pdf 163 KB - ReAct

reactgroup.org
  • No tags were found...

pdf 163 KB - ReAct

www.reactgroup.orgReAct QuarterlyNo 1/2009Antibiotics Access and ExcessEditorial by Liselotte Diaz Högberg, Deputy Director of ReActReAct's vision is that current and future generations of people aroundthe globe will have access to effective treatment of bacterial infectionsas part of their right to health. Working towards this goal meansaddressing both the problem of excess use to preserve the effect ofexisting drugs, but equally addressing the reverse problem of limitedaccess in other settings to make sure that these potentially lifesavingdrugs reaches those who need them the most.EPN call to ActionAntimicrobial Resistance Workshopin Moshi,Tanzania in November 2008The ReAct partner EcumenicalPharmaceutical Network (EPN)organized a5dayworkshop inMoshi, Tanzania 'Workshop onlocal and regional actions toaddress the problems withantimicrobial resistance.New figures from Unicef show thatonly around 40 percent of childrenunder five in sub-Saharan Africa withsuspected pneumonia are taken to anappropriate health care provider, aproportion that has hardly changed atall during the last six years.Antibiotic use in these children isin many countries reported to be aslow as 10%.Liselotte Diaz-Högberg,Deputy Director,ReActEven worse, we have to rememberthat these figures give us no informationwhether they are receivingeffective antibiotics.We know that resistance to cotrimoxasole,one of the most commonlyused drugs to treat pneumonia is highin many populations, hardly beingmore effective than a sugar pill.For neonatal sepsis, another urgentglobal health problem, up to 70% of allinfections have been estimated not torespond to the WHO recommendedfirst-line treatment.Access to more expensive secondandthird line alternatives that are stilleffective is limited for a largeproportion of people.This raises an important question.When discussing and measuringaccess to treatment of bacterialinfections, should we be satisfied withmerely counting those treated?Or should we focus on what reallymatters, access to treatment thatworks? If so, antibiotic resistance canno longer be ignored.Group photo of the participants at the AMR workshopin MoshiTanzania November 2008. Photo:EPNThe highly appreaciated work-shopwas attended by representatives frommember organisations in 11 countriesin Africa. The objectives of theworkshop were to:Orient the staff of EPN memberorganisations on the serious threatposed by Antimicrobial resistance(AMR)Orient participants on theadvocacy and containment actionsto address this threatReAct Quarterly no 1/2009 1 (2)


www.reactgroup.orgReAct QuarterlyNo 1/2009... EPN call to Action Inform participants on the approachesand tools developed byManagement Sciences for Healthand Strengthening PharmaceuticalSystems programs and other EPNpartners in this regard.Speaking on the clinical consequencesof AMR, ReAct representativeBjorn Blomberg from theUniversity of Bergen in Norwayhighlighted the infectious diseaseburden in African population and theneed for local surveillance data toguide treatment.The key outputs of the meeting werean EPN call to action on AMR andmessages for various actors in healthcare delivery which will be disseminatedin all appropriate fora.Participants also made commitmentsto undertake local action within theircountries and institutions on AMRadvocacy and containment.Read the full meetingreport and the completeMoshi declaration here>EcumenicalPharmaceuticalNetworkwww.epnetwork.orgMicrobes and MetaphorsRe-imaging bacteria, infection and the bodyA dialogue between scientists and artists,5-9 Dec 2008 at Wee Jasper,AustraliaBy Mary Murray,Olle Nordberg and Satya SivaramanFrom 5 to 9 December 2008 a group of artists, scientists, socialactivists and journalists gathered at Cooradigbee Homestead, WeeJasper in New South Wales,Australia, to begin a special mission. Setamidst open green pastures over spectacular undulating terrain andhome to some of the globe's oldest fossil finds, their task was to pulltogether ideas from a wide range of human endeavours with thecommon purpose of re-defining the perception of microbes in thepresent world to evolve new images and metaphors of the dynamicrelationship between microbes,human beings and other species.Participants at the Microbes and Metaphors meetingThe thinking behind the dialogue wasinspired by the report ‘Ending theWarMetaphor: The Changing Agendafor Unravelling the Host–MicrobeRelationship', organised by theInstitute of Medicine of the USNational Academy of Science; and byemerging scientific and artisticexperimentation with bacterial artand ideas for learning from bacterialorganisation.The need for a new paradigm hasbecome more urgent as thepredominant metaphor of war,enemy and antibiotics as the mainweapons against them, is inaccurateand inadequate as a response to theserious threat of antibiotic resistance.The Wee Jasper dialogue wasintended to give fresh attention to thecreation of new concepts andmethods and allow them space andtime to grow naturally.Participants found that many shared asimilar sense of limitation about thecurrent paradigm. It takes time forimages to develop and come to amature expression and avoid cliches.They all agreed that the interactionshould continue and a full report fromthe meeting will be made available onwww.reactgroup.orgA summary with photos andquotes from the participantscan be downloaded here>ReAct Quarterly no 1/2009 2 (2)

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines