Views
3 years ago

Excellence Everywhere - National University of Ireland, Galway

Excellence Everywhere - National University of Ireland, Galway

Components

Components of anEspecially Useful Agendan Meeting title, group title,where it will be held, date, timen Meeting purposen Desired outcomen Expected preperationn Attendees and known absencesn Minutes from the last meetingn New businessn Other businessn Date and content of next meetingn Be specific and objective. Focus your commentson first-hand data, actions, and behavior and not onthe person or speculation about his or her intentions.For example, instead of saying “You are notfocused enough on your work,” or “You do notseem to care about your experiments,” think of aspecific instance that you thought was a problem.“We decided at our meeting that you would dothese three experiments, but you only did one.”n Reinforce expectations. Provide feedback interms of previously outlined goals and decisions(“We decided at the last meeting...”).n Avoid subjective statements. An example ofsuch a statement is “I do not like the fact that youshow up in the lab whenever you feel like it.” Tryinstead to stick to objective arguments. “If youarrive at unpredictable times, it is difficult for otherpeople in the lab to know when they can talk toyou. Many people depend on your expertise andneed to know when you are available.”n Be very clear about what you want yourdiscussion to achieve. Sometimes when peoplereceive negative feedback, they feel defeated.But that outcome may not help you achieve yourintended goal. If you have an excellent worker whois failing to meet your expectations for workingregular hours in the lab, for example, you mayneed to say explicitly “In the long run, this is thekind of problem people get fired for. But we arenot at that stage yet and we will not be as long aswe can work together and solve the problem. Youand I both know that you are a good worker andthat you struggle with family responsibilities. Whatcan you do today that will help you get here ontime for the next five days in a row?” Workingtoward small goals can sometimes help goodworkers meet your standards.n Present it in a constructive way. Feedbackshould be seen as a method for improvementrather than as a punitive step. To this end, ensurethat the student or other trainee in the lab has aplan for dealing with any problems you haveidentified, and arrange a way to monitor progress.Why does a person come to the lab late in the dayand have an erratic work schedule? Does she havea problem with getting transportation to and fromthe lab? Has he taken an additional job? Suggestways to overcome these problems and agree on adeadline for re-evaluating the problem. You cannotorganize a person’s life for them, but you can pointout solutions, saying, for example, “Maybe stayingcloser to the lab during the week or catching a ridewith someone in another part of the institutionwould help?”n Make sure it registers. Feedback is oftensubject to distortion or misinterpretation. You maywant to ask the student or postdoc to rephrasewhat you have said and talk about his or herassessment of the issues you raised.n Avoid too much. Select the highest priorityissues to start with, and remember that time andspace are needed for integrating feedback. Evenpositive, well-motivated people sometimes haveto think a few days to assimilate your message.Receiving Feedback. In some cultures it is notacceptable for someone working or training inyour laboratory to give you feedback on anyaspects of your own performance. In suchsystems, you are The Boss, and that is the endof the story. So how can you get feedback if youwant it?60 excellence everywhere

If possible, invite people in your lab to providefeedback on specific issues by asking questionsduring lab meetings or scheduled one-on-onemeetings. This feedback will make you a bettermanager. Make it a point to meet with yourown supervisor, if you have one, on a regularbasis, and have lunch with senior colleagues to geta sense of how they think your work is progressingand whether you are on track for achievingyour scientific and career goals. If you are a verysenior scientist at your institution despite havingonly recently finished your own training and havelittle hope of getting honest feedback from yourcolleagues, it may be that old friends or trustedrelatives can help you work through your growingpains. Past advisors may also be able to help withsome issues. If you have entirely trained abroad,however, you also need to find someone in yourcurrent social and scientific culture who can helpyou maintain your perspective and sense of humor.Regardless of where you get your advice, rememberthat to get honest comments and suggestions,you must be receptive. If you respond angrily ordefensively, those in your lab and other colleagueswill be reluctant to give you their true opinions. Asyou are listening to a comment, try to understandwhat the other person is saying. If something isnot clear, ask for clarification. If the feedback isnegative, take time to think about what you heard,even if you do not agree. What behaviors mighthave caused these perceptions? What changes, ifany, do you need to make?Making DecisionsAs the head of a new laboratory you will be makingtens if not hundreds of decisions a day, fromdetermining which emails to open and how toanswer each one, to deciding what experiments todo, to choosing to hire a new researcher to workin your lab. In each case, the first step in making adecision involves understanding the demands ofthe situation by answering the following questions:n How important is the decision I have to make?For example, the decision involved in hiring anew technician is a serious one. You will have tointerview the candidate and carefully research hisor her background before you make a decision.Whether or not you give a talk at the departmentalseminar next August may be a decision that willnot carry very serious consequences.n When do I need to make the decision?n Do I have enough information to make the decision?n How critical are the consequences of this decision?n Who needs to know or cares about the decision Iam about to make?n Will I need assistance or approval from others?n If I made the same kind of decision before, can Iuse the same approach?Answers to these questions will help you choosethe most appropriate decision style, that is, thedegree to which you go at it alone or include others.Making a decisionin complete isolationThis decision style works best when you areunder severe time constraints, when there is noneed for buy-in from other people, when you alonehave the best insight, or when you are dealingwith highly confidential information. For example,if another scientist approaches you to collaborateon some experiments for a paper he is in a rushto publish, you may quickly decide whether it isworthwhile for you to get involved. You can makethis decision without consulting anyone else ifthe work can be done by yourself or a technician.Another example would be to decide whether toreferee a paper or write a letter of reference forsomeone working in your laboratory.Making a decision afterconsulting with other individualsYou would use this decision style when you needinput from others and have sufficient time to gatherinformation. In general, this approach improvesthe quality of the decision, but you run the risk ofinvolving people who are not really participating inthe decision-making process, which may lead toresentment or misunderstanding. For example, ifapproached by another researcher to collaborateon a project, you may ask your colleagues whethermanaging your many roles61

Nottingham Galway - National University of Ireland, Galway
Here - National University of Ireland, Galway
Undergraduate - National University of Ireland, Galway
download - National University of Ireland, Galway
anseo - National University of Ireland, Galway
download - National University of Ireland, Galway
download - National University of Ireland, Galway
Here - National University of Ireland, Galway
download - National University of Ireland, Galway
PHA inside - National University of Ireland, Galway
Orientation Booklet For - National University of Ireland, Galway
a presidential encounter - National University of Ireland, Galway
A level Guide 2013 - National University of Ireland, Galway
ARAMARK National University of Ireland Galway ... - CampusDish
View/Open - ARAN - National University of Ireland, Galway
FinometerTM User's Guide - National University of Ireland, Galway
The BA Connect Prospectus - National University of Ireland, Galway
Download Report - National University of Ireland, Galway
for interested students - National University of Ireland, Galway
Adult Education Prospectus - National University of Ireland, Galway
Staff Handbook inside - National University of Ireland, Galway
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE - National University of Ireland, Galway
Health Strategy - National University of Ireland, Galway
2008 _ 2009 - National University of Ireland, Galway
BSc in Marine Science - National University of Ireland, Galway
Dry grasslands - National University of Ireland, Galway
for interested students - National University of Ireland, Galway
Find out more : Click on Link - National University of Ireland, Galway
2010-2012 Biennial Report - National University of Ireland, Galway
4858 Mental Health Report - National University of Ireland, Galway