood1-6 and Adolescence 7-12Diverse Abilities and Needsof Students in InclusiveClassrooms Birth - Grade2, Childhood 1-6 andAdolescence 7-12Credits333102


DivisionofHumanitiesPrograms of Study103


Welcome to the Division of Humanities from theDean of the DivisionWelcome to the Graduate Music Therapy Program from theDean of Humanities.Music is one of the greatest attributes of the human spirit,and without it the range of human emotions would be irrevocablydiminished. The unfailing belief in its sublimity prompted onetheologian to quip that music is the only preternatural gift nottaken away after the Fall. However one defines it and in whatevergenres it expresses itself, music integrates feelings and thoughtsin profound ways that transcend the limits of time. No wonderthe power of music is fabled in ancient stories associated withindividuals of mythic proportions – the Davids and Orpheuses– whose talents transformed and elevated listeners into heavenlyrealms. Our level of sophistication does not impair our appreciationof music any more than it lessens our response. Music speaksdirectly to the human heart. Of all the arts and sciences that canbe enlisted to aid human beings in moments of need, music is a major player and provides a privilegedplace in helping others.With a mission that includes respect for the uniqueness of each person, Molloy College welcomesthe graduate music therapy major, who will become part of a healing tradition that has roots in centuriespast and a future in the lives of those whom they touch. Congratulations on choosing Molloy College,with a devoted faculty that will guide you in achieving your professional goals.A. Nicholas Fargnoli, Ph.D.Dean of the Division of Humanitiesand Professor of Theology and EnglishGraduate Business Programs104


Welcome to the Music Therapy Program fromthe Chairperson of the Music DepartmentWelcome to the Graduate Music Therapy Program at MolloyCollege! You have chosen a challenging and exciting program,which will lead to a rewarding career. Our Department includesprofessional music therapists who bring a wide range and depthof experience to your academic training. You will become familiarwith the various theories of music therapy practice, engage inresearch, and develop skills in music psychotherapy. Molloy’s programis approved by the New York State Education Department,Office of the Professions, and fulfills educational requirements forlicensure as a Creative Arts Therapist in the State of New York(LCAT). Students who enter without the MT-BC credential willalso have the opportunity to take courses to prepare for the BoardCertification Exam in Music Therapy.Molloy’s Graduate Degree in Music Therapy is designed toprovide students with extensive supervised clinical practice and afocus on integration of advanced theory and practice. We are theonly school on Long Island with this degree. Our clinical training takes place at a wide variety of sitesthroughout the New York metropolitan area, as well as in our on-campus clinic, the Rebecca Center forMusic Therapy. You will receive close mentoring from our faculty to prepare you for advanced professionalwork in music therapy.I am confident that at Molloy College you will find a vibrant, stimulating and comprehensive Master’sDegree Program in Music Therapy. I invite you to join us to begin or continue your growth anddevelopment as a professional music therapist.Evelyn C. Selesky, M.A. LCAT, MT-BCChairperson of the Music DepartmentDirector of Undergraduate Music Therapy105


Welcome to the Music Therapy Program fromthe DirectorDear Student:Congratulations on your decision to pursue a graduate degreein music therapy. Molloy’s Program is designed to meet the needsof the beginning music therapy professional with a Baccalaureatedegree in music, as well as the experienced music therapy professionallooking for advanced training and specialization.Our program offers a comprehensive curriculum highlightingthe breadth and depth of the music therapy profession. Thedegree has been approved by the State Education Department,Office of the Professions and fulfills educational requirements forlicensure as a Creative Arts Therapist in the State of New York(LCAT). Courses integrate concepts from contemporary musictherapy practice through didactic and experiential learning. Youwill receive extensive hands-on training at area schools, hospitals,outpatient clinics, nursing homes, and psychiatric centers in thegreater metropolitan area. In addition, we are offering courses in specialized areas such as Guided Imageryand Music (GIM), Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy, and Analytical Music Therapy.Molloy’s Music Therapy Program prides itself on individualized attention focused on each student’sparticular strengths and needs. We will work toward providing you the best possible education toprepare you for a variety of music therapy employment scenarios. You will develop music skills that canbe applied to clinical practice, explore theoretical concepts relevant to the field, and engage in researchacross a variety of paradigms and perspectives.We look forward to helping you achieve your professional goals in the dynamic and growing field ofmusic therapy.Suzanne Nowikas Sorel, D.A., LCAT, MT-BC, NRMTDirector, Graduate Music Therapy Program106


Music TherapyProgramW21 Wilbur Arts Center516.678.5000, Ext. 6191Evelyn C. Selesky, M.A., ChairpersonSuzanne Sorel, D.A., Associate Dean and Director, GraduateProgram in Music TherapyAssociate Professor: Suzanne SorelAssistant Professors: John Carpente, Seung-A Kim, ThomasMaloneAdjunct Assistant Professor: Madelaine VentreAdjunct Instructors: Elizabeth Schwartz, Michael ViegaMusic Therapy ProgramPhilosophyThe music therapy department at Molloy College embodies ahumanistic vision regarding the power of music to reach, support,heal, and enhance an individual’s social, emotional, physical, andspiritual development and well-being.Music therapy is an established, goal-directed healthcare professionthat uses music and specially designed musical experiences toimprove the quality of lives of children and adults with disabilities orillnesses. Music therapy graduate students develop skills in workingwithin an interdisciplinary team, writing and implementing clinicalgoals, effectively communicating information regarding treatmentplans and the profession, and in procuring and securing fundingfor programs.The graduate program combines experiential learning in theclassroom with supervised field experiences at healthcare andeducational facilities in the New York Metropolitan area. Thecoursework reflects the philosophy of the department in providinga broad range of study for the contemporary practitioner, includingcourses in music and medicine, music therapy in educationalsettings, ethics in music therapy, clinical improvisation, research,and music psychotherapy. Board-certified music therapists (MT-BC) studying in the graduate program will deepen their practiceby identifying a specialization or a unique interest of study, suchas Nordoff-Robbins music therapy, Guided Imagery and Music,or Analytical Music Therapy. The in-depth study of these areas oftreatment and practice requires professionalism, musicianship, andemotional maturity. The graduate student is supported and closelymonitored throughout the program with one-on-one supervisionand advisement with faculty.The full-time and adjunct faculty members of the music therapygraduate program are nationally and internationally recognizedmusic therapists engaging in cutting edge research and practice.Graduate students will receive supervision by Board-Certified(MT-BC), Licensed Creative Arts Therapists (LCAT) at hospitals,rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, schools, outpatientclinics, hospices, and psychiatric centers in the New York Cityarea. In addition, students will have opportunities to practiceat the Rebecca Center for Music Therapy, Molloy College’s oncampusmusic therapy clinic. This training will provide graduatestudents with clinical experience through observation, co-leading,leading, and documentation of music therapy sessions under thesupervision and guidance of experienced master’s or Doctoral levelmusic therapists.Music Therapy Program GoalsGraduates of the Music Therapy Program will be able to:• Practice music therapy at an advanced level promotinghealing through music experiences and therapeuticrelationship• Understand client needs from various theoreticalperspectives and clinical models• Work with a wide range of clients across a variety ofclinical and educational settings• Utilize and apply advanced music skills in clinicalpractice107


• Engage in ongoing professional and personaldevelopment• Adhere to ethical standards of practice in music therapy• Understand and conduct research with the goal ofproducing scholarly writing in music therapyFACILITIESIn addition to lecture rooms and a fully equipped electronickeyboard/computer lab, an extensive instrumental collection formusic therapy courses is available. There are two rehearsal roomsfor small ensembles, practice rooms and a 300 seat theatre.The Rebecca Center for Music Therapy is a nonprofit organizationthat provides music therapy services for people with special needsin New York and Long Island. The Rebecca Center’s approachinvolves the interactive use of live music to stimulate and developcommunication, expressiveness, socialization and relationship.Another important facet of the Center’s mission is to educateand train music therapy students to help prepare tomorrow’smusic therapists. The training facility at Molloy College providesstudents with clinical experience through observation, co-leadingand leading music therapy sessions under the supervision andguidance of experienced music therapists of the Rebecca Center.The clinical staff at the center are fully trained, professionallycredentialed music therapists. All therapists hold a minimum of aMaster’s degree in music therapy.Admissions Requirements -Music Therapy ProgramProspective students in the Master’s degree programs are requiredto have the registrars of all colleges and universities previouslyattended send official transcripts directly to Molloy College. Inaddition, applicants must:• Complete the graduate degree program application.• If the student has completed a music degree, thefollowing psychology prerequisites must be completed:Abnormal Psychology, Developmental Psychology,and a Psychology Research course.• If the student has a degree in a related field that is notmusic, such as psychology, he/she must completeprerequisite music courses: Music theory and sightsinging,Harmony and Music History courses or canpass placement exams.• Have achieved a minimum of a 3.0 overall gradedpoint average in undergraduate work. (Studentshaving a GPA between 2.8 and 3.0 may be accepted onprobationary status.)• Submit three (3) letters of reference from former collegeprofessors and/or professional associates.• Pass an audition for the Molloy College MusicDepartment.• Participate in a personal interview with the ProgramDirector.• New York State Law #2165 requires that all students108


orn on or after January 1, 1957, have on file proof ofimmunity from measles, mumps, and rubella. Thesevaccinations must have been given on or after thefirst birthday. Therefore, students must submit poofof immunization signed by a physician or high schoolhealth official.Music Therapy ProgramProgression PoliciesStudents must pass a music therapy jury (which is a formalevaluation of music skills by Music Therapy Department faculty)prior to fieldwork and internship experiences. Students will begranted one additional opportunity to re-take their jury in thenext semester of attendance. Students who do not pass the musictherapy jury a second time will be dismissed from the program.Graduation Requirements:Degree requirements include:• Music Therapy: Documentation of completed musictherapy internship and/or 500 supervised clinical hours(MUS 535) depending upon whether Baccalaureatedegree is in music therapy or related field.• Completion of program in seven (7) academic years forGraduate Music Therapy.• Maintenance of 3.0 cumulative average in GraduateMusic Therapy.• Students may participate in commencement exercisesif they have six(6) credits or less left to complete theirdegree.Licensure Requirements:Professionals seeking licensure as Creative Arts Therapists underSection 6507 of the amended Education Law must complete, asa condition of licensure, at least two clock hours of training in theidentification and reporting of child abuse and maltreatment as acondition of licensure.Program of Studyleading to M.S. Degreesin Music TherapyMusic Therapy - M.S. forStudents Admitted Not Holdinga B.S. Degree in Music TherapyNew York State Registered Program Code: 32101HEGIS Code: 1099.00 {Fine and Applied Arts, Other}For students admitted without a Bachelor’s Degree in MusicTherapy:Total Credits Required: 60 creditsProgram Courses (60 credits required):CreditsMUS 505 Music Therapy Foundations 3MUS 506Music Therapy TreatmentPlanning3MUS 508Clinical Practicum in MusicTherapy I3MUS 509Clinical Practicum in MusicTherapy I3MUS 520 Internship I 3MUS 521 Internship II 3MUS 525 Clinical Improvisation 3MUS 526 Clinical Piano Improvisation 3MUS 527 Survey of World Music 3MUS 528Introduction to GuidedImagery and Music3MUS 529Basic Theories of Psychotherapyand Their3Relationship to Music TherapyMUS 530 Music Therapy IEP Assessment 3MUS 531Foundations of Music TherapyGroups3MUS 532Music and Medicine: MusicPsychotherapy in Healthcare3CommunitiesMUS 533Professional Ethics in MusicTherapy3MUS 534Qualitative and QuantitativeResearch3MUS 535 Advanced Clinical Supervision 3MUS 540 Thesis 3PSY 505Advanced Survey ofDevelopmental Psychology3PSY 541 Psychopathology 3Total Credits Required: 60*Students with a Bachelor’s Degree in Music Therapy may be109


granted equivalency for these courses up to 15 credits. A minimumof 48 credits will be required for the M.S. degree.Music Therapy - M.S. forStudents Admitted Holding aB.S. Degree in Music TherapyNew York State Registered Program Code: 32101HEGIS Code: 1099.00 {Fine and Applied Arts, Other}For students admitted with a Bachelor’s Degree in MusicTherapy:Total Credits Required: 48 creditsProgram Courses (48 credits required):CreditsMUS 521 Internship II 3MUS 526 Clinical Piano Improvisation 3MUS 527 Survey of World Music 3MUS 528Introduction to GuidedImagery and Music3MUS 529Basic Theories of Psychotherapyand Their3Relationship to Music TherapyMUS 530 Music Therapy IEP Assessment 3MUS 531Foundations of Music TherapyGroups3MUS 532Music and Medicine: MusicPsychotherapy in Healthcare3CommunitiesMUS 533Professional Ethics in MusicTherapy3MUS 534Qualitative and QuantitativeResearch3MUS 535 Advanced Clinical Supervision 3MUS 540 Thesis 3PSY 505Advanced Survey ofDevelopmental Psychology3PSY 541 Psychopathology 3Music Therapy Electives (6 credits): 6MUS 536Basic Theory and Practice ofGuided Imagery and Music*(GIM)MUS 537Clinical Applications to BasicGuided Imagery and Music*(GIM)MUS 538Nordoff-Robbins MusicTherapy*MUS 539 Analytical Music Therapy *MUS 590Special Topics in MusicTherapy*Total Credits Required: 48Students with a Bachelor’s Degree in Music Therapy may begranted equivalency for these courses and therefore need 48credits for the M.S. program.MUS 505 Music Therapy Foundations 3MUS 506Music Therapy TreatmentPlanning3MUS 508Clinical Practicum in MusicTherapy I3MUS 509Clinical Practicum in MusicTherapy I3MUS 520 Internship I 3110


Graduate Music TherapyCourse DescriptionsMUS 505 MUSIC THERAPY FOUNDATIONSAn in-depth survey of the music therapy discipline andprofession. The history of the profession, educational andtraining requirements in the field and major theories andmodels of music therapy will be addressed. Music therapy clientpopulations will be discussed, as well as the music therapyprocess and an introduction to music therapy research. Courseincludes fifty hours of observation of music therapy sessions. 3creditsMUS 506 MUSIC THERAPY TREATMENTPLANNINGAn in-depth examination of music therapy assessment,planning, implementation and evaluation. Various methodsand models will be explored and applied across different clientpopulations. Students will explore case examples, plan andimplement simulated music therapy assessments and developresources for future use. Course includes fifty hours of musictherapy observation. 3 creditsMUS 508 CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN MUSICTHERAPY IA one hundred (100) hour supervised music therapy practicumexperience with children. Students will develop the necessaryclinical and musical skills for leading music therapy sessions, aswell as refining observation and documentation skills. Courseincludes a weekly seminar. 3 creditsMUS 509 CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN MUSICTHERAPY IIA one hundred (100) hour supervised music therapy practicumexperience with adults. Students will develop the necessaryclinical and musical skills for leading music therapy sessions, aswell as refining observation and documentation skills. Courseincludes a weekly seminar. 3 creditsMUS 520 INTERNSHIP IDevelopment of clinical skills and methods of treatmentthrough extensive observation and experience with clientsunder supervision of experienced clinician. Requires 400 hoursof supervised clinical practice and a weekly seminar at college.3 creditsMUS 521 INTERNSHIP IIAdvanced development of clinical skills in the music therapyfield. Requires 500 hours of fieldwork and on-going supervisionfrom the professor. Student will lead individual and groupmusic therapy sessions, write assessment and goal plans andcomplete a weekly internship log. 3 creditsMUS 525 CLINICAL IMPROVISATIONCourse will provide techniques for developing vocal, guitarand percussive improvisations and their application to clinicalsituations. Students will explore a variety of modes, styles andscales on various musical media. Case studies will be providedto support study of clinical improvisation techniques andphilosophy. 3 creditsMUS 526 CLINICAL PIANO IMPROVISATIONCourse will provide students with advanced piano skillsneeded to implement various models of improvisational musictherapy to clinical settings. Course will include application ofmusical resources, such as modes, idioms, styles, scales andvarious musical forms into clinical scenarios. Techniques suchas clinical composition and role-playing will enable studentsto engage in an experiential learning process focused on skillbuilding, clinical awareness, developing emotional empathyand personal growth. 3 creditsMUS 527 SURVEY OF WORLD MUSICStudents will explore music from a variety of cultures andcontinents such as Asia, Africa, West Indies, North America andSouth America. Students will learn about musical styles andnative instruments. Scales, idioms and styles of music will bestudied in-depth. 3 creditsMUS 528 INTRODUCTION TO GUIDED IMAGERYAND MUSICCourse will explore historical origins of Guided Imagery andMusic (GIM) as well as contemporary developments. Studentswill participate in experiential component, review literature andrelated musical excerpts. 3 creditsMUS 529 BASIC THEORIES OF PSYCHOTHERAPYAND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO MUSIC THERAPYCourse will survey psycho-therapeutic theories from thefollowing frameworks: Behavioral, Psychoanalytical, Humanistic,Existential and Transpersonal. These theories will be discussedin relation to current music therapy practice. Related literaturewill be shared from the afore-mentioned models and frommusic therapy case studies and theoretical texts. 3 creditsMUS 530 MUSIC THERAPY INDIVIDUALIZEDEDUCATION PLAN (IEP) ASSESSMENTAn in-depth look at the individualized education plan (IEP)required for special needs children in order to determineeligibility for services. Particular emphasis on assessment, goalplanning, documentation procedures and evaluation within aninterdisciplinary model. 3 creditsMUS 531 FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC THERAPYGROUPSSurvey of music therapy groups based upon behavioral,psychoanalytic, humanistic, existential and Gestalt modelsof psychotherapy. Students will participate in experiential“mock” music therapy groups reflecting different models andapproaches. 3 credits111


MUS 532 MUSIC AND MEDICINE: MUSICPSYCHOTHERAPY IN HEALTHCARE COMMUNITIESThis course will teach the several approaches and modelsof music therapy in medicine. A variety of techniques andapplications will be presented. The application of musicin meeting the mental, physical and spiritual influences ofwellness and illness will be addressed through reading, writing,video and hands-on experiences. 3 creditsMUS 533 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS IN MUSICTHERAPYA review of ethical standards of practice set forth by theAmerican Music Therapy Association. Course will also includereview of laws regarding treatment of human subjects inpsychotherapy, institutional review board guidelines, as well asdiscussion regarding informed consent, confidentiality, FERPAand HPPA regulations. 3 creditsMUS 534 QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITIVERESEARCHCourse will describe principles and theories of quantitative andqualitative research methods and survey past and current musictherapy research. Students will have opportunities to develop atopic, design studies and practice methods. Students will studya variety of types of quantitative and qualitative research, suchas experimental research, survey research, naturalistic inquiryand phenomenological inquiry. 3 creditsMUS 535 ADVANCED CLINICAL SUPERVISIONSupervised clinical practice by music therapy faculty. Studentswill meet regularly with music therapy faculty to discuss clinicaland administrative issues relating to their placement site. Willinclude orientation to a variety of music therapy supervisionmodels to help prepare students to supervise others. 3 creditsMUS 536 BASIC THEORY AND PRACTICE OFGUIDED IMAGERY AND MUSIC (GIM)Course will concentrate on the dynamics of a first guidedimagery and music session. Session components will beanalyzed for psychological, educational, screening, diagnosticand evaluation purposes. 3 creditsMUS 539 ANALYTICAL MUSIC THERAPYAn examination of psycho-dynamic and psychoanalyticalconcepts and theories and their relationship to music therapypractice as defined by Mary Priestley. Course will describeevolution of Analytical Music Therapy, training practices andcurrent clinical research studies. 3 creditsMUS 540 THESIS: MUSIC THERAPYStudents will write thesis that reflects a clinical or researchinterest. Document will include survey of past and currentliterature related to topic. Student will demonstrate advancedunderstanding in particular areas of interest. Student mustobtain approval of topic from music therapy faculty. 3 creditsMUS 540 THESIS: MUSIC THERAPYSpecial topics on relevant current issues in Music Therapy areoffered to expand knowledge and skills in the field. This coursemay also be taught for students to develop piano and guitaraccompaniment skills for music therapy practice.1-3 creditsPSY 505 ADVANCED SURVEY OFDEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGYA survey course related to research in developmentalpsychology field. Studies will be presented related to growthand development through the lifespan. Theoretical modelswill be examined in the literature with particular emphasis onspecific cultural, social and historical contexts. 3 creditsPSY 541 PSYCHOPATHOLOGYStudents will examine contemporary theories and researchon classification, etiology and treatment of mental andbehavioral disorder. Students will review the theory ofscientific classification and the basis of DSM-IV-TR assessmentclassification. Case studies will be reviewed and presented tofurther enhance student’s understanding of psychopathologyand the impact of mental disorders on individuals. Currenttrends in treatment will be discussed. 3 creditsMUS 537 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS TO BASICGUIDED IMAGERY AND MUSIC (GIM)Course will continue to examine the dynamics of initial sessionswith particular emphasis on the function of the music and casematerial in the planning and implementation of techniques.Music psychotherapy relationships and processes will beexplored through didactic and experiential components. 3creditsMUS 538 NORDOFF-ROBBINS MUSIC THERAPYFoundations of the practice of Nordoff-Robbins music therapywill be explored through in-depth study of archival andcontemporary studies via audiotape, videotape, DVD andthe literature. Particular emphasis on the use of music as theprimary agent for change in promoting well-being and growthin delineated goal areas. Clinical musicianship and the Nordoff-Robbins training model will be reviewed. 3 credits112


DivisionofNursingPrograms of Study113


Welcome to the Graduate Nursing Programs fromthe Dean of the DivisionDear Student:Welcome to the Division of Nursing at Molloy College,and congratulations on a desire to pursue an advanced degreein Nursing. Since 1955, the Division has been educating menand women to become professional nurses. Molloy alumni arerecognized as professionals with an obvious commitment toquality health care, and they set high standards for those whoaspire to follow in their path.Nursing Education at Molloy focuses on a humanisticapproach to each and every person, and upholds the dignityof the individual. It addresses the full scope of wellness andthe evolving needs and nuances of contemporary health caredelivery. The educational process at Molloy acknowledges theimportance of the pivotal role nurses play in health care, andthen prepares for the varied situations and people in their care.The course of study leading to a Master’s Degree in Nursing is intended to optimize the scholarlycomponents of the professional role and expand the professional mindset. It is designed to motivatestudents to address the emerging challenges of health care and to be committed to the responsibilitiesof the advanced role and the profession. The Master’s experience expands both knowledge and perspective,and promotes a keen sense of inquiry integral to the advanced role. The educational journeyat Molloy builds upon experience, allows pursuit of individual interests, and commands commitmentto personal and professional growth. It is dynamic, challenging, and meaningful. Be part of Nursing atMolloy today, and become instrumental in Nursing for the future.Jeannine D. Muldoon, Ph.D., R.N.Dean and ProfessorDivision of Nursing114


Welcome to the Nursing Master’s and Post Master’sPrograms from the Director of Graduate NursingDear Student:The Graduate Nursing Program at Molloy College offers a Masters of Science degree in nursingspecialties pertinent to contemporary nursing. A foundation of core courses prepares students with atheoretical base and processes prior to study in the selected specialty area.Students can choose to study in one of the seven nursing specialty tracks; nursing education, administrationand informatics, clinical nurse specialist, and four practitioner tracks: family nurse practitioner,adult nurse practitioner, pediatric nurse practitioner and psychiatric nurse practitioner. Each trackprovides academic experiences that build on the core courses and integrate practica appropriate to thespecialty. Faculty with expertise in each of the areas conduct courses on campus and clinical practica, andcoordinate preceptorships with colleagues in a variety of health care settings and roles. Students workclosely with all the professors and an advisor from the selected specialty throughout the program. Theprogram is designed to provide advanced study of nursing with resources to promote success and professionaladvancement. The college strives to accommodate the interests and needs of the graduate studentto promote individual growth and a sense of enthusiastic and enduring inquiry. Academic success andsatisfaction for each student is a prime goal of the program.Denise Susan Walsh, Ph.D., R.N.Director of Master of Science Nursing Programs115


Nursing Master’sProgramHR111A Graduate Nursing Center, Maria Regina Hall516.678.5000, Ext. 6301Jeannine D. Muldoon, Ph.D., R.N., Dean of the Division ofNursingProfessors: Teresa Aprigliano, Carol Clifford, Bernadette Curry,Veronica Feeg, Carole Gutterman, Lois Moylan, Jeannine D.Muldoon, Freida Pemberton, Ellen Rich, Rose SchecterAssociate Professors: Mary O’Shaughnessy, Patricia Rozea,Margaret Shepard, Margaret WhelanAssistant Professors: Nicolette Ceo, Donna Driscoll, Joan Ginty,Debra Hanna, Diane Harper, Nona Holmes, Susan Krenitsky-Korn,Susan Ledlie, Diane Pastor, Susan VitaleNote: The Division of Nursing reserves the right to makenecessary program alterations in response to changes inprofessional nursing practice and/or the health care deliverysystem. Students are responsible for meeting all Programrequirements.Philosophy of the Division ofNursing Master’s ProgramThe faculty of the Division of Nursing in accord with MolloyCollege, believe that every person, as a biological, psychological,sociological, spiritual, cultural being, has an innate potential for selfactualizationin a dynamic universe. We believe that human beingsare entitled to an environment which fosters individual self-esteemand mutual positive regard. We hold in high esteem the inherentworth and dignity of all individuals. It is the concept of valuing, inrelation to humanity-environment-health, which gives meaning tohumanistic nursing practice.Each human being is an integrated whole evolving through time.The uniqueness of humanity is reflected through individuals,families and communities continuously interacting with theirenvironment. Since environment influences the health and wellbeingof humanity, we recognize our collective responsibility tostrive toward an environmentally better world.Health is a dynamic state of bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-culturalwell-being. A responsible society provides a health care system thatenables individuals to function at their highest level. Nursing meetsthe actual and potential needs of humanity by assisting a diverse,multicultural population to attain, maintain, and retain optimumhealth.Nursing is both a science and an art which focuses on the diagnosisand treatment of human responses. Humanistic nursing integratestheory and practice within a framework of ethical decisionmaking.Nursing provides health care for individuals, families,and communities. Central to professional practice are caring,interpersonal communication, and nursing therapeutics. We116believe that nursing is a social contract grounded in the profession’scode of ethics and requires a life-long professional commitment.Baccalaureate nursing education is based on liberal arts andsciences. This foundation distinguishes baccalaureate nurses bypreparing them to communicate, evaluate, and provide humanistichealth care. Professional nursing education includes nursing’sscientific body of knowledge which is augmented by the findingsof multidisciplinary research. Baccalaureate education prepares thenurse generalist in a beginning leadership role as a member of aninterdisciplinary health care team who is able to practice in a varietyof settings.The faculty believe that learning is an ongoing process that fostersintellectual inquisitiveness, critical thinking and decision-making,a creative approach to life situations, and an appreciation ofethical and aesthetic values. We believe learning occurs best in ahumanistic environment that values students and supports themin becoming increasingly self-aware and self-directed.A Master of Science degree builds on a foundation of baccalaureatenursing education and integrates nursing theory, research andknowledge from other disciplines. Students, through scholarlyactivities, acquire the necessary knowledge, understanding andvalues that lay the groundwork for advanced humanistic nursingpractice. It is the integration of theory and practice, grounded inethical decision-making that distinguishes humanistic practice.Graduate education assists students to perceive new relationshipsamong variables that affect professional nursing in an evolvinghealth care system.The faculty believe that graduate education provides an opportunityfor professional nurses to develop advanced competencies innursing therapeutics, in areas of clinical concentration and rolefunction, congruent with an expanding theoretical knowledgeand authority base. Master’s education prepares nurses to managecare in complex situations and meet intensified health caredemands. The faculty recognize the importance of collaborationamong health care professionals, and the uniqueness of nursing’scontribution.Nursing Master’s ProgramStatement of PurposeThe purpose of the Graduate Program in Nursing at MolloyCollege is to prepare nurses as leaders for advanced roles withinan increasingly complex health care environment. The programis designed to foster personal and professional growth, translateadvanced knowledge into practice, and provide a foundationfor doctoral study. Through the Humanistic Nursing Framework,the graduate program reflects the uniqueness of Molloy’s Judeo-Christian traditions, contributing to the goal of educating nurses forexcellence in caring, scholarship, and collaboration.Characteristics of the MolloyCollege Master’s Prepared Nurse• Demonstrates and transmits a belief in the inherentworth and dignity of all individuals through rolemodeling professional nursing.• Demonstrates advanced competencies and ethical


decision-making.• Assumes responsibility and accountability for advancedprofessional practice in an increasingly complex healthcare environment.• Assumes a leadership role based on theory, research,and expert practice.• Designs and implements research.• Advocates for an environment of health in a globalsociety.General information about graduate students is found at thebeginning of the graduate section of the Catalog.Bridge Program for RN’s witha Non-Nursing BaccalaureateDegreeAlternative Admission Pathway to Master’s ProgramThis is an alternative admission pathway to a master’s degreeprogram for registered nurses with a non-nursing baccalaureatedegree. NUR 471, a “Bridge’’ course designed to provide learningopportunities that reflect baccalaureate program outcomes,prepares this population of nurses for the graduate nursingprogram. Upon completion of the “Bridge’’ course with a minimumgrade of “B’’, and by meeting the following criteria, the applicant iseligible for matriculation into the graduate program.The following Master’s program admission criteria apply:• Registered Nurse from an accredited associate degreecollege.• Non-nursing baccalaureate degree from an accreditedcollege/university.• Current malpractice insurance.• “Bridge’’ course (NUR 471) (minimum grade of “B’’).• Undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.• Current New York State Registered Nurse licenseregistration certificate.• Three years of recent clinical nursing experience.• Three letters of recommendation that attest to clinicalcompetency.• A personal interview.• Undergraduate statistics.• Undergraduate (nursing) research.• A completed application.The course description for NUR 471 Theoretical Transitionto Professional Nursing is in the Graduate Nursing CourseDescriptions.Admission to Master’s NursingProgramRequirements: Requirements for matriculation and admissioninto the Master of Science Program in Nursing include:• Bachelor’s degree in nursing from a professionallyaccredited program. (Applicants from non-accreditedprograms may be considered for admission on anindividual basis.)• *Undergraduate GPA 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or an overallundergraduate GPA of at least 2.7 with a 3.0 or better inthe upper half of undergraduate work.• Current New York State license registration certificate.• One year of clinical nursing experience is required priorto specialization courses. Nurse Practitioner applicantsare required to have a minimum of one year of recentclinical experience.• Three letters of recommendation. Nurse Practitionerand Clinical Nurse Specialty applicants’ letters mustattest to clinical competency.• A personal interview.• A completed application.117


*Applicants who do not have an undergraduate GPA of 2.7 andshow promise may be admitted with provisional academic status.These students must receive a minimum grade of B in the first 6credits taken in the graduate program. Upon completion of thesesix (6) credits, the student’s records will be reviewed. At this timethe student will be accepted as matriculated or asked to withdrawfrom the program.Progression: Requirements for progression through the Master ofScience Program in Nursing include:• Undergraduate research as a prerequisite to NUR 555.• Evidence of a basic physical assessment course or itsequivalent (C.E.) as a prerequisite to NUR 572.• Health and professional requirements as determinedby the nursing program (see Pre-Clinical/ PracticumRequirements).• Evidence of an undergraduate statistics course withinpast 5 years or its equivalent (C.E.) as a prerequisite toMAT 550.Maintenance of Academic Standards: The quality point indexrequirement is 3.0. If the GPA falls below 3.0 it must be raised to3.0 by the end of the following semester. Students who fail to raisetheir GPA to 3.0 will be withdrawn from the program.Repeating Courses: A course in which the student receives a gradebelow “B-’’ must be repeated once. The option to repeat a coursemay not be used more than two times (Two Different Courses).Pass/Fail Option: In selected graduate courses in the curriculum,the student may be offered the option of taking the course on aPass/Fail basis. Notification for this option must be made in writingto the Office of the Registrar by the dates indicated in the AcademicCalendar for each semester. Forms are available in the Office of theRegistrar. Once approved, the request for Pass/Fail stands and thestudent may not petition for a change to a letter grade. Pass/ Failoptions are limited to one (1) three-credit course. Note: “P’’ grade isequivalent to a “B-’’ in Graduate Clinical courses.Procedures for Admission: All students seeking admission to theMaster’s Program in Nursing must complete a graduate programapplication form with the non-refundable application fee. Checksshould be made payable to Molloy College. Prospective studentsmust submit official transcripts from the institution that conferredtheir Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing. After all information hasbeen received and reviewed, an interview with the Associate Deanand Program Director will be arranged for qualifying applicants.Application for the Fall semester should be submitted by April 1st.Spring semester applications should be submitted by November1st. Prospective students who miss the application deadline datesmay be considered on an individual basis.Matriculated Status: Students are matriculated if they havemet the requirements of admission, have been accepted intothe Graduate Nursing Program and are seeking to fulfill all therequirements of the Master’s degree.Non-matriculated Status: Students whose admission process isincomplete but are earning credits for the specific prerequisite orrequired graduate courses for the degree; or students who wish totake graduate courses without pursuing a degree. Such studentsmust have the permission of the Associate Dean and Director of theGraduate Program. Should a non-matriculated student decide towork toward a degree, he or she must follow the regular admissionsprocess. Non-matriculated students should be aware that no morethan 6 credits completed as a non-matriculated student may be118


used to fulfill requirements for a degree, and that non-matriculatedstatus can be maintained for a maximum period of two years.Provisional Academic Status: Students who have been acceptedinto the M.S. program, but have not fully met the GraduateAdmissions criteria may register for courses and must receivea grade of “B” in the first six (6) credits taken. Re-evaluation forcontinued matriculated status will follow completion of thesecourses. Failure to achieve a grade of “B” or better in the first 6credits taken will result in dismissal from the program.Nursing Master’s Pre-Clinical/Practicum RequirementsPrior to entry into a clinical or practicum course, students arerequired to have the following on file in the Graduate Office:• Current New York State license registration certificate.• Malpractice insurance appropriate to your program(Registered Nurse or Nurse Practitioner) with coverageof $1,000,000 per claim/ $3,000,000 aggregate.• Basic Life Support (BLS) Certification• Evidence of Infection Control Training.• A completed Department of Nursing Physical Form.Required as per Department calendar.• A drug screen may be required by clinical agencies.No student will be permitted in Clinical/Practicum settings withoutcompleting their Pre-Clinical/Practicum Requirements by therequired due date. A fee of $50.00 will be charged to processmaterials after the due date (see posted Graduate schedule).Nursing Master’s ProgramThe mission of graduate study is to provide the opportunity for theattainment of advanced theoretical knowledge and its applicationin a selected area of nursing practice. The Molloy College programcombines academic, clinical and research activities which enablethe student to develop the knowledge and skills necessary topractice at a high level of expertise—a distinguishing feature ofgraduate education.The Master’s program in Nursing has received accreditation fromthe Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) for a 10year period through September 2018.There are seven tracks in the Master of Science Degree Programin Nursing. Students choose from Nurse Practitioner tracks inAdult, Pediatrics, Family or Psychiatry, CNS: Adult Health, NursingEducation or Nursing Administration with Informatics. The numberof credits required for graduation ranges from 42–48.The core courses, germane to the philosophy of the program,provide the foundation for the Humanistic Professional Nursingcurriculum. These courses consist of 12 credits and are required forall master’s students. Research is a critical seven credit componentof the program and is required of all master’s students. Thesecourses provide the link between theory, education and practice,as well as the knowledge and skills necessary for computer assistedresearch. All core requirements must be completed prior to startingspecialty track courses.The nurse practitioner tracks are designed to prepare advancedpractice nurses in the primary care of the adult, pediatric or familyclient. The curriculum assists students in the development of theskills necessary to foster high levels of client health through thepractice of promotion, prevention and self-care. Educationalexperiences include the assessment of physical and mental health(NPP) conditions, diagnosis of illnesses and the performance oftherapeutic and corrective measures.Nurse practitioner students fulfill their clinical concentration with 15or 18 credits in areas of their specialty, and their nurse practitionerrole function includes eleven credits of advanced practice corecourses. Graduates are eligible for certification in New York State,which grants prescriptive privileges. Graduates are also eligibleto take the certification examinations offered by the AmericanNurses’ Credentialing Center (a subsidiary of the American Nurses’Association), the National Certification Board of Pediatric NursePractitioners and Nurses and the American Academy of NursePractitioners.Clinical Nurse Specialist, Administration with Informatics andEducation tracks fulfill their specialty clinical concentration androle function with 12–26 credits in courses that provide foundationfor each of these advanced study areas. The specialty area coursesare planned to develop the student’s expertise and expandopportunities for the graduate to meet career goals. The totalnumber of credits required for graduation ranges from 42–48.Graduates are eligible to take the certification examinations offeredby The American Nurses’ Credentialing Center and The NationalLeague of Nursing.Curriculum for Master’s NursingTracksThe Master’s Program entitled “Humanistic Nursing Practice inan Evolving Health Care System’’ has seven tracks which include:Nursing Education, Nursing Administration with Informatics, CNS:Adult Health, Adult Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner,Nurse Practitioner Psychiatry and Family Nurse Practitioner. TheAdult, Pediatric, Family and Psychiatry Nurse Practitioner Tracks arecomprised of four component groups: the core, research core, theadvanced practice core and the nurse practitioner specialty area.The CNS: Adult Health student is prepared through classroom andclinical activities to provide comprehensive care to individualswith health problems in a particular area. Research, education,collaboration, coordination and referral are roles for the ClinicalNurse Specialist.The Nurse Educator track provides the skills necessary to teach ina formal academic setting, in a patient education situation or in astaff development role.The Nurse Administration and Informatics track is focused on theskills needed by the nurse administrator and manager. NursingAdministration, in combination with informatics and businessconcepts, provide a strong foundation in the current and evolvinghealth care environment. Graduates who fulfill the requiredcredits and clinical hours are eligible to take the American Nurses’Credentialing Center certification exam for Nurse Informatics.119


Programs of Study for Master’sof Nursing TracksNursing Education,Administration or ClinicalPractice Areas M.S. TracksNursing Education - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 22182New York State Registered Program Code: 22186 (Dual BS/MS)New York State Registered Program Code: 22187 (Dual RN-BS/MS)HEGIS Code: 1203.10 {Nursing-R.N. Required for Admission}Core Courses (12 credits required):CreditsETH 505Contemporary Ethical Issuesin Health Care3NUR 505 Advanced Nursing Theory 3NUR 510Current Issues in ProfessionalNursing3NUR 515 Organizational Theory 3Research Core Courses (7 credits required):MAT 550Statistical Analysis withComputers3NUR 555 Research Method and Design 4Advanced Practice Core Courses (3 creditsrequired):Select one 3 credit course from the following (NUR524 or 572 or 573)*:3NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology *NUR 572Advanced PhysicalAssessment*NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics *NE Track Courses (20 credits required):NUR 528Informatics for NurseEducators3NUR 529Health Issues with a GlobalView2NUR 530 Curriculum Development 3NUR 531 Measurement and Evaluation 3NUR 532Practicum in NursingEducation (90 clinical3hours)NUR 570 Higher Education in America 3NUR 571Creative Strategies forTeaching Nursing3Total Credits Required: 42Nursing Administration with Informatics- M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 22183New York State Registered Program Code: 22188 (Dual BS/MS)New York State Registered Program Code: 22189 (Dual RN-BS/MS)HEGIS Code: 1203.10 {Nursing-R.N. Required for Admission}Core Courses (12 credits required):CreditsETH 505Contemporary Ethical Issuesin Health Care3NUR 505 Advanced Nursing Theory 3NUR 510Current Issues in ProfessionalNursing3NUR 515 Organizational Theory 3Research Core Courses (7 credits required):MAT 550Statistical Analysis withComputers3NUR 555 Research Method and Design 4NAI Track Courses (24 credits required):NUR 540 Administration I 3NUR 541 Administration II 3NUR 542Practicum in NursingAdministration (903clinical hours)NUR 543 Nursing Informatics I 3NUR 544 Nursing Informatics II 3NUR 545Nursing Informatics III(100 experiential hours)3NUR 546Human ResourcesManagement3NUR 548Nursing Informatics IV(100 experiential hours)3Total Credits Required: 43Clinical Nurse Specialist: Adult Health -M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 22181New York State Registered Program Code: 22184 (Dual BS/MS)New York State Registered Program Code: 22185 (Dual RN-BS/MS)HEGIS Code: 1203.10 {Nursing-R.N. Required for Admission}Core Courses (12 credits required):CreditsETH 505Contemporary Ethical Issuesin Health Care3NUR 505 Advanced Nursing Theory 3NUR 510Current Issues in ProfessionalNursing3NUR 515 Organizational Theory 3Research Core Courses (7 credits required):MAT 550Statistical Analysis withComputers3NUR 555 Research Method and Design 4120


Advanced Practice Core Courses (11 creditsrequired):NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 538Role of the Clinical NurseSpecialist2NUR 572Advanced PhysicalAssessment3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3CNS Track Courses (12 credits required):CNS:Foundations/DecisionmakingNUR 533(125 clinical3hours)NUR 534CNS: Adult Health Practice I(125 clinical hours)2NUR 535CNS: Adult Health Practice II(125 clinical hours)2NUR 536CNS: Adult Health Practice III(125 clinical hours)2Electives 3Total Credits Required: 42Nurse Practitioner ClinicalSpecialty Areas M.S. TracksThe Nurse Practitioner Clinical Specialty courses focusing on Adult,Pediatric, Family and Psychiatry are structured to enable studentsto assess physical and mental health (NPP) conditions, diagnoseillnesses, to perform therapeutic measures and to foster high levelsof health through promotion, prevention and self-care.Note: Students will be evaluated for clinical competenciesafter completing their minimum number of clinical hours(580) for Adult, Pediatrics and Psychiatry, and (715) for Family.Additional practicum hours may be required. Practicum:Primary Care IV (NUR 597) will fill this need (credits and clinicalhours vary according to individual need.)Adult Nurse Practitioner - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 19421New York State Registered Program Code: 21419 (Dual BS/MS)New York State Registered Program Code: 20708 (Dual RN-BS/MS)HEGIS Code: 1203.10 {Nursing-R.N. Required for Admission}Core Courses (12 credits required):CreditsETH 505Contemporary Ethical Issuesin Health Care3NUR 505 Advanced Nursing Theory 3NUR 510Current Issues in ProfessionalNursing3NUR 515 Organizational Theory 3Research Core Courses (7 credits required):MAT 550Statistical Analysis withComputers3NUR 555 Research Method and Design 4Advanced Practice Core Courses (11 creditsrequired):NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 572Advanced PhysicalAssessment3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 583Role of Nurse Practitioner inPrimary Care2ANP Track Courses (15 credits required):NUR 576ANP: Diagnostic Reasoning(90 clinical hours) 3NUR 579ANP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics I 3NUR 580ANP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics II 3NUR 557ANP: Practicum I (155 clinicalhours) 2NUR 558ANP: Practicum II (155 clinicalhours) 2NUR 559NP: Practicum III (155 clinicalhours) 2Total Credits Required: 45Family Nurse Practitioner - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 20830New York State Registered Program Code: 21418 (Dual BS/MS)New York State Registered Program Code: 20839 (Dual RN-BS/MS)HEGIS Code: 1203.10 {Nursing-R.N. Required for Admission}Core Courses (12 credits required):CreditsETH 505Contemporary Ethical Issuesin Health Care3NUR 505 Advanced Nursing Theory 3NUR 510Current Issues in ProfessionalNursing3NUR 515 Organizational Theory 3Research Core Courses (7 credits required):MAT 550Statistical Analysis withComputers3NUR 555 Research Method and Design 4Advanced Practice Core Courses (11 creditsrequired):NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 572Advanced PhysicalAssessment3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 583Role of Nurse Practitioner inPrimary Care2FNP Track Courses (18 credits required):121


NUR 578FNP: Diagnostic Reasoning(90 Clinical hours)3NUR 581FNP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics I3NUR 582FNP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics II3NUR 586FNP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics III3NUR 562FNP: Practicum I (200 clinicalhours)2NUR 563FNP: Practicum II (200 clinicalhours)2NUR 564FNP: Practicum III (200clinical hours)2*NUR 597Practicum IV (Required foradvanced placement1-2students as advised)Total Credits Required: 48*Note: NUR 597 Practicum IV serves as an opportunity forstudents in any track to obtain additional clinical hours -required for advanced placement NP students in the FNPprogram.Nurse Practitioner Psychiatry - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 20841New York State Registered Program Code: 21417 (Dual BS/MS)New York State Registered Program Code: 20838 (Dual RN-BS/MS)HEGIS Code: 1203.10 {Nursing-R.N. Required for Admission}Core Courses (12 credits required):CreditsETH 505Contemporary Ethical Issuesin Health Care3NUR 505 Advanced Nursing Theory 3NUR 510Current Issues in ProfessionalNursing3NUR 515 Organizational Theory 3Research Core Courses (7 credits required):MAT 550Statistical Analysis withComputers3NUR 555 Research Method and Design 4Advanced Practice Core Courses (11 creditsrequired):NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 572Advanced PhysicalAssessment3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 583Role of Nurse Practitioner inPrimary Care2NPP Track Courses (15 credits required):NUR 592NPP: Theoretical Foundation(60 clinical hours)3NUR 593NPP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics I3NUR 594NPP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics II3NUR 551NPP: Practicum I (165 clinicalhours)2NUR 552NPP: Practicum II (165 clinicalhours)2NUR 553NPP: Practicum III (165clinical hours)2Total Credits Required: 45Pediatric Nurse Practitioner - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 19420New York State Registered Program Code: 21416 (Dual BS/MS)New York State Registered Program Code: 20710 (Dual RN - BS/MS)HEGIS Code: 1203.10 {Nursing-R.N. Required for Admission}Core Courses (12 credits required):CreditsETH 505Contemporary Ethical Issues inHealth Care3NUR 505 Advanced Nursing Theory 3NUR 510Current Issues in ProfessionalNursing3NUR 515 Organizational Theory 3Research Core Courses (7 credits required):MAT 550Statistical Analysis withComputers3NUR 555 Research Method and Design 4Advanced Practice Core Courses (11 creditsrequired):NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 572 Advanced Physical Assessment 3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 583Role of Nurse Practitioner inPrimary Care2PNP Track Courses (15 credits required):NUR 577PNP: Diagnostic Reasoning (90clinical hours)3NUR 584PNP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics3NUR 585PNP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics II3NUR 566PNP: Practicum I (155 clinicalhours)2NUR 567PNP: Practicum II (155 clinicalhours)2NUR 568PNP: Practicum III (155 clinicalhours)2Total Credits Required: 45122


Nursing Master’s andPost Master’s CourseDescriptionsNOTE: Course Prerequisite—A preliminary requirementthat must be met before a course may be taken. CourseCorequisite—Two or more classes required simultaneouslyor before a course may be taken.BRIDGE PROGRAM COURSE DESCRIPTION:NUR 471 is not a graduate-level course (Below the 500-level)NUR 471 THEORETICAL TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONALNURSINGThis three (3) credit theory course is meant to provide transitionto professional nursing for nurses with a baccalaureate degreein a non-nursing field. The Humanistic Nursing Framework atMolloy College is introduced and nurses are prepared in suchareas as nursing research, critical thinking, leadership andmanagement and legal/ethical/health care issues that facenurses in current practice in a variety of situations. 45 hours persemester. Tuition and credits are at the undergraduate level.(Offered as needed.) 3 creditsETH 505 ADVANCED MEDICAL ETHICS(formerly PHI 505 and THE 505)This course will focus on the study of general philosophical and/or theological theories, principles and applications in the fieldof medical ethics. (Offered Fall, Spring, Summer) 3 creditsMAT 550 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS WITH COMPUTERSThis course will provide the foundation for statistical researchby developing the technical and interpretive skills necessary.This course offers: Statistical models; data analysis; estimation;tests of hypotheses; analysis of variance; covariance andmultiple comparisons; regression and non-parametric methods.Computer use will be integral in this course. (Course requiresadditional independent time in computer lab.) Prerequisite:Evidence of an undergraduate statistics course within the past5 years or its equivalent CEU. (Offered Fall, Spring) 371/2 hoursper semester: 3 creditsMAT 591 INDEPENDENT STUDYIndependent study in mathematics under the guidance of amember of the mathematics faculty teaching in the GraduateProgram. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and GraduateProgram Director. (Offered upon request) 1–3 creditsNUR 505 ADVANCED NURSING THEORYThis course explores the nature of nursing’s conceptualmodels and theories. Students are expected to interpret theview of current theorists in relation to the concepts of theMolloy Humanistic Nursing Framework. Emphasis is placedon comparing and contrasting recognized theories and theirapplication to professional practice. (Offered Fall, Spring) 30lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 510 CURRENT ISSUES IN PROFESSIONAL NURSINGThis course provides for the critical analysis of professionalnursing as influenced by social, cultural, political, economic,legal and educational trends. Emphasis will be placed onnursing’s mandate to hold in high esteem the uniquenessand dignity of all humanity. Consideration is given to ethicaldecision-making as it relates to social policy. Incorporated inthe course will be debate and persuasive argumentation basedon critical thinking. (Offered Fall, Spring) 30 lecture hours persemester: 3 creditsNUR 515 ORGANIZATIONAL THEORYThis course focuses on the exploration of current researchfindings in organizational theories. Students examine behaviorsin organizations, with a particular focus on organizationaldesign and structure, organizational culture and climate,theories of motivation, groups, leadership, power and conflictand change and organizational innovation. Students applytheories to actual situations in nursing education and nursingmanagement through the use of case study analysis. (OfferedFall, Spring) 30 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 524 ADVANCED PATHOPHYSIOLOGYThis course focuses on physiologic and pathologic mechanismsof disease that serve as a component of the foundation forclinical assessment, decision-making and management.The student is prepared to relate this information towardinterpreting changes in normal function that result in symptomsindicative of illness, and in assessing an individual’s response topharmacologic and other management approaches. 45 lecturehours/semester: 3 creditsNUR 528 INFORMATICS FOR NURSE EDUCATORSThis course focuses on foundational concepts and skills forcomputer-based nursing education such as the application ofcomputerized student information systems and educationalsoftware used in diverse educational venues includinginteractive learning resources, clinical simulation, virtualinstruction modalities, synchronous and asynchronouscommunication, distance learning, research and collaboration.45 lecture hours per semester. Prerequisite or corequisite: NUR532. 3 creditsNUR 529 HEALTH ISSUES WITH A GLOBAL VIEWThis course focuses the nurse educator student on currenthealth care issues in a world health/global environment.The health care needs and illness prevention strategies for achanging population are addressed in light of social, political,environmental and economic conditions. Students are expectedto apply information technology to explore global health issues.(Offered Spring) 30 lecture hours per semester: 2 creditsNUR 530 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENTThis course focuses on the application of theoretical conceptsas related to curriculum development. The influence of issuesand trends on curriculum design will be explored. Students123


develop a simulated nursing curriculum. External evaluationand ethical considerations of curriculum development will bediscussed. Pre- or corequisites: NUR 505 and NUR 515. (OfferedFall) 30 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 531 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATIONThis course deals with methods of educational measurementand evaluation. Content includes: Application of measurementand numbers, qualities of a good measurement instrument,test construction, score interpretation, summative andformative evaluation and standardized tests. Emphasis is on therelationship between measurement and educational decisionmaking.Pre- or corequisites: NUR 505 and NUR 515 (OfferedSpring) 30 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 532 PRACTICUM IN NURSING EDUCATION(formerly Practicum in Education)This course provides the opportunity to investigate varioustheories of teaching, learning and evaluation with a view tothe development of effective strategies for the teaching andevaluation of students. These principles will be applied throughguided practice in classroom and clinical settings. Students willutilize the computer as a modality for teaching and learning.Practica will be individualized for each student. Seminars willbe arranged for students to share their experiences and to usegroup problem solving. Prerequisites: NUR 530 and NUR 531.(Offered Fall) Fee—$445.00 15 lecture hours and 90 practicumhours per semester, student arranged: 3 creditsNUR 533 CNS: FOUNDATIONS AND DECISION MAKINGThis course introduces the student to the principles ofadvanced problem solving. The course explores the generalconcepts of diagnostic reasoning, therapeutic modalitiesand the collaborative role of the clinical nurse specialistin medical surgical nursing. Emphasis is placed on theidentification of nursing needs of clients and the subsequentplanning, consultation, collaboration, education, referral andcoordination of resources that might be necessary in a clinicalsetting. Prerequisites: NUR 505, 515, 524, 572 and 573. (Offeredalternating years as needed.) Fee- $445.00 15 lecture hours and125 clinical hours per semester, student arranged: 3 creditsNUR 534 CNS: ADULT HEALTH PRACTICE IThis course focuses on the therapeutic management of clienthealth problems through application of theory to researchbasedpractice. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis, consultation,collaboration, referral, education and coordination. Thestudent is expected to utilize advanced practice skills to attainand maintain high levels of nursing performance for self andother members of the nursing staff. Students focus their study,under supervision of a master’s prepared nurse, on cardiovascular,oncology, neurological or other specialty diagnosisarea through research, discussion and selection of clinical siteexperiences. (Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisites: NUR 533. Fee–$445.00. Seminar and 125 clinical hours per semester, studentarranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 535 CNS: ADULT HEALTH PRACTICE IIThis course continues to develop the student’s specialty focusand provides opportunity to explore the quality care andmanagement issues that apply in various settings. A master’sprepared preceptor serves to guide the student’s learning.(Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisites: NUR 533, 534. Fee–$445.00.Seminar and 125 clinical hours per semester, student arranged:2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 536 CNS: ADULT HEALTH PRACTICE IIIThis course assists the student to explore managed care issueswithin the chosen specialty area focus, as well as identifypotential areas for research and education. The student expandsskills in direct and indirect care activities for individuals andfamilies and serves as educator and resource for staff. (Pass/FailPracticum) Prerequisites: NUR 534, 535. Fee–$445.00. Seminarand 125 clinical hours per semester, student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 538 ROLE OF THE CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALISTThis course provides students with the opportunity to study andanalyze strategies and skills needed to engage in the advancedpractice Clinical Nurse Specialist role. Historical development ofadvanced practice nursing and of the Clinical Nurse Specialistrole and sub roles will be discussed in terms of other nursingroles (staff nurse, nurse manager, nurse educator, NP, casemanager, clinical nurse leader). Emphasis will be placed onunderstanding how to anticipate problems and successfullynegotiate this leadership role in an interdisciplinary workenvironment. Elements of internal and external consultationstrategies will be discussed as well as change theory relevantfor the Clinical Nurse Specialist role. Professional organization,which support and regulate advanced practice roles will bediscussed, as well as certification and advanced practicelicensingissues. 30 lecture hours per semester. 2 CreditsNUR 540 ADMINISTRATION IThe course is designed to explore and examine thoseadministrative skills required in responding to today’scomplex health care environment. Concepts of health servicesleadership/ management organizational design and redesign,strategic alliances, innovation and change and performance willbe presented. The material will be discussed in light of personaland philosophical development. Corequisites: NUR 505 andNUR 515. (Offered Fall) 30 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 541 ADMINISTRATION IIThe course is designed to explore the administrativeskills required in responding to challenges presented intoday’s complex health care environment. Organizationaldevelopment, motivation, conflict management, power andpolitics and coordination and communication will be discussed.Material will be presented in light of personal and philosophical124


development. Corequisites: NUR 505 and NUR 515. (OfferedSpring) 30 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 542 PRACTICUM IN NURSING ADMINISTRATIONThis course focuses on the process of nursing administrationthrough observation and participation in selected health caresettings. Classroom seminars are utilized to assist and supporteach student in the process of professional development.Clarification of theoretical and empirical practices will beaddressed. Practica will be individualized for each student.Seminars will be arranged for group sharing, problem solvingand on-going evaluation. Prerequisites: NUR 540 and 541.(Offered Summer) Fee–$445.00. 15 lecture hours and 90practicum hours per semester; student arranged: 3 creditsNote: Students must have computer access and on-linecapability; distance learning modalities will be included inall informatics courses.NUR 543 NURSING INFORMATICS IThis course facilitates development of a growing awarenessof and proficiency with concepts relevant to nursing andhealth care informatics and the application of computerizedinformation systems in a variety of venues including, butnot exclusive to, patient care environments, care mapping,research, interactive learning resources, communication,distance learning and collaboration and networking. (OfferedFall and Spring) 45 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNote: Students must have computer access and on-linecapability; distance learning modalities will be included inall informatics courses.NUR 544 NURSING INFORMATICS IIThis course facilitates understanding of systemic approachesto the organization of information, including knowledgeschemas, index languages and a systems approach todesign, implementation and analysis of information systems.Prerequisite: NUR 543. (Offered Fall and Spring) 45 lecture hoursper semester: 3 creditsNote: Students must have computer access and on-linecapability; distance learning modalities will be included inall informatics courses.NUR 545 NURSING INFORMATICS IIIThis course facilitates the application of nursing and informationsystems theory to practice environments. Students participatein relevant clinical practice with a health or nursing informationtechnology expert. Seminar will provide theoretical contentand discussion of current issues and trends in informatics.Prerequisites: NUR 543, 544. Fee–$445.00. 15 Seminar hoursand 100 experiential hours per semester; student arranged: 3creditsNote: Students must have computer access and on-linecapability; distance learning modalities will be included inall informatics courses.NUR 546 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENTThis course assists the student to manage human resourcesmore effectively by improving ability to analyze and plan.The focus is on the development of systems that supportbasic business objectives as well as foster good workingrelations between employees and management. Legal andregulatory issues as well as strategic management, negotiationstrategies and leadership are topics included for development.Prerequisite: NUR 515. (Offered Spring) 45 lecture hours persemester: 3 creditsNUR 547 HEALTH CARE FINANCE AND BUDGETINGThis course focuses on the knowledge and skills needed to plan,manage, monitor and evaluate the budget and fiscal affairsfor a unit or division. Health care economics, personnel andpatient activities are analyzed from a budgetary and financialmanagement perspective within an environment of regulationsand market competition. Financial management/cost analysisand micro- and macro-economics are addressed. Prerequisites:NUR 515. (Offered Fall) 45 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 548 NURSING INFORMATICS IVThis course facilitates the synthesis of prior learning andapplication of nursing and clinical informatics to practiceenvironments. Students participate in relevant clinical practicewith a health or nursing information technology expert.Seminar will provide theoretical content and discussionsof the current issues and trends in informatics focusing onapplications of health information systems related to patientcare, strategic planning in management and tactical planningfor Telehealth. Prerequisites: NUR 543, 544, 545. Fee–$445.00.15 Seminar hours and 100 experiential hours per semester;student arranged: 3 creditsNUR 551 NPP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE I(formerly NUR 595)This clinical course provides the advanced practice studentwith the opportunity to collaborate with a Nurse Practitioneror Physician (psychiatry) preceptor. Students participate inperforming diagnostic evaluations, identifying treatmentmodalities and in other aspects of collaborative and independentpractice. Primary psychiatric care will be provided to clientsin a variety of settings. Activities are designed to develop therole of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse in meetingthe acute and chronic mental and behavioral health needs ofindividuals. The Molloy Humanistic Framework will focus onhealth promotion, health restoration and rehabilitation. (Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisite: NUR 592; Corequisite: NUR 593.Fee–$445.00; Seminar and 165 clinical hours/semester; studentarranged: 2 creditsNUR 552 NPP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE II(formerly NUR 596)This clinical course provides the advanced practice studentwith the opportunity to collaborate with a Nurse Practitioneror Physician (psychiatry) preceptor. Students participate inperforming diagnostic evaluations, identifying treatmentmodalities and in other aspects of collaborative andindependent practice. Primary psychiatric care will be providedto clients in a variety of settings. Clinical practice activities aredesigned to further develop the role of the advanced practice125


psychiatric nurse in meeting the acute and chronic mental andbehavioral health needs of individuals. The Molloy HumanisticFramework will focus on health promotion, health restorationand rehabilitation. (Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisites: NUR 592and 593; Corequisites: NUR 594, 551. Fee—$445.00; Seminarand 165 clinical hours/semester; student arranged: 2 creditsNUR 553 NPP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE III(formerly NUR 598)This culminating course will provide students the opportunityto further expand their role as an advanced practice nurse inpsychiatry. Students, in preceptored situations with a NPPor Psychiatrist, may choose a specialty area such as: adult,adolescent, geriatric, dual diagnosis and chemically dependentpopulations. Clinical practice may include the role of primaryprovider, consultation/liaison, case manager and multidisciplinarytreatment member. The Molloy College HumanisticFramework will focus on health promotion, health restorationand rehabilitation. (Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisites: NUR 593,551 and 552; Corequisite: 594. Fee–$445.00; Seminar and 165clinical hours/semester; student arranged: 2 creditsNUR 555 RESEARCH METHOD AND DESIGNThis course focuses on the research process and addressesboth quantitative and qualitative research methods. The courseincludes review and critical analysis of design, and collection,analysis and interpretation of data. Emphasis is on theprofessional as producer and consumer of research. Studentsmay use the computer to store and retrieve information. Theculminating experience of the course will be the developmentof a research proposal. Prerequisites: An undergraduateresearch course and MAT 550. (Offered Fall, Spring) 45 lecturehours per semester: 4 creditsNUR 557 ANP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE I(formerly NUR 581)This clinical course provides students with the opportunityto collaborate with an Adult Nurse Practitioner or Physicianpreceptor. Students participate in focused comprehensivephysical assessments, treatment protocols and collaborativepractice. Primary care will be provided to clients in a varietyof settings. Students are expected to participate within theguidelines of the preceptor’s protocols. Clinical practice activitiesare designed to develop advanced practice competencies.(Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisites: NUR 505, 524, 572, 573, 576;Corequisites: NUR 579 or 580. Fee—$445.00. Seminar and 155clinical hours/ semester; student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 558 ANP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE II(formerly NUR 582)Students are required to select an area of concentration inprimary care practice. Preceptored experiences focus on theassessment, diagnostic work-up and development of treatmentplans within the collaborative agreements of the Adult NursePractitioner. Clinical practice activities are designed to furtherdevelop advanced competencies. (Pass/Fail Practicum)Prerequisites: NUR 505, 524, 572, 573, 576; Corequisites:Remaining Diagnosis and Therapeutics course, NUR 579 or580. Fee—$445.00. Seminar and 155 clinical hours/semester;student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 559 ANP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE IIIThis clinical course focuses on the comprehensive role of theAdult Nurse Practitioner. Students, in preceptored situationswith ANPs or Physicians, provide case management servicesto coordinate care and meet multiple client health care needs.Emphasis is placed on the multidimensional role of the AdultNurse Practitioner. Clinical practice activities are designed tofurther develop advanced level competencies in the provisionof care, advocacy, teaching, consulting, case management,research, leadership and change agent in the community healthcare setting. (Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisites: NUR 579, 580,557, 576, 558. Fee—$445.00; Seminar and 155 clinical hours/semester; student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 560 THESIS ADVISEMENT (OPTIONAL)This course is designed for students who elect to initiate aresearch proposal culminating in a Master’s Thesis that is theintellectual product of NUR 561. Thesis advisement providesfaculty guidance during the proposal implementation andpreparation of the thesis. The student has the opportunity tochoose a graduate faculty member to serve as an advisor. Athesis advisement fee is assigned each semester until the thesisis completed. Grading is Pass/Fail. Fee—One (1) credit hourequivalent. 0 creditsNUR 561 THESIS (OPTIONAL)The thesis that was initiated and prepared in NUR 560 will bepresented in complete form and evaluated by a Thesis ApprovalCommittee of the Division of Nursing. Successfully defendedthesis will be submitted in both electronic and bound copyformat and filed in the James Edward Tobin Library. 3 creditsNUR 562 FNP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE I(formerly NUR 590)This clinical course provides students with the opportunity tocollaborate with a Nurse Practitioner or Physician preceptor.Students have the opportunity to practice in women’s health,pediatric, geriatric or family settings. Students provide primarycare to individuals/families in various settings, utilizingappropriate assessment, diagnostic and therapeutic techniques.Emphasis is placed on the role of the Family Nurse Practitioner inhealth promotion, health maintenance, anticipatory guidanceand disease prevention in the ambulatory/community primarycare setting. Assessment and management of acute self-limitingconditions, selected crisis situations and common chronicproblems throughout the life cycle will be presented. Clinicalpractice activities are designed to develop advanced level directcare competencies. (Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisite: NUR 578;Corequisite: NUR 581 or 582 or 586. Fee—$445.00. Seminar and126


200 clinical hours/semester; student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 563 FNP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE II(formerly NUR 591)This clinical course provides students with the opportunity tocollaborate with a Nurse Practitioner or Physician preceptor.Students have the opportunity to practice in women’s health,pediatric, geriatric and/or family settings. Students provideprimary care to individuals/families in various settings, utilizingappropriate assessment, diagnostic and therapeutic techniques.Emphasis is placed on the role of the Family Nurse Practitionerin health promotion, health maintenance, anticipatoryguidance and disease prevention in the ambulatory/community primary care setting. Assessment and managementof acute self-limiting conditions, selected crisis situations andcommon chronic problems throughout the life cycle will bepresented. Clinical practice activities are designed to furtherdevelop advanced level direct care competencies. (Pass/FailPracticum) Prerequisite: NUR 578. Corequisite: NUR 581 or 582or 586. Fee—$445.00. Seminar and 200 clinical hours/ semester;student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.Note: NUR 562, 563 may be taken in the same semesterprovided that 2 of 3 Diagnoses and Therapeutics courseshave been completed.NUR 564 FNP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE IIIThis clinical course focuses on the comprehensive role of thefamily nurse practitioner. Students, in preceptored situationswith a NP or physician, provide case management services tocoordinate care and meet multiple client health care needs.Emphasis is placed on the multidimensional role of the familynurse practitioner. Clinical practice activities are designed tofurther develop advanced level competencies in the provisionof care, advocacy, teaching, consulting and counseling,case management, research, leadership and change agentin the community health care setting. (Pass/Fail Practicum)Prerequisite: NUR 582, and 581 or 586 and NUR 562 and 563.Corequisite: Remaining Diagnosis and Therapeutics course.Fee—$445.00. Seminar and 200 clinical hours/semester;student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 566 PNP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE I(formerly NUR 587)Under the preceptorship of a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner ora Pediatrician, the student provides primary care to pediatricclients utilizing appropriate assessment, diagnostic andtherapeutic techniques. Emphasis is placed on the role ofthe Pediatric Nurse Practitioner in health promotion, healthmaintenance, anticipatory guidance and disease preventionin primary health care settings. Assessment and managementof children with common acute and chronic diseases will beemphasized. Clinical practice activities are designed to developadvanced level direct care competencies. (Pass/Fail Practicum).Prerequisites: NUR 505, 524, 572, 573, 577; Corequisite: NUR 584or 585. Fee—$445.00. Seminar and 155 clinical hours/semesterstudent arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 567 PNP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE II(formerly NUR 588)Under the preceptorship of a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner orPediatrician, the student provides primary care to pediatricpatients utilizing appropriate assessment, diagnostic andtherapeutic techniques. Emphasis is placed on the role ofthe Pediatric Nurse Practitioner in health promotion, healthmaintenance and disease prevention in primary health caresettings. This course encourages the student to choose aspecialty area of practice with the permission of the instructor.Clinical practice activities are designed to further developadvanced level direct care competencies. (Pass/Fail Practicum).Prerequisites: NUR 572, 573, 577; Corequisites: NUR 505, 524,584 or 585. Fee—$445.00. Seminar and 155 clinical hours/semester; student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 568 PNP: PRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE IIIThis clinical course focuses on the comprehensive role of thePediatric Nurse Practitioner. Students, in preceptored situationswith PNPs or Pediatricians, provide case management servicesto coordinate care and meet multiple client health care needs.Emphasis is placed on the multidimensional role of the PediatricNurse Practitioner. Clinical practice activities are designed tofurther develop advanced level competencies in the provisionof care, advocacy, teaching, consulting and counseling, casemanagement, research, leadership and change agent. (Pass/Fail Practicum) Prerequisites: NUR 566, 567, 584 and 585.Corequisite: NUR 578. Fee— $445.00. Seminar and 155 clinicalhours/semester; student arranged: 2 creditsNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 570 HIGHER EDUCATION IN AMERICAThis course focuses on the development and the present statusof colleges in the United States. Issues related to structure andgovernance, administration, students, faculty, curriculum andteaching are explored. Financial implications and the needfor outcome criteria will be discussed. Prerequisite: NUR 505.(Offered Fall) 30 lecture hours per semester: 3 credits127


NUR 571 CREATIVE STRATEGIES FOR TEACHINGNURSINGThis is a three credit course focusing on the developmentof a repertoire of creative methodologies for teaching inan undergraduate nursing program. Emphasis is placed onimplementation of methods to foster a spirit of inquiry in theadult learner, as classroom and clinical teaching strategies arepresented and evaluated. Specific content areas include theapplication of teaching-learning theory, the use of technologyand the arts in teaching and current research in nursingeducation. Prerequisite: NUR 505. (Offered Spring) 30 lecturehours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 572 ADVANCED PHYSICAL ASSESSMENTThis course provides a systematic approach to the skillsnecessary for primary practice. Assessment skills includephysical examination for pediatric, geriatric and adult clientswith specific reference to womens’ health issues. Emphasis isplaced on the writing of the history and physical. A supervisedclinical field experience is required in which students acquireinitial skills in assessment, decision-making and managementof care. Prerequisite: Evidence of the satisfactory completionof a basic physical assessment course or its C.E. equivalent,and students must take and pass a Basic Physical AssessmentCompetency Exam. (Offered Fall, Spring) Fee—$445.00. 30lecture hours and 45 clinical/college laboratory hours persemester: 3 creditsNUR 573 PHARMACOTHERAPEUTICSThis course provides an in-depth, systematic approach to thestudy of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugtherapy for common health problems in acute and chronic care.Clinical application focuses on therapeutic outcomes, adversereactions and interactions across the life span. Instructionin drug management and teaching as an advanced practicemodality is emphasized. This course includes three clockhours of instruction in New York State and Federal laws andregulations related to prescription writing and record keeping.(Offered Fall, Spring) 45 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 576 ANP: DIAGNOSTIC REASONINGThe student is introduced to the principles of advanced clinicalproblem solving. The course explores the general conceptsof diagnostic reasoning, therapeutic modalities and thecollaborative role of the Adult Nurse Practitioner. Emphasis isplaced on the work-up of case-studies, diagnostic statementsand professional presentation of human responses to actualand potential health problems. Prerequisites: NUR 505, 524, 572and 573. (Offered Fall, Spring) Fee—$445.00. 15 lecture hoursand 90 clinical hours per semester, student arranged: 3 creditsNUR 577 PNP: DIAGNOSTIC REASONINGThe student is introduced to the principles of advanced clinicalproblem solving. The focus of this course is the explorationof the general concepts of diagnostic reasoning, therapeuticmodalities and to refine assessment skills related to principle ofgrowth and development. Through the analysis of case-studies,students will become acclimated to the role of the PediatricNurse Practitioner in case-presentation. Prerequisites: NUR 505,524, 572 and 573. (Offered Summer) (Offered alternate years/asneeded.) Fee—$445.00. 15 lecture hours and 90 clinical hoursper semester, student arranged: 3 creditsNUR 578 FNP: DIAGNOSTIC REASONINGThe student is introduced to the principles of advanced clinicalproblem solving. This course explores the general concepts of128


diagnostic reasoning, therapeutic modalities and the role ofthe family nurse practitioner. Emphasis is placed on a familysystems approach as the theoretical basis for primary carethroughout the life cycle. Prerequisites: NUR 505, 524, 572 and573. (Offered Fall, Spring) Fee—$445.00. 15 lecture hours and90 clinical hours per semester, student arranged: 3 creditsNUR 579 ANP: DIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS IThis course focuses on the collaborative management of theadult client experiencing an alteration in health. Conceptsand theories related to differential diagnosis, treatmentmodalities, referral, patient education, are emphasized utilizinga general systems approach grounded in advanced physiology.Application of diagnostic reasoning focuses on healthpromotion, health restoration and rehabilitation in the acuteand chronic populations. Prerequisites: NUR 576, 578 (OfferedFall, Spring) 45 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 580 ANP: DIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS IIThe course focuses on the collaborative management of theadult client experiencing an alteration in health. Groundedin advanced physiology, the concepts related to differentialdiagnosis, treatment modalities, referral, patient education, andthe role of the adult nurse practitioner are explored. The focusis on the physiological implications of evolving health careproblems. Application of diagnostic reasoning concentrateson health promotion, health restoration, and rehabilitationin acute and chronic populations. Prerequisite: NUR 576, 578(Offered Fall, Spring) 45 lecture hours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 581 FNP: DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPEUTICS IThis course focuses on the primary health care across thelifespan. A general systems approach, grounded in advancedphysiology, provides the framework for the assessment,diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The role of the familynurse practitioner in the care of the patients presenting withsymptoms and conditions most frequently encountered inclinical practice is emphasized throughout the course. Specificpathologies and resulting interventions are discussed in detail.Integration of research into practice will be emphasized, aswell as the advanced practice role within a changing socioeconomicclimate. Prerequisite: NUR 578. 45 lecture hours persemester: 3 creditsNUR 582 FNP: DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPEUTICS IIThis course focuses on the management of the care ofindividuals/families experiencing a selected alteration inhealth. Concepts and theories related to differential diagnosis,treatment modalities, referral, patient education and the roleof the family nurse practitioner are emphasized utilizing ageneral systems approach grounded in advanced physiology.Application of diagnostic reasoning focuses on healthpromotion, health restoration and rehabilitation through thelifespan. Prerequisite: NUR 578. 15 lecture hours per semester:3 creditsNUR 583 ROLE OF NURSE PRACTITIONER IN PRIMARY CAREThis course provides students with the opportunity to exploreand analyze the role of the Nurse Practitioner in professionalorganizations which support the Nurse Practitioner role. NursePractitioner protocols and collaborative practice agreementswill be discussed, analyzed and created. Case managementand research principles will be introduced and strategies forincorporating these principles into practice will be reviewed.Legislative issues and health care policies impacting on the roleof the Nurse Practitioner will be analyzed. 30 lecture hours: 2creditsNUR 584 PNP: DIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS IThis course focuses on the primary health care guidelines forthe pediatric client from birth through adolescence. A generalsystems approach, grounded in advanced physiology, providesthe framework for the assessment, diagnostic and therapeuticapproaches. The role of the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner forspecific pediatric conditions most frequently encountered inclinical practice is emphasized throughout the course. Specificpathologies and resulting interventions are discussed in detail.Integration of research into practice will be emphasized, as wellas the advanced practice role within a changing socioeconomicclimate. Prerequisites: NUR 577 or 578. (Offered Fall) 45 lecturehours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 585 PNP: DIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS IIThis course focuses on the primary health care guidelinesfor the pediatric client. A systems approach, groundedin advanced physiology, provides the framework for theassessment, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for bothacute and chronic illnesses. Advanced concepts related tohealth promotion, health maintenance and disease preventionwill be explored. Emphasis is placed on the disease processesmost frequently encountered in the pediatric population.Prerequisite: NUR 577 (Offered Spring) 45 lecture hours persemester: 3 creditsNUR 586 FNP: DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPEUTICS IIIThis course focuses on the collaborative management of thecare of individual/families experiencing a selected alterationin health. Grounded in advanced physiology, the conceptsrelated to differential diagnosis, treatment modalities, referral,patient education and the role of the family nurse practitionerare explored. The focus is on the physiological implicationsof evolving health care problems. Application of diagnosticreasoning concentrates on health promotion, health restorationand rehabilitation through the lifespan. Prerequisites: NUR 505,524, 572, 573, and 578. (Offered Fall, Spring). 45 lecture hoursper semester: 3 creditsNUR 592 NPP: THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS(formerly NPP: Diagnostic Reasoning)This course focuses on mental health across the life span andon therapeutic use of self. Theories of personality developmentand neurobiological integration will be emphasized. Criticalthinking will be applied to interviewing skills and mental statusassessment. Students explore concepts of diagnostic reasoning,differential diagnosis and the role of the Nurse Practitioner inPsychiatry. Human responses to actual or potential healthproblems will incorporate the Molloy College HumanisticNursing Framework to address the acute and chronic healthneeds of individuals. Prerequisites: NUR 505, 524, 572, 573.(Offered Summer) (Offered alternate years/as needed.) Fee—$445.00. 30 lecture hours and 60 clinical hours per semester,129


student arranged: 3 creditsNUR 593 NPP: DIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS IThis course focuses on managing clients experiencing acuteor chronic mental and behavioral health problems. Studentswill build upon prior courses and critically analyze patient careneeds as a primary psychiatric provider. Differential diagnosticskills and modalities of individual therapy will be explored.Application of the Molloy Humanistic Nursing Frameworkwill focus on health promotion, health restoration andrehabilitation. Prerequisite: NUR 592. (Offered Fall) 45 lecturehours per semester: 3 creditsNUR 594 NPP: DIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS IIThis course focuses on managing clients experiencingacute or chronic mental and behavioral health problems.Management of individuals with chemical dependency needswill be incorporated. Students will build upon prior courses andcritically analyze patient care needs as a primary psychiatric careprovider. Various psychotherapeutic modalities will be exploredincluding; group therapy, family therapy, psychotherapeuticeducation, consultation/ liaison and community interventions.Prerequisite: NUR 593. (Offered Spring) 45 lecture hours persemester: 3 creditsNUR 597 PRACTICUM: PRIMARY CARE IV(Formerly offered as NUR 598)This course serves as an opportunity for students in anynurse practitioner track to obtain additional clinical hours.This practicum is required for advanced placement. NursePractitioner students seeking additional learning in a differentclinical field. Varies based on program requirements. Fee—$445.00, clinical hours as determined, student arranged. Creditsand clinical hours vary according to need. Credits varyNote: NP and CNS students will be required to demonstratecompetency in Physical Assessment prior to starting eachclinical practicum.NUR 598 TOPICS IN NURSING THEORY1–3 creditsNUR 599 INDEPENDENT STUDY(Formerly NUR 591)Open to students to pursue an in-depth area of specialinterest. Directed readings, discussion and study of a problemunder guidance of a member of the department teaching inthe Graduate Program. Approval of instructor and GraduateProgram Director required. Credits varyCOGNATES:PHI 591 INDEPENDENT STUDYOpen to students to pursue an in-depth area of specialinterest. Directed readings, discussion and study of a problemunder guidance of a member of the department teaching inthe Graduate Program. Approval of Instructor and GraduateProgram Director required. Credits varyNursing Post Master’sAdvanced CertificateProgramsThe purpose of the formal Post-Graduate Advanced CertificatePrograms is to provide advanced study for registered nurseswithout completing a second master’s of science degree in nursing.As with all Molloy College Division of Nursing Programs, the PostMaster’s Advanced Certificate Programs were developed to meetboth the career goals of nurses and society’s needs.Overview of Post-Master’sNursingPost-Master’s Programs are offered in: Nursing Administration withInformatics, Nursing Administration, Nursing Informatics, NursingEducation, CNS: Adult Health, Nurse Practitioner areas of Adult,Pediatrics, Family and Psychiatry.Advanced Certificate programs are meant for those master’sdegree prepared nurses who seek to advance their knowledge andskill in various areas of education, administration or clinical practice.The Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist AdvancedCertificate Programs are designed to prepare the advancedpractitioner in primary care (NP) or a clinical specialty area (CNS).The education and administration programs prepare those seekingto expand their role in these areas.Consideration is given to the learner as an adult. As such, studentsassume self-direction and identify their specific learning needs.Instructional methods demonstrate individualized learning andcollaboration between students, faculty and mentors or preceptors.Nursing Education, NursingAdministration, NurseInformatics, NursingAdministration with Informaticsand Clinical Nurse Specialist:Adult HealthThe primary focus of the Nursing Education Advanced CertificateProgram is humanistic teaching/learning as it applies to nursingeducation in baccalaureate or associate degree programs as well asin-service, continuing education or community health programs.The Nursing Administration Advanced Certificate Program has asits focus, humanistic management of human resources in a varietyof health care settings requiring nursing services. The theory/field experience (practica) courses provide for the testing of roletheories, the exploration of role expectations and experience in theselected role.130


The CNS student is prepared through classroom and clinicalactivities to provide comprehensive care to individuals with healthproblems in a particular area. Research, education, collaboration,coordination, consultation and referral are roles for the ClinicalNurse Specialist.The Nurse Educator track is meant to provide the skills necessary toteach in a formal academic setting, in a patient education situationor in a staff development role.The Nurse Administration and Informatics track is focused on theskills needed by the nurse administrator and manager. NursingAdministration in combination with informatics and businessconcepts provide a strong foundation in the current and evolvinghealth care environment.The Nurse Informatics track is an advanced course of studydesigned for nurses who have a master’s degree in nursing. Thiscurriculum focuses on theory and skills required to succeed as aninformatics nurse specialist in a variety of health care environmentsthat incorporate Telehealth practice/health information systems.Students participate in relevant clinical practice with a health ornursing information technology expert. Seminars will providetheoretical content and discussions of the current issues and trendsin informatics focusing on applications of health informationsystems related to patient care, strategic planning in managementand tactical planning for Telehealth practice.Adult Nurse Practitioner,Pediatric Nurse Practitioner,Nurse Practitioner Psychiatryand Family Nurse PractitionerThe ANP, PNP, NPP and FNP Advanced Certificate Programs aredesigned to provide students with the knowledge, skills and abilitiesfor advanced humanistic practice in primary care. Educationalexperiences in the classroom, Nurse Practitioner College LearningLaboratory and the clinical practica prepare students in theassessment of physical and mental health (NPP) conditions,diagnosis of illnesses and the performance of therapeutic andcorrective measures within a specialization. The focus on advancedpractice roles is to foster high levels of health through promotion,prevention and self-care. These programs may be attended full orpart-time, include 27 credits (30 for FNP) and a minimum of 600clinical hours for ANP, PNP and NPP areas and 735 clinical hoursfor the FNP concentration. Certified ANP, PNP or Women’s HealthPractitioners may seek advanced standing to the FNP or otherNP programs. A minimum of six credits and 300 clinical hours arerequired to be taken at Molloy. Each applicant will be evaluatedand a program of study determined by the Associate Dean andGraduate Program Director and the coordinator of the relevantprogram. Certified Nurse Practitioners who choose to advance theirpractice by preparing in another Nurse Practitioner specialty areamay seek advanced standing. Each applicant must meet admissioncriteria and provide documentation of master’s level academicwork that meets Molloy standards and that applies to the definedprogram course work. A minimum of six credits and 300 clinicalhours are required. Any decision regarding advanced standing willbe made by the Associate Dean and Graduate Program Director inconsultation with the appropriate track coordinator. Graduates areeligible for certification as a nurse practitioner in New York State,which grants prescriptive privileges. Graduates are also eligible totake the certification examinations offered by the American Nurses’Credentialing Center (a subsidiary of American Nurses’ Association),the National Certification Board of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners andNurses and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.Admission to Post Master’sAdvanced Certificate ProgramsRequirements for admission to the Post-Master’s AdvancedCertificate Programs include:• Master’s Degree in nursing from a professionallyaccredited program. (Applicants from non-accreditedprograms may be considered for admission on anindividual basis.)• Graduate GPA 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.• Current New York State license registration certificate.• One year recent clinical experience in specialty area.• Three letters of reference that attest to clinicalcompetency.• A personal interview.• Evidence of the successful completion of a basicphysical assessment course or its C.E. equivalent as aprerequisite to NUR 572.• Health and professional requirements as determinedby the nursing program. (See Pre-Clinical/PracticumRequirements.)• A completed application.• Students must take and pass a Basic PhysicalAssessment Competency Exam prior to beginningAdvanced Physical Assessment (NUR 572).131


Programs of Study -Nursing Education,Administration orClinical PracticeNUR 535CNS: Adult Health Practice II(125 clinical hours)2NUR 536CNS: Adult Health Practice III(125 clinical hours)2NUR 538Role of the Clinical NurseSpecialist3Elective 3Total Credits Required: 23Clinical Nurse Specialist: AdultHealth - ADV. CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 22190HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}CNS Track Courses (23 credits required):CreditsNUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 572Advanced Physical Assessment(45 Clinical/3college lab hours)NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 533CNS:Foundations and Decisionmaking(125 clinical hours)3NUR 534CNS: Adult Health Practice I(125 clinical hours)2Nurse Informatics - ADV. CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 27860HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}NI Track Courses (15 credits required):CreditsNUR 543 Informatics I 3NUR 544 Informatics II 3NUR 545Practicum in Informatics II (100clinical hours)3NUR 548 Informatics IV (100 clinical hours) 3NUR/BUS546Human Resources Management 3Total Credits Required: 15132


Nursing Administration - ADV.CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 19088HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}NA Track Courses (21 credits required):CreditsNUR 515 Organizational Theory 3NUR 540 Administration I 3NUR 541 Administration II 3NUR 542Practicum in NursingAdministration3NUR 543 Nursing Informatics I 3NUR/BUS547Healthcare Finance 3NUR/BUS546Human Resources Management 3Total Credits Required: 21Nursing Administration withInformatics - ADV. CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 22191HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}NAI Track Courses (27 credits required):CreditsNUR 515 Organizational Theory 3NUR 540 Administration I 3NUR 541 Administration II 3NUR 542Practicum in NursingAdministration (90 clinicalhours)NUR 543 Nursing Informatics I 3NUR 544 Nursing Informatics II 3NUR 545Practicum in Informatics (100clinical hours)3NUR 546 Human Resources Management 3NUR 548Nursing Informatics IV (100clinical hours)3Total Credits Required: 27Nursing Education - ADV. CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 19035HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}NE Track Courses (23 credits required):CreditsNUR 528 Informatics for Nurse Educators 3NUR 529Health Issueswith a Global View2NUR 530 Curriculum Development 3NUR 531 Measurement and Evaluation 33NUR 532Practicum in Education(90 clinical hours)3NUR 570 Higher Education in America 3NUR 571Creative Strategies for TeachingNursing3Select one 3 credit course from the followingAdvanced Practice Core courses (NUR 524 or 572 or573):3NUR 524 Advanced PathophysiologyNUR 572NUR 573Advanced Physical AssessmentPharmacotherapeuticsTotal Credits Required: 23Adult Nurse Practitioner - ADV.CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 19422HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}Advanced Practice Core courses (11 creditsCreditsrequired):NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 572 Advanced Physical Assessment3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 583 Role of NP in Primary Care 2ANP Track Courses (15 credits required):(Includes 580 clinical hours)NUR 576ANP: Diagnostic Reasoning (90clinical hours)3NUR 579ANP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics I3NUR 580ANP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics II3NUR 557ANP: Practicum I(155 clinical hours)2NUR 558ANP: Practicum II (155 clinicalhours)2NUR 559ANP: Practicum III (155 clinicalhours)2Total Credits Required: 26Family Nurse Practitioner - ADV.CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 20837HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}Advanced Practice Core courses (11 creditsCreditsrequired):NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3133


NUR 572 Advanced Physical Assessment 3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 583 Role of NP in Primary Care 2FNP Track Courses (18 credits required): (Includes715 clinical hours)NUR 578FNP: Diagnostic Reasoning (90clinical hours)3NUR 581FNP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics I3NUR 582FNP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics II3NUR 586FNP: Diagnoses andTherapeutics III3NUR 562FNP: Practicum I (200 clinicalhours)2NUR 563FNP: Practicum II (200 clinicalhours)2NUR 564FNP: Practicum III (200 clinicalhours)2*NUR 597Practicum IV Required foradvanced placementstudents as advisedCredits vary1-2(creditsvary)Total Credits Required): 29*Note: NUR 597 Practicum IV serves as an opportunity forstudents in any track to obtain additional clinical hours -required for advanced placement NP students in the FNPprogram.Nurse Practitioner Psychiatry -ADV. CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 20836HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}Advanced Practice Core courses (11 creditsrequired):CreditsNUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 572 Advanced Physical Assessment 3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 583 Role of NP in Primary Care 2NPP Track Courses (15 credits required):(Includes 580 clinical hours)NUR 592NPP: Theoretical Foundations (60clinical hours)3NUR 593NPP: Diagnosis and TherapeuticsI3NUR 594NPP: Diagnosis and TherapeuticsII3NUR 551NPP: Practicum I (165 clinicalhours)2NUR 552NPP: Practicum II (165 clinicalhours)2NPP: Practicum III (165 clinicalNUR 5532hours)Total Credits Required: 26Pediatric Nurse Practitioner -ADV. CERT.New York State Registered Program Code: 19423HEGIS Code: 1203.12 {Nursing-Supplemental Clinical}Advanced Practice Core courses (11 creditsCreditsrequired):NUR 524 Advanced Pathophysiology 3NUR 572 Advanced Physical Assessment3NUR 573 Pharmacotherapeutics 3NUR 583 Role of NP in Primary Care 2PNP Track Courses (15 credits required):(Includes 580 clinical hours)NUR 577PNP: Diagnostic Reasoning (90clinical hours)3NUR 584PNP: Diagnoses and TherapeuticsI3NUR 585PNP: Diagnoses and TherapeuticsII3NUR 566PNP: Practicum I (155 clinicalhours)2NUR 567PNP: Practicum II (155 clinicalhours)2NUR 568PNP: Practicum III (155 clinicalhours)2Total Credits Required: 26134


Welcome to the Nursing Doctoral Program fromthe Associate Dean and DirectorDear Molloy Ph.D. Student:Welcome to the Molloy College Division of Nursing Doctor ofPhilosophy (Ph.D.) Program. The decision to pursue doctoral studiesis an important one for you as you consider advanced educationbeyond the Master’s Degree. A doctorate in nursing prepares you asa scholar and researcher as you integrate the theoretical and practicalimplications of health care delivery and contribute to the disciplinarybody of knowledge through your research and leadership.The Doctor of Philosophy degree builds upon a foundation ofbaccalaureate and master’s education that integrates nursing theory,research and knowledge from other disciplines. Based on the Divisionof Nursing humanistic framework, the doctoral program emphasizesthe dignity of the individual, scholarly inquiry, self enrichment, andhigh personal and professional standards. Goals of the program are toeducate aspiring nursing leaders who will take their place alongsideother disciplinary leaders to maintain, monitor, and improve healthfor all individuals in society. A commitment to doctoral educationopens doors of opportunity to excel in the complex environmentswhere health care is delivered.The curriculum focuses on building a knowledge base in nursing, leadership, and research to begin theprocess of conducting original studies that lead to the dissertation. Cognates support the knowledge neededfor in-depth exploration of theory and content related to the research direction and allows you to customizean individualized plan of study. A research residency provides an experiential learning opportunity for you towork with faculty engaged in research. A health policy immersion experience puts you into the legislative andpolicy arena where you will learn how to influence with your knowledge and expertise. The dissertation is theculmination of doctoral studies after completion of all required coursework that explores a problem on theboundaries of knowledge in the discipline.The decision to seek a Ph.D. degree is a transforming one. The process requires life-style changes andreordering of priorities. With Molloy’s student-centered philosophy, the administration and faculty are committedto offering doctoral scholars the support equal to the challenge of the Ph.D. pursuit.Aspire - Commit - ExcelVeronica D. Feeg, Ph.D, R.N., F.A.A.N.Associate Dean and DirectorDoctoral Program in Nursing135


Nursing DoctoralProgramsHR111A Graduate Nursing Center, Maria Regina Hall516.678.5000, Ext. 6258Jeannine D. Muldoon, Ph.D., R.N., Dean of the Division ofNursingVeronica D. Feeg, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., Associate Dean andDirector, Nursing Doctoral ProgramNote: The Division of Nursing reserves the right to makenecessary program alterations in response to changes inprofessional nursing practice and/or the health care deliverysystem. Students are responsible for meeting all programrequirements.Nursing Doctoral ProgramPhilosophyThe underlying beliefs of the Division of Nursing at Molloy Collegeare rooted in its humanistic framework. In keeping with thisframework, Molloy College makes a unique contribution to thenursing profession through its doctoral program. It is the role ofthe nurse to stand against the occurrence of dehumanization thatmay happen in health care settings. In an environment where theremay be a devotion to technology and cost containment and whereothers may be less concerned with the patient as a human being, theMolloy Ph.D. prepared nurse will lead in knowledge developmentand nursing interventions that demonstrate value and respectfor persons vulnerable to illness. Leadership by the MolloyCollege Ph.D. prepared nurse will be directed to transformingvulnerabilities to strengths and to attain and maintain optimumhealth. Humanistic nursing behavior, rooted in the principles ofcaring, is a goal of the doctoral program. A curriculum enriched bythe study of the humanities assists in achieving that goal.Nursing Doctoral Program GoalsThe goal of advancing nursing knowledge must be grounded inrespect for the dignity of the individual human being. It must alsoemerge from principles and methods of scientific inquiry and anexamination of nursing actions within nursing environments. Theprocess for reaching this goal is provided in a core of requiredcourses that addresses the theoretical and empirical basis fornursing and the substantive construction of research and theory toguide nursing practice.The program design allows students to expand upon prioreducational endeavors through a variety of individually selectedlearning experiences. Scholarly electives provide additionalflexibility to plan a program of study that strengthens dissertation,research and career goals. Depth of knowledge in the researchinterest area is developed through the combination of requiredcoursework, elective courses, research residency (an immersion inactivities with a research-active faculty mentor), independent studyand the dissertation process.Nursing Doctoral Statement ofPurposeThe purpose of the Ph.D. program in nursing is to prepare scholarsand researchers who will advance the profession of nursingthrough their leadership. The program prepares graduates who areable to:• Serve as leaders in advancing the practice of nursingthrough research, education, administration and healthpolicy.• Participate fully in multidisciplinary contributions to thecreation of knowledge.• Generate, test and extend knowledge through researchand theory development, and disseminate findings.• Influence health policy to advance nursing and healthcare in a global society.• Integrate theory and practice through advanced ethicalanalysis.• Appreciate and extend the aesthetic values of nursing.• Value the inherent dignity of all humans and protectthem from dehumanization of health care.• Treasure the ideals of nursing through the stewardshipof caring.Admission to the NursingDoctoral ProgramAdmissions ProceduresAll students seeking admission to the Ph.D. Program in Nursingmust complete a Doctoral Admissions Application Form andsubmit with the non-refundable application fee. Prospectivestudents must submit official transcripts from the institution thatconferred their Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing and Master’sDegree. After all information has been received, an interview withthe Associate Dean and Program Director will be arranged forqualifying applicants.Applications for the Fall semester should be submitted by April 1st.Prospective students who miss the application deadline dates maybe considered on an individual basis.Admissions CriteriaThe Division of Nursing at Molloy College employs a “wholeperson” philosophy to evaluate candidates for admissionto the doctoral program. A multifaceted assessment of theapplicant’s potential for success includes the following:• A baccalaureate degree in nursing and/or a master’sdegrees in nursing (or its rigorous equivalent) fromaccredited programs.136


• Minimum Grade Point Average of 3.5 on a 4.0 scalefrom applicant’s master’s program.• An official report of scores, no more than 5 years old,from the Graduate Record Examination.• Complete official transcripts from all college programsand courses.• Current license to practice as a registered nurse in theUnited States and eligible for New York State licensure.• A written statement of career goals and proposed areaof research.• Three letters of reference from professionals in the fieldthat speak to the potential of the applicant as a scholar,to include at least one from a former faculty and at leastone from a recent employer.• A current curriculum vitae (professional resumé.)• Master’s-level statistics course, (3 credit minimum,preferably completed within last 5 years) appropriateto the academic endeavors of the doctoral program.• A copy of a recent scholarly paper, research report orpublication.• An interview with the Associate Dean and Directorof the Doctoral Program and faculty of the DoctoralProgram with concurrent completion of an on-sitebrief writing sample evaluated by a designated Ph.D.admission committee.Transfer CreditCourses submitted for transfer credit are evaluated individuallyrelative to program requirements and the student’s plan of study.Students may transfer up to 6 graduate-level credits from anotherinstitution. These courses must be reviewed and approved by theDirector of the Doctoral Program:• The course must either be duplicative of coursesrequired within the program and/or congruent withthe doctoral program purposes.• The course must not have been used toward meetingthe requirements for another degree.• The student must have received graduate credit for thecourse at an accredited institution.• The student must have earned a grade of “B” or above.• A student requesting transfer of credit should submitthe request and a copy of the course syllabus to theDirector of the Doctoral Program. All transfers of creditmust be approved by the Director of the DoctoralProgram and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.Matriculated StatusStudents are matriculated if they have met the requirements ofadmission, have been accepted into the Graduate Nursing Programand are seeking to fulfill all the requirements of the Ph.D. Program.Non-Matriculated StatusStudents whose admission process is incomplete but are earningcredits for the specific prerequisite or required graduate coursesfor the degree can request permission of the Associate Deanand Director of the Ph.D. Program. Non-matriculated studentsshould be aware that no more than 6 credits completed as a nonmatriculatedstudent may be used to fulfill requirements for thePh.D, and that non-matriculated status can be maintained for amaximum period of one semester.Provisional Academic StatusStudents who have been accepted into the Ph.D. program, buthave not fully met the Ph.D. admissions criteria may registerfor courses and must receive a grade of “B-” in the first 6 creditstaken. Re-evaluation for continued matriculated status will followcompletion of these courses.Nursing Doctoral ProgramProgression RequirementsCumulative Grade Point Average RequirementStudents are expected to succeed academically and maintain aminimum cumulative grade point average of 3.2 (on a 4.0 scale).Non-compliance with this criterion may result in program dismissal.Maintenance of Academic StandardsThe quality point index requirement is 3.2. If the GPA falls below3.2, it must be raised to 3.2 by the end of the following semester.Students who fail to raise their GPA to 3.2 will be dismissed fromthe program.Repeating CoursesA course in which the student receives a grade below “B-” mustbe repeated once. The option to repeat a course may not be usedmore than two times (for two different courses).Comprehensive ExaminationThe purpose of the Comprehensive Examination is to determinewhether the student meets minimum criteria at the doctoral-levelin nursing science and research methods. The written examinationis designed to test the student’s knowledge related to analysisand synthesis of course content. The examination will includequestions testing the synthesis of theory, research and specializedsubstantive knowledge. Students must have completed at least27 credit hours in order to sit for the Comprehensive Examination.After successfully passing the Comprehensive Examination, thestudent is considered eligible for candidacy.The procedure for the Comprehensive Examination is as follows:• After completion of 27 credits, the student will file aNotification of Intent to take Doctoral ComprehensiveExamination Form. The student must be admitted tocandidacy at least 2 semesters prior to the anticipateddate of graduation. Upon review that the student hasfulfilled all criteria, a Certificate of Candidacy will beissued. The student will then maintain matriculationthroughout the dissertation process.• The examination will be graded by members of theDoctoral Comprehensive Examination Committee.The examination will be graded as either “eligiblefor candidacy” or “not eligible for candidacy” by the137


committee. If there is not a unanimous decision aboutthe grade, members will meet to identify and discussdifferences in evaluation.• A student may be assessed as “not yet eligible forcandidacy” only once. A student receiving a gradeof “not yet eligible for candidacy” will meet with theacademic advisor, who will provide feedback andguidance to assist the student in preparing for a secondadministration of the Comprehensive Examination.• A second grade of “not yet eligible for candidacy” willresult in dismissal from the program.Certificate of CandidacyWith successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination,the student is deemed by faculty as qualified to conduct theresearch necessary for the dissertation and submits an applicationfor candidacy to the Director of the Doctoral Program. The studentmust be admitted to candidacy at least two (2) semesters prior toanticipated graduation. Upon review that the student has fulfilledall criteria, a Certificate of Candidacy will be issued. The student willthen maintain matriculation through the dissertation process.DissertationEach student is required to conduct original, independent researchwhich contributes to knowledge development in nursing. Thestudent will select a Dissertation Chair and members of theDissertation Committee with approval of the Associate Deanand Director of the PhD Program. A written dissertation proposalmust be approved and signed off by all members of the student’sDissertation Committee.Dissertation DefenseEach student is required to successfully defend the completeddissertation as evaluated by the Dissertation Committee. Thefinal oral dissertation defense is scheduled following completionof the dissertation and approval by all members of the student’sDissertation Committee. The dissertation defense is an oralpresentation and inquiry open to all faculty, students, andcommunity as deemed appropriate by the Director of the Ph.D.Program.Length of Time to Complete RequirementsA student has a period of nine (9) years after acceptance to completeprogram requirements. A student must be admitted to candidacywithin five years after admission to the doctoral program and atleast one academic year before the anticipated date on which thedegree is to be conferred. The student must complete all programrequirements within four years following admission to candidacy.Continuous RegistrationAll doctoral students are required to maintain continuousregistration of a minimum of at least one credit each semester(Fall and Spring) from admission until graduation unless anauthorized leave of absence has been granted. If the student isunable to engage in doctoral study for a given semester for healthor personal reasons, a Leave of Absence Form must be completedand approval must be obtained from the advisor and the Directorof the Doctoral Program. The student must be registered for creditduring the term (Fall, Spring or Summer) in which the dissertationdefense is scheduled and degree requirements completed.When all dissertation credits are exhausted, students can remainactively matriculated by paying the continuous enrollment feeuntil the dissertation is successfully completed.Registration ProceduresThe Academic Advisor (or in his/her absence, the Director of theDoctoral Program) will sign registration materials. It is crucial thatthe student meet with his/her academic advisor for advisementpurposes prior to the registration period each semester. If thestudent wishes to register for a cognate course in anotherdepartment or at a participating institution, permission of thecourse instructor should be gained in advance of registration.Students should be aware that registration and course dates on theother campuses may differ from those at Molloy College. Studentsare expected to have met specified prerequisites for any coursethey wish to take.Incomplete GradesStudents who do not complete course requirements on timebecause of illness or other extenuating circumstances may be givena grade of “Incomplete” (“I”) by the instructor. All work to rectifyincomplete grades must be in compliance with College policies.Students are advised whenever possible to complete requirementswithin the time allotted for the course. Incomplete grades mustbe rectified before taking the Comprehensive Exam. Incompletegrades do not count toward requirements or graduation.Waiver of Course RequirementOccasionally, a student is admitted to the Doctoral Program whopresents the credentials of having experience that is equivalentto the required course. In this instance, the student may requesta waiver of course. The Advisor and the student are then notifiedin writing of the action taken. Any student receiving a favorablewaiver of course action will be required to take a course, withadvisement, that will provide the appropriate number of credits tosubstitute for the waived course.Health of StudentA student in the Program who is unable to meet course objectivesdue to health problems will be requested to either take an“Incomplete” in the course or withdraw from the course dependingupon which is more appropriate.Licensure as a Registered NurseA student in the Doctoral Program must maintain current licensureas a registered professional nurse in New York State and/or in anyother state where the student may be involved in clinical activities.Malpractice InsuranceEvidence of malpractice insurance may be required according tostudent’s program of study.Nursing Doctoral Program Planof StudyEach student plans collaboratively with his/her faculty advisor aplan of study which constitutes a unified program, planned withinthe framework of doctoral program requirements and the student’sresearch interests and career goals. The selection and sequence ofcourses are planned with the student’s advisor. The Plan of Study138


is submitted to the Director of the Doctoral Program before thestudent has completed 12 credits. Advisors can assist students inselecting courses and cognates in conjunction with developingtheir research proposal. In planning an individualized program ofstudy specific to the students’ needs, advisors should guide thestudent to develop an area of research to begin formulating aproposal as early as possible.COURSE COMPONENTS:Theory/Core - 15 CreditsThe core courses address the theoretical and conceptual bases fornursing practice, and the underpinnings of professional leadership.Hallmarks of Scholarly Inquiry introduces the doctoral studentto the scholarly process of dissertation research preparation.Ethics: The Foundation of Leadership explores traditional andcontemporary ethical principles and core nursing values in orderto develop students’ complex analytical skills. Nursing ConceptAnalysis Through the Humanities allows students to investigatephenomena important to nursing and explore them throughthe lens of the humanities. Students will also develop theoreticalconnections and philosophical reflections as bases for futuretheory construction. Students gain exposure to the United Stateshealth care system and the organizations and public and corporatepolicies that shape and influence it as a background for nursingleadership in the Scholarship of Health Care Organizations andPolicy. In Philosophical Evolution of Nursing Knowledge, elementsof philosophy of science are used as a guide to exploration ofthe evolution of nursing science. Nursing theory construction isexamined as a foundation for research.Research - 15 CreditsIn the research cluster, students explore the tools that will allowthem to build their research skills. A strong foundation in bothqualitative and quantitative methods is offered in QualitativeResearch Design, Quantitative Research Design, and a choice ofeither Advanced Quantitative or Qualitative Analysis. ResearchResidency affords students learning opportunities encompassingall aspects of the research process. In Hallmarks of Scholarly Designand Implications, students deepen the connection with dissertationresearch, with a particular emphasis on proposal development aswell as implications for the nursing profession.Leadership and Education – 6 CreditsLeadership themes are threaded throughout the curriculumassuring preparation for leadership in health policy andorganizations. Leadership Innovations and Interventions allowsstudents to examine the complex interaction of forces shapingorganizations and policy nationally and globally. NursingEducation: Principles, Dynamics, and Innovations providesstudents with teaching experience and knowledge necessary fordoctoral graduates of the future.Cognates – 6 Credits MinimumThis component allows students to pursue an individualized planof study that builds a specialized area of competence and supportstheir research interests and career goals. A portion of the cognatecourses is ordinarily chosen from other disciplines (minimum of 3credits) that contribute to the development of nursing knowledgethrough theoretical and/or methodological approaches. Studentsmay be approved to take courses from appropriate academicinstitutions. Up to 6 credits may be applied as cognates with priorapproval from the student’s advisor or the Director of the DoctoralProgram.Dissertation Seminar - 3 Credits and Dissertation ProgressionThe dissertation is the culmination of doctoral study. DissertationProgression is taken after the completion of all required coursework,and provides the opportunity for the student to develop and refinethe dissertation. Following the Dissertation Seminar, the studentregisters for continuous Dissertation Progression until completionof successful oral defense.Research Residency – 3 CreditsThe Research Residency is an experiential learning activity (3credits) guided by a Division of Nursing faculty member in whichthe student works with a leader in health care who serves as139


a preceptor. Flexibility is possible in formulating the researchimmersion experience in either a 3 credit block or in 1 credit persemester experiences. The research residency course providesopportunity for doctoral students to immerse themselves directlyin research activities under the supervision of a research mentor foreach credit. Relevant research experiences include developing aresearch question and plan, writing a research proposal, preparingan IRB application, preparing for the conduct of research, datacoding and preparation, conducting human research, analyzingdata, publishing and disseminating research, and planning forfuture research.Students planning to enroll in the residency are interviewedto determine their research goals and objectives, analyze theirprofessional and educational backgrounds and experiences, andidentify an appropriate experience. Students will collaborate withfaculty and their preceptor to develop individualized objectivesbased on the course objectives of the Research Residency. Facultywill confer regularly with the students and the preceptors toplan experiences, monitor performance, and generally serve asa resource to students in the Residency. Students produce ascholarly, analytical paper integrating the analysis of (a) theoreticalmodel(s) with the experience.Health Policy Experience – 3 CreditsStudents in the doctoral program will be involved with leadershipdevelopment that includes a focus on health policy. In class,students will discuss the United States health care system andthe organizations and public/private policies that shape andinfluence it, which may lead to shape the research questions theyformulate in their program of study. As part of this experience,students will have an immersion opportunity to engage with policyorganizations that influence health policy at the national, state andlocal levels. This will include experiential learning in conjunctionwith an educational experience in Washington, D.C. with CatholicUniversity of America and with direct observation of high levelorganizational and government policy officials. This experience willbe planned and confirmed in the semester prior to the experience.Details will be discussed.Nursing - Ph.D.New York State Registered Program Code: 33576HEGIS Code: 1203.10 {Nursing-R.N. Required for Admission}Theory/Core (15 Credits Required):CreditsNUR 600 Hallmarks of Scholarly Inquiry 3NUR 601Ethics: The Foundation ofLeadership3NUR 602Nursing Concept AnalysisThrough the Humanities3NUR 603Scholarship of Health CareOrganization Policy3NUR 604Philosophical Evolution ofNursing Knowledge3Research Core (15 Credits Required):NUR 605 Qualitative Research Design 3NUR 606 Quantitative Research Design 3Complete either NUR 607 or NUR 608: 3NUR 607Advanced QualitativeAnalysis*orNUR 608Advanced QualitativeAnalysis*NUR 609 Research Residency 3NUR 610Hallmarks of Scholarly Designand Implications3Leadership (6 Credits Required):NUR 700Leadership Innovations andInterventions3NUR 701Nursing Education:Principles, Dynamics and3InnovationsCognates (6 Credits Required): 6--------Cognates Variable Credits(1-3)**Dissertation Seminar (3 Credits Required):NUR 800 Dissertation Seminar 3Total Credits Required: 45Dissertation Completion (6 credits minimum requiredbeyond 45 credits needed for the Ph.D. Program):Dissertation Progression(Continues eachNUR 801semester until defensedate)*Nursing Cognates may be repeated for up to 6 credits.Nursing Doctoral ProgramHandbookThe Molloy College Catalog provides basic initial informationabout the new doctoral program beginning in Fall 2010. A NursingDoctoral Program Handbook will be available for students enteringthe program. Additional information and policies, includingspecific details on progression will be covered in this handbook.Nursing programs are subject to being updated as necessary tomeet licensing and educational requirements of the state and tomaintain regional and national accreditations. It will be the doctoralstudent’s responsibility to adhere to the information in the NursingDoctoral Program Handbook as it is updated during the student’scourse of study. For the final word on any questions or concernsabout the program, the Director of the Doctoral Program shouldbe always be consulted.6140


Nursing DoctoralCourse DescriptionsNUR 600 HALLMARKS OF SCHOLARLY INQUIRYThis seminar introduces the doctoral student to the scholarlyprocess of dissertation research preparation. The focus includesstewardship, reflection, critique and creativity. Studentsdevelop connections between theory and research with anemphasis on problem identification as well as professional goaltrajectory focus. 3 creditsNUR 601 ETHICS: THE FOUNDATION OF LEADERSHIPThis course explores traditional and contemporary ethicalprinciples and core nursing values in order to develop complexanalytical skills within students. These skills are needed toaddress moral issues and dilemmas in health care researchand delivery as well as in the arenas of leadership, politics,scholarship and organizations. Advanced ethical theories andtheir applications and topics in the area of research ethics areaddressed. 3 creditsNUR 602 NURSING CONCEPT ANALYSIS THROUGH THEHUMANITIESAn exploration of concept analysis and its development throughthe humanities is the focus of this course. Certain phenomenaare of central concern to the nursing profession: hope, joy,wellness, grief, suffering and vulnerability. These concepts,and others, are analyzed through the mindful study of thehumanities: art, music, dance, poetry and literature. The uniqueyet integral role of the humanities in uncovering the meaning ofthe human experience is the central focus. Students investigatephenomena of concern and illuminate them through the studyof the humanities. Students develop theoretical connectionsand philosophical reflections for future theory construction. 3creditsNUR 603 SCHOLARSHIP OF HEALTH CAREORGANIZATION AND POLICYStudents explore the United States health care system and theorganizations and public and corporate policies that shape andinfluence it as a background for nursing leadership. Studentsexplore theories related to organizations, policy planning,implementation and evaluation. Complex health issues andtheir relationship to public policy are analyzed and synthesizedwith an emphasis on future trends. (Course includes combinedclass and experiential hours developed in conjunction with theCatholic University of America partnership in Washington, D.C.)Fee - To Be Determined. 3 creditsNUR 604 PHILOSOPHICAL EVOLUTION OF NURSINGKNOWLEDGEElements of philosophy of science are used as a guide toexploration of the evolution of nursing science. Nursing theoryconstruction is examined as a foundation for research. Theintegration of the roles of praxis, scholarship and stewardship ofthe profession is investigated, with an emphasis on generationof knowledge. Students evaluate theories that complementnursing, including theories related to development, sociallearning, behavior change and health promotion. Integratedcourse content assists students in development of thetheoretical basis of the dissertation. 3 creditsNUR 605 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNThis introductory, overview course examines qualitativeresearch methodologies, including ethnography, groundedtheory, historiography and phenomenology, as well as variousdesign aspects of qualitative nursing research. Studentsstudy published, qualitative, empirical research in nursing andrelated disciplines with emphasis on paradigm distinctions,theoretical perspectives, various research approaches, designsand methods, critique of research reports, and ethical issues inqualitative research. Learning experiences include fieldworkexercises in data collection, management and analysis thatlead to the development of a modified, qualitative researchproposal. Fee - To Be Determined. 3 creditsNUR 606 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNThis course examines the foundation of research design andmethodology used in scholarly scientific inquiry. Advancedquantitative research designs are critically analyzed, with anemphasis on correspondence between research questions andoptimal designs. Applicability of processes of inquiry to futureindependent endeavors is emphasized. Fee - To Be Determined.3 creditsNUR 607 ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE ANAYLSISThis course is designed to build upon the introductory coursesin statistics and research. It focuses on multivariate analytictechnique and analysis. Students analyze complex relationshipsamong multiple variables and synthesize factors contributingto an understanding of those relationships, including theapplication of advanced statistical methods. Studentsdemonstrate the ability to interpret the results of multivariateanalysis and apply such statistical analysis in the researchprocess. Prerequisites: NUR 606; Graduate level statistics course.Fee - To Be Determined. 3 creditsNUR 608 ADVANCED QUALITATIVE ANAYLYSISThis course explores advanced qualitative data analysismethods, including analysis of field notes and text, usingcomputerized and alternate techniques. Students analyze,critique and synthesize qualitative data using a variety ofcontemporary and evolving methods. Analytical strategiesare based on relationship to the research design and relatedto potential dissertation research questions. Prerequisite: NUR605. Fee - To Be Determined. 3 creditsNUR 609 RESEARCH RESIDENCYThe research residency course provides opportunity fordoctoral students to immerse themselves directly in researchactivities under the supervision of (multiple) research mentors.Relevant research experiences include developing a researchquestion and plan, writing a research proposal, preparing an IRBapplication, preparing for the conduct of research, data codingand preparation, conducting human research, analyzing data,141


publishing and disseminating research, and planning for futureresearch. Flexibility is possible in formulating the researchimmersion experience in either a 3 credit block or in 1 credit persemester experiences. 3 creditsNUR 610 HALLMARKS OF SCHOLARLY DESIGN ANDIMPLICATIONSThis seminar continues the process, begun in the Hallmarks ofScholarly Inquiry, of students’ deepening connections to theirdissertation research with an emphasis on scholarly design andproposal development. The context of the dissertation designand implementation is viewed within the issues pertinent tothe nursing profession. Exploration of these issues and theirimplications aid in the integration of the contribution of thestudents’ doctoral work to the nursing profession. 3 creditsNUR 699 ADVANCED DIRECTED STUDY TOPICSThis course can be designed to fulfill the cognate requirements.Open to students to pursue advanced focused readings ofsignificant relevance to the student’s dissertation area of study.Literature development, discussion and advanced applicationsof the study problem, health policy or methods are guided bya member of the faculty in the doctoral or graduate programs.Approval of advisor and the Director of the Doctoral Programrequired. Can be repeated for up to 6 credits. 1-3 creditsNUR 700 LEADERSHIP INNOVATIONS ANDINTERVENTIONSStudents in this course use analytical frameworks andtheories to examine the complex interaction of forcesshaping organizations. Elements of leadership such as culturalcompetence, strategic thinking, communication, economicplanning as well as consensus and coalition building areintegrated. Collaborative and trans-disciplinary facets ofleadership are explored. Students build on their previousanalytical endeavors to formulate organizational or policy goalsand objectives, and design, implement and evaluate programsthat contribute to health care. Vision and advocacy for qualityoutcomes are synthesized to contribute new knowledge to therole of nursing in health care. 3 creditsNUR 701 NURSING EDUCATION: PRINCIPLES,DYNAMICS AND INNOVATIONSStudents critically explore the evolution of educational practicein the context of political, philosophical, scientific and culturalforces. Pedagogical theories are analyzed and synthesized.Contemporary and evolving educational interventions areinvestigated as students in this course explore and critiquethe dynamics of higher education. Innovations in education,shifting paradigms, trans-disciplinary interface and themultiplicity of educational roles are explored. Informed by theunderlying theoretical framework of situated learning, thisexperience encourages students to explore complex scholarlyleadership within the context of an academic setting, healthcare organization or policy arena. Students build on previousanalytical endeavors as they design, implement and evaluateprograms that contribute to innovations in educationalprocesses. 3 creditsNUR 800 DISSERTATION SEMINARStudents who have completed the majority of their coursework and attained candidacy attend Dissertation Seminar.Dissertation seminar provides formal, collaborative opportunity,with faculty guidance, to critically examine assumptions, biasesand ideas relating to doctoral work in process. The seminarformat exposes the dissertation researcher to a diversity offeedback. Seminar students have the opportunity to refine theircritiquing skills as they examine their own work. 3 creditsNUR 801 DISSERTATION PROGRESSIONStudents enrolled in this course are in the active process ofconducting research under committee direction that willculminate in the dissertation. Students must be engaged with thechair of the dissertation committee to meet benchmarks relativeto course credit throughout the process. Upon completion ofcredits and until successful defense of the dissertation, studentscan remain actively enrolled via the continuous enrollmentfee to maintain continuous matriculation until completion ofall degree requirements. Grading is Pass/Fail. Course may berepeated as needed. 3-6 credits142


DivisionofSocialSciencesPrograms of Study143


Welcome to the Division of Social Sciences fromthe Dean of the DivisionWelcome to the Division of Social Sciences’ Graduate Programin Criminal Justice from the Division Dean!Terrorism. Rape. Murder. These are the plagues of ourtime. Consequently, there is a growing need for educated individualsto participate in battling these horrors. Obtaining anadvanced degree in Criminal Justice is an increasingly necessarymeans to that end. Criminal Justice, as one of the socialsciences, is interdisciplinary in nature. While many of ourstudents are already employed in careers in the criminal justicesystem as police officers, corrections officers, and privatesecurity personnel, those who have undergraduate degrees indisciplines such as psychology, sociology, political science, andeven in the humanities, nursing, and business, also are attractedto this burgeoning field.The Graduate Program in Criminal Justice at Molloy College prides itself on our excellent,dedicated faculty as well as the personal attention that we give to our students in order to tailortheir educational experience to their interests and career goals. We not only prepare you for professionalcareers, but we educate you to become well-rounded, compassionate individuals who areable to see the world from a broader perspective and to think about it in a critical, analytical way.Our program also provides a firm foundation in research, and internship opportunities are availablethat are tailored to students’ interests.Thank you for your interest in our program and it is my hope that in studying criminal justiceyou will help to make the world a better place.Kathleen Maurer Smith, Ph.D.Dean of the Division of Social Sciences144


Welcome to the Criminal Justice Program fromthe Associate Dean and DirectorOne only has to open a newspaper or watch the eveningnews to hear about criminal acts. Many students choose to majorin criminal justice in an attempt to address and understandthese deviant and often violent crimes.Criminal Justice practitioners and researchers need topossess the information, skills, and abilities that are developedthrough graduate education. In many criminal justice agencies,a graduate degree is essential when seeking an advancedposition.Graduate criminal justice study will not only help in securingemployment, but will also provide the knowledge andcritical thinking skills necessary to properly perform the oftencomplicated duties required of criminal justice agency personnel.The Program also provides the foundation necessary topursue doctoral study.The Master’s Program in Criminal Justice reinforces the strengths of Molloy College, particularlyits emphasis on ethical practice. Interactions between professor and student make Molloy’seducational experience one that is individualized, thus assisting students currently employed in thefield and those who aspire to work in the field.I wish you success in your studies. You are always welcome to contact me with any questionsyou may have.John A. Eterno, Ph.D.Associate Dean and Director of Criminal Justice145


Criminal JusticeProgramS108 Siena Hall516.678.5000, Ext. 6135John A. Eterno, Ph.D., Associate Dean and Director of CriminalJustice ProgramsAssociate Professors: John A. Eterno, Michael Santaniello,Christopher G. Sullivan, S. Vicki ToaleAdjunct Instructors: John Laffey, John P. McLaughlin, TheresaTobinPhilosophy of the CriminalJustice ProgramThe Master of Science program in Criminal Justice is founded onthe Mission of Molloy College. In particular, it reflects the College’scommitment to scholarly inquiry and respect for each individual’sworth and dignity. Building on Molloy’s Catholic and Dominicantradition, graduate studies expand knowledge and provide bothself-enrichment and the realization of personal and professionalgoals. Additionally, justice practitioners are prepared to meet thechallenges of today’s complex society.Goals of the Criminal JusticeProgramGraduates of the M.S. in Criminal Justice Program will:• Develop the ability to identify and critically evaluatecurrent criminal justice theories.• Demonstrate the ability to identify and explain theconcepts of judicial review and constitutional rights.• Demonstrate an understanding of the scientificmethod and the ability to critically evaluate currentcriminal justice research and policy.• Articulate ethical theories and apply those theories tospecific situations in the criminal justice system.• Develop an understanding of democratic principlesand how they apply to the criminal justice system.• Develop advanced written and oral communicationskills.Admissions Requirements -Criminal Justice ProgramThe applicant must possess an appropriate Baccalaureate Degreein the social sciences from an accredited college or university.Those who do not have an appropriate Baccalaureate degreewill be required to take undergraduate classes as a prerequisiteto admission. The required undergraduate-level classes will bedetermined by the Director after transcript evaluation and apersonal interview. Students applying to the Criminal Justice146Graduate Program should have some basic foundational classes incriminal justice, sociology, psychology and political science (at least30 credits). Applicants with a social science background and nofoundation in criminal justice must take CRJ 480, Survey of CriminalJustice, with permission from the Program Director to enter theprogram.Applicants must submit an official transcript of all undergraduateand graduate work.Only credit from institutions that are accredited by their regionalhigher education body will be accepted for transfer into theGraduate Criminal Justice Program. No more than six hours oftransfer credits are accepted at the Master’s degree level, andthe student must have attained a “B” or better in those classes.There are no waivers of credit. No academic credit is awarded bythe Criminal Justice Graduate Program for life experience or formilitary, police academy, or other professional training.Applicants must have a GPA of at least 3.0 for matriculation.However, applicants with less than a 3.0 GPA may be admitted atthe discretion of the Program Director on a probationary status.If the student cannot maintain a 3.0 for the first six (6) credits, thestudent will be dismissed from the Program.Applicants must submit at least three (3) letters of recommendation.Additionally, all applicants are required to participate in a personalinterview with the Program Director.The maximum time to complete the Master’s degree is five (5)years.Note: The Graduate Program in Criminal Justice reserves theright to make necessary changes in programs and courses inresponse to regulations received from the New York StateDepartment of Education or other certification bodies. Thesechanges will become effective according to dates specified bythe New York State Education Department or by a certificationbody. Students are responsible for adhering to all programrequirements.Progression through CriminalJustice ProgramTo progress in this Program, students must:• Complete all required coursework and prerequisites• Successfully complete a Master’s Thesis (either aresearch or policy project - see CRJ 599 for specificcriteria)• Complete program in five (5) yearsNOTE: M.S. degree requires 33 credits for graduation. Creditfor classes with grades below “B-” are not counted towarddegree requirements. Students must have a 3.0 to graduate.Program of Study leading to aM.S. Degree in Criminal JusticeMolloy College’s graduate program in Criminal Justice containsa 15-credit Core, which is required of all students. Students willcomplete the degree requirement by selecting from electivecourses which include: Criminal Justice Technology, Advanced


Research Methods, and Criminal Justice Internship. The CriminalJustice Master of Science degree will be awarded to studentswho complete the 33-credit requirement. Classes are offeredthroughout the year, including summer sessions.Criminal Justice - M.S.New York State Registered Program Code: 31635New York State Registered Program Code: 31634 (Dual BS/MS)HEGIS Code: 2105.00 {Police Law Enforcement and Corrections}Prerequisites:Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice:Total Credits Required: 33 creditsCore Courses (15 credits required):CreditsCRJ 501 Modern American Justice 3CRJ 502Constitutional Law and LegalIssues3CRJ 503Research Methods in CriminalJustice3CRJ 504Ethics and Morality in CriminalJustice3CRJ 599 Master’s Thesis Seminar 3Criminal Justice Electives (18 credits): 18CRJ 510 Violence in American Society *CRJ 511 Technology and Computers *CRJ 512Domestic and InternationalTerrorism*CRJ 513 Modern Law Enforcement *CRJ 514Survey of International JusticeSystems*CRJ 515Advanced Criminal JusticeInternship*CRJ 516Advanced Research Methodsand Statistics in Criminal*JusticeCRJ 517Ideology, Socioeconomics andPolitics of Crime and Terrorism*CRJ 518 Modern Correctional Systems *CRJ 590Advanced Topics in CriminalJustice*Total Credits Required: 33147


Graduate CriminalJustice CourseDescriptionsCRJ 480 SURVEY OF CRIMINAL JUSTICEThis course provides the non-criminal justice undergraduatestudent with an overview of criminal justice so that he/she can understand and participate in graduate-level work.Upon successful completion of this course, the student willbe permitted to enter the Criminal Justice Program with theknowledge and skill necessary to succeed. The student mustattain a “B” or better in this class in order to advance to graduatestudy. Prerequisite: Permission of the Director. This is not agraduate-level course. (Offered as needed) 3 undergraduatecreditsCRJ 501 MODERN AMERICAN JUSTICEThis course provides an overview of current American criminaljustice theories and practices. The focus of the class is ondeveloping an in-depth understanding of criminality and policywith respect to American justice. Particular emphasis will beplaced on practical applications. Current theoretical approachesto understanding American justice will be also studied. 3 creditsCRJ 502 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND LEGAL ISSUESThis course will critically examine constitutional and legal issueswhich are essential components of the modern criminal justicesystem of the United States. In recent decades, court casesand legislation have had a profound impact in shaping ourmodern criminal justice system. Examples of court cases andtheir progeny that will be examined include Miranda v. Arizona,Terry v. Ohio and Mapp v. Ohio among others. Theories on theJudiciary will also be examined such as the attitudinal modelversus the legal model of jurisprudence. 3 creditsCRJ 503 RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICEThis course provides the student with a graduate-levelintroduction to criminal justice research, statistics, andmethodologies. Criminal justice research keeps policy makersand social scientists informed of vital updates in the field.As such, research techniques and methods will be stronglyemphasized. Both qualitative and quantitative studies will becritically analyzed. In addition, the course will closely examinethe scientific method and how that method influences research.Prerequisites: Undergraduate statistics course or permission ofDirector. 3 creditsCRJ 504 ETHICS AND MORALITY IN CRIMINAL JUSTICEEthics and morality are incorporated into every aspect of criminaljustice. From the police officer patrolling the street to the paroleofficer checking in on his/her parolees, the role of ethics andmorality should not be underestimated. This course examinesreal-life ethical decisions that occur every day in the criminaljustice field. Using case studies and hypothetical scenarios, thestudent will be able to understand the complexities of criminaljustice ethics. 3 creditsCRJ 510 VIOLENCE IN AMERICAN SOCIETYViolence has become commonplace to Americans. One onlyhas to watch the evening news to be bombarded by imagesof murder, rape, robbery, assault, and other violent crimes.This course will explore why American society, in particular, isso violent. This course will examine this violence through casestudies including: workplace violence, relationship violence,child abuse, organizational violence, school violence, gangviolence, militia violence, serial killers, and other types ofviolence. Prerequisites: CRJ 501 and CRJ 503, or permission ofDirector. 3 creditsCRJ 511 CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND TECHNOLOGYTechnology has revolutionized the field of criminal justice.From policing to after-the-fact crime analysis, the use oftechnology has greatly advanced the war on crime. Somehands-on examples of these techniques will be demonstrated:DNA fingerprinting, photographic imaging, bomb detection,and other developments in technology will be covered.Additionally, technology has also created severe problems forlaw enforcement. The availability of information to constructWeapons of Mass Destruction or even fairly destructive bombsare now commonplace. Also, criminals have the ability tocommit crime trans-nationally using computers. Such problemsfor law enforcement will be closely examined. Prerequisites:CRJ 501 and CRJ 503, or permission of Director. 3 creditsCRJ 512 DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL TERRORISMThis course provides an overview of terrorism with a focuson the United States. It will examine the history, the threat ofterrorism on U.S. soil, efforts by American officials at identifyingpriorities and solutions, future threats, and the impact onsociety. Prerequisites: CRJ 501 and CRJ 503, or permission ofDirector. 3 creditsCRJ 513 MODERN LAW ENFORCEMENTThis course provides a thorough survey of modern lawenforcement agencies and practices and how these aspectshave evolved over time. Topics which will be covered includethe professionalization of police officers, community policing,broken windows, Compstat, and how these influence lawenforcement administration and procedure. Prerequisites: CRJ501 or permission of Director. 3 creditsCRJ 514 SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE SYSTEMSThis course will survey various justice systems throughoutthe world. It will focus on a wide variety of countries: India,Brazil, China, Nigeria, Russia, United States, and others. Eachcountry’s system will be explored and evaluated. Specific issuesregarding each country will be addressed. For example, theRussian Federation, as a new democracy, is dealing with manyproblems, especially but not exclusively, corruption. Theseissues will be closely examined country by country. Additionally,the interconnections between countries and the handling oftransnational crime will be addressed. Prerequisites: CRJ 501and CRJ 503, or permission of Director. 3 credits148


CRJ 515 ADVANCED CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIPThis course provides the student the opportunity to intern in acriminal justice agency. This course will give the student real-lifeexperience in the field. The student will spend a minimum of150 hours interning with a criminal justice agency performingsupervised fieldwork. As such, the student will learn throughobservation and some participation. Additionally, the studentwill be responsible for keeping a logbook detailing sessions.This class is designed for those who are not criminal justicepractitioners. Prerequisites: CRJ 501 or permission of Director. 3creditsCRJ 516 ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS ANDSTATISTICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICEThis course provides an in-depth study of advanced criminaljustice research methods. The topics covered include the use ofmultivariate statistics as well as additional advanced methods.The student will then use these advanced methods in writinghis/her own research paper. The importance of scientificresearch in criminal justice will be stressed. Additionally,proficient understanding of the role of scholarly journals andidentification of criminal justice journals will be covered. Thecourse is designed for students who intend on producing theirown research and perhaps advancing to the doctorate level ofstudy. Prerequisites: CRJ 501, CRJ 503 and an undergraduatestatistics course, or permission of DIrector. 3 creditsand professional research. Prerequisites: CRJ 501 or permissionof Director. 3 creditsCRJ 599 MASTER’S THESIS SEMINARThis is a capstone course in which the student is assisted incompleting the thesis requirement. Students will either conductindependent research or complete an independent policyproject. In consultation with a faculty member, the student willidentify an appropriate topic for research/policy change in thefield of Criminal Justice, put the topic/policy selected in theform of a research question or questions, prepare an annotatedbibliography of relevant research using scientific journal articlesand/or law journals, select appropriate research methods/evaluative methods suitable to completing a thesis/policychange, and submit a comprehensive research/policy changeplan in the form of a Thesis Proposal. Those doing research willcomplete their research as a requirement for the class. Thosedoing a policy change will, to the extent possible, implementthe change and evaluate. Both the research and policy projectrequire a paper to be completed. Students will demonstratetheir projects orally to class. This is a rigorous thesis that mustreflect advanced graduate knowledge, skills and abilities toconduct independent work. 3 creditsCRJ 517 IDEOLOGY, SOCIOECONOMICS AND POLITICSOF CRIME AND TERRORISMThe role that ideology and socioeconomic factors play in crimeand punishment are enormous in American society. This coursewill analyze how the topic of crime traditionally has been usedby politicians seeking public support. The influences that socialand economic factors have on criminal behaviors and criminaljustice reactions also will be investigated. Additionally, thiscourse will focus on how terrorism is used as an ideologicaland political pawn, and how this “use” of crime and terrorismis received by the public when these political promises fail.Prerequisites: CRJ 501 or permission of Director. 3 creditsCRJ 518 MODERN CORRECTIONAL SYSTEMSIn American society, reliance on formal social controlmechanisms to restrict unwanted behaviors is exceptional.The United States has one of the most populous criminaljustice systems in the world. Students will be exposed totheoretical reasons as to why this is so. Additionally, there aremany strategies employed by Correctional agencies to changebehaviors. This course will develop an in-depth understandingof these strategies. It will include study of both traditional andnon-traditional methods. Emphasis will be placed on evaluatingand critiquing these strategies using scientific studies.Prerequisites: CRJ 501 or permission of Director. 3 creditsCRJ 590 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICEThis course will feature a rotating set of topics that arecontinually updated each semester to reflect the ever-changingand evolving field of criminal justice. These topics are notdiscussed in any other criminal justice graduate course currentlyoffered in the program. Discussion of the topic will include anin-depth analysis which features the use of scholarly journals149


Graduate Program inSocial WorkThe Fordham University Graduate School of Social Service atMolloy CollegeC 014 Casey Center516.678.5000, Ext. 6597jmckinnon@molloy.eduJennifer S. McKinnon, LCSW, Program DirectorElaine Congress, DSW, Associate Dean of Extra Mural ProgramsFUGSSSLois A. Carey, Ph.D., Chairperson, Molloy College Department ofSocial WorkFull-Time Molloy College Faculty: Susan Bliss, Ph.D., Lois A. Carey,Ph.D.Full-Time Fordham University Faculty: Shirley Gatenio-Gabel,Ph.D.Part-Time Faculty on Molloy College Campus: Melissa A. Firmes,MSW, Claudia Rotondo, LCSW, Amandia Speakes-Lewis, Ph.D., AlanStein, LMSWMissionThe mission of the Fordham University Graduate School of SocialService is to prepare advanced social work practitioners who arecommitted to the profession’s goals, values and ethical standards;are able to provide quality services that promote the well-beingof individuals, families, groups, and communities; can effectivelyreach and serve the most vulnerable populations, particularly inthe metropolitan region; and are committed to working toward ajust, equitable and caring society, free from violence, oppressionand discrimination.Goals of the MSW ProgramThe school aims to prepare graduates with the MSW degree whocan:• Demonstrate in their practice an understanding that thepurpose of social work is to strengthen the capacitiesof individuals, families, groups, and communities asthey strive to meet their needs and maintain their wellbeing;• Demonstrate an understanding of the social workprofession, defined by its mission and history;• Apply the knowledge and skills necessary to practicewith a high degree of autonomy in their chosen area ofconcentration;• Integrate and apply in their practice a foundationof knowledge of generalist social work practice,social welfare policy, human behavior and the socialenvironment, diversity and oppression;• Assess needs of and provide appropriate services todiverse populations and to client systems of varyingsizes in different organizational settings;• Apply critical-thinking skills in the selection and useof a wide range of theories, methodologies, andintervention strategies for practice;• Incorporate in their work an awareness and respectfor diversity; and an understanding of how diversityaffects their clients, their own practice, and thecommunities and organizations in which both clientsand professionals interact;• Demonstrate that the social work profession’s valuesand ethical standards guide their professional behavior;• Understand the dynamics and consequences ofinequity, injustice, and oppression in society, and becommitted to working toward a just and equitablesociety;• Influence the programs, organizations, and policies thatimpact upon the lives of their clients, especially thosepopulations most vulnerable and at special risk, andadvocate for resources and initiatives that can changetheir clients’ situations;• Use research findings and multiple research methodsin their practice, especially as they evaluate theirinterventions, outcomes and the services they provide;• Demonstrate a beginning ability to further thedevelopment and dissemination of knowledge relevantto social work practice; and• Recognize the need for ongoing professionaldevelopment, self-reflection, continuous learning andcontinuing education.Admissions Requirements -MSW Programs• Applications may be submitted by mail or in person tothe Fordham University School of Social Service Officeof Admissions, Lincoln Center. The application packagemay be obtained in the Social Work Department atMolloy College or downloaded from the FordhamUniversity website at www.fordham.edu/gss.• Applicants must have earned the baccalaureate degree,with liberal art content, from a regionally accreditedcollege. It is expected that an undergraduate gradepoint average (GPA) of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scalewill have been achieved, although this is not a rigidrequirement. Since an applicant may have had asuccessful experience in social work practice, or mayhave demonstrated a capacity for graduate work byvirtue of study in other areas related to social work,the GPA is reviewed within the context of the totalapplication.The following forms and supporting materials are required:150


• The application form• An autobiographical statement (An outline is providedfor the statement.)• Transcripts from all undergraduate and graduateschools attended. Undergraduate transcripts that totalfewer than 20 credits are not required.• Three letters of reference. These references canrepresent a number of areas of interest for the applicant.Some examples of qualified references would beemployers, community leaders, teachers, or supervisorsof volunteer activities. These references may be sentdirectly to the Office of Admissions, or enclosed in theapplication package.• A $60 application fee.Tips for Application to FUGSS at Molloy College• Contact the Fordham/Molloy Graduate Social WorkProgram Director on the Molloy Campus 516. 678.5000,Ext. 6957 to arrange an initial meeting regarding theapplication process.• Flexible plans of study• Classes at suburban Molloy Campus• Stress Free Fordham/Molloy Transportation to LincolnCenter CampusExceptions to the Basic Requirements• Applicants with a B.S.W. degree from Molloy Collegemay apply for advanced standing. These applicantsmust submit a copy of their interim or final fieldworkevaluation of their undergraduate social workinternship.• Applicants applying for status as transfer students mustsubmit a copy of their final fieldwork evaluation fortheir foundation internship in their accredited M.S.W.program at another school. Additionally, one of theapplicant’s letters of recommendation must be fromthe faculty advisor, and should include a review of theapplicant’s academic and field achievements, as well asspecific recommendation for continuing M.S.W. studiesat another institution.• Applicants for the Experienced and Employed SocialService Practitioner program will receive a form for theiremployers to complete in making the commitment tothe EESSP placement arrangements.Note: All applicants will be notified by Fordham University thattheir application has been received. Applicants should contact theGraduate School of Social Service Office of Admissions to determinethe status of their application six weeks subsequent to receiptof this (in compliance with the accreditation standards ofCSWE, Mission States Commission on Higher Education, NYState Department of Education) notice. Each application will bereviewed by the admissions committee when all required materialshave been received and the applicant will be notified as to thedecision of the committee.The MSW degree is granted by Fordham University.(in compliance with the accreditation standards of CSWE, MissionStates Commissions on Higher Education, NY State Department ofEducation)Programs of Study for MSWProgramThe school attempts, without departing from the standards thatmust be met, to provide a sound professional education to assist thestudent in attaining the degree despite work or family obligationsthat may limit the time available to pursue educational goals.Students may attend the program full-time over two academicyears or extend their studies and complete the program in three orfour years. Students are encouraged to consider the demands offamily and career before selecting a plan of study.With two exceptions, the minimum time required to secure thedegree is two years and the maximum is four years after admission.The two exceptions are: (1) for selected persons who have abachelor’s degree in social work from a school accredited by theCouncil on Social Work Education and who may be admitted tothe one year Advanced Standing program, and (2) for personswho have completed their foundation requirements at anotheraccredited school of social workAdvanced Standing Plan of Study (Full or Part Time)Fall SemesterSpring SemesterAt Rockville Centre:At Rockville Centre:SWGS 6413Clinical Practice IAt Rockville Centre:SWGS 6430Advanced Clinical Assessmentand DiagnosisAt Lincoln Center:SWGS 6007Social Policy Analysis,Advocacy and PracticeAt Lincoln Center:ElectiveSWGS 6414Clinical Practice IIAt Rockville Centre:SWGS 6415Clinical PracticeAt Lincoln Center:ElectiveAt Lincoln Center:ElectiveLong Island Placement: Long Island Placement:SWGS 6902Field Work IISWGS 6902Field Work IITwo, Three or Four Year Plan of StudyFall SemesterSpring SemesterAt Lincoln Center:At Lincoln Center:SWGS 6208Human Behavior and theSocial Environment ISWGS 6209Human Behavior and theSocial Environment II151


At Lincoln Center:SWGS 6801Social Work Practice inResearch IAt Lincoln Center:SWGS 6802Social Work Practice inResearch IISecond Academic YearFall SemesterAt Rockville Centre:SWGS 6413Clinical Practice ISpring SemesterAt Rockville Centre:SWGS 6414Clinical Practice IIAt Rockville Centre:SWGS 6319Social Justice-Practicewith Organizations andCommunitiesAt Rockville Centre:SWGS 6006Social Welfare Policy andServicesAt Rockville CentreSWGS 6430Advanced Clinical Assessmentand DiagnosisAt Rockville CentreSWGS 6415Clinical Practice SeminarAt Rockville Centre:SWGS 6321Generalist Social Work Practicewith Individuals, Families andGroups IAt Rockville Centre:SWGS 6322Generalist Social Work Practicewith Individuals, Families andGroups IIAt Lincoln CenterSWGS 6007Social Policy Analysis,Advocacy and PracticeAt Lincoln CenterElectiveLong Island Placement:SWGS 6901Field Work ILong Island Placement:SWGS 6901 Field Work IAt Lincoln Center:ElectiveAt Lincoln Center:ElectiveLong Island PlacementSWGS 6902Field Work IILong Island PlacementSWGS 6902Field Work II152


Board of TrusteesDaniel T. Henry, M.B.A.ChairpersonDrew Bogner, Ph.D.PresidentTrusteesJohn T. AhernTheresa P. Ahlstrom, B.S., C.P.A.Ann Barlow, M.B.A.S. Marilyn A. Breen, O.P., M.S.Daniel W. Bythewood, D.D.S., P.C.Laura A. Cassell, B.S., C.P.A.John F. Coghlan, M.S.Edward L. Donnelly, Jr., B.S., M.P.A.Jeffrey H. Greenfield, B.S.S. Mary Hughes, O.P., Ed.D.Gerald Kaiser, J.D.William K. Lloyd, Ph.D.Welquis Ray Lopez, M.A.S. Kathleen McCarthy, O.P., M.A.Daniel T. McGowan, M.S.Rev. John McGuire, O.P., S.T.L., S.T.D.Daniel L. Murphy, M.B.A.S. Margaret Murphy, O.P., D.Min.Most Rev. William Francis Murphy, D.D., S.T.D.Charles M. Piluso, M.A., M.B.A.John Pohlman, M.B.A.Kathleen Sideli, Ph.D.S. Kathleen Sullivan, O.P., M.A.Lisa Tepper, B.S.Chair EmeritiJames F. Campbell, A.S.Paul H. Durnan, B.S.Trustees EmeritiJohn G. Aicher, Esq.Bruno Baratta, Esq.Francis E. DarcyS. Loretta M. Devoy, O.P., Ph.D.Charles Macdonald GraceA. Patricia McCarthyDaniel D. McCarthyJohn E. SchaeferMary Ann C. Tuttle, B.S.President EmeritaS. Janet A. Fitzgerald, O.P., Ph.D.PRESIDENT’S ADVISORY BOARD ON MULTI-CULTURALCONCERNSCharlotte L. Allen, L.C.S.W.Michael Battle, B.A.Michelle Chamblin, Ed.D.Mary F. Claybon-Watson, Ph.D.Laura Shea Doolan, Ed.D.Leonardo A. FernandezS. Dorothy A. Fitzgibbons, O.P., Ed.D.Maryse Emmanuel Garcy, L.M.S.W.Andrea Honigsfeld, Ed.D.Wayne F. James, D.A.Peggy Kerolle, B.A.Hon. Welquis Ray Lopez, M.A.Patricia Mason, Ed.DBarbara McFadden, R.N., B.S..Harmon P. Mercer, M.S.Lisa Miller, M.S.Lisa Zakiya Newland, Ph.D., LCSWAngeles Placer, Ph.D.Elaine Polan, RNC, M.S., Ph.D.Deacon Manuel J. Ramos, HLD, PD, MAAllen Rauch, Ed.D.Hattie R. Norman Robertson, R.N., M.A.Max Rodriguez, B.S.Robin Thompson, M.B.A.Luis Valenzuela, Ph.D.Darcel Whitten-Wilamowski153


Offices of AdministrationOffice of the PresidentPRESIDENTDrew Bogner, Ph.D.PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.S. Biology, B.S. History, Kansas Newman College; M.S., Ph.D.,University of KansasASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENTDiane K. FornieriA.A., Molloy CollegeOffice of Academic AffairsVICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRSDEAN OF FACULTYValerie Hawkes CollinsASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Molloy College; M.A., Ph.D., New York UniversityASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRSMargaret C. Kavanagh, O.P.ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF COMMUNICATION ARTSB.A., Molloy College; M.A., Saint Joseph Seminary; M.A.,New York University; Ed.D., Columbia UniversityDIRECTOR OF INSTITUTE OF INTERFAITHDIALOGUEAND MOLLOY INSTITUTE FOR LIFELONGLEARNING (MILL)Marion W. LowenthalB.B.A., Northwestern University; M.A., AdelphiUniversity; Brookdale Post-Master’s Certificate inGerontological StudiesDIRECTOR OF OFFICE OF INTERNATIONALEDUCATIONKathleen RebaADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ARTB.F.A., New York Institute of Technology; M.F.A.,School of Visual ArtsASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICESDolores ParryB.S., M.B.A., C.W.Post; M.S.Ed., L.I.U. BrentwoodASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ASSESSMENTKathleen E. BeltonPROFESSOR OF BIOLOGYB.S., Molloy College; M.S., Ph.D., Fordham UniversityASSOCIATE DEAN FOR UNDERGRADUATECURRICULUMLillian Bozak-DeLeoPROFESSOR OF THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIESB.S., Marquette University; M.S., New York University; Ph.D.,Marquette UniversityDIRECTOR OF FRESHMAN LEARNINGCOMMUNITIESKathleen ConwayASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ENGLISHB.A., College of New Rochelle; M.A., New YorkUniversity; D.A., St. John’s UniversitySERVICE-LEARNING COORDINATORMadeline GunnB.A., Molloy College; M.S.W., Fordham University;Ph.D., SUNY at StonybrookDIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES / TRiOPROGRAMNicolette CeoASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Hunter College; M.A., New York University; M.S., C.W.Post, L.I.U.COORDINATOR OF THE WRITING RESOURCECENTERRichard KileyADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ENGLISHB.A., Catholic University of America; M.A., RivierCollegePROFESSIONAL TUTORValerie GriggsADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF ENGLISHB.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.F.A.,Brooklyn College; M.A., FordhamUniversityPROFESSIONAL TUTORMary Ann HowellADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF ENGLISHB.A., Adelphi University; M.A., C.W. Post,L.I.U.PROFESSIONAL TUTORPamela SmithADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF ENGLISHB.A., Molloy College; M.S., QueensCollegeCOORDINATOR OF DISABILITY SUPPORTSERVICES /SUCCESS THROUGH EXPANDED EDUCATIONPROGRAMCari Rose-TomoB.S., University of Virginia; M.S., Brooklyn CollegeASSISTANT COORDINATOR OFDISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES /SUCCESS THROUGH EXPANDEDEDUCATION PROGRAMKerri-Ann McGuckinB.A., Iona College; M.S., Molloy CollegeCOORDINATOR OF ACADEMIC ENRICHMENTPROGRAM-AcEKimberly HavensB.A., York College, CUNY; M.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.154


DIRECTOR OF FACULTY PROFESSIONAL CENTERMary Pat Neylon, O.P.ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIESAND COMMUNICATION ARTSB.A., Molloy College; M.A., Adelphi University; Ed.D., NovaSoutheastern UniversityEDUCATION TECHNOLOGY SPECIALISTS. Rita Vanson, C.I.J.ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., SUNY at Stony Brook; M.S., St. Louis UniversityDEAN OF CONTINUING EDUCATION ANDPROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTLouis CinoB.A., MPA, Long Island UniversityASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF CONTINUINGEDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTAnn McTigueB.A., Southampton College, L.I.U.ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF CONTINUINGEDUCATION-NURSINGAnna JanssonB.S., M.S., Molloy CollegeASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF OFF-CAMPUSPROGRAMSSalvatore RizzoB.S., New York Institute of Technology; M.S., St.John’s UniversityDIRECTOR OF CENTER FOR SOCIAL AND ETHICALCONCERNSStephan MayoPROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHYA.B., St. Michael’s College; M.A., Ph.D., Fordham UniversityDIRECTOR OF SIENA WOMEN’S CENTERCheryl CamenzuliASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGYB.S., Long Island University; M.A., Ph.D., FordhamUniversityDIRECTOR OF LIBRARYRobert D. MartinB.A., St. Francis Xavier University; M.L.I.S., University ofWestern OntarioASSISTANT DIRECTORPatricia G. SullivanB.S., M.A., M.L.S., St. John’s UniversityREFERENCE LIBRARIANWenhui ChenB.A., Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taiwan; M.L.S., St.John’s UniversityREFERENCE LIBRARIANNorman A. WeilB.A., Queens College; M.A., Brooklyn College; M.L.S.,Queens CollegeMULTI-MEDIA LIBRARIANCori MillerB.A., Hofstra University; M.L.S., Queens CollegeASSOCIATE LIBRARIANREFERENCE SERVICES, NURSING AND ALLIEDHEALTHTheresa RienzoB.S.N., Adelphi University; M.S., St. Joseph’s College;M.L.I.S, L.I.U.ELECTRONIC RESOURCES LIBRARIAN/WEBMASTERJudith Brink-DrescherB.A., C.W. Post, L.I.U.; M.B.A., Dowling College;M.L.I.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.Office of AdvancementVICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENTEdward J. ThompsonB.A., College of the Holy Cross; J.D., St. John’s UniversityDIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONSKen YoungB.S., Auburn University; M.B.A., University of AlabamaASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONSJacquelyn RathB.S., SUNY at GeneseoGRAPHIC ARTISTFrancis BonnetB.A., Fashion Institute of TechnologyDIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENTCatherine Tully MuscenteB.A., Molloy College; M.B.A., Molloy CollegeALUMNI DEVELOPMENT OFFICERMarion Flomenhaft, Ph.D.B.A., St. John’s University; M.S., Fordham University;Ph.D. New York UniversitySENIOR DEVELOPMENT OFFICER FORCORPORATE AFFAIRSCynthia MetzgerA.A.S., Fashion Institute of Technology; B.A., MolloyCollegeSENIOR GRANTS OFFICERSherry RadowitzB.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., University of NorthernColorado; Ph.D., Union Institute and UniversityDEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE - ANNUAL FUNDRegina GorneyB.A., Molloy CollegeDEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE - ALUMNI EVENTSMary ScanioA.A., Molloy College155


SUSTAINABILITY INSTITUTEEXECUTIVE DIRECTORNeal Lewis, Esq.B.A., SUNY at New Paltz; J.D., CUNY at Queens CollegePROGRAM COORDINATORElisabeth Fiteni, MSELB.A., Connecticut College; M.S. Vermont Law SchoolRESEARCH COORDINATORAndrew ManittB.A., SUNY at BuffaloCOMMUNICATIONS COORDINATORDemosthenes MaratosB.A., B.S., St. John’s UniversityTHE ENERGEIA PARTNERSHIPThe Academy for Regional StewardshipEXECUTIVE DIRECTORPaul TonnaB.A., New York University; M.A., Immaculate ConceptionSeminaryDIRECTORNancy EngelhardtB.A., SUNY at CortlandOffice of EnrollmentManagementVICE PRESIDENT FOR ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENTLinda Finley AlbaneseB.A., Molloy College; M.A., C.W. Post, L.I.U.ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ENROLLMENTMANAGEMENTKrista LombardoB.A., Hofstra University; M.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONSMarguerite LaneB.A., Hunter CollegeALBERTUS MAGNUS COUNSELORJoanne SnappB.S., M.A., Northwest Missouri StateUniversityASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONSJoanna ForgioneB.A., Molloy CollegeASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF GRADUATEADMISSIONSAlina R. HaitzB.A., Pennsylvania State UniversitySENIOR ADMISSIONS COUNSELORKimberly VerelineB.A., Iona CollegeSENIOR ADMISSIONS COUNSELORMichael BattleB.A., SUNY at AlbanySENIOR ADMISSIONS COUNSELORBrendan T. DrogeB.A., Iona College; M.B.A., Molloy CollegeADMISSIONS COUNSELORJaclyn MachowiczB.A., Quinnipiac CollegeDIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL AIDAna C. LockwardB.B.A., Baruch College; M.S., Lehman CollegeSENIOR ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL AIDKathleen ShevlinA.A., B.A., Molloy CollegeASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL AIDRuth Pavon-RamosB.S., Dowling College; M.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.FINANCIAL AID COUNSELOR/COLLEGE WORK-STUDY COORDINATORPatricia E. McClintockB.S., St. John’s UniversityFINANCIAL AID COUNSELORGene RogersB.A., M.S., New York Institute of TechnologyREGISTRARSue FortmanB.A., M.A., University of California/BerkeleySENIOR ASSOCIATE REGISTRARMary C. ZinkB.A., Molloy CollegeASSOCIATE REGISTRARMary B. UlicnyB.A., Molloy CollegeASSOCIATE REGISTRARBethel AngawB.S., DeVry Institute of TechnologyASSISTANT REGISTRARJean KuehnA.S., Nassau Community CollegeDIRECTOR OF STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICESSharion ScottB.S., St. Joseph’s College; M.B.A., Molloy CollegeASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF STUDENT FINANCIALSERVICESKenesha HarrisB.A., University of California/Santa Cruz; M.B.A.,Molloy CollegeDIRECTOR OF ST. THOMAS AQUINAS PROGRAMPamela J. BranhamB.S., St. John’s University156


ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ST. THOMAS AQUINASPROGRAMRebecca WestB.S., Morgan State UniversityPROGRAM COUNSELOR OF ST. THOMASAQUINAS PROGRAMOffice for MissionVICE PRESIDENT FOR MISSIONS. Dorothy Anne Fitzgibbons, O.P.B.S. Ed., St. John’s University; M.S. Ed., Boston College, M.A.,Seminary of the Immaculate Conception; Ed.D., ColumbiaUniversityCHAPLAINRev. Gabriel MuteruB.A., Urbanian University, Rome; M.A., Fordham University;Ph.D., New School of Social ResearchDIRECTOR OF CAMPUS MINISTRIESScott SalvatoB.A., St. Bonaventure University; M.A., St. John’s UniversityASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF CAMPUS MINISTRIESDiane L. Capuano, O.P.B.S., Hebert H. Lehman College; M.S., St. John’sUniversity; P.D., Pastoral Counseling, FordhamUniversityARCHIVIST AND COORDINATOR OF COLLEGE RECORDSLarissa D. WooB.A., Hunter College; M.S., M.S.L.I.S., Pratt InstituteOffice of Planning, Research andTechnologyVICE PRESIDENT FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY,PLANNING AND RESEARCHRobert PatersonADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRYAND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIESB.S., University of Miami at Coral Gables; M.S., Central MichiganUniversity; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and StateUniversityDIRECTOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGYVincent F. VenturaA.A., Queensborough Community CollegeIT OPERATIONS MANAGERMichael AlesiB.S., M.A., Molloy CollegeHELPDESK SUPERVISORKevin QuiambaoB.A., Sacred Heart University; M.B.A.,Molloy CollegeACTING ASSISTANT NETWORKMANAGEREdwin PalaciosA+, IT CertifiedPROGRAMMERAmos ChungB.S., Aletheia University, Taiwan; M.S., New YorkInstitute of TechnologyDATABASE ADMINISTRATORJean GlaserB.A., Molloy CollegeJENZABAR/SOFTWARE SPECIALISTMichael OlivoB.S., M.B.A., Molloy CollegeDIRECTOR OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCHMichael TorresB.A., SUNY at Geneseo; M.A., Hofstra UniversityMANAGER OF WEB TECHNOLOGIESLisa GalellaB.A., Molloy College; Webmaster Certificate, Penn State;Certified Internet Webmaster (CIW) ProfessionalWEB CONTENT EDITORKarenlyn BaroneA.A., Nassau Community CollegeNETWORK MANAGERSean LaurieNovell CNE; MCP, CCNAASSOCIATE NETWORK MANAGERDominick RussellNovell Master CNE; A+ CertifiedDIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC COMPUTER LABSMarlon FolkesB.A., Molloy CollegeNIGHT MANAGER OF ACADEMIC COMPUTERLABSStephen LewisB.S., CIS, Molloy CollegeDIRECTOR OF MEDIA SERVICESNick SimoneB.A., C.W. Post, L.I.U.MEDIA SERVICES OPERATIONS COORDINATORAzad KhanAV Tech Certificates, Extron SchoolMEDIA SERVICES SYSTEMS SPECIALISTImraan KhanB.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.; ACSP; CTS CertifiedMEDIA SERVICES ASSISTANT COORDINATORTimothy GaussB.S., Ithaca College157


Office of Student AffairsVICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRSRobert C. HoulihanADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND PHYSICALEDUCATIONB.S., New York Institute of Technology; M.S., M.S., Brooklyn, L.I.U.158DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICSSusan Cassidy-LykeB.A., Molloy College; M.A., John Jay CollegeASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICSJason TrufantB.A., SUNY at Albany; M.S., Frostburg StateUniversityASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS/COMPLIANCE OFFICERMichael GrassoB.A., Molloy College; M.A., Adelphi UniversitySPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTORIan SchraierB.F.A., C.W. Post, L.I.U.ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS FORSPORTS MEDICINEJames ZegersB.S., Molloy College; M.A., Adelphi UniversityASSISTANT ATHLETIC TRAINERKimberly PasseroB.S., MHSc, Nova Southeastern UniversityASSISTANT ATHLETIC TRAINEREric RessengerTBAASSISTANT TO THE DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICSCollen GuarneiriB.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.DIRECTOR OF CAMPUS LIFEStephen OstendorffB.A., Clark University; M.S. Ed., St. John’s UniversityASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF CAMPUS LIFEJohn FarleyA.S., Nassau Community CollegeCOORDINATOR OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONSCody SnappB.S., Northwest Missouri UniversityDIRECTOR OF CAMPUS SAFETYASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF CAMPUS SAFETYJohn AmodeoM.A., St. John’s UniversityDIRECTOR OF HEALTH SERVICESDIRECTOR OF NURSING LABSusan SalvoB.A., Adelphi University; B.S., M.S., Molloy CollegeNURSING CENTER NURSE ANDNURSING LAB INSTRUCTORAnita DaLeoB.S., Molloy CollegeDIRECTOR OF CAREER SERVICESJune HintonB.A., Long Island University; M.S., Syracuse University; P.D.,Hofstra University; M.S.W., Fordham UniversityCAREER SERVICES SPECIALISTBetty MorrB.A., Hofstra UniversityDIRECTOR OF PERSONAL COUNSELINGCarrie Sollin, L.M.H.C.B.A., M.A., Marist CollegeOffice of the TreasurerVICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE AND TREASURERMichael A. McGovernB.S., Athens State UniversityASSISTANT TREASURERAnthony J. PerfettiB.S., St. John’s University; M.B.A., Adelphi University; C.P.A.,New York StateACCOUNTING MANAGERAndrea RobertsonB.A., Florida State UniversityDIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCESLisa MillerB.A., Bucknell University; M.S., Cornell UniversityBENEFITS ADMINISTRATORPeggy A. HughesA.A.S., Nassau Community College; B.A., MolloyCollegeDIRECTOR OF PURCHASING AND ADMINISTRATIVESERVICESLorraine JacksonPURCHASING MANAGERPeggy SaluteDIRECTOR OF FACILITIESJames MultariASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FACILITIESJoseph J. BarberaA.A.S., SUNY, Farmingdale; B.S., New York Instituteof TechnologyMAINTENANCE FOREMANSal DeStefanoSPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATORLouis CaponeA.A.S., Nassau Community College; B.A., B.A., MolloyCollege


Professors EmeritiLEONORE LOEB ADLERPROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., Queens College CUNY; Ph.D., Adelphi UniversityMARIA BOUZON-SILVAPROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., St. Mary’s College; M.S., Hofstra University; D.A., SUNY atStony BrookS. M. JANICE BUETTNER, O.P.PROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., St. John’s University; M.S., New York University; Ph.D., St.John’s UniversityJOHN J. CLANCY, JR.PROFESSOR EMERITUSB.S., M.A., Columbia University; M.A., Johns Hopkins University;Ph.D., St. John’s UniversityMARY JOAN COLLISONPROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., St. Joseph’s College; M.S., Ph.D., New York UniversityDONALD S. CORNELIUSPROFESSOR EMERITUSB.A., Susquehanna University; M.Div., Lutheran TheologicalSeminary; M.A.,Yale University; M.S.W., Adelphi University; D.S.W., CUNY, NYS. JEAN DOMINICI DeMARIA, O.P.PROFESSOR OF EMERITAB.S., St. John’s University; M.S., SUNY at Buffalo; M.A., C.W. Post,L.I.U.; Ph.D., New York UniversityS. CATHERINE M. DULLEA, O.P.PROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., M.A., St. John’s University; Ph.D., Ball State UniversityKAREN ANN EDWARDSPROFESSOR EMERITAB.B.A., Hofstra University; M.A., SUNY at Stony Brook; Ed.D.,Hofstra UniversityS. JANET A. FITZGERALD, O.P.PRESIDENT EMERITAPROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., St. John’s UniversityMARY THERESA FITZPATRICKPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., M.S., Ph.D., Fordham UniversityJAMES FONSECAPROFESSOR EMERITUSB.A., St. John’s University; M.A., Hunter CollegeCAROLE M. GERRITYPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., Molloy College; M.S., Fordham UniversityJANE GILROYPROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., Molloy College; M.A., Hofstra University; Ph.D., FordhamUniversityJOAN KENNYPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., Adelphi University; M.A., New York University;Ph.D., Adelphi UniversityLORETTA LAGANAPROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., M.A., Hunter College; Ph.D., City University of New YorkS. MIRIAM CECILE LENEHAN, O.P.PROFESSOR EMERITAB.Mus., Manhattanville College; M.S., Queens College; Ed.D., St.John’s UniversityLORRAINE MAGNANIPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., Molloy College; M.A., New York University;Ph.D., Adelphi UniversityROSA MASPROFESSOR EMERITAM.A., Hofstra UniversityGRACE D. MATZENPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., St. Francis College; M.A., CUNY Hunter CollegeS. MARY VERITY MCNICHOLAS, O.P.PROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., M.A., St. John’s University; Ph.D., Indiana UniversityS.M. LEO FRANCIS MONAGHAN, O.P.PROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., M.S., St. John’s UniversityVIOLET M. MORLEYPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., St. John’s University; M.S., St. Bonaventure UniversityROSE ANN NAUGHTONPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., Ed.M., Ed.D., Columbia UniversityMARY ANN O’DONOGHUEPROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., Trinity College; M.A., Catholic University; M.A., MontclairState University; Ph.D., Hofstra UniversityJANE DINEEN PANEKPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., St. John’s University; M.A., SUNY at Stony BrookS. MARY JANE PHILLIPSPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., St. John’s University; M.S., Adelphi UniversityS. FRANCIS DONINICI PISCATELLA, O.P.PROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., M.S., St. John’s UniversityS. MARY WILLIAM POSTHAUER, O.P.PROFESSOR EMERITAB.A., M.A., St. John’s University; Ed.D., Columbia UniversityELEANOR B. WAPNERPROFESSOR EMERITAB.S., M.A., New York University159


Faculty - Full TimeTERESA C. APRIGLIANOASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR RN/DUAL DEGREE/LPNPROGRAMSPROFESSOR OF NURSINGA.A.S., Pace University; B.S., M.S., Adelphi University; Ed.D.,University of SarasotaROBERT BIOLSIASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BUSINESSB.A., M.B.A., St. John’s University; Ph.D., Graduate Center, CUNYMARGARET BLAIRINSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Marymount College; M.A., New York University; P.D., C.W.Post, L.I.U.SUSAN BLISSASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL WORKB.A., Franklin and Marshall College; M.S.W., Ph.D., Smith CollegeLOIS A. CAREYDEPARTMENTAL CHAIRPERSON OF SOCIAL WORKPROFESSOR OF SOCIAL WORKB.S.W., M.S.W., Adelphi University; Ph.D., New York UniversityRONALD T. CARMANASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR, UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESSPROGRAMSASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF BUSINESSA.B., Cornell University; J.D., Hofstra University; M.B.A., ColumbiaUniversityJOHN CARPENTEASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MUSIC THERAPYB.A., Molloy College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., TempleUniversitySAMUEL W. CARPENTIERASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., SUNY at Oswego; M.A., Hofstra University; Ed.D., St. John’sUniversityNICOLETTE A. CEOASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Hunter College; M.A., New York University; M.S., C.W. Post,L.I.U.AUDRA CERRUTOASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Skidmore College; Ed.M., Ph.D., Columbia UniversityMICHELLE CHAMBLINASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., City University of New York; M.A., Ed.M., Ed.D., ColumbiaUniversityDANIEL R. CILLISPROFESSOR OF BUSINESSB.B.A., Baruch College; M.B.A., St. John’s University; Ph.D., NewYork UniversityCAROL CLIFFORDPROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Molloy College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., St. John’sUniversityAUDREY F. COHANPROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., HofstraUniversityEVELYN CONNOLLYASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Queens College; M.A.L.S., SUNY at Stony Brook; Ed.D.,Hofstra UniversityMERITTA B. CULLINANPROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGYB.A., Ohio Dominican College; M.A., New School for SocialResearch; Ph.D., Fordham UniversityBERNADETTE D. CURRYDEAN EMERITA, DIVISION OF NURSINGPROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Niagara University; M.S., Ph.D., SUNY at BuffaloS. BERNADETTE M. DONOVAN, O.P.ASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR, GRADUATE PROGRAMS INEDUCATIONPROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., St. John’s University; M.S., Adelphi University; M.A., HunterCollege; Ph.D., St. John’s UniversityMARIA DOVEASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Queens College; M.A., Hunter College; Ed.D., St. John’sUniversityDONNA DRISCOLLASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Molloy College; M.S., SUNY at Stony Brook; Ph.D., TouroUniversity InternationalJOHN A. ETERNOASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR OF CRIMINAL JUSTICEPROGRAMSASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CRIMINAL JUSTICEB.A., Queens College; M.P.S., New York Institute of Technology,M.A., Ph.D., SUNY at AlbanyA. NICHOLAS FARGNOLIDEAN OF THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIESPROFESSOR OF THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES ANDENGLISHB.A., St. Francis College; M.A., Catholic University; Ph.D.,Marquette UniversityVERONICA D. FEEGASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR, NURSING DOCTORALPROGRAMPROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S.N., Villanova University; M.A., New York University; Ph.D.,Pennsylvania State UniversityJOAN GINTYASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Pace University; M.S., SUNY at Stony Brook160


VICKY GIOUROUKAKISASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., New York University; M.A., Columbia University; M.S., Ph.D.,University of PennsylvaniaCAROLE GUTTERMANPROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., SUNY Downstate Medical Center; M.S., Ph.D., AdelphiUniversityDEBRA HANNAASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.A., University of Minnesota; B.S.N., Columbia University;M.S.N., Lehman College; Ph.D., Boston CollegeDIANE S. HARPERASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGA.A.S., SUNY at Farmingdale; B.S., M.S., SUNY at Stony BrookPATRICIA HINDS-MASONASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., Hunter College; M.S., Queens College; Ed.D., HofstraUniversityNONA HOLMESASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., M.S., SUNY at Stony BrookANDREA HONIGSFELDASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Kossuth Lajos University; M.S., Queens College; Ed.D., St.John’s UniversityCHARLES HOWLETTASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Marist College; Ed.M., Columbia University; M.A., Ph.D.,SUNY at AlbanySEUNG-A KIMASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MUSIC THERAPYB.A., Ewha University; B.A., Molloy College; M.A., New YorkUniversity; Ph.D., Temple UniversitySUSAN KRENITSKY-KORNASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S.N., Long Island University; M.S.N., SUNY at Stony Brook;Ed.D., Dowling CollegeSUSAN W. LEDLIEASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGA.A.S., Long Island College Hospital; B.S.N., Adelphi University;M.S., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of PennsylvaniaPETER K. LYNCHASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., M.A., Hofstra University; Ed.D., St. John’s UniversityTHOMAS MALONEASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MUSIC THERAPYB.A., New England Conservatory of Music; M.A., D.M.A., BostonUniversityRAYMOND L. MANGANELLIASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR GRADUATE BUSINESSPROGRAMSASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BUSINESSB.A., Rutgers College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., ColumbiaUniversitySTEPHAN MAYODIRECTOR OF CENTER FOR SOCIAL AND ETHICAL CONCERNSPROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHYA.B., St. Michael’s College; M.A., Ph.D., Fordham UniversityLOIS BIGGIN MOYLANPROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., M.S., Ph.D., Adelphi UniversityJEANNINE D. MULDOONDEAN OF THE DIVISION OF NURSINGPROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Boston College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts atAmherstJACQUELINE NENCHINASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., SUNY at Oswego; M.A., Vanderbilt University; M.S., MolloyCollege; Ph.D. Candidate, Macquarie UniversityS. JUDY OLSEN, O.P.ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BUSINESSB.S., St. John’s University; B.A., Molloy College; M.S., HunterCollege; M.B.A., St. John’s University; CPA, New York StateMARY T. O’SHAUGHNESSYASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR, GRADUATE NURSINGPROGRAMSASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Molloy College; M.A., New York University; Psy.D., CaliforniaCoast UniversityDIANE PASTORASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S.N., University of Maryland; M.B.A., Boston College; D.N.Sc.,Columbia UniversityFREIDA L. PEMBERTONPROFESSOR OF NURSINGA.A., NYC Community College, Brooklyn; B.S., City College-Mt.Sinai School of Nursing;M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Walden UniversityALLEN G. RAUCHASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Midwestern College; M.S., M.A., Ed.D., Columbia UniversityELLEN RICHPROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.A., SUNY at Stony Brook; M.S., Pace University; Ph.D., AdelphiUniversityPATRICIA ANN ROZEAASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.A., St. Joseph’s College; B.S., SUNY Downstate Medical Center;M.S., Ph.D., Adelphi UniversityMICHAEL SANTANIELLOASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGYB.A., SUNY at Stony Brook; M.A., M.Phil, Ph.D., ColumbiaUniversityROSE SCHECTERASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR, UNDERGRADUATEPROGRAM IN NURSINGPROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Hunter College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., AdelphiUniversity161


MARJORIE SCHIERINGPROFESSOR OF EDUCATION AND ENGLISHB.S., Ohio State; M.S., College of New Rochelle; Ed.D., St. John’sUniversityEVELYN C. SELESKYDEPARTMENTAL CHAIRPERSONDIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE MUSIC THERAPYASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MUSICB.A., Adelphi University; M.A., New York UniversityKATHLEEN MAURER SMITHDEAN OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCESPROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGYB.A., Molloy College; M.A., Adelphi University; Ph.D., CityUniversity of New YorkLAURA SHEA-DOOLANASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., Oklahoma State University; M.S., Kent State University;Ed.D., St. John’s UniversityKEVIN SHEEHANASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., M.A., SUNY at AlbanyMARGARET SHEPARDASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D., University of PennsylvaniaSUSAN A. SMITHASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., SUNY at Oneonta; M.A., Hofstra University; Ed. D. St. John’sUniversitySUZANNE SORELASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE MUSICTHERAPY PROGRAMASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MUSICB.S., SUNY at New Paltz; M.A., D.A., New York UniversityCHRISTOPHER G. SULLIVANASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CRIMINAL JUSTICEA.A., Queensborough Community College; B.S., John JayCollege of Criminal Justice;M.P.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.; J.D., St. John’s UniversityS. VICKI TOALE, O.P.ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUSSTUDIESB.A., Molloy College; M.A., Manhattan College; M.Div.,Immaculate Conception Seminary;D. Min., Graduate Theological FoundationVINCENT TUMMINELLOCOORDINATOR OF GRADUATE PROGRAMS AND CERTIFICATIONOFFICER FOR GRADUATE CANDIDATESB.S., M.S., St. John’s University; C.A.S., Hofstra UniversitySUSAN VITALEASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGA.A., Nassau Community College; B.S., SUNY at Albany; M.S.,SUNY at Stony Brook; Ph.D., New York UniversityDENISE SUSAN WALSHASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR, MASTER OF SCIENCENURSING PROGRAMS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Marywood University; M.S.N., Sacred Heart University;Ph.D., University of ConnecticutMAUREEN T. WALSHDEAN OF THE DIVISION OF EDUCATIONPROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Molloy College; M.Ed., Catholic University, Puerto Rico;Ed.D., University of Puerto RicoC. ED WEISDEAN OF THE DIVISION OF BUSINESSASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF BUSINESSB.S. Lipscomb University; MAcc, J.D., University of Tennessee;Ph.D., University of GeorgiaMARGARET WHELANASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., Hunter College; M.S., Lehman College; Ed.D., ColumbiaUniversityS. ALEXANDRIA WOLOCHUK, O.P.ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., St. Peter’s College; M.S., St. John’s University; M.A., Ph.D.,New York University162


Faculty - Part TimeSONIA BAKERADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., SUNY at Binghamton; M.A., Columbia University;Ph.D. New York UniversityDONNA BANEKADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., Molloy College; M.A., Adelphi UniversityMICHAEL L. BETZAGADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.S., CUNY at Staten Island; M.B.A., St. John’s UniversitySTEPHEN BIERADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.A., College of the Holy Cross; M.B.A., Adelphi UniversitySTEPHEN BONGIOVIADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., LeMoyne College; M.A., Hofstra UniversityPETRONELLA CELLURAADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., M.S., Queens CollegeMICHAEL CHEAHADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.B.A., University of Singapore; M.S., London Business SchoolDANIELLE COLBYADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., M.S., Dowling CollegeMAUREEN CONNOLLYASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., M.A., Ed.D., St. John’s UniversityJAMES C. CULLENADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.B.A., Iona College; M.B.A., Dowling CollegeMELISSA A. FIRMESADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF SOCIAL WORKB.A., St. Joseph’s College; M.S.W, SUNY at StonybrookROBIN FRUMANADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University; M.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.J. PETER GARRITYADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.A., Stonehill College; M.Ed., State College at Boston; M.A.,Ed.D., Columbia UniversityPETER GIACONEADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.A., Georgetown University; M.B.A., New York UniversityGLORIA GROSSOADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., SUNY at Oneonta; M.A., Sam Houston State UniversityMARGARET IPPOLITOADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., Molloy College; M.A., Ed.D., Hofstra UniversityGERARDINE JOHNSON-CARPENTERADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Mt. St. Mary College; M.S., St. John’s University; Ed.D.,Hofstra UniversityRICHARD L. KLASSADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.A., Queens College; M.S.F.S., American College, CLU, ChFC, CFPJENNIFER L. LAFFEYADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF NURSINGB.S., M.S., Molloy CollegeJOHN LAFFEYADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF CRIMINAL JUSTICEB.A., M.A., John Jay CollegeDEBRA LOVERDEADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Molloy College; M.S., City University of New YorkJOHN MCLAUGHLINADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF CRIMINAL JUSTICEA.A.S., Nassau Community College; B.S., St. John’s University;M.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.JUDITH MORANADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., D’Youville College; M.S., Boston University; D.N.Sc.,University of CaliforniaRICKEY MORONEYADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.F.A., New York Institute of Technology; M.F.A., C.W. Post, L.I.U.;M.S., Walden UniversityEDMUND PAJARILLOADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF NURSINGB.S., M.P.A., University of the Philippines; M.S., Excelsior College;Ph.D., C.W. Post, L.I.U.BETTY PIERRE-GILLESADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF NURSINGA.A.S, New York Technical College; B.S.N., SUNY Health ScienceCenter at Brooklyn; M.S., Molloy CollegeHUMERA QAZIADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.B.A., Adelphi University; M.B.A., Hofstra UniversityMARGARET A. RENNERADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Molloy College; M.S., Hofstra University;M.A., Immaculate Conception Seminary; Ph.D., FordhamUniversitySALVATORE R. RIZZOASSISTANT DIRECTOR OFF CAMPUS PROGRAMSADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., New York Institute of Technology; M.S., P.D., St. John’sUniversity163


PATRICIA ROBERTSADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Marymount College; M.S., Queens College; S.D.A./S.A.S.,College of New RochelleCAUDIA R. ROTONDOADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF SOCIAL WORKB.S., St. John’s University; M.S.W., Adelphi UniversityJANICE M. SAWYERADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Marymount Manhattan College; M.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.;Ed.D., Hofstra UniversityLINDA SCALICEADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Hofstra University; M.A., SUNY at Stony BrookELIZABETH SCHWARTZADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF MUSIC THERAPYB.M., SUNY Postdam, M.A., New York UniversityDAVID SMITHADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., M.S., C.W. Post, L.I.U.DONNA M. SOWERBYADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., Medgar Evers College; M.S., Brooklyn CollegeAMANDIA SPEAKES-LEWISADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL WORKB.A., M.S., SUNY at Stonybrook; Ph.D., Adelphi UniversityALAN STEINADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF SOCIAL WORKB.A., Hofstra University; M.A., New School for Research; M.S.W.,Yeshiva UniversityIRA STOLZENBERGADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.S., Brooklyn College; M.B.A., Baruch CollegeANGELA SULLIVANADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.S., St. Thomas Aquinas College; M.S., Iona College; Ed.D., St.John’s UniversityJACLYN THORESZADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF NURSINGB.S., SUNY at Plattsburg; M.S., SUNY at Stony BrookTHERESA C. TOBINADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF CRIMINAL JUSTICEB.S., Marist College; M.S.W., Fordham University; M.A., SUNY atAlbanyTHALIA VENDITTIADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., Queens College; M.S., Ed.D., Hofstra UniversityMADELAINE VENTREADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MUSICB.A., Queens College, B.M.E., University of Kansas, M.S., HofstraUniversityMICHAEL VIEGAADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF MUSIC THERAPYB.M., Appalachian State University; M.A., Temple UniversityLESLIE WECKSLERADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF EDUCATIONB.A., SUNY at Albany; M.A., Hofstra UniversityJAMES WERNERADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.S., M.B.A.,Hofstra University; CFPWAYNE F. WILHELMADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSB.S., University of Scranton; M.B.A., New York UniversityDIANE WILKIEADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR OF BUSINESSA.S., Nassau Community College; J.D., Hofstra University; CFP164


Nursing LearningLaboratory Coordinatorsand InstructorsSUSAN SALVODIRECTOR OF NURSING LEARNING LABORATORY AND HEALTHSERVICESB.A., Adelphi University; B.S., M.S., Molloy CollegeMARIA FIATANURSING LEARNING LABORATORY INSTRUCTORB.S., Long Island UniversityKAREN GONYONNURSING LABORATORY INSTRUCTORB.S., Molloy CollegeANNMARIE KORNOBISNURSING LABORATORY INSTRUCTORB.S., Molloy CollegeKAREN PALKANURSING LABORATORY INSTRUCTORB.S., Hunter CollegeANNE TOWEYNURSING LABORATORY INSTRUCTORB.S., Molloy College; M.A., Adelphi UniversityHEALTH SERVICESANITA DALEOHEALTH SERVICES NURSEB.S., Molloy CollegeRehabilitation ActCampus CoordinatorsIn compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973and with ADA requirements, Molloy College offers the followingauxiliary aids free of charge to all admitted students submitting acurrent psychological evaluation/diagnostic testing by a certifiedexpert in the field, indicating such need.Auxiliary Aids:• note takers• use of tape recorders for class• extended time for tests• alternate testing sites• tutorial services for math and science• personal counseling service• career counseling services.Individual academic adjustments will be made when necessary.Identification of Campus Coordinators:ADA/Section 504 CoordinatorCari-Rose TomoC011 Casey Center516.678.5000, Ext.6381Nondiscrimination Coordinator- Title VII and Title IXLisa MillerK112 Kellenberg Hall516.678.5000, Ext.6312165


Academic Calendar2010–2011Fall 2010August 4 - WednesdayPayment of tuition due for advance registered students.August 6 - FridayCollege offices closed.August 8 - SundaySt. Dominic’s Day.August 13 - FridayCollege offices closed.August 20 - FridayCollege offices closed.August 23—26 - Monday—ThursdayFALL New Student Orientation Days - Freshmen and Transfers.August 27 - FridayCollege offices closed.August 30 - MondayAward date of August degrees and certificates. No ceremony.(All grades for incomplete coursework must be submitted bythis date in order for degrees to be awarded with this date.)September 3 - FridayCollege offices closed.September 6 - MondayLabor Day—College Closed.September 7- TuesdayCommunity Meetings.September 8 - WednesdayCLASSES BEGIN FOR FALL.September 8—14 - Wednesday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students— Wednesday and Thursday—9:00am–8:00pm, Friday 9:00am–5:00pm, Monday and Tuesday—9:00am–8:00pm.September 14 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and program change. After thisdate, students may withdraw from a course with a grade of “W,”until October 20, 2010. Signatures of the instructor, advisor,and Financial Aid Officer are required. (Students with classesscheduled to meet once-a-week for the first time on September14, 2010, will have until September 15, 2010, to correct theirschedule.)September 15 - WednesdayRegistration for auditors, PRIME (age 62 and over), and ALUMNIauditors - Office of the Registrar, Wilbur Arts Center 9:00am–7:00pm. MILL members make arrangements through theDirector of Special Programs.September 15 - WednesdayIncompletes for SPRING 2010 and SUMMER SESSIONS 2010become “F”.September 23 - ThursdayMass - Kellenberg Great Lawn - 10:00am - 11:00am. Classmeeting times will be shortened to allow all students to attend:7:30am - 8:55am = 7:30am - 8:35am9:05am - 10:30am = 8:45am - 9:50am10:00am - 11:00am = Mass Time10:40am - 12:05pm = 11:10am - 12:05pm.September 29 - WednesdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL.October 1 - FridayDeadline for filing application for graduation in December 2010or January 2011 degree award datesOctober 5 - TuesdayOpening Convocation - Quealy Gymnasium - 10:00am- 11:30am.Class meeting times will be shortened to allow all students toattend:7:30am - 8:55am = 7:30am - 8:35am9:05am - 10:30am = 8:45am - 9:50am10:00am - 11:30am Convocation Time10:40am - 12:05pm = 11:40am - 12:45pm12:15pm - 1:40pm =12:55pm - 2:00pm1:50pm - 3:15pm = 2:10pm - 3:15pm.October 11 - MondayColumbus Day—College Closed.October 20 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course with a grade of “W”.Signatures of the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officerare required. Withdrawals after this date will result in a gradeof “W” or “WF” at the discretion of the faculty member untilDecember 14, 2010.October 22 - FridayMid-semester appraisals due.October 25—29 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for JANUARYINTERSESSION and SPRING: Graduate Students (Matriculatedand Non-Degree Graduate Students); Seniors (96 or moreearned credits); and Sophomores Plus (Sophomores Plusare students with more than 64 earned credits working onAllied Health Associate Degrees). Non-Degree Graduatestudents may only register in-person. In-person Registrationwill also be available in the Registrar’s Office. NO STUDENTS WILLBE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TO REGISTER BEFORE THEIRASSIGNED WEEK.166


November 1—5 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for JANUARYINTERSESSION and SPRING: Juniors (64-95 earned credits)and Priority Groups (Non-Senior Honors Program, Athletes,and Student Government). In-person Registration will alsobe available in the Registrar’s Office. NO STUDENTS WILL BEALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TO REGISTER BEFORE THEIRASSIGNED WEEK.November 2 - TuesdayElection Day—Observed. College Closed.November 8—12 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for JANUARYINTERSESSION and SPRING: Sophomores (30-63 earnedcredits). In-person Registration will also be available in theRegistrar’s Office. NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BEADVISED OR TO REGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.November 11 - ThursdayVeterans’ Day—NOT observed. College in session.November 15—19 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for JANUARYINTERSESSION and SPRING: Freshmen (0-29 earned credits).In-person Registration will also be available in the Registrar’sOffice. NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TOREGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.November 22 - MondayWeb Advising and Web Registration continues as on-goinguntil the end of Add/Drop period - Non-degree or Non-Matriculated Undergraduates for SPRING. (New studentsbeginning in the Spring must be confirmed by Admissionsbefore making appointments for Advisement and Registration.)November 24—28 - Wednesday—SundayThanksgiving Recess-College Closed.November 29 - MondayCLASSES RESUME.December 1 - WednesdayDeadline for filing application for graduation in May 2011.December 3 - FridayLast date to register on web for WINTER INTERSESSION. ForWINTER INTERSESSION tuition and fees are due on this date.After this date, full payment is due within one business dayof registration. In-person only registrations allowed fromDecember 6, 2010 until January 4, 2011.December 9 - ThursdayOffices closed 3:30pm-5:00pm for Holiday Event. (Offices withevening hours reopen at 5pm.)December 14 - TuesdayLast day of classes. Last day to withdraw from a course with a“W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and the FinancialAid Officer are required.December 15—21 - Wednesday—TuesdayFinal examination or last class meeting (See separate FinalExamination Schedule) for FALL semester classes.December 21 - TuesdayRecorded award date and exit date for December 2010 degreesand certificates. No ceremony. Deadline for any outstandingincomplete or missing work for students graduating with aDecember degree award date is December 21, 2010.December 22 - WednesdayCollege offices open 9:00am - 5:00pm.Grades due in Office of the Registrar 48 hours after last class orfinal examination. In-person support for faculty.December 22 - WednesdayNursing Pinning Ceremony—Quealy Hall—7:30pm.December 23—January 3 - Thursday—MondayCollege Closed.January Intersession 2011December 3 - FridayLast date to register on web for JANUARY INTERSESSION.For WINTER INTERSESSION tuition and fees are due on thisdate. After this date, full payment is due within one businessday of registration. In-person only registrations allowed fromDecember 3, 2010 until classes begin.January 3 - MondayNew Year’s Day (Observed) - College Closed.January 4 - TuesdayCLASSES BEGIN FOR JANUARY INTERSESSION.January 4—5 - Tuesday—WednesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program for Intersession-Officeof the Registrar, Wilbur Arts Center (Full payment of tuition andfees required). ALL Students—9:00am–5:00pm.January 5 - WednesdayLast day to drop a course. After this date, students maywithdraw with a grade of “W” until January 7, 2011. Signatures ofinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.January 6 - ThursdayLast day to declare a course PASS/Fail.January 7 - FridayLast day to withdraw from a course with a grade of “W.”Signatures of the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officerare required. Withdrawals after this date must also be signedby the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officer and willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until January 13, 2011.January 8 - SaturdaySnow make-up day for JANUARY INTERSESSION—if required.January 13 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course with a “W” or “WF.”Signatures of instructor, advisor, and the Financial Aid Officer arerequired.January 14 - FridayFinal examination or last class meeting all JANUARYINTERSESSION classes.167


January 15 - SaturdaySnow make-up day for JANUARY INTERSESSION—if needed.January 17 - MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Day (Observed) - College Closed.January 18 - Tuesday (12:00 Noon)JANUARY INTERSESSION grades due in Office of the Registrar by12:00 NOON.Spring 2011January 3 - MondayNew Year’s Day (Observed)—College Closed.January 6 - ThursdayPayment of tuition due for advance registered students.January 11 - TuesdayGENERAL REGISTRATION—Anselma Room, Kellenberg Hall (fullpayment of tuition and fees required): 9:00am–8:00pm—NEWSPRING Freshmen, Transfers, Returning Students, GraduateStudents.January 17 - MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Day (Observed) —College Closed.January 18 - TuesdayJANUARY INTERSESSION grades due in the Office of the Registrarby 12:00 NOON.January 19- WednesdayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SPRING.January 19—25 - Wednesday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program-Office of theRegistrar—Wilbur Arts Center—(full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—Wednesday and Thursday—9:00am–8:00pm, Friday 9:00am–5:00pm, Tuesday and Wednesday-9:00am–8:00pm.January 25 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and program change. After thisdate, students may withdraw with a grade of “W,” until March 2,2011. Signatures of instructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officerare required. (Students with classes scheduled to meet oncea-weekfor the first time on January 25, 2011, will have untilJanuary 26, 2011, to correct their schedules if needed.)January 26 - WednesdayRegistration for auditors, PRIME (age 62 and over), and ALUMNIauditors—Office of the Registrar, Wilbur Arts Center - 9:00am–7:00pm. MILL members make arrangements through theDirector of Special Programs.January 26 - WednesdayIncompletes for FALL 2010 and JANUARY INTERSESSION 2011become “F.”January 27 - ThursdaySPRING New Student Orientation Day—Freshmen and Transfers.January 31 - MondayAward date of January degrees and certificates. Noceremony. (All grades for incomplete coursework mustbe submitted by this date in order for degrees to beawarded with this date.)February 9 - WednesdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL.February 21 - MondayPresidents’ Day—College Closed.February 23 - WednesdayMONDAY classes held on this day.March 2 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course with a grade of “W.”Signatures of the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid officerare required. Withdrawals after this date must also be signedby the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officer and willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” at the discretion of the facultymember until May 3, 2011.March 4 - FridayMid-semester appraisals due.March 7—11 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL:Graduate Students (Matriculated and Non-Degree GraduateStudents); Seniors (96 or more earned credits); SophomoresPlus (Sophomores Plus are students with more than 64earned credits working on Associate Degrees); and Non-Degree Graduate students may only register in-person. InpersonRegistration will also be available in the Registrar’sOffice. NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TOREGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.March 14—20 - Monday—SundaySpring Recess—No Classes (College Offices will remain open.)March 21—25 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL:Juniors (64-95 earned credits) and Priority Groups (Non-Senior Honors Program, Athletes, and Student Government). In-person Registration will also be available in the Registrar’sOffice. NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TOREGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.March 28—April 1 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL:Sophomores (30-63 earned credits). In-person Registrationwill also be available in the Registrar’s Office. NO STUDENT WILLBE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TO REGISTER BEFORE THEIRASSIGNED WEEK.April 1 - FridayDeadline for filing application for graduation for August 2011.April 4—8 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL.Freshmen (0 - 29 earned credits). In-person Registrar’sOffice. NO STUDENT WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TOREGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.168


April 11 - MondayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL:for Continuing students is on-going until the end of publishedAdd/Drop periods for each term - Non-degree or Non-Matriculated Undergraduates, New Transfers are allowedfor SUMMER AND FALL. (New transfer students beginning inthe FALL term must be confirmed by Admissions before makingappointments for Advisement and Registration. New freshmenincoming for the Fall, may register on dates announced byAdmissions.)For SUMMER SESSIONS tuition and fees are due on this date.After this date, full payment is due within one business day ofregistration.April 21—25 - Thursday—MondayEaster Recess-College Closed.April 26 - TuesdayFounders’ Day—College Closed. Honors Convocation-7:30pm.April 27- WednesdayCLASSES RESUME.May 3 - TuesdayLast day of classes. Last day to withdraw from a course with a“W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and the FinancialAid Officer are required.May 4, 5, 6 and 7 - Wednesday—SaturdaySnow make-up days, if necessary, otherwise study days.May 8—14 - Sunday—SaturdayFinal examination or last class meeting (see separate FinalExamination Schedule) for SPRING semester classes.May 14 - SaturdayMay 14, 2011 will be the recorded award date and exit date forMay 2011 degrees and certificates. Deadline for any outstandingincomplete or missing work for students graduating with a Maydegree award date is May 14, 2011.May 17 - TuesdayNursing Pinning Ceremony—Quealy Hall—7:30pm.May 17 - Tuesday (12:00 Noon)ALL STUDENTS’ GRADES DUE in Office of the Registrar 48 hoursafter each last class or final examination: last date for submission.May 18 - WednesdayGraduate Class Night Hooding—8:00pm.May 19 - ThursdayUndergraduate Student Hooding and Class Night for Division ofEducation, Humanities and Natural Sciences—4:30pm.Undergraduate Student Hooding and Class Night for Division ofNursing, Social Sciences and Business—7:00pm.May 20 - FridayCommencement Liturgy, followed by Alumni CommencementBreakfast.May 23 - MondayCommencement— 6:00pm. (May 14, 2011 will be the recordedaward date and exit date for May 2011 degrees and certificates.Deadline for any outstanding incomplete or missing work forstudents graduating with a May degree award date is May 14,2011.)May 24—26 - Tuesday—ThursdayRegistration—NEW FALL Freshmen and NEW FALL HonorsStudents ONLY. Students must register on the date and at thetime scheduled by the Office of Admissions. from 4:00pm-8:00pm.May 30 - MondayMemorial Day—College Closed.June 7 - TuesdayAllied Health Sciences Pinning Ceremony—7:30pm.Summer Sessions Short andLong 2011NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION SHORT meet every weekdayfor two weeks, except for Memorial Day holiday.NOTE: Classes for SUMMER LONG generally meet once or twicea-weekfor fourteen weeks, unless otherwise announced in thecourse schedule.April 11 - MondayFor SUMMER SESSIONS tuition and fees are due on this date.After this date, full payment is due within one business day ofregistration.May 23 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSIONS SHORT AND LONG.May 23—24 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of Registrar,Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and fees required).ALL Students 9:00am–7:00pm.May 24 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSIONS SHORT and LONG. After this date, students maywithdraw from a course with a grade of “W,” until May 27, 2011.Signatures of instructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer arerequired.May 24—26 - Tuesday—ThursdayRegistration—NEW FALL Freshmen and NEW FALL HonorsStudents ONLY. Students must register on the date and at thetime scheduled by the Office of Admissions. from 4:00pm–8:00pm in the Multi-Purpose Room of Wilbur Arts Building..May 26 - ThursdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSIONSHORT).May 27 - FridayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION SHORTwith a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor, and theFinancial Aid Officer are required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a “W” or “WF” at the discretion of the faculty memberuntil June 2, 2011.May 30 - MondayMemorial Day—College Closed.169


June 2 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION SHORTwith a grade of “W” or “WF” at the discretion of the facultymember. Signatures of instructor, advisor and the Financial AidOfficer are required.June 3 - FridayFinal Examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONSHORT classes.June 3 - FridayMonday classes held for Summer Long, if meeting 14 weeks.(Another day may be assigned by instructor of Monday onlyclasses in Summer Long.)June 10 - FridayMolloy College Community Annual Picnic at Cedar Grove—Offices Closed at 1:00 pm.June 10 - FridayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSIONLONG).June 21 - TuesdayRegistration—NEW FALL Freshmen and NEW FALL HonorsStudents ONLY. Students must register on the date and atthe time they are scheduled by the Office of Admissions.12:00 noon–4:00pm in the Multi-Purpose Room of Wilbur ArtsBuilding..June 22 - WednesdayRegistration—NEW FALL Transfer Students and New GraduateStudents ONLY. Students must register on the date and atthe time they are scheduled by the Office of Admissions.10:00am–2:00pm and 5:00pm–8:00pm in the Anslema Room ofKellenberg Hall.June 23 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMERSESSION LONG with a grade of “W.” Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officer arerequired. Withdrawals after this date will result in agrade of “W” or “WF” at the discretion of the faculty memberuntil the day before the last class meeting or the finalexamination. (THIS LAST DATE OF CLASSES WILL VARY FORSUMMER SESSION LONG.)———Last day to withdraw from a course in SUMMERSESSION LONG with a “W” or “WF” will vary. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officer are required.This date will be the day before the last class meeting or the finalexamination. (THIS DATE WILL VARY FOR SUMMER SESSIONLONG.)———Final examination or last class meeting for SUMMERSESSION LONG classes. (THIS DATE WILL VARY FOR SUMMERSESSION LONG.)July 4 - MondayIndependence Day Observed—College Closed.July 15—September 2 - FridaysCollege is closed Fridays in the summer beginning on July 15and ending on September 2.August 29 - MondayLast class meeting date of LONG SUMMER SESSIONS.August 29 - MondayRecorded award date and exit date for August 2011 degreesand certificates. No ceremony. Deadline for any outstandingincomplete or missing work for students graduating with anAugust degree award date is August 29, 2011.Summer Session I 2011NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION I meet Mondays throughThursdays for four weeks.June 6 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION I.June 6—7 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.June 7 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSION I. After this date, students may withdraw from a coursewith a grade of “W,” until June 16, 2011. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.June 13 - MondayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION I).June 16 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION I witha grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until June 29, 2011.June 29 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION I with a“W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor, and the FinancialAid Officer are required.June 30 - ThursdayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSION Iclasses.Summer Session II 2011NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION II meet Mondays throughThursdays for four weeks.July 4 - MondayIndependence Day—College Closed.July 5 - TuesdayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION LONG II.July 5—6 - Tuesday—WednesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program-Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.170


July 6 - WednesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course, DROPa course with a FULL refund of tuition only for SUMMER SESSIONII. After this date, students may withdraw from a course with agrade of “W,” until July 18, 2011. Signatures of the instructor,advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.July 12 - TuesdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION II).July 15 - FridayCollege Closed.July 18 - MondayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION II witha grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until July 28, 2011.July 22 - FridayCollege Closed.July 28 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION II witha “W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and the FinancialAid Officer are required.July 29 - FridayCollege Closed.August 1 - MondayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSION IIclasses.Summer Session Long I 2011NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION LONG I meet Mondaysthrough Thursdays for five weeks.May 23 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION LONG I.May 23—24 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.May 24 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSION LONG I. After this date, students may withdraw from acourse with a grade of “W,” until June 9, 2011. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.May 26 - ThursdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION LONGI).May 30 - MondayMemorial Day—College Closed.June 9 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGI with a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor andthe Financial Aid Office required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until June 23, 2011.June 23 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGI with a “W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer are required.June 27 - MondayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONLONG I classes.Summer Session Long II 2011NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION LONG II meet Mondaysthrough Thursdays for five weeks.July 4 - MondayIndependence Day—College Closed.July 5 - TuesdayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION LONG II.July 5—6 - Tuesday—WednesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.July 6 - WednesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSION LONG II. After this date, students may withdraw from acourse with a grade of “W,” until July 20, 2011. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.July 12 - TuesdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION LONGII).July 15 - FridayCollege Closed.July 20 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGII with a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor andthe Financial Aid Office required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until August 4, 2011.July 22 - FridayCollege Closed.July 29 - FridayCollege Closed.August 4 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGII with a “W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer are required.August 8 - MondayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONLONG II classes.171


Summer Session Long III 2011NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION LONG III meet Mondaysthrough Thursdays for seven weeks.May 23 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION LONG III.May 23—24 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.May 24 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSION LONG III. After this date, students may withdraw from acourse with a grade of “W,” until June 13, 2011. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.May 30 - MondayMemorial Day—College Closed.June 3 - FridayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION LONGIII).June 3 - FridayMonday classes held this day. (Another day may be assigned byinstructor for SUMMER SESSION LONG III Monday classes.)June 13 - MondayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGIII with a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor andthe Financial Aid Office required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until July 7, 2011.July 4 - MondayIndependence Day—Observed College Closed.July 7 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGIII with a “W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer are required.July 11 - MondayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONLONG III classes.July 15 - FridayCollege Closed.July 22 - FridayCollege Closed.July 29 - FridayCollege Closed.August 5 - FridayCollege Closed.August 8 - MondaySt. Dominic’s Day.August 12 - FridayCollege Closed.August 19 - FridayCollege Closed.August 26 - FridayCollege Closed.August 29 - MondayAward date and exit date for August 2011 degrees andcertificates. No ceremony. Deadline for any outstandingincomplete or missing work for students graduating with adegree award date in August 2011.September 2 - FridayCollege Closed.Sept 5 - MondayLabor Day - College Closed.Fall 2011 Classes BeginWednesday, September 7, 2011.172


Academic Calendar2011–2012Fall 2011August 3 - WednesdayPayment of tuition due for advance registered students.August 5 - FridayCollege offices closed.August 8 - MondaySt. Dominic’s Day.August 12 - FridayCollege offices closed.August 19 - FridayCollege offices closed.August 22—25 - Monday—ThursdayFALL New Student Orientation Day - Freshmen and Transfers.August 26 - FridayCollege offices closed.August 29 - MondayAward date of August degrees and certificates. No ceremony.(All grades for incomplete coursework must be submitted bythis date in order for degrees to be awarded with this date.)September 2 - FridayCollege offices closed.September 5 - MondayLabor Day—College Closed.September 6 - TuesdayCommunity Meetings.September 7 - WednesdayCLASSES BEGIN FOR FALL.September 7—13 - Wednesday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students— Wednesday and Thursday - 9:00am–8:00pm, Friday 9:00am–5:00pm, Monday and Tuesday—9:00am–8:00pm.September 13 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and program change. After thisdate, students may withdraw from a course with a grade of“W,” until October 19, 2011. Signatures of the instructor, advisorand Financial Aid Officer are required. (Students with classesscheduled to meet once-a-week for the first time on September13, 2011, will have an extension until September 14, 2011, tocorrect their schedules.)September 14 - WednesdayRegistration for auditors, PRIME (age 62 and over), and ALUMNIauditors - Office of the Registrar, Wilbur Arts Center 9:00am–7:00pm. MILL members make arrangements through theDirector of Special Programs.September 14 - WednesdayIncompletes for SPRING 2011 and SUMMER SESSIONS 2011become “F.”September TBA ConvocationOpening Convocation - Quealy Gymnasium - 10:00am- 11:00am.Class meeting times will be shortened to allow all students toattend:7:30am - 8:55am = 7:30am - 8:35am9:05am - 10:30am = 8:45am - 9:50am10:00am - 11:30am Convocation Time10:40am - 12:05pm = 11:40am - 12:45pm12:15 - 1:40pm = 12:55pm - 2:00pm1:50pm - 3:15pm = 2:10pm - 3:15pm.September 22 - ThursdayMass - Kellenberg Great Lawn - 10:00am - 11:00am. Classmeeting times will be shortened to allow all students to attend:7:30am - 8:55am = 7:30am - 8:35am9:05am - 10:30am = 8:45am - 9:50am10:00am - 11:00am = Mass Time10:40am - 12:05pm = 11:10am - 12:05pm.September 28 - WednesdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL.October 1 - SaturdayDeadline for filing application for graduation for December 2011or January 2012 degree award dates.October 10- MondayColumbus Day—College Closed.October 19 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course with a grade of “W”.Signatures of the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officerare required. Withdrawals after this date will result in a grade of“W” or “WF” until December 13, 2011.October 21 - FridayMid-semester appraisals due.October 24—28 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for JANUARYINTERSESSION and SPRING: Graduate Students (Matriculatedand Non-Degree Graduate Students); Seniors (96 or moreearned credits); Sophomores Plus (Sophomores Plusare students with more than 64 earned credits workingon Allied Health Associate Degrees); and Non-DegreeGraduate students may register in-person only. In-personRegistration will also be available in the Registrar’s Office. NOSTUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TO REGISTERBEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.October 31—November 4 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for JANUARYINTERSESSION and SPRING: Juniors (64-95 earned credits)and Priority Groups (Non-Senior Honors Program, Athletes,and Student Government). In-person Registration will alsobe available in the Registrar’s Office. NO STUDENTS WILL BEALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TO REGISTER BEFORE THEIRASSIGNED WEEK.173


November 7—11 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for JANUARYINTERSESSION and SPRING: Sophomores (30-63 earnedcredits). In-person Registration will also be available in theRegistrar’s Office. NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BEADVISED OR TO REGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.November 8 - TuesdayElection Day—Observed. College Closed.November 11 - FridayVeterans’ Day—NOT observed. Classes in session.November 14—18 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for JANUARYINTERSESSION and SPRING: Freshmen (0-29 earned credits).In-person Registration will also be available in the Registrar’sOffice. NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TOREGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.November 21 - MondayWeb Advising and Web Registration continues as on-goinguntil the end of Add/Drop period - Non-degree or Non-Matriculated Undergraduates and New Freshmen and NewTransfers for SPRING (New students beginning in the Springmust be confirmed by Admissions before making appointmentsfor Advisement and Registration.)November 23—27 - Wednesday—SundayThanksgiving Recess-College Closed.November 28 - MondayCLASSES RESUME.December 1 - ThursdayDeadline for filing application for graduation in May 2012.December 2 - FridayLast date to register on web for WINTER INTERSESSION. ForWINTER INTERSESSION tuition and fees are due on this date.After this date, full payment is due within one business dayof registration. In-person only registrations allowed fromDecember 5, 2011 until January 3, 2012.December 8 - Thursday (tentative date)Offices closed 3:30pm-5:00pm for Holiday Event. (Offices withevening hours reopen at 5pm.)December 13 - TuesdayLast day of classes. Last day to withdraw from a course with a“W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and the FinancialAid Officer are required.December 14—20 - Wednesday—TuesdayFinal examination or last class meeting (See separate FinalExamination Schedule) for FALL semester classes.December 20 - TuesdayRecorded award date for December 2011 degrees andcertificates. No ceremony. Deadline for any outstandingincomplete or missing work for students graduating with aDecember degree award date is December 20, 2011.December 21 - WednesdayCollege offices open 9:00am - 5:00pm.Grades due in Office of the Registrar 48 hours after last class orfinal examination. In-person support for faculty.December 21 - WednesdayNursing Pinning Ceremony—Quealy Hall—7:30pm.December 22—January 2 - Thursday—MondayCollege Closed.January Intersession 2012December 2 - FridayLast date to register on web for JANUARY INTERSESSION.For WINTER INTERSESSION tuition and fees are due on thisdate. After this date, full payment is due within one businessday of registration. In-person only registrations allowed fromDecember 5, 2011 until classes begin.January 2 - MondayNew Year’s Day (Observed) - College Closed.January 3 - TuesdayCLASSES BEGIN FOR JANUARY INTERSESSION.January 3—4 - Tuesday—WednesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program for INTERSESSION-Office of the Registrar, Wilbur Arts Center (Full payment oftuition and fees required). ALL Students—9:00am–5:00pm.January 4 - WednesdayLast day to drop a course. After this date, students maywithdraw with a grade of “W” until January 6, 2012. Signatures ofinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.January 5 - ThursdayLast day to declare a course PASS/Fail.January 6 - FridayLast day to withdraw from a course with a grade of “W.”Signatures of the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officerare required. Withdrawals after this date must also be signedby the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officer and willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until January 12, 2012.January 7 - SaturdaySnow make-up days for JANUARY INTERSESSION—if required.January 12 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course with a “W” or “WF.”Signatures of instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officer arerequired.January 13 - FridayFinal examination or last class meeting all JANUARYINTERSESSION classes.January 14 - SaturdaySnow make-up days for JANUARY INTERSESSION—if required.January 16 - MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Day (Observed) - College Closed.January 17 - TuesdayJANUARY INTERSESSION grades due in Office of the Registrar by12:00 NOON.174


Spring 2012January 2 - MondayNew Year’s Day (Observed) —College Closed.January 5 - ThursdayPayment of tuition due for advance registered students forSPRING 2012..January 10 - TuesdayGENERAL REGISTRATION—Anselma Room, Kellenberg Hall (fullpayment of tuition and fees required): 9:00am–8:00pm—NEWSPRING Freshmen, Transfers, Returning Students, GraduateStudents.January 16 - MondayMartin Luther King, Jr. Day (Observed) —No Classes CollegeClosed.January 17 - TuesdayJanuary Intersession grades due in the Office of the Registrar by12:00 NOON.January 18 - WednesdayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SPRING .January 18—24 - Wednesday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program-Office of theRegistrar—Wilbur Arts Center—(full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students— Wednesday and Thursday—9:00am–8:00pm, Friday 9:00am–5:00pm, Tuesday and Wednesday—9:00am–8:00pm.January 24 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and program change. After thisdate, students may withdraw with a grade of “W,” until February29, 2012. Signatures of instructor, advisor and Financial AidOfficer are required. (Students with classes scheduled to meetonce-a-week for the first time on January 24, 2012, may haveuntil January 25, 2012, to correct their schedules.)January 25 -WednesdayRegistration for auditors, PRIME (age 62 and over), and ALUMNIauditors - Office of the Registrar, Wilbur Arts Center - 9:00am–7:00pm. MILL members make arrangements through theDirector of Special Programs.January 25 - WednesdayIncompletes for FALL 2011 and JANUARY INTERSESSION 2012become “F.”January 26 - ThursdaySPRING New Student Orientation Day—Freshmen and Transfers.January 31 - TuesdayAward date of January degrees and certificates. No ceremony.(All grades for incomplete coursework must be submitted bythis date in order for degrees to be awarded with this date.)February 8 - WednesdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL.February 20 - MondayPresidents’ Day—College ClosedFebruary 22 - WednesdayMONDAY classes held on this day.February 29 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course with a grade of “W.”Signatures of the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officerare required. Withdrawals after this date must also be signedby the instructor, advisor and the Financial Aid Officer and willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until May 1, 2012.March 2 - FridayMid-semester appraisals due.March 5—9 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL:Graduate Students (Matriculated and Non-Degree GraduateStudents); Seniors (96 or more earned credits); SophomoresPlus (Sophomores Plus are students with more than 64earned credits working on Associate Degrees); and Non-Degree Graduate students may register in-person only. InpersonRegistration will also be available in the Registrar’sOffice. NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TOREGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.March 12—18 - Monday—SundaySpring Recess—No Classes (College Offices will remain open.)March 19—23 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL:Juniors (64-95 earned credits) and Priority Groups (Non-Senior Honors Program, Athletes, and Student Government).In-person Registration will also be available in the Registrar’sOffice. NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TOREGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.March 26—30 - Monday—FridayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL:Sophomores (30-63 earned credits). In-person Registrationwill also be available in the Registrar’s Office. NO STUDENTS WILLBE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TO REGISTER BEFORE THEIRASSIGNED WEEK.April 1 - SundayDeadline for filing application for graduation for August 2012.April 2—4 & 10—11- Mon—Wed & Tues—WedWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL.Freshmen (0 - 29 earned credits). In-person Registrar’s Office.NO STUDENTS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE ADVISED OR TOREGISTER BEFORE THEIR ASSIGNED WEEK.April 5—9 - Thursday—MondayEaster Recess-College Closed.April 10 - TuesdayCLASSES RESUME.175


April 12 - ThursdayWeb Advising and Web Registration - for SUMMER and FALL:for Continuing students is on-going until the end of publishedAdd/Drop periods for each term - Non-degree or Non-Matriculated Undergraduates, New Transfers are allowedfor SUMMER AND FALL. (New transfer students beginning inthe FALL term must be confirmed by Admissions before makingappointments for Advisement and Registration. New freshmenbeginning in the Fall must register on dates announced byAdmissions.For SUMMER SESSIONS tuition and fees are due on this date.After this date, full payment is due within one business day ofregistration.April 24 - TuesdayFounders’ Day—College Closed. Honors Convocation—7:30pm.May 1 - TuesdayLast day of classes. Last day to withdraw from a course with a“W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor, and the FinancialAid Officer are required.May 2, 3, 4, and 5 - Wednesday—SaturdaySnow make-up days, if necessary, otherwise study days.May 6—12 - Sunday—SaturdayFinal examination or last class meeting (see separate FinalExamination Schedule) for SPRING semester classes.May 12 - SaturdayMay 12, 2012 will be the recorded award date and exit date forMay 2012 degrees and certificates. Deadline for any outstandingincomplete or missing work for students graduating with a Maydegree award date is May 12, 2012.May 15 - Tuesday (12:00 Noon)ALL STUDENTS’ GRADES DUE in Office of the Registrar 48 hoursafter each last class or final examination: last date for submission.May 15 - TuesdayNursing Pinning Ceremony—Quealy Hall—7:30pm.May 16 - WednesdayGraduate Class Night Hooding—8:00pm.May 17 - ThursdayUndergraduate Student Hooding and Class Night for Division ofEducation, Humanities and Natural Sciences—4:30pm.Undergraduate Student Hooding and Class Night for Division ofNursing, Social Sciences and Business—7:00pm.May 18 - FridayCommencement Liturgy, followed by Alumni CommencementBreakfast.May 19 - 21 - Tentative Dates for CommencementCommencement—TBA. (May 12, 2012 will be the recordedaward date and exit date for May 2012 degrees and certificates.Deadline for any outstanding incomplete or missing work forstudents graduating with a May degree award date is May 12,2012.)May 22—24 - Tuesday—ThursdayRegistration—NEW FALL Freshmen and NEW FALL HonorsStudents ONLY. Students must register on the date and atthe time scheduled by the Office of Admissions. from 4:00am-8:00pm.May 28 - MondayMemorial Day—College Closed.June 5 - TuesdayAllied Health Sciences Pinning Ceremony—7:30pm.Summer Sessions Short andLong 2012NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION SHORT meet every weekdayfor two weeks, except for Memorial Day holiday.NOTE: Classes for SUMMER LONG generally meet once- or twicea-weekfor fourteen weeks, unless otherwise announced in thecourse schedule.April 12 - ThursdayFor SUMMER SESSIONS tuition and fees are due on this date.After this date, full payment is due within one business day ofregistration.May 21 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSIONS SHORT AND LONG.May 21—22 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of Registrar,Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and fees required).ALL Students 9:00am–7:00pm.May 22 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSIONS SHORT and LONG. After this date, students maywithdraw from a course with a grade of “W,” until May 25, 2012.Signatures of instructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer arerequired.May 22—24 - Tuesday—ThursdayRegistration-NEW FALL Freshman and NEW FALL HonorsStudents ONLY. Students must register on the date and at thetime scheduled by the Office of Admissions. from 4:00pm-8:00pm in the Multi-Purpose Room of Wilbur Arts Building.May 24 - ThursdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSIONSHORT).May 25 - FridayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION SHORTwith a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer are required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a “W” or “WF” until May 31, 2012.May 28 - MondayMemorial Day—College Closed.May 31 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION SHORTwith a grade of “W” or “WF” at the discretion of the facultymember. Signatures of instructor, advisor and the Financial AidOfficer are required.176


June 1 - FridayFinal Examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONSHORT classes.June 8 - FridayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSIONLONG).June 19 - TuesdayRegistration—NEW FALL Freshmen and NEW FALL HonorsStudents ONLY. Students must register on the date and atthe time they are scheduled by the Office of Admissions.12:00 noon–4:00pm in the Multi-Purpose Room of Wilbur ArtsBuilding..June 20 - WednesdayRegistration—NEW FALL Transfer Students and New GraduateStudents ONLY. Students must register on the date and atthe time they are scheduled by the Office of Admissions.10:00am–2:00pm and 5:00pm–8:00pm in the Anslema Room ofKellenberg Hall.June 21 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGwith a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer are required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” at the discretion of the facultymember until the day before the last class meeting or the finalexamination. (THIS LAST DATE OF CLASSES WILL VARY FORSUMMER SESSION LONG.)———Last day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGwith a “W” or “WF.” will vary. Signatures of the instructor, advisorand the Financial Aid Officer are required. This date will be theday before the last class meeting or the final examination. (THISDATE WILL VARY FOR SUMMER SESSION LONG.)———Final examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONLONG classes. (THIS LAST DATE OF CLASS WILL VARY FORSUMMER SESSION LONG.)July 4 - WednesdayIndependence Day—College Closed.July 13—August 31 - FridaysCollege is closed Fridays in the summer beginning on July 13and ending on August 31.August 29 - WednesdayLast class meeting date of LONG SUMMER SESSIONS. (Note thatTuesday classes meeting for a14 weeks do not meet on Tuesday,August 28, unless an extra meeting is needed as a make-upclass.)August 29 - WednesdayRecorded award date and exit date for August 2012 degreesand certificates. No ceremony. Deadline for any outstandingincomplete or missing work for students graduating with anAugust degree award date is August 29, 2012.Summer Session I 2012NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION I meet Mondays throughThursdays for four weeks.June 4 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION I.June 4—5 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.June 5 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSION I. After this date, students may withdraw from a coursewith a grade of “W,” until June 14, 2012. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.June 11 - MondayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION I).June 14 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION I witha grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Office required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until June 27, 2012.June 27 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION I witha “W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and the FinancialAid Officer are required.June 28 - ThursdayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSION Iclasses.Summer Session II 2012NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION II meet Mondays throughThursdays for four weeks.July 4 - WednesdayIndependence Day—Observed College Closed.July 9 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION II.July 9—10 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program-Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.July 10 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course, DROPa course with a FULL refund of tuition only for SUMMER SESSIONII. After this date, students may withdraw from a course with agrade of “W,” until July 19, 2012. Signatures of the instructor,advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.July 16 - MondayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION II).July 13 - FridayCollege Closed.177


July 19 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION II witha grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until August 1, 2012.July 20 - FridayCollege Closed.August 1 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION II witha “W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and the FinancialAid Officer are required.July 27 - FridayCollege Closed.August 2 - ThursdayFinal examination or last class meeting for Summer Session IIclasses.August 3 - FridayCollege Closed.Summer Session Long I 2012NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION LONG I meet Mondaysthrough Thursdays for five weeks.May 21 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION LONG I.May 21—22 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.May 22 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSION LONG I. After this date, students may withdraw from acourse with a grade of “W,” until June 7, 2012. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.May 24 - ThursdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION LONGI).May 28 - MondayMemorial Day—College Closed.June 7 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGI with a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor andthe Financial Aid Office required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until June 21, 2012.June 21 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGI with a “W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer are required.June 25 - MondayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONLONG I classes.Summer Session Long II 2012NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION LONG II meet Mondaysthrough Thursdays for five weeks.July 4 - WednesdayIndependence Day- College Closed.July 9- MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION LONG II.July 9—10 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.July 10 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSION LONG II. After this date, students may withdraw from acourse with a grade of “W,” until July 26, 2012. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.July 12 - ThursdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSIONLONG II).July 13 - FridayCollege Closed.July 20 - FridayCollege Closed.July 26 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGII with a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor andthe Financial Aid Office required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until August 9, 2012.July 27 - FridayCollege Closed.August 3 - FridayCollege Closed.August 8 - WednesdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGII with a “W” or “WF.” Signatures of instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer are required.August 9 - ThursdayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONLONG II classes.August 10 - FridayCollege Closed.Summer Session Long III 2012NOTE: Classes for SUMMER SESSION LONG III meet Mondaysthrough Thursdays for seven weeks.May 21 - MondayCLASSES BEGIN FOR SUMMER SESSION LONG III.178


May 21—22 - Monday—TuesdayLate Registration/Late Change of Program—Office of theRegistrar, Wilbur Arts Center (full payment of tuition and feesrequired). ALL Students—9:00am–7:00pm.May 22 - TuesdayLast day for late registration and last day to ADD a course,DROP a course with a FULL refund of tuition only, for SUMMERSESSION LONG III. After this date, students may withdraw from acourse with a grade of “W,” until June 7, 2012. Signatures of theinstructor, advisor and Financial Aid Officer are required.May 28 - MondayMemorial Day—College Closed.May 24 - ThursdayLast day to declare a course PASS/FAIL (SUMMER SESSION LONGIII).June 14 - ThursdayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGIII with a grade of “W.” Signatures of the instructor, advisor andthe Financial Aid Office required. Withdrawals after this date willresult in a grade of “W” or “WF” until July 6, 2012.July 4 - WednesdayIndependence Day—Observed College Closed.July 6 - FridayLast day to withdraw from a course in SUMMER SESSION LONGIII with a “W” or “WF”. Signatures of instructor, advisor and theFinancial Aid Officer are required.July 9 - MondayFinal examination or last class meeting for SUMMER SESSIONLONG III classes.July 13 - FridayCollege Closed.July 20 - FridayCollege Closed.July 27 - FridayCollege Closed.August 3 - FridayCollege Closed.August 8 - WednesdaySt. Dominic’s Day.August 10 - FridayCollege Closed.August 17 - FridayCollege Closed.August 24 - FridayCollege Closed.August 29 - WednesdayAward date and exit date for August 2012 degrees andcertificates. No ceremony. Deadline for any outstandingincomplete or missing work for students graduating with adegree award date in August 2012.August 31 - FridayCollege Closed.September 3 - MondayLabor Day - College Closed.Fall 2012 Classes BeginWednesday, September 5, 2012.179


IndexAAcademic Calendar 2010–2011.......................................................166Academic Calendar 2011–2012.......................................................173Academic Computer Labs....................................................................21Academic Policies and Procedures...................................................27Academic Support Facilities................................................................21Academic Support Services.................................................................20ACCOUNTING - M.B.A............................................................................41ACCOUNTING AND MANAGEMENT - M.B.A...................................44ACCOUNTING AND PERSONAL FINANCIALPLANNING - M.B.A...........................................................................44Accreditations..........................................................................................11AcE—Academic Enrichment Program............................................14Admission to Master’s Nursing Program......................................117Admission to Post Master’s Advanced Certificate Programs.131Admission to the Nursing Doctoral Program..............................136Admissions................................................................................................14Admissions Application Procedures................................................14Admissions Requirements...................................................................40Admissions Requirements - Criminal Justice Program............146Admissions Requirements - MSW Programs...............................150Admissions Requirements - Music Therapy Program..............108Admissions Requirements for Division ofEducation Programs.......................................................................52Adolescent Education - Biology Programs....................................63Adolescent Education - English Programs.....................................68Adolescent Education - Mathematics Programs..........................72Adolescent Education - Social Studies Programs........................75Adolescent Education - Spanish Programs....................................79ADOLESCENT EDUCATION BIOLOGY (7-12) - INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................63ADOLESCENT EDUCATION BIOLOGY (7-12) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................66ADOLESCENT EDUCATION BIOLOGY (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - DUAL INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................65ADOLESCENT EDUCATION BIOLOGY (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION IN AREA OF INITIAL CERTIFICATION ANDINITIAL CERTIFICATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION - M.S.......67ADOLESCENT EDUCATION BIOLOGY (7-12)/TESOL (PK-12) -DUAL INITIAL CERTIFICATION - M.S...........................................64ADOLESCENT EDUCATION ENGLISH (7-12) - INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................68ADOLESCENT EDUCATION ENGLISH (7-12) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................70ADOLESCENT EDUCATION ENGLISH (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - DUAL INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................69ADOLESCENT EDUCATION ENGLISH (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION IN AREA OF INITIAL CERTIFICATION ANDINITIAL CERTIFICATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION - M.S.......71ADOLESCENT EDUCATION ENGLISH (7-12)/TESOL (PK-12) -DUAL INITIAL CERTIFICATION - M.S...........................................68ADOLESCENT EDUCATION MATHEMATICS (7-12) - INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................72180ADOLESCENT EDUCATION MATHEMATICS (7-12) -PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................74ADOLESCENT EDUCATION MATHEMATICS (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - DUAL INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................73ADOLESCENT EDUCATION MATHEMATICS (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION IN AREA OF INITIAL CERTIFICATION ANDINITIAL CERTIFICATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION - M.S.......75ADOLESCENT EDUCATION MATHEMATICS (7-12)/TESOL (PK-12)- DUAL INITIAL CERTIFICATION - M.S........................................72ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SOCIAL STUDIES (7-12) - INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................75ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SOCIAL STUDIES (7-12) -PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................78ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SOCIAL STUDIES (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - DUAL INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................77ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SOCIAL STUDIES (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION IN AREA OF INITIAL CERTIFICATION ANDINITIAL CERTIFICATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION - M.S.......79ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SOCIAL STUDIES (7-12)/TESOL (PK-12) - DUAL INITIAL CERTIFICATION - M.S.................................76ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SPANISH (7-12) - INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................79ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SPANISH (7-12) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................82ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SPANISH (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - DUAL INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................81ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SPANISH (7-12)/TEACHINGSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (7-12) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION IN AREA OF INITIAL CERTIFICATION ANDINITIAL CERTIFICATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION - M.S.......83ADOLESCENT EDUCATION SPANISH (7-12)/TESOL (PK-12) -DUAL INITIAL CERTIFICATION - M.S...........................................80Adult Nurse Practitioner - ADV. CERT.............................................133ADULT NURSE PRACTITIONER - M.S...............................................121Adult Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, NursePractitioner Psychiatry and Family Nurse Practitioner.....131ALPHA PHI SIGMA...................................................................................34ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MISSION STATEMENT..............................36At Molloy...................................................................................................... 9ATTENDANCE AND RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES............................28AUDITING COURSES...............................................................................29BBoard of Trustees...................................................................................153BRIDGE PROGRAM COURSE DESCRIPTION:.................................123Bridge Program for RN’s with a Non-Nursing BaccalaureateDegree...............................................................................................117BURSAR HOLDS........................................................................................15BUS 500 INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR MANAGERS...................44BUS 501 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING...........44BUS 503 ACCOUNTING THEORY........................................................44BUS 505 ACCOUNTING RESEARCH....................................................44BUS 507 COMPUTER AUDITING.........................................................44BUS 510 MARKETING MANAGEMENT..............................................44BUS 511 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR...........................................45BUS 515 BUSINESS ETHICS AND PROFESSIONALRESPONSIBILITY................................................................................45BUS 520 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS..................................45BUS 521 CORPORATE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT.......................45


BUS 525 FINANCIAL PLANNING PROCESS AND INSURANCE...45BUS 530 INVESTMENT PLANNING.....................................................45BUS 535 INCOME TAX PLANNING.....................................................45BUS 540 LEADERSHIP IN ORGANIZATIONS....................................45BUS 541 ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT....45BUS 543 RETIREMENT PLANNING AND EMPLOYEE BENEFITS.45BUS 545 ESTATE PLANNING................................................................45BUS 546 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT.............................45BUS 547 HEALTH CARE FINANCE AND BUDGETING...................46BUS 550 PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGY............................................46BUS 559 INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT.............................................46BUS 560 ADVANCED TOPICS IN FINANCE......................................46BUS 561 FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS....................46BUS 562 VALUE INVESTING..................................................................46BUS 570 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS................................................46BUS 580 MANAGERIAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS..............................46BUS 585 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS SUPPORTINGMANAGERIAL DECISIONS..............................................................46BUS 590 TOPICS IN BUSINESS.............................................................46BUS 595 ENTREPRENEURSHIP/INTRAPRENEURSHIP(CAPSTONE).......................................................................................46Business Course Descriptions.............................................................44Business Division MBA Program Goals............................................40Business Division Program Philosophy...........................................40Business Program....................................................................................40CCampus Ministries...................................................................................24Career Development Center...............................................................24CENTER FOR SOCIAL AND ETHICAL CONCERNS..........................24Characteristics of the Molloy College Master’sPrepared Nurse...............................................................................116CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (1-6) - INITIAL CERTIFICATION - M.S.........................................................................59CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (1-6) - PROFESSIONALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................62CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (1-6)/EARLY CHILDHOOD (BIRTH -GRADE 2) - DUAL INITIAL CERTIFICATION - M.S....................59CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (1-6)/TEACHING STUDENTS WITHDISABILITIES (1-6) - DUAL INITIAL - M.S...................................61CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (1-6)/TEACHING STUDENTS WITHDISABILITIES (1-6) - PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION IN AREAOF INITIAL CERTIFICATION AND INITIAL CERTIFICATION INSPECIAL EDUCATION - M.S...........................................................62CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (1-6)/TESOL (PK-12) - DUAL INITIALCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................60Childhood Education Programs.........................................................59CLASSIFICATION......................................................................................29Clinical Nurse SpecialistAdult Health - ADV. CERT...................................................................132CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALISTADULT HEALTH - M.S...........................................................................120COGNATES:..............................................................................................125COLLECTION POLICIES AND GUIDELINES.......................................17COMMENCEMENT...................................................................................36COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY PARTICIPATION...........................36COMPLAINT PROCEDURES...................................................................33Compliance with Federal Regulations.............................................11CONFIDENTIALITY AND DIRECTORY INFORMATION..................12CONFIRMATION DEPOSITS..................................................................15CONTENT/PEDAGOGY COURSES FOR ADOLESCENT AREAS (SEECOURSES NUMBERED EDU 580 AND HIGHER):.....................85CONTINUING EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT.................................................................................25COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM............................................................33CRIMINAL JUSTICE - M.S......................................................................147Criminal Justice Program....................................................................146CRJ 480 SURVEY OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE........................................148CRJ 501 MODERN AMERICAN JUSTICE..........................................148CRJ 502 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND LEGAL ISSUES...............148CRJ 503 RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE..............148CRJ 504 ETHICS AND MORALITY IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE..........148CRJ 510 VIOLENCE IN AMERICAN SOCIETY..................................148CRJ 511 CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND TECHNOLOGY........................148CRJ 512 DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM..........148CRJ 513 MODERN LAW ENFORCEMENT........................................148CRJ 514 SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS.......148CRJ 515 ADVANCED CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP..............149CRJ 516 ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS INCRIMINAL JUSTICE.........................................................................149CRJ 517 IDEOLOGY, SOCIOECONOMICS AND POLITICS OFCRIME AND TERRORISM...............................................................149CRJ 518 MODERN CORRECTIONAL SYSTEMS..............................149CRJ 590 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE..................149CRJ 599 MASTER’S THESIS SEMINAR..............................................149Curriculum for Master’s Nursing Tracks........................................119DDEPARTMENTAL HONORS AT GRADUATION................................35DIPLOMA NAMES....................................................................................35DISMISSAL FROM PROGRAMS............................................................31Division of Business Programs of Study..........................................37Division of Education — Philosophy and ConceptualFramework.........................................................................................50Division of Education Programs of Study.......................................47Division of Humanities Programs of Study..................................103Division of Nursing Programs of Study.........................................113Division of Social Sciences Programs of Study...........................143Dominican Liberal Arts Heritage.......................................................10DSS—Disability Support Services.....................................................20EEDU 500 APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN EARLYCHILDHOOD/CHILDHOOD INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM (40HRS).......................................................................................................85EDU 500A APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ADOLESCENTINCLUSIVE CLASSROOM (40 HRS)..............................................85EDU 500B APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN CHILDHOOD/SPECIAL EDUCATION INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM (20 HRS, 20HRS).......................................................................................................85EDU 500C APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ADOLESCENT/SPECIAL EDUCATION INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM DUALPROGRAM (20 HRS, 20 HRS).........................................................85EDU 500D APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN CHILDHOOD/TESOL INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM DUAL PROGRAM (20 HRS,20 HRS).................................................................................................85EDU 500E APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ADOLESCENT/TESOL INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM DUAL PROGRAM (20 HRS,20 HRS).................................................................................................85EDU 500F APPRENTICE FIELD EXPERIENCE IN TESOL INCLUSIVECLASSROOM (20 HRS, 20 HRS)....................................................86EDU 502 THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS AND TEACHINGPRACTICES OF REGULAR AND SPECIAL EDUCATION FORBIRTH-GRADE 2, CHILDHOOD 1-6, ADOLESCENCE 7-12....86EDU 503 SCIENCE CURRICULUM AND METHODS FOR DIVERSELEARNERS BIRTH-GRADE 2, CHILDHOOD 1-6........................86181


EDU 504 INTERDISCIPLINARY BIRTH-GRADE 2, CHILDHOOD1-6, AND MIDDLE CHILDHOOD TEACHING METHODS FORDIVERSE LEARNERS..........................................................................86EDU 505 ADVANCED METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICSIN INCLUSIVE EARLY CHILDHOOD, CHILDHOOD, ANDMIDDLE CHILDHOOD CLASSROOMS........................................86EDU 506A INTEGRATED LANGUAGE ARTS AND READING FORTHE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM OF DIVERSE LEARNERS INEARLY CHILDHOOD AND CHILDHOOD SETTINGS...............87EDU 506B ADOLESCENT READING, WRITING ANDCOMMUNICATING IN THE CONTENT AREAS FOR INCLUSIVECLASSROOMS OF DIVERSE LEARNERS.....................................87EDU 507 METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE IN INCLUSIVECLASSROOMS OF MIDDLE SCHOOL AND ADOLESCENTLEARNERS...........................................................................................87EDU 509 CURRICULUM AND METHODS OF TEACHING SOCIALSTUDIES IN BIRTH-GRADE 2 AND CHILDHOOD 1-6 ININCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS..............................................................87EDU 510 STRATEGIES AND TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHINGMIDDLE SCHOOL AND ADOLESCENT STUDENTS ININCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS..............................................................87EDU 512 METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS FOR MIDDLESCHOOL AND ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERS.................87EDU 513 MEETING THE NEEDS OF CULTURALLY DIVERSESTUDENTS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS IN BIRTH-GRADE 2,CHILDHOOD 1-6 AND ADOLESCENCE 7-12............................88EDU 514 TEACHING ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLS)..88EDU 515 CURRICULUM ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT....88EDU 516 CURRICULUM AND METHODS OF TEACHING SOCIALSTUDIES TO DIVERSE ADOLESCENT LEARNERS IN INCLUSIVECLASSROOMS....................................................................................88EDU 518 SPANISH CURRICULUM AND METHODS FORINCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OF ADOLESCENT DIVERSELEARNERS...........................................................................................88EDU 521 TECHNOLOGY FOR INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMTEACHERS BIRTH-GRADE 2, CHILDHOOD 1-6,ADOLESCENCE 7-12........................................................................88EDU 522 ADVANCED DESIGN TECHNOLOGY FOR INCLUSIVECLASSROOM TEACHERS................................................................89EDU 523 TEACHER AS THE EDUCATIONAL LEADER INPARTNERSHIPS FOR COLLABORATIVE EDUCATION............89EDU 524 TOPICS IN EDUCATION........................................................89EDU 525 CURRICULUM, STRATEGIES, METHODOLOGY ANDMATERIALS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, BIRTH -GRADE 2..............................................................................................89EDU 526 CURRENT ISSUES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION,BIRTH-GRADE 2ASSESSMENT OF PROGRESS, RELATIONSHIPS, FAMILIES, LEGALAND COMMUNITY ISSUES.............................................................89EDU 530 ADVANCED MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM ANDMETHODS FOR CHILDHOOD AND MIDDLE CHILDHOODDIVERSE LEARNERS..........................................................................89EDU 531 ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS CURRICULUMAND METHODS FOR INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OFCHILDHOOD DIVERSE LEARNERS...............................................89EDU 532 ADVANCED SCIENCE CONTENT AND METHODOLOGYFOR CHILDHOOD DIVERSE LEARNERS......................................90EDU 533 ADVANCED CURRICULUM AND METHODS OFTEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN CHILDHOOD INCLUSIVECLASSROOMS....................................................................................91EDU 537 DIVERSE ABILITIES AND NEEDS OF STUDENTS ININCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS BIRTH GRADE-2, CHILDHOOD 1-6AND ADOLESCENCE 7-12..............................................................90EDU 539 FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL(FLES) METHODS – TEACHING WORLD LANGUAGES TOCHILDREN...........................................................................................90EDU 540 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS FOR TESOLPROFESSIONALS...............................................................................90EDU 541 SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND TESOLTHEORY AND PRACTICE........................................................................90EDU 542 STRUCTURE AND APPLICATION OF AMERICANENGLISH..............................................................................................91EDU 543 INTERDISCIPLINARY TEACHING METHODS ANDENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS FOR PK-12 ENGLISH LANGUAGELEARNERS...........................................................................................91EDU 544 PK-12 TESOL TEACHING PRACTICES AND ASSESSMENTIN THE CONTENT AREAS................................................................91EDU 545 TESOL STUDENT TEACHING (GRADES PK–12)............91EDU 546 TESOL SUMMER PRACTICUM............................................91EDU 547A DEVELOPING ACTION RESEARCH FOR DIVERSECLASSROOMS....................................................................................91EDU 547B DEVELOPING ACTION RESEARCH FOR SPECIALEDUCATION AND INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS IN CHILDHOODEDUCATION........................................................................................91EDU 547C DEVELOPING ACTION RESEARCH FOR SPECIALEDUCATION AND INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS INADOLESCENT EDUCATION...........................................................92EDU 547D DEVELOPING ACTION RESEARCH FOR TEACHINGENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL)..92EDU 548 TESOL STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR PK–6, 7– 12...92EDU 549A TEACHER AS RESEARCHER IN DIVERSECLASSROOMS....................................................................................92EDU 549B TEACHER AS RESEARCHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATIONAND INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OF CHILDHOODLEARNERS...........................................................................................93EDU 549C TEACHER AS RESEARCHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATIONAND INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS OF ADOLESCENTLEARNERS...........................................................................................93EDU 549D TEACHER AS RESEARCHER IN TEACHING ENGLISH TOSPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL)...........................93EDU 550A PRE-PROFESSIONAL CHILDHOOD FIELDEXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS............................93EDU 550B PRE-PROFESSIONAL CHILDHOOD/SPECIALEDUCATION FIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVECLASSROOMS....................................................................................93EDU 550D PRE-PROFESSIONAL CHILDHOOD/TESOL PK–12FIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS................93EDU 550E PRE-PROFESSIONAL EARLY CHILDHOOD/CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCE, NURSERY, PK,KINDERGARTEN, GRADES 1-2 (60 HRS)....................................94EDU 550F PRE-PROFESSIONAL SUMMER TESOL PK–12 FIELDEXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS............................94EDU 551A* STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD (GRADES 1–3).94EDU 551B* STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD (GRADES 1–3,REGULAR AND SPECIAL EDUCATION)......................................94EDU 551E STUDENT TEACHING EARLY CHILDHOODNURSERY, PK, KINDERGARTEN, GRADES 1-2.................................94EDU 552A* STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD (GRADES 4–6).94EDU 552B* STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD/SPECIALEDUCATION (GRADES 4–6 REGULAR AND SPECIALEDUCATION)......................................................................................94EDU 553A* STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR—CHILDHOOD(GRADES 1-6).....................................................................................94EDU 553B* STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR—CHILDHOOD/SPECIAL EDUCATION (GRADES 1–6).........................................94EDU 554A PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADOLESCENT FIELDEXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS............................95182


EDU 554B PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADOLESCENT/SPECIAL EDUCATIONFIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS......................95EDU 554D PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADOLESCENT/TESOL PK–12FIELD EXPERIENCES IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS................95EDU 555A* STUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE (GRADES 7–9).... 95EDU 555B* STUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE/SPECIALEDUCATION (GRADES 7–9)...........................................................95EDU 556A* STUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE (GRADES10–12)..................................................................................................95EDU 556B* STUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE/SPECIALEDUCATION (GRADES 10–12)......................................................95EDU 557A* STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR ADOLESCENT(GRADES 7–12)..................................................................................95EDU 557B* STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR ADOLESCENT/SPECIAL EDUCATION (GRADES 7–12).......................................95EDU 565 STRATEGIES AND TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHINGMIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS.96EDU 567 PSYCHOLOGICAL, SOCIAL AND SPECIAL NEEDS OFADOLESCENTS..................................................................................96EDU 569 AUTISM AND ASPERGER IN INCLUSIVECLASSROOMS....................................................................................96EDU 570 CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS WITHDISABILITIES.......................................................................................96EDU 571 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF STUDENTS WITHDISABILITIES.......................................................................................96EDU 572 STRATEGIES, METHODS AND ENVIRONMENTS FORTEACHING CHILDHOOD STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES....96EDU 573 STRATEGIES, METHODS AND ENVIRONMENTS FORTEACHING ADOLESCENT STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES..96EDU 574 CURRICULUM CONTENT, PRACTICES ANDENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES FOR TEACHING CHILDHOODSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES.....................................................97EDU 575 CURRICULUM CONTENT, PRACTICES ANDENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES FOR TEACHING ADOLESCENTSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES.....................................................97EDU 576 SPECIAL EDUCATION PRACTICUM..................................97EDU 577 SPECIAL EDUCATIONSTUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD (GRADES 1–6)...............97EDU 578 SPECIAL EDUCATIONSTUDENT TEACHING ADOLESCENCE (GRADES 7–12)........97EDU 579 STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR—CHILDHOOD ANDADOLESCENCE/SPECIAL EDUCATION......................................97EDU 580 EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY AND ANTHROPOGENICEFFECTS ON BIODIVERSITY FOR ADOLESCENT CLASSROOMS.97EDU 581 MOLECULAR GENETICS WITH APPLICATIONS TOINHERITED DISEASE, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ANDEVOLUTION........................................................................................98EDU 582 ADVANCED RESEARCH TECHNIQUESTHE MODERN LABORATORY EXPERIENCE AS AN INVESTIGATIVESTRATEGY TO ENHANCE SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY FOR THEADOLESCENT LEARNER.................................................................98EDU 583 HISTORY OF BIOLOGY AND 21ST CENTURYSOCIAL, ETHICAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL CONCERNS........98EDU 584 MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY FORTEACHING GRADES 7, 8 AND ALGEBRA 1 FOR DIVERSELEARNERS IN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS..................................98EDU 585 MATHEMATICS CONCEPTS AND PEDAGOGY OF THEREFORM PRE-CALCULUS AND CALCULUS..............................98EDU 586 MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGYFOR PROBLEM SOLVING IN GEOMETRY, ALGEBRA 2 ANDTRIGONOMETRY FOR THE DIVERSE LEARNER IN THEINCLUSIVE CLASSROOM................................................................98EDU 587 MATHEMATICS AND PEDAGOGY USING THE GRAPHINGCALCULATOR AND COMPUTER APPLICATIONS..........................99EDU 588 WRITING TECHNIQUES FOR DIVERSE ADOLESCENTLEARNERS...........................................................................................99EDU 589 LITERARY GENRES FOR DIVERSE ADOLESCENTLEARNERS...........................................................................................99EDU 590 MYTHOLOGY, FICTION, FILM AND THE TEACHING OFCONTEMPORARY ISSUES TO DIVERSE ADOLESCENT LEARNERS.99EDU 591 TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING TO DIVERSEADOLESCENT LEARNERS...............................................................99EDU 592 TEACHING THE UNITED STATES IN THE AGE OFGLOBALIZATION TO ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERS....99EDU 593 TEACHING EUROPE IN THE 20TH CENTURY TOADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERS.............................................99EDU 594 TEACHING THE MODERNIZATION OF THE NON-WESTERN WORLD TO ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERS.99EDU 595 TEACHING THE POLITICS OF CHOICE TO ADOLESCENTDIVERSE LEARNERS........................................................................100EDU 596 COMMUNICATIVE PROFICIENCYTHE DEVELOPMENT OF ORAL SKILLS IN THE INCLUSIVECLASSROOM OF ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERS..........100EDU 597 SPANISH GRAMMAR TOPICS, PEDAGOGICAL APPLICATIONTO THE READING AND WRITING PROCESS FOR THE INCLUSIVECLASSROOM OF ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERS................... 100EDU 598 SPANISH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION FOR THE INCLUSIVECLASSROOM OF ADOLESCENT DIVERSE LEARNERS................... 100EDU 599 LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION FORTHE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM OF ADOLESCENT DIVERSELEARNERS.........................................................................................100Education Master’s and Post Master’s Program Policies andPractices..............................................................................................54Education Master’s and Post Master’s Programs.........................58Education Master’s Programs.............................................................50Education Program Progression Policies........................................53ETH 505 ADVANCED MEDICAL ETHICS..........................................118Expenses.....................................................................................................15EXPENSES FOR DOCTORAL PROGRAM............................................16EXPENSES FOR MASTER’S AND POST MASTER’S PROGRAMS.15FFaculty - Full Time.................................................................................160Faculty - Part Time................................................................................163Fall 2010....................................................................................................166Fall 2011....................................................................................................173Fall 2011 Classes Begin Wednesday, September 7, 2011.......172Fall 2012 Classes Begin Wednesday, September 5, 2012.......179Family Nurse Practitioner - ADV. CERT..........................................133FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER - M.S..............................................121Federal Aid - Graduate..........................................................................19FERPA RIGHTS NOTIFICATION............................................................12FINAL EXAMINATIONS...........................................................................29Financial Aid, Scholarships and Awards..........................................19GGoals of Molloy College........................................................................10Goals of the Criminal Justice Program...........................................146GRADE APPEALS......................................................................................31GRADE REPORTS......................................................................................31GRADING POLICY....................................................................................29Graduate Assistant Program...............................................................19Graduate Criminal Justice Course Descriptions.........................148Graduate Education Course Descriptions......................................85Graduate Fellowships............................................................................19Graduate Music Therapy Course Descriptions...........................111Graduate Program in Social Work...................................................150GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS...........................................................35183


HHEALTH AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE..............................................15History of Molloy....................................................................................... 9HONOR PLEDGE AND ACADEMIC HONESTY.................................31Honor Societies........................................................................................34Honors, Awards, Graduation and Beyond......................................35IINCOMPLETES...........................................................................................30INDEPENDENT STUDY............................................................................29INSTITUTE FOR INTERFAITH DIALOGUE..........................................26INSTITUTE FOR SCHOOL LEADERSHIP.............................................25INSTITUTE OF GERONTOLOGY............................................................26INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD........................................................28INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION.............................................................23International Education - Formerly Global Learning..................22INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION SHORT-TERM PROGRAMS.........22International Students...........................................................................14JJanuary Intersession 2011..................................................................167January Intersession 2012..................................................................174KKAPPA DELTA PI.......................................................................................34Kiran and Anil Chaturvedi MBA Leadership Award....................20LLetter from the Vice President for Academic Affairs.................... 7LIABILITY AND STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY.....................................15Library..........................................................................................................21MMANAGEMENT - M.B.A..........................................................................42MANAGEMENT AND PERSONAL FINANCIALPLANNING - M.B.A...........................................................................44MAT 525 TOPICSMATHEMATICS EDUCATION..............................................................100MAT 550 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS WITH COMPUTERS..............118MAT 591 INDEPENDENT STUDY.......................................................118Memberships............................................................................................11Middle School Extensions....................................................................84MILL - MOLLOY INSTITUTE FOR LIFELONG LEARNING...............26Mission of the Office of Academic Affairs......................................... 9Mission Statement of Molloy................................................................ 9MUS 505 MUSIC THERAPY FOUNDATIONS..................................111MUS 506 MUSIC THERAPY TREATMENT PLANNING.................111MUS 508 CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN MUSIC THERAPY I.............111MUS 509 CLINICAL PRACTICUM IN MUSIC THERAPY II............111MUS 520 INTERNSHIP I........................................................................111MUS 521 INTERNSHIP II.......................................................................111MUS 525 CLINICAL IMPROVISATION..............................................111MUS 526 CLINICAL PIANO IMPROVISATION................................111MUS 527 SURVEY OF WORLD MUSIC.............................................111MUS 528 INTRODUCTION TO GUIDED IMAGERY AND MUSIC....111MUS 529 BASIC THEORIES OF PSYCHOTHERAPY AND THEIRRELATIONSHIP TO MUSIC THERAPY........................................111MUS 530 MUSIC THERAPY INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PLAN(IEP) ASSESSMENT..........................................................................111MUS 531 FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC THERAPY GROUPS.........111MUS 532 MUSIC AND MEDICINEMUSIC PSYCHOTHERAPY IN HEALTHCARE COMMUNITIES...112MUS 533 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS IN MUSIC THERAPY.............112184MUS 534 QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITIVE RESEARCH.............112MUS 535 ADVANCED CLINICAL SUPERVISION............................112MUS 536 BASIC THEORY AND PRACTICE OF GUIDED IMAGERYAND MUSIC (GIM)..........................................................................112MUS 537 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS TO BASIC GUIDED IMAGERYAND MUSIC (GIM)..........................................................................112MUS 538 NORDOFF-ROBBINS MUSIC THERAPY.........................112MUS 539 ANALYTICAL MUSIC THERAPY.......................................112MUS 540 THESISMUSIC THERAPY....................................................................................112Music Therapy - M.S. for Students Admitted Holding a B.S.Degree in Music Therapy............................................................110Music Therapy - M.S. for Students Admitted Not Holding a B.S.Degree in Music Therapy............................................................109Music Therapy Program......................................................................107Music Therapy Program Goals..........................................................107Music Therapy Program Philosophy..............................................107Music Therapy Program Progression Policies.............................109NNONDISCRIMINATION POLICY...........................................................11NUR 471 THEORETICAL TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONALNURSING...........................................................................................123NUR 505 ADVANCED NURSING THEORY......................................123NUR 510 CURRENT ISSUES IN PROFESSIONAL NURSING........123NUR 515 ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY............................................123NUR 524 ADVANCED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY..................................123NUR 528 INFORMATICS FOR NURSE EDUCATORS.....................123NUR 529 HEALTH ISSUES WITH A GLOBAL VIEW.......................123NUR 530 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT........................................123NUR 531 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION..............................124NUR 532 PRACTICUM IN NURSING EDUCATION........................124NUR 533 CNSFOUNDATIONS AND DECISION MAKING......................................124NUR 534 CNSADULT HEALTH PRACTICE I...............................................................124NUR 535 CNSADULT HEALTH PRACTICE II..............................................................124NUR 536 CNSADULT HEALTH PRACTICE III.............................................................124NUR 538 ROLE OF THE CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST...............124NUR 540 ADMINISTRATION I.............................................................124NUR 541 ADMINISTRATION II............................................................124NUR 542 PRACTICUM IN NURSING ADMINISTRATION.............125NUR 543 NURSING INFORMATICS I.................................................125NUR 544 NURSING INFORMATICS II................................................125NUR 545 NURSING INFORMATICS III...............................................125NUR 546 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT..........................125NUR 547 HEALTH CARE FINANCE AND BUDGETING................125NUR 548 NURSING INFORMATICS IV..............................................125NUR 551 NPPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE I.......................................................125NUR 552 NPPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE II.....................................................125NUR 553 NPPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE III....................................................126NUR 555 RESEARCH METHOD AND DESIGN................................126NUR 557 ANPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE I.......................................................126NUR 558 ANPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE II.....................................................126NUR 559 ANPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE III....................................................126NUR 560 THESIS ADVISEMENT (OPTIONAL).................................126


NUR 561 THESIS (OPTIONAL)............................................................126NUR 562 FNPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE I.......................................................126NUR 563 FNPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE II.....................................................127NUR 564 FNPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE III....................................................127NUR 566 PNPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE I.......................................................127NUR 567 PNPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE II.....................................................127NUR 568 PNPPRACTICUM IN PRIMARY CARE III....................................................127NUR 570 HIGHER EDUCATION IN AMERICA.................................127NUR 571 CREATIVE STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING NURSING...128NUR 572 ADVANCED PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT...........................128NUR 573 PHARMACOTHERAPEUTICS.............................................128NUR 576 ANPDIAGNOSTIC REASONING..................................................................128NUR 577 PNPDIAGNOSTIC REASONING..................................................................128NUR 578 FNPDIAGNOSTIC REASONING..................................................................128NUR 579 ANPDIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS I..................................................129NUR 580 ANPDIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS II................................................129NUR 581 FNPDIAGNOSIS AND THERAPEUTICS I...................................................129NUR 582 FNPDIAGNOSIS AND THERAPEUTICS II..................................................129NUR 583 ROLE OF NURSE PRACTITIONER IN PRIMARY CARE.129NUR 584 PNPDIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS I..................................................129NUR 585 PNPDIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS II................................................129NUR 586 FNPDIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPEUTICS III...........................................129NUR 592 NPPTHEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS..........................................................129NUR 593 NPPDIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS I..................................................130NUR 594 NPPDIAGNOSES AND THERAPEUTICS II................................................130NUR 597 PRACTICUMPRIMARY CARE IV..................................................................................130NUR 598 TOPICS IN NURSING THEORY..........................................130NUR 599 INDEPENDENT STUDY.......................................................130NUR 600 HALLMARKS OF SCHOLARLY INQUIRY........................141NUR 601 ETHICSTHE FOUNDATION OF LEADERSHIP................................................141NUR 602 NURSING CONCEPT ANALYSIS THROUGH THEHUMANITIES....................................................................................141NUR 603 SCHOLARSHIP OF HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION ANDPOLICY...............................................................................................141NUR 604 PHILOSOPHICAL EVOLUTION OF NURSINGKNOWLEDGE....................................................................................141NUR 605 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN..................................141NUR 606 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN..............................141NUR 607 ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE ANAYLSIS........................141NUR 608 ADVANCED QUALITATIVE ANAYLYSIS........................141NUR 609 RESEARCH RESIDENCY......................................................141NUR 610 HALLMARKS OF SCHOLARLY DESIGN ANDIMPLICATIONS.................................................................................142NUR 699 ADVANCED DIRECTED STUDY TOPICS........................142NUR 700 LEADERSHIP INNOVATIONS AND INTERVENTIONS.142NUR 701 NURSING EDUCATIONPRINCIPLES, DYNAMICS AND INNOVATIONS..............................142NUR 800 DISSERTATION SEMINAR..................................................142NUR 801 DISSERTATION PROGRESSION........................................132Nurse Informatics - ADV. CERT.........................................................121Nurse Practitioner Clinical Specialty Areas M.S. Tracks...........134Nurse Practitioner Psychiatry - ADV. CERT...................................122NURSE PRACTITIONER PSYCHIATRY - M.S....................................122Nurse Practitioner Specialities..........................................................128Nursing - Ph.D.........................................................................................140Nursing Administration - ADV. CERT..............................................133Nursing Administration with Informatics - ADV. CERT............133NURSING ADMINISTRATION WITH INFORMATICS - M.S..........120Nursing Doctoral Course Descriptions..........................................141Nursing Doctoral Program Goals.....................................................136Nursing Doctoral Program Handbook...........................................140Nursing Doctoral Program Philosophy.........................................136Nursing Doctoral Program Plan of Study.....................................138Nursing Doctoral Program Progression Requirements...........137Nursing Doctoral Programs...............................................................136Nursing Doctoral Statement of Purpose.......................................136Nursing Education - ADV. CERT........................................................133NURSING EDUCATION - M.S..............................................................114Nursing Education, Administration or Clinical Practice AreasM.S. Tracks........................................................................................120Nursing Education, Nursing Administration, Nurse Informatics,Nursing Administration with Informatics and Clinical NurseSpecialistAdult Health............................................................................................130Nursing Learning Laboratory Coordinators and Instructors.165Nursing Master’s Program..................................................................116Nursing Master’s and Post Master’s Course Descriptions.......123Nursing Master’s Pre-Clinical/Practicum Requirements.........119Nursing Master’s Program..................................................................119Nursing Master’s Program Statement of Purpose.....................116Nursing Post Master’s Advanced Certificate Programs...........130OOffice for Mission...................................................................................157Office of Academic Affairs..................................................................154Office of Advancement.......................................................................155Office of Enrollment Management.................................................156Office of Planning, Research and Technology............................157Office of Student Affairs......................................................................158Office of the President.........................................................................154Office of the Treasurer.........................................................................158Offices of Administration...................................................................154Overview of Post-Master’s Nursing.................................................130PPAYMENT METHODS..............................................................................17Pediatric Nurse Practitioner - ADV. CERT......................................134PEDIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER - M.S........................................122PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING - M.B.A.....................................42PHI 591 INDEPENDENT STUDY.........................................................130Philosophy of the Criminal Justice Program...............................146Philosophy of the Division of Nursing Master’s Program.......116Post-Master’s Advanced Certificate Programs In Education.101Post-Master’s Certificate Program - Teaching English toSpeakers of Other Languages PK-12.......................................101Post-Master’s Certificate Program - Teaching Students withDisabilities in Grades 1-6.............................................................101185


Post-Master’s Certificate Program - Teaching Students withDisabilities in Grades 7-12..........................................................102PROBATION POLICY................................................................................31Professors Emeriti..................................................................................159Program of Study leading to a M.S. Degree inCriminal Justice...............................................................................146Program of Study leading to M.S. Degreesin Music Therapy............................................................................109Programs of Study - Nursing Education, Administration orClinical Practice...............................................................................132Programs of Study for Master’s of Nursing Tracks....................120Programs of Study for MBA Degrees:........................................41, 43Programs of Study for MSW Program............................................151Programs of Study Leading to M.S. in Education Degrees.......58PROGRESSION POLICY...........................................................................31Progression through Criminal Justice Program.........................146PSY 505 ADVANCED SURVEY OF DEVELOPMENTALPSYCHOLOGY..................................................................................112PSY 541 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY..........................................................112RReadmission/Re-Entry Policies...........................................................14REFUNDS....................................................................................................18REGISTRATION AND ADVISEMENT....................................................27Rehabilitation Act Campus Coordinators.....................................165REPEATING COURSES.............................................................................30ROTC—RESERVE OFFICER’S TRAINING CORP................................26SSCIENCE AND MATH EDUCATION INSTITUTE...............................26SEMESTER HOURS/CREDIT HOURS...................................................33SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAM...........................................................26SIENA WOMEN’S CENTER.....................................................................26SIGMA BETA DELTA................................................................................34SIGMA THETA TAU, EPSILON KAPPA CHAPTER............................34SPECIAL FEES............................................................................................16Special Molloy Programs, Centers and Institutes........................24Spring 2011.............................................................................................168Spring 2012.............................................................................................175STEEP—Success Through Expanded Education Program.......20Student Affairs..........................................................................................23Student Health Services........................................................................23Student Personal Counseling Service..............................................24Suffolk Center...........................................................................................21Summer Session I 2011.......................................................................170Summer Session I 2012.......................................................................177Summer Session II 2011......................................................................170Summer Session II 2012......................................................................177Summer Session Long I 2011............................................................171Summer Session Long I 2012............................................................178Summer Session Long II 2011...........................................................171Summer Session Long II 2012...........................................................178Summer Session Long III 2011..........................................................172Summer Session Long III 2012..........................................................178SUMMER SESSIONS.................................................................................28Summer Sessions Short and Long 2011.......................................169Summer Sessions Short and Long 2012.......................................176TRANSFER POLICY...................................................................................28Tuition Discount - Education..............................................................19UUNDERGRADUATE-LEVEL EXPENSES POLICY................................16WWAIVER/SUBSTITUTION COURSES....................................................29Welcome to the Criminal Justice Program from the AssociateDean and Director.........................................................................145Welcome to the Division of Education from the Dean of theDivision................................................................................................48Welcome to the Division of Humanities from the Dean of theDivision..............................................................................................104Welcome to the Division of Social Sciences from the Dean ofthe Division......................................................................................144Welcome to the Education Master’s and Post Master’sPrograms from the Associate Dean and Director................49Welcome to the Graduate Nursing Programs from the Dean ofthe Division......................................................................................114Welcome to the MBA Programs from the Associate Dean andDirector................................................................................................39Welcome to the MBA Programs from theDean of the Division.......................................................................38Welcome to the Music Therapy Program from the Chairpersonof the Music Department............................................................105Welcome to the Music Therapy Program from the Director.106Welcome to the Nursing Doctoral Program from the AssociateDean and Director.........................................................................135Welcome to the Nursing Master’s and Post Master’s Programsfrom the Acting Director of Graduate Nursing...................115WITHDRAWAL - EXIT OFFICIALLY FROM COLLEGE.....................32WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES.........................................................31WITHDRAWALS - LEAVE FOR ONE SEMESTER OFF......................32Writing Resource Center.......................................................................21TTESOL (PK-12) - PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION IN AREAS OFINITIAL CERTIFICATION AND ADDITIONAL INITIAL TESOLCERTIFICATION - M.S.......................................................................84TESOL (PK-12) Program.........................................................................84TRANSCRIPTS............................................................................................31186


Directions toMolloy CollegeVIA RAILROAD - From Manhattan (Penn Station) or Brooklyn(Flatbush Avenue Station):Take the L.I.R.R. Babylon branch eastbound to Rockville Centre.Cabs are available from the Rockville Centre train station, ortake the N16 bus north to the campus.VIA RAILROAD - From points east of Rockville Centre:Take either the L.I.R.R. Babylon line or the Main Branchwestbound. On the Babylon branch, go to Rockville Centreand follow instructions above. On the Main Branch, go toHempstead, and either take a cab or the N16 bus southbound.VIA AIRMolloy College is located approximately 30 miles from LongIsland’s MacArthur Airport, and within 20 miles of LaGuardiaAirport and Kennedy International Airport. Limousine serviceis available from all three area airports. In addition, there is ascheduled bus service from Kennedy Airport to the RockvilleCentre railroad station.VIA CAR From Manhattan or Queens:Take Grand Central Parkway or Long Island Expressway eastto the Cross Island Parkway. Take Cross Island Parkway southto Southern State Parkway. Take Southern State east to Exit19N (Peninsula Boulevard). Make the second right turn ontoAlabama Avenue. Continue to S. Franklin Avenue. Make a rightturn. Molloy is on the right side of the street after the overpass.From New England, Westchester, upstate New York or theBronx:Take either the Whitestone or Throgs Neck Bridge to the CrossIsland Parkway. Take Cross Island Parkway south to SouthernState Parkway. Take Southern State Parkway east to Exit 19Nas described above.From Brooklyn:Take the Belt Parkway, which becomes the Southern StateParkway east to Exit 19N as described above.From points on Long Island east of Rockville Centre:Take Southern State Parkway west to Exit 20S. Turn right ontoGrand Avenue. Make a right on Georgia Street. Georgia Streetbecome Beech Street, which ends opposite Molloy College.FROM EXIT 20S (Grand Avenue):Turn right onto Grand Avenue. Make a right onto Georgia Street.Georgia Street becomes Beech Street, which ends opposite MolloyCollege (approximately one-half mile from Grand Avenue toMolloy).187


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