Views
3 years ago

Technical Report #19 - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...

Technical Report #19 - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...

Wood-filled HIPS is

Wood-filled HIPS is currently being used for low-cost window lineals. It is usuallypainted and treated like wood. Polystyrene waste could be used for making wood-plastic composites,but its low bulk density makes it difficult to economically collect and ship. Also, it is notreadily available as a recycled material and is relatively brittle.Number 7 (Other): Anything that does not fit into Numbers 1-6 above is classified asnumber 7. This includes multilayer bottles that hold acidic products like ketchup and small volumeniche products using specialty plastics. Because of its small volume and indeterminateheritage, mixed plastic packaging identified by the Number 7 should not be considered for usewith wood-plastic materials. However, if separated by flotation technology, the floatable fraction(mostly HDPE, PP, and LDPE) might be a suitable, inexpensive binder for a wood-plastic composite.(PS, PVC, and PET would sink.)Table 15: Post Consumer Plastics# NAME INITIALS CONSUMER USE APPROPRIATEFORCOMPOSITES1 Polyethyleneteraphthalate2 High DensityPolyethylene3 PolyvinylChloridePETEorPETHDPEPVCSoda and WaterBottles No NoPRACTICALFORCOMPOSITESMilk, cider, anddetergent bottles,some plastic bagsYesYesHousehold cleaners,cooking oil Yes Possibly4 Low DensityPolyethyleneLDPEMost plastic bags,flexible lids Yes Yes5 Polypropylene PP Margarine tubsand yogurt containers6 Polystyrene PS Styrofoam7 Other n/a Specialty packages,Multi-LayerYesYesPossiblyPossiblyNoPossiblyNOTE: The development of technology may change the above judgements.30

3. Recycled Wood Feedstocks Suitable for CompositesAs described elsewhere in this report, there is a great deal of wood available for compositeproduction. Given enough time and money, almost any of it could be prepared for satisfactoryinclusion in wood-plastic composites. It makes the most economic sense, however, to use thosematerials that lend themselves to production of wood flour or wood fiber. Wood waste completelyfree of any non-wood contaminants and with less than 8% moisture (and absolutely lessthan 12%) is best for use in wood-plastic composites.Primary Wood Wastes: Primary wood wastes are post-industrial wood wastes from sawmills.Sawdust from sawmills tends to be wet and needs to be well-dried before being incorporatedinto a composite. Drying costs and the initial purchase price of the wet sawdust, as well asthe availability of dry sawdust and planer shavings from secondary plants, will influence therelative economics of using green sawdust from sawmills. It also must be kept clean and be relativelyfree of bark. Other primary residues such as edgings, slabs, and wood chips hold potentialfor use in composites but research and technologies are needed to develop the market. Currently,these waste streams are used as boiler fuel, compost augmentation, or mulch. The developmentof added-value products such as composites, furniture parts, or fireplace logs is needed.Secondary Wood Wastes: Secondary wood wastes are post-industrial wood wastes generatedwhen wood products like furniture, cabinets, and wood window frames and doors are made.These wood wastes are ideal for the production of wood flour and wood fiber because theirmoisture content is less than 12%. The boards are of a known species and the planer shavingsand sawdust generated during manufacturing are captured in a dust collector system. These cleanresidues can be bulk loaded into dedicated truck trailers for transportation to the wood flour/fiberfacility. The infrastructure to do this is already established. There are a number of wood flourand wood fiber plants throughout the United States and Canada.Post-Consumer Wood Wastes: Post-consumer wood wastes can be anything from constructionand demolition debris to waste pallets and containers. These products have been successfullyused for the production of wood fiber for wood-plastic composites. They are dryer thanprimary wood wastes, but require extensive cleaning and preparation. Often a tipping fee must becharged to help offset the cleaning costs incurred.Urban Forest Residues: Urban forest residues include stumps and tree trimmings frommetropolitan areas. They have the same problems as some primary wood wastes, (i.e., highmoisturecontent, bark and dirt contamination). As such, they are not considered appropriate forwood-plastic composites and are more effectively used as mulch, boiler fuel, or compost augmentation.4. Material PreparationA surprising amount of technology and good manufacturing practice is needed to make aviable wood-plastic composite product. This good practice starts with material preparation.While paying strict attention to material conditions does not guarantee a business will be successful,there is a much greater chance of making a salable product. There are several importantmaterials conditions.31

Non-Ferrous Metals Recycling Economic, Technical and - Cetem
Report of the Technical Inspectorate SENS, SWICO Recycling, SLRS
Report - University Center for Regional Economic Innovation
mining report - Center for Economic and Social Rights
Economic Report to the Governor 2010 - Center for Business and ...
2003 Annual Report - The Center for Jewish - Arab Economic ...
Annual Report 2006 - The Center for Jewish - Arab Economic ...
Exploring and Increasing the Economic Impact of Recycling
Taking economic benefits of recycling: Hoang Thi Van Nga
2007 Research Report: Center for Economic ... - Census Bureau
Report - University Center for Regional Economic Innovation
Report - University Center for Regional Economic Innovation
2008 Research Report: Center for Economic ... - Census Bureau
A report on AmBev's Social, Economic and Environmental ...
Report - University Center for Regional Economic Innovation
Report - University Center for Regional Economic Innovation
Camden Abbott Indicators Technical Report - Education Law Center
Report - University Center for Regional Economic Innovation
Economic Report to the Governor 2003 - Center for Business and ...
Education Report Final - Center for Economic and Social Rights
MEL Annual Report 2004 - Center for Maritime Economics and ...
Report - University Center for Regional Economic Innovation
Report - University Center for Regional Economic Innovation
Technical Report #6 - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...
Technical Report # 42 - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...
Technical Report # 40 - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...
Technical Report #3 - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...
Technical Report # 29 - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...
RBED Report - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...
#4 Millers River - Chelsea Center for Recycling and Economic ...