Views
2 years ago

Safety_Series_025_1968 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...

Safety_Series_025_1968 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...

This publication is no

This publication is no longer validPlease see http://www.ns-iaea.org/standards/with the work are sufficiently great, the utmost should be done toestablish such total doses, since they alone make possible a fullevaluation of the risks incurred by a worker through exposure. Asradiochemical analysis and spectrometry methods develop, progressivelybetter results may be expected.4.2. MEDICAL SUPERVISION4.2. 1. Responsibility of the medical serviceThe medical service is responsible for the medical aspects ofradiological protection. It is responsible for selecting personnelfor work involving actual or potential exposure to ionizing radiation(pre-employment medical examination), holding medical examinationsduring employment and, in particular, carrying out special examinationsand laboratory tests for persons exposed at or above maximumpermissible levels and undertaking the diagnosis and treatmentof radiation injury in cases of accident.Finally, an additional reason for medical surveillance is to demonstrateover a long period the normality of the incidence ofdisease in groups of people exposed to radiation within the permissiblelimits.The ICRP gives general guidance as to what the aim of healthsurveillance is. The ICRP indicates that the assessment of healthbefore and during employment is directed towards determiningwhether the health of the worker is compatible with the tasks forwhich he is employed. The type and extent of the surveillance shouldbe essentially the same as in general industrial medical practice andshould include both pre-employment and routine examinations, thefrequency of the latter being determined mainly by the individual'sgeneral health and the conditions of the work. Workers where exposuremay exceed 3/10 of the maximum perm issible doses (seesection 3. 2. 1) may require more detailed surveillance to providea background of information which could be useful in the event ofa serious over-exposure, and to detect any conditions contraindicatingemployment or specific tasks. Provision should also bemade for any necessary tasks and examinations on individuals whohave received abnormal exposure referred to the medical officer.The ICRP qualifies abnormal exposure as being exposure receivedby a worker which exceeds the maximum perm issible doses re -100

This publication is no longer validPlease see http://www.ns-iaea.org/standards/commended for normal practice. Such exposures can be either voluntary,in which case they are called.em ergency exposures, orinvoluntary, when they are termed accidental exposures.Medical officers should therefore be acquainted with the dutiesof workers, with the working environment and with the radiologicalhazards to which the latter may be exposed. They should ascertainthat levels of exposure are in accordance with the standards andregulations in force and should keep, or at least have access to, allrecords of workers' overall exposure and radioactive contamination.In addition, they should carry out general and special medical examinationsin order to detect any disorder or illness which might bedue to ionizing radiation. With the aid of up-to-date health records,they can compare the results of these examinations with the resultsof personnel monitoring, with a view to establishing causal relationshipswhenever pathological disturbances appear.In cases of accident, the responsible medical officer must takethe necessary decisions. If there are no detectable clinical symptomsand the total irradiation of the body is less than 3 rem s, a simplewarning is sufficient. If the total irradiation due to an accidentalexposure or due to an intake of radioactive material exceeds twicethe annual limit, the ICRP states that "the situation should be reviewedby a competent medical authority. The worker may still beallowed to continue routine work if there is no objection from themedical standpoint, due account having been taken of his previousexposure, health, age and special skills, as well as his social andeconomic responsibilities". Having taken these various factors intoconsideration, if detectable clinical symptoms are found, the necessarysteps must betaken to permit the individual to spend theperiod necessary for recovery outside the range of any radiationsource, either by transfer to another post or by temporary or permanentsuspension from work. In addition the medical officer mustapply first aid and other treatment appropriate to the case.The medical service should have accurate knowledge of the radiologicalhazards to which workers are subjected. It should takepart in the planning of safety measures taken to limit workers' exposureto permissible levels and should be acquainted with all thedata concerning the radiological environment in which the workersare placed.The medical service should take part in giving workers inserviceinstruction on radiological protection. This consists mainlyin an educational task. Workers must be properly informed of the101

Safety_Series_013_1965 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Safety_Series_006_1961 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Radiation Protection Procedures - gnssn - International Atomic ...
Safety_Series_008_1962 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Safe Handling of Radioisotopes - gnssn - International Atomic ...
Safety_Series_041_1975 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Safety_Series_024_1967 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Safety_Series_019_1966 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Safety_Series_016_1966 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Safety_Series_015_1965 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Safety_Series_004_1961 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
SAFETY ST; NDARDS - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
No.6-Suppl 1988 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
Safety_Series_005_1961 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
safety series - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
Safety_Series_035-S-1_1992 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
LEVEL 3 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
SAFETY PR A CTICES - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
1 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
Level 2 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
SAFETY P R A C TIC E S - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
SAFETY P R A C TIC ES - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
Safety_Series_028_1968 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Safety_Series_050-SG-S2_1979 - gnssn - International Atomic ...
Safety_Series_010_1963 - gnssn - International Atomic Energy ...
Borchardt - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
Notes on Certain Aspects of the Regulations - gnssn - International ...
Research Reactor - gnssn - International Atomic Energy Agency
Principles for Establishing Limits for the Release of ... - gnssn
INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY VIENNA 1958 - gnssn