CRICKET MUSEUM - New Zealand Cricket

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CRICKET MUSEUM - New Zealand Cricket

NEW ZEALANDCRICKET MUSEUMEDUCATIONSri Lankan Dance Academy PerformanceIn association with the museum and New ZealandCricket, the Sri Lankan Dance Academy of Wellingtonperformed a series of cultural dances during thesecond test match against Sri Lanka at the BasinReserve in December.The 12-minute performance took place during theSunday tea break on the third day of the test to anappreciative audience of spectators. The Sri LankanDance Academy presented a medley of traditionaland modern dance styles. The dance routines combined aboutsix dance styles seen in Sri Lanka today. The colourful costumes,gracefulness of the dance, and the rhythm of the music broughttogether a unique dance performance created specially forthe occasion.Four Sri Lankan Dancers performing a Snake(front) and Gypsy Dance 2005Photographer: Narmalie WeerasekeraPrivate CollectionIt is hoped that in future, the museum,in collaboration with New ZealandCricket and cultural organisationswithin the Wellington region, will beable to organise annual cultural eventsand/or performances when visitingteams play test matches at the BasinReserve. This concept and practicecould be adopted at other venues, as a way of celebrating culturaldiversity, and paying respect to a touring teams historical, socialand cultural traditions.William Wakefield Memorial DisplayA new display to celebrate the restoration and installation ofthe William Wakefield Memorial, to as near as possible to itsoriginal 1917 location insidethe Basin Reserve, wasopened in the John OakleyGallery in the museum onthe 7th of October, the sameday the installation wasofficially celebrated by theWellington City Council.EXHIBITIONS / DISPLAYSNew Zealand Cricket – 1930’s & 1940’s ChronologyThis showcase display opened on the 28th of November. The undoubted highlight isthe unique film to DVD transfer of original moving, silent film material shot by theNew Zealand vice-captain H. G. ‘Giff’ Vivian on the 1937 New Zealand cricket tour ofEngland (not the 1931 tour as noted in the Winter/Spring 2006 NZCM Newsletter).The original 180 minutes of 7 film reels has been edited to approximately 6 x 6 minutesegments, totalling just over 40mins in all. The images include a practice at the BasinReserve before the departure by ship to England, shipboard scenes of deck gamesand exercises, plus footage of New Zealand’s first Labour Prime Minister, MichaelJoseph Savage, who accompanied the cricketers en route to the coronation of KingGeorge VI.The footage also includes the arrival in England, the first net practice at Lord’s, imagesof the county and test matches, as well as social and formal occasions on tour. Finally,there are images of the Adelaide Oval, the MCG and SCG on the return to New Zealandvia Australia and games against South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales.This includes images of Don and Jessie Bradman, and New Zealand-born, Australiantest cricketer, Clarrie Grimmett, bowling his leg-spinners and ‘flippers’ in front ofthe camera.The film was shot on aBell & Howell 8mmcamera which has beenkindly gifted to themuseum and includedin the display.New Zealand Women’s Cricket Team - Tour of England 1954Members of the team take the field against a combined Essex & Kent XI, Chalkwell Park, Southend, England 14 July 1954(I. to r.): Betty Butler, Rona McKenzie, Peg Batty, Ina Lamason, Verna Coutts, Eris Paton, Joyce Currie, Vi Farrell(at rear), Joan Hatcher, Mary Rouse.Photographer: UnknownPrivate CollectionSummer/Autumn Newsletter 2006/07Two Sri Lankan Dancers in traditional Kandyan Dance Costumes 2005Photographer: Narmalie Weerasekera. Private CollectionVISITS TO THE MUSEUM Phone: 04 385 6602 • Fax: 04 384 3498The Old Grandstand, Basin Reserve, WellingtonPublic HoursSummer Season: 10.30 – 3.30pm Monday to Sunday and all matchdays i.e. 01 November to 30 April.Winter Season: 10.30 – 3.30pm Weekends only i.e. 01 May to31 October or by special arrangement.Closed Christmas Day, New Year’s Day and Good Friday.Schools & Group HoursSummer Season: Open Monday to Friday 10.30 – 3.30pmby prior arrangement (not on match days).Winter Season: As above but by special arrangement.Admission Charge$5 adults; $2 students/children. Children (12 years & under) freeif accompanied by an adult.School groups $1per student and $2 per adult.Other group visits by arrangement.BookingsThe museum welcomes school/group visits by prior arrangement. Weappreciate at least two weeks notice to enable successful liaison timewith the Host/Guide and to ensure that you are able to book the mostsuitable times.Note: The museum can comfortably accommodate 25 students andaccompanying teachers and adults, split into two groups, at one time.William Wakefield Memorialc.1890J.N. Taylor CollectionAlexander Turnbull LibraryF1047771/2Email: national.cricket.museum@paradise.net.nzWebsite: www.nzcricket.co.nzBasin Reserve ToursTours can be organised to the New Zealand Cricket Museum, theR.A. Vance Stand, the Groundsmen’s Shed and the perimeter ofthe ground to view famous historical cricket plaques.FacilitiesMuseum toilet including disabled toilet.Bus & car parking adjacent to the museum.Museum shop stocks a variety of books, postcards, miniature cricketbats, balls etc.Lending LibraryThe library is available for lending, research and study purposes.Hours by arrangement.How To Find UsBy Car: Drive in/enter by the southern (J.R. Reid) Gate at theBasin Reserve.By Bus: Stagecoach Wellington. Buses 1, 42, 43, 44 travel to/fromKent & Cambridge Terrace to the Central Railway Station.By Rail: NZ Tranz Metro units depart from the Central Railway Station.By Foot: Enter the Basin by the northern or southern Gates andproceed to museum.GeneralSmoking, food or drink are not permitted.‘Giff’ Vivian filming the arrivalin England of the 1937 NZCricket Team at Southamptonon board the R.M.S. ArawaPhotographer: E.H. Buckley,Southampton, EnglandPrivate CollectionAlso ShowingNew Zealand Test Cricketers 2006An updated display (commenced 28.11.2006).William Wakefield Memorial DisplaySee Education page for details (commenced 07.10.2006).The 1930’s & 1940’s Showcase Display 2006Photographer: Mark Coote. NZCM Archives


COLLECTION MANAGEMENTCollection & Archives UpgradeA major re-organisation of the collection and the upgrade ofthe collection and archives storeroom was undertaken over thewinter months and early spring leading to the temporaryrelocation of the collection and archives to the museum theatre.This allowed the existing and untreated wooden shelving unitsto be removed and replaced with ‘keylock’ metal shelving unitsand moisture-cured sheets of customwood. Sheets of Eva60foam were then placed on top of the customwood (in thecollection area only) in readiness for the re-installation of thecollection and archives.The task of returning the collections and archives from thetheatre to the storeroom was undertaken at the same time asappropriate collection and placement strategies were put inplace. This work included a substantial amount of resorting,re-boxing and re-labelling of the collection into museumconservation boxes using mylar sleeves, acid-free tissues, acidfreeenvelopes etc. When this process of re-organisation, redefinitionof collection andarchives categories, and shelfplacements was resolved andcompleted, the collections andarchives were re-housed on thenew storage shelves.This project was Stage Oneof a longer-term strategy toupgrade the environmentalconditions of the collectionand archives store and preparefor the introduction ofthe Vernon CollectionsManagement software systemin 2007. Computer hardwarehas already been purchasedand funding is available to acquire the Vernon software packageand provide training. The next step is to secure funding for theappointment of a part-time Collections Manager to accessionand document the collection.The Museum Curator placing a silver trophy on a shelfCollection and Archives Storeroom, NZCMPhotographer: Mark CooteNZCM ArchivesCostume Boxes with Caps and NZC World Cup Blazer 1992Equipment & Clothing Collection, NZCMPhotographer: Mark CooteNZCM ArchivesConservation Boxes housing Photographs, Badges& Miniature Cricket BatsPhotography, Ephemera, Equipment & Clothing CollectionsPhotographer: Mark CooteNZCM ArchivesThe new ‘Keylock’ Shelving housing Collection ObjectsCollection and Archives Storeroom, NZCMPhotographer: Mark CooteNZCM ArchivesNEW ZEALAND CRICKET HISTORYNew Zealand Women’s Cricket Team –Tour of England 1954On 10 April 1954, sixteen players and a manager left Wellingtonon the adventure of a lifetime. Ahead of them lay a month-longsea voyage – the prelude to a strenuous nineteen-match tourof England that would include three tests.Overall, expectations were not high. No New Zealand women’steam had toured England before. Only two of the players hadany experience of English conditions. There had been criticismover the number of older players picked and debate about thereplacement of the incumbent test captain, Wellington’s wilyIna Lamason, by Auckland’s Rona McKenzie. Worse, to allowtime for raising enough money to finance the trip, the selectorshad been forced to choose the team a season early. Some ofthose selected were now out of form.England’s visits to New Zealand in 1935 and 1949 had exposeda gaping gulf between the two sides. No one could be sure thatNew Zealand had improved since then. ‘We are breaking newground,’ said team manager, Hilda Coldham, at a parliamentaryreception on the eve of departure. ‘If we win we will takeit modestly, and if we lose it will make us more determinednext time.’Mrs Coldham, NZ Manager, talking to the Mayor of Derby at one of themany Civic Receptions in England 1954Photographer: UnknownPhotography Collection, NZCM. No Accession No.New Zealand Women’s Cricket Team Tour of England 1954Standing (I. to r.): M. J. Currie, V. R. Coutts, J. W. Francis, E. A. Paton, V. H. M.Farrell, P. Blackler, J. M. Coulston, J. C. Hatcher, J. ClothierSeated (I. to r.): M. T. Rouse, R. U. McKenzie (captain), Mrs. G. S. Coldham(manager), I. M. Lamason (vice-captain), J. G. LamasonIn Front: E. M. Butler, M. A. Mitchell. Inset: P. BattyPhotographer: Frank Thompson, Crown Studio, WellingtonPhotography Collection, NZCM. Accession No. 99/16First stop for the tourists was Lord’s. It was only the secondtime women had been allowed to practice there. Some MCCmembers were outraged, but theplayers were warmly welcomedby C.B. Fry and other staunchsupporters of women’s cricket.In London, and during each ofthe tests, the team membersstayed in hotels. The rest of thetime they were billeted locally.They found themselves almostkilled with kindness andlost count of the receptionsattended, the sights seen andthe friendships made. Asambassadors for their country,the 1954 team provedoutstandingly successful.They were also very competitivein the field, despite striking oneof England’s wettest, coldestsummers. Three pulloversapiece were needed to combatthe chill during the opening match versus Warwickshire andSouth Midlands at Edgbaston on 22 April. New Zealand won offthe last ball of the day – the first of several nail-biting finisheson tour.Of the sixteen county matches played, nine were won, fourdrawn and two lost: a satisfying record. Even the two losses –to Yorkshire and to a strong South of England side – were hardfought encounters where the result was in doubt to the end. Theloss to Yorkshire was tempered by the thrill of the team’s firstcentury, a spirited 103 not out to Canterbury’s Phyllis Blackler.The South of England match in Hastings marked the retirementof England’s captain, Molly Hide. A large Bank Holiday crowdsaw 780 runs scored in two days as both teams chased victory.‘A British CartoonistComments on the NZWomen’s Team’Daily Mail, London 1954Cartoonist: Roy UllyettNZCM ArchivesEngland wasexpected todominate the threetests, but there wassurprisingly littlebetween the teamsin terms of bowlingand fielding. WhereEngland excelledwas in cricketingknow how and inbatting. This wasapparent in the first test at Headingley, where Englandbatted themselves out of a dangerous first-innings situationwith breezy aggression while most of the New Zealandersadopted an ultra defensive mindset which led to theirdownfall. With New Zealand’s most dangerous bowler,Wellington’s Joan Francis, succumbing to injury early onday two, England won the match by six wickets.The second and third tests, at Worcester and the Oval, werecloser and more entertaining. At Worcester, fine bowlingby Blackler and Francis put New Zealand in a position to winif they could score 338 in five and a half hours. Instead,team management opted for a draw. In the processAuckland’s Joyce Clothier created an unwanted record bybatting through the entire innings for 37 runs. The thirdtest was interrupted by rain, which spoilt any chance of aresult.The tour proved that New Zealand could competeinternationally. Several players, notably Blackler, Francis,Otago all-rounder Eris Paton, and team captain, RonaMcKenzie, had acquitted themselves with particulardistinction and the team, as a whole, could not be faultedfor effort. But a firsttest victory stillseemed a distantprospect. It awaitedthe day when a NewZealand team wouldhave the confidenceto play to win, ratherthan not to lose.History suppliedAdrienne SimpsonSouvenir ProgrammeNew Zealand Women’sCricket Tour of England1954Ephemera Collection,NZCM. Accession No.2006.37.1BRIEFLY‘The Underarm’ PlayA play entitled ‘The Underarm’, focusing on thecontroversial underarm incident in the ODIbetween New Zealand and Australia at theMelbourne Cricket Ground in 1981 wasperformed at Centrepoint Theatre in PalmerstonNorth and the Circa Theatre in Wellingtonduring October andNovember. Themuseum distributedbrochures to CircaTheatre during theplay’s season inWellington to attractvisitors to themuseum and inreturn the museumallowed CircaTheatre to provideflyers at the museumto promote the play.‘The Underarm’Play Flyer‘French Artist’s XI’The Curator has been invited by the editor of theEnglish Cricket Society Journal to contribute anarticle in a forthcoming issue of the Journal. Hecomposed a ‘French Artist’s XI’ after attending atest match between New Zealand and Australiain March 2005. It was inspired by being in thepresence of his good friends J. Neville Turnerand Monique Damitio.Museum VolunteersThis newsletter continues the theme of anintroduction to museum volunteers.Alun Jones – Originallyfrom Swansea, thehighlight of my first tripto London in 1949 was avisit to the Oval for theEngland v New Zealandtest. Little did a 11 yearoldrealise the part NewZealand would have in myfuture. I came to NZ inAlun Jones1961 – for three years! – and am still here. I haveplayed, coached and umpired cricket and am acollector of books, magazines and programmes.Being a volunteer means you get to meet manyinteresting enthusiasts.Dan Kelly – I am a longtimeBasin Reservistsince my days at St. Pat’sCollege, CambridgeTerrace and as a memberof Wellington Cricket forover 40 years. My interestin museums dates frommy time as a lecturer atTeachers’ College whichDan Kellyinvolved visiting students on teaching practiceat the Museum on Buckle Street. After retiringI spent some years in match management at theBasin and gradually involved myself in thehistory of the Basin, but also in the developmentof the cricket museum.

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