Views
3 years ago

RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 23 • JUNE 11, 2010 ...

RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 23 • JUNE 11, 2010 ...

PAGE 4

PAGE 4 WINGSPREADJUNE 11, 2010Gate guards to scan ID cards to test DBIDSBy Robert Goetz502nd Air Base Wing OL-B Public AffairsGate guards will soon scan theID cards of incoming motorists on atrial basis to test Randolph’s newbase-entry system.The 902nd Security ForcesSquadron will begin this “socialization”phase for the DefenseBiometric Identification Systemsometime this month, possibly asearly as next week.“We want to make sure guardsare trained and people are gettingused to having their cardsscanned,” said Master Sgt. AndrewRodriguez, 902nd SFS InstallationSecurity Section NCO in charge.“The socialization phase will definitelytake place during non-peaktraffic hours; it will not create asafety hazard. We want to makesure everybody knows the systemand is seeing how it works.”He said one way people canexpedite the process, both during thesocialization phase and when DBIDSis fully operational later this year, is totake their ID cards out of their walletsor card holders so there is no delaywhen guards scan their cards.Museums offer free admission to military familiesBy Elaine WilsonAmerican Forces Press ServiceCourtesy graphicRandolph’s gate guards will soon beginscanning ID cards to test the new DefenseBiometric Identification System.WASHINGTON – Active-duty servicemembers andtheir families can gain free access to hundreds of museumsthroughout the nation this summer, thanks to apartnership between the National Endowment for theArts and Blue Star Families.More than 600 museums in 50 states and the Districtof Columbia have signed up so far to participate inOperation Appreciation: Blue Star Museums. The programoffers active-duty servicemembers – including activatedGuard and Reserve – and up to five of their immediatefamily members free admission to participatingmuseums through Labor Day.“The Blue Star Museums initiative is a tangibleexpression of appreciation to servicemembers and theirfamilies,” said Barbara Thompson, director of thePentagon’s office of family policy, children and youth. “Itwarms our hearts to see how other federal agencies andlocal communities can think creatively to recognize theirsacrifice and contribution to the nation.”People can visit http://www.arts.gov/national/bluestarmuseums/index.phpfor a complete list of participatingmuseums, which run the gamut from children’s and fineSergeant Rodriguez also saidmotorists whose cards are scanned butare not registered for DBIDS will bebriefed on the requirement and encouragedto register as soon as possible.Active-duty and civilian personnel,including contractors, beganregistering their ID cards for DBIDSin January according to a unitschedule prepared by the 902ndSFS. Open registration for retirees,dependents and personnel not ableto make it during their scheduledtime began May 3 and will concludeJune 30; the remaining open registrationperiods are next week at theRambler Fitness Center, June 21-25at the base exchangeand June 28-30 at the commissary.However, afterJune 30, peoplewill still be ableto register theirID cards at theRandolph VisitorCenter, Bldg.1021, or at the IDcard office, Bldg.399. The visitorcenter housed twopermanent stationsthroughout the registrationperiod while a mobile stationhas moved to various locations throughoutthe process.Participating area museums• Austin Museum of Art, Austin• Fort Sam Houston Museum, Fort Sam Houston• Frontier Times Museum, Bandera• McNay Art Museum, San Antonio• Museum of Western Art, Kerrville• National Museum of the Pacific War, Fredericksburg• Neill-Cochran House Museum, Austinarts to history and science museums. Participatingmuseums include the Art Institute of Chicago, DallasMuseum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, theMuseum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum ofArt in New York City. Participating museums around SanAntonio include the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio,the National Museum of the Pacific War inFredericksburg and the Austin Museum of Art.“This is a fantastic opportunity for servicemembersand their families to enjoy the cultural experiences thatmight have otherwise been inaccessible because of cost,”Ms. Thompson said. “We truly appreciate the generosityDBIDS, an Air Force-wide initiative toenhance force protection, employsscanning devices to manage access atDoD installations. When an ID card isregistered for DBIDS, it is imbeddedwith information that enhances theidentification process. DBIDS provides aconnection to law enforcement databasesand allows guards to spot legitimateversus bogus ID cards, SergeantRodriguez said.Other benefits are giving guards visualand audible crosschecks to verify identities,allowing ID cardholders to enter anybase within the region they have permissionto enter and providing retirees withpermanent registration, he said.Sergeant Rodriguez said DBIDS registrationis now part of in- and outprocessingat Randolph. People whoreceive their DoD ID card in Bldg. 399– or have to obtain a new one – shouldalso get it registered for DBIDS, whichrequires a waiting period of about 30minutes.He estimated that some 20,000 peoplehave registered their ID cards for DBIDS.“I think we’re doing well for our registrationphase,” Sergeant Rodriguez said.He also asked active-duty personneland retirees to make sure their dependents’ID cards are registered.of the National Endowment for the Arts and the participatingmuseums.”While admission is free of charge, some special or limited-timeexhibits may not be included in the program,according to a Blue Star Museums news release. Peopleshould contact the museum directly for specifics.“There have always been wonderful examples of partnershipsbetween museums and military installations,but the scale of this gift from the museum community tomilitary families is thrilling,” Kathy Roth-Douquet, chairmanof Blue Star Families, said in a news release.“Military families work hard for this country, and it isgratifying for us to be recognized for that.”“We anticipate that thousands of military families willparticipate in the program and visit museums this summer– many of them for the first time,” she continued.“Blue Star Families will work hard to help our militaryfamilies make the most of these opportunities.”A group of military spouses formed Blue Star Familiesin December 2008 to raise awareness of the challengesof military family life in partnership with civilian communitiesand leaders, according to the organization’s Website. The nonprofit group has grown to include spousesand families from all services, including National Guardand Reserve, as well as veterans and civilians.

JUNE 11, 2010WINGSPREADNATO students see EWO defense doctrine in actionBy Sean Bowlin502nd Air Base Wing OL-BPublic AffairsThey come from Italy,Germany and Turkey. Theynumber helicopter and jetpilots, an Electronic WarfareOfficer on board AWACS, aground control intercept officerand Remotely Piloted Aircraftmission commanders.They’re student EWOs atRandolph Air Force Base’s563rd Flying Training Squadronsent here to learn to deny theelectronic spectrum of communicationsto the enemy forces.That means there’s much timespent in class, where the NATOstudents were found late lastFriday afternoon as a lot ofRandolph Airmen and civilianswere making homeward-bounddrives out of the base.Capt. Thomas Walker, 563rdFTS instructor, pressed a pointPhoto by Steve ThurowCapt. Thomas Walker (left), 563rd Flying Training Squadron instructor,answers a question from Capt. Giovanni Nappi, Italian Air Force studentelectronic warfare officer.home at the end of his class onElectronic Defense.“The main thing I want youguys to take away from all of thisis that we, as allies, have thecapabilities that can jam them(enemy bloggers, radio broadcastersand other communicators)and take away their spectrum,”Captain Walker said.“We’re winning today’s warby ballots and dollars, bybuilding schools and hospitals.To fight the enemy wehave to enter his OODA Loopquickly. That’s where networkattack and network defenseoperations come in.”Capt. Simone Scuderi, ItalianAir Force student EWO, had afew positive points to makeabout his classes.“I like the structure of the lecturesand the classes are alwaysvery well-prepared,” the nativeof Reggiocalabria, Italy said.“Plus, the doctrine is the same Ilearned in NATO and at home.And the experienced U.S. AirForce guys gave us a big contributionof knowledge to ourunderstanding. All this informationis usable to us and it alsoserves as a vantage point fromwhere we can compare tacticsand discuss them.”Speaking of tactics, his IAFPAGE 5counterpart, Capt. GiovanniNappi, a veteran of sixAfghanistan tours and one Iraqtour, said the exposure toNATO electronic warfare doctrineand interaction withother student EWOs gave hima better idea what he’ll face asa Remotely Piloted vehiclesmission commander.“Thanks to the structure ofthis course, I know a lot nowabout electronic warfare. And bynow, I have ‘visuals’ of mywork,” Captain Nappi added.Another captain and fellowstudent, German Luftwaffe Capt.Axel Wardenga, who has 7900hours on the AWACS – manyamassed during denying airspaceover Turkey – said courseinformation was well-presented.“I flew in support of EW aircraftand know how well theywork with each other,” CaptainWardenga said.”Now I see howit’s all put together.”Day in the Life: Fire station manager makes tough decisionsBy Sean Bowlin502nd Air Base Wing OL-B Public AffairsStation Chief Scott Ridenour keeps a lot of balls inthe air at Randolph Fire Emergency Services’ mainfire station. Daily, a lot happens there...and he’s likea civilian version of a first sergeant. He’s the conduitthrough which all information flows.That information starts flowing during daily shiftchange meetings at 7:30 a.m.“That’s when we do our morning changeover,”Mr. Ridenour said.”That’s where our day starts. Werun anywhere from our minimum manning of 14-15 people to about 18 people,” he said.He said the shift has a day off every six shifts.“How it works,” he added, “is we’re at work 72hours a week per person. You work three 24-hourshifts a week. Then you’re off for three days.”The most fun part of his job, he said, is thathe looks forward to the interaction with “theguys” every day.There’s a bond there.“I live with these guys more hours during theweek than I’m with family,” he observed. “Whetherit’s just kicking back with the guys here or just horsingaround, you never know what you’re going toget each day.”But each day, one of the things he has to do isfigure out the chow roster – who wants to eatat the dining facility and when.“The problem,” he explained, “is I have tolook at who wants to go to chow and we can’tcook here like we used to. These guys can go tothe dining facility and eat, while my wholeworld revolves with staffing my engines withcertified personnel for each critical job on eachtruck. I can have the mere numbers of peoplepresent to man the trucks – but if I don’t havethe right qualified personnel, I have problems.”But there are usually no issues with that orthe daily schedule he maintains, which encompassescleaning the firehouse, the trucks, maintainingother critical equipment – and ofcourse, training to extinguish blazes.“Mainly, we train, but we also get 10 to 12 callsper shift,” Mr. Ridenour said. “The fire preventionprogram is top-notch and we go out and inspectbuildings as lot, so the fires we do have to respondto are usually small.”Mr. Ridenour noted that for him, each day is kindof crisis management.“If someone’s sick, I have to figure out things andit all changes,” he said. “Bottom line, we have to putout fires, man the trucks and train and maintain.Sometimes you just don’t have the manpower tocover the job and you have to tell someone no, theycan’t go do something. That’s the hard part – sometimesyou’ve got to say no.”Photo by Don LindseyScott Ridenour (right), Randolph Fire Station manager, and Airman1st Class John Evans look on as Airman 1st Class Karl Goodwin(left) unrolls a fire hose in preparation for routine inspection.

RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 16 • APRIL 23, 2010
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 22 • JUNE 4, 2010
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 11 - San Antonio ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 18 • MAY 7, 2010
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 10 • MARCH 12, 2010
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 21 • MAY 28, 2010 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 50 - San Antonio ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 47 - San Antonio ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 43 - San Antonio ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 39 • OCTOBER 1 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE No. 25 • JUNE 25, 2010
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 36 - San Antonio ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 23 • JUNE 10, 2011
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 10 • MARCH 11 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 6 • FEBRUARY 11 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE JULY 23, 2010 - San Antonio News
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No - San Antonio News
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 6 • FEBRUARY 11 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 12 - San Antonio ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 48 • DECEMBER 3 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 64th Year • No. 46 • NOVEMBER 19 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 20 • MAY 20, 2011
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 19 • MAY 13, 2011
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 13 • APRIL 1, 2011 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 5 • FEBRUARY 4 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE No. 28 • JULY - San Antonio News
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 22 • JUNE 3, 2011 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 9 • MARCH 4, 2011
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 2 • JANUARY 14 ...
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE 65th Year • No. 25 • JUNE 24, 2011