Views
3 years ago

Classroom Action Research has been a familiar term as long as I ...

Classroom Action Research has been a familiar term as long as I ...

classroom, a summary discussion happens at the end of a lesson. I will provide an aside aboutCMP classrooms for non-CMP people.A Launch is done with the big group. This involves setting up a purpose for the problemand getting the kids ready to dive in. During the Explore kids are working, often with a partner,to solve the problem. In a Summary solutions are presented. The big ideas in the math arebrought out.For example, a problem in the sixth grade book, Covering and Surrounding, asks kids todesign different rectangular dog pens with a fixed perimeter. During the launch I want to makesure that kids understand they have a fixed amount of fence to work with, and that fence =perimeter. There are given a strategy to record their findings in a chart with the headings Length,Width, Area, and Perimeter. During the Explore they have access to grid paper, tiles, and apartner to talk about the problem. During this time I circulate to observe conversations, and askquestions that prompt kids to continue their work if they have stalled. Towards the end of theExplore I identify students who will share their work back with the class. In this problem, I invitestudents to put their solutions on the board. Individuals may not have found all possibilities, butas a class we are able to see them all. During the summary the class is encouraged to comparetheir own work with their classmates’ work, and to add on to their solutions. Questions such as,Which dimensions would give the most area? Which dimensions would be the best place for adog to play? are discussed during the Summary.Last year I focused on what I could do as a teacher to involve more kids directly inthinking about and doing math. Was I asking kids questions that made them think? Were they thetype of questions that put the responsibility for learning on the kids’ shoulders? In other words,was I asking, rather than telling? Was I asking for kids to justify answers? Was I highlighting thebig mathematical ideas in kid’s solutions? It was work, but I felt it was worth the effort. Overtime, I began to feel comfortable with my use of Accountable Talk, but I wanted kids to modelthis talk when I wasn’t there. I knew the kids could ask many of the same questions I would askof them while they were face to face. I felt frustrated by a reoccurring conversation that playedout:Student: “Mrs. Jordahl I don’t get it.”Me: “What is confusing you?”Student: “The whole thing. I just don’t get the problem.”

Me: “Well look back here, I want you to reread this part and tell me what is confusingyou.”When I encounter situations like this I think of this quote from Suzanne Sutton:“Struggling (with school work) is not the enemy, any more than sweating is the enemy inbasketball; it is part of the process, and a clear sign of being in the game.”I also find myself asking, “What can I do to increase Accountable Talk between students?”Often redirecting a student to the problem is what it takes to get them started or at least toget them asking a better question. Some students will avoid thinking at all costs.If we allow them, they will let us break down the problem so that it becomes mechanicalprocedure rather than an exercise in thinking for them. There is a danger here. The more we dothis, the more dependent they become on us. One of my goals with Accountable Talk, is that kidswill learn to trust that other students, not only the teacher, have the answers they are seeking.Ultimately they will learn to ask those same questions of themselves and thus become more selfsufficient.Because they have permission to talk all at once, more kids are most actively engagedduring the Explore. Since I am only able to talk with one group at a time, I want to make surethat what they are discussing is mathematical, not purely social. Sometimes kids do not feel thattheir way is valid until they have had a discussion with the teacher. I try to minimize this byencouraging them to find ways for them to prove or disprove their own ideas. Kids really want toknow, “Is this right?” I try not to fall into the trap of validating their work, but instead try to ask,“Does your answer make sense?” or “Can you compare your answer with another group?” I wantto get kids to get the message that they can check the reasonableness of their own work.Data Collection and AnalysisI collected data in a variety of ways. I relied on my own observations, which I recorded injournal entries and e-mail reflections. I asked some several people familiar with AccountableTalk to observe my classroom. I read articles throughout the year and adopted new strategieswhen possible. And finally, I asked for student input.I was encouraged to journal at my classroom action research meetings, and I did early on,however I found I was not developing reliable habits. I remembered that the e-mail reflectionsthat I’d done for my Math Masters’ classes were a good reminder to get me to reflect regularly.

A new Chair has been appointed as part of a new long-term ...
a classroom action research at the third year of SMU Negeri I ...
RESEARCH APPROACH Long Term Perspective First it has to be ...
This is a great day that has been a long time coming, and I am really ...