Views
2 years ago

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

92 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE

92 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also requires States to cooperate with international organisations intheir efforts to protect and assist the child and to trace the child’s parentsor other relatives. 215In respect of tracking, the use of DNA tracking systems should notcreate additional obstacles to family reunification, should require priorinformed consent of the applicant, and should be used only when necessary.216Even when the family is identified through tracking, or in any other caseof family reunification, the Committee on the Rights of the Child haswarned that “family reunification in the country of origin is not in thebest interest of the child and should therefore not be pursued wherethere is a “reasonable risk” that such a return would lead to the violationof fundamental human rights of the child. Such risk is indisputablydocumented in the granting of refugee status or in a decision of thecompetent authorities on the applicability of non-refoulement obligations[. . .]. Where the circumstances in the country of origin containlower level risks and there is concern, for example, of the child beingaffected by the indiscriminate effects of generalised violence, such risksmust be given full attention and balanced against other rights-basedconsiderations, including the consequences of further separation.” 217i) Discrimination and access to the territoryThe situation of unaccompanied minors, whether seeking asylum or not,warrants special consideration, due both to their vulnerability to exploitationand abuse and to their incapacity to cope with systems andinstitutions designed to address adult migration. Under the CRC, childrenenjoy particular protection against discrimination. The CRC providesthat children’s rights must be protected without discrimination ofany kind, 218 including discrimination due to their nationality, immigrationstatus or statelessness. 219 Furthermore, “States Parties shall takeall appropriate measures to ensure that the child is protected against allforms of discrimination or punishment on the basis of the status, activities,expressed opinions, or beliefs of the child’s parents, legal guard-215 Article 23.2 ACRWC.216 See, Concluding Observations on Denmark, CCPR, UN Doc. CCPR/CO/70/DNK, 15 November2000, para. 15; Concluding Observations on France, CCPR, op. cit., fn. 188, para. 21.217 CRC, General Comment No. 6, op. cit., fn. 138, paras. 82–83. The General Comment provideswith even more detailed information on considerations and procedural requirementstowards unaccompanied children.218 Article 2.1 CRC.219 See CRC, General Comment No. 6, op. cit., fn. 138, paras. 12, 16 and 18. See also, Officeof the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Study on challenges and bestpractices in the implementation of the international framework for the protection of therights of the child in the context of migration, UN Doc. A/HRC/15/29, 5 July 2010 (OHCHRStudy), paras. 21–22.

MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW | 93ians, or family members.” 220 A child should, therefore, not be discriminatedagainst on the basis, for example, of his or her parents’ irregularentry onto the national territory.In any decision concerning children the primary consideration must bethe best interests of the child. 221 The Committee on the Rights of theChild has affirmed that this overarching consideration as to what is thebest interest of a child requires a clear and comprehensive assessmentof the child’s identity, including nationality, upbringing, ethnic, culturaland linguistic background, particular vulnerabilities and protectionneeds, “allowing the child access to the territory is a prerequisite to thisinitial assessment process”. 222 The Committee identifies an obligation toappoint a competent guardian and, if needed, to provide legal representation.223 In relation to entry, therefore, unaccompanied or separatedchildren 224 are always to be granted access under the “best interests”principle.Further authoritative guidance on these principles is set out in theCommittee on the Rights of the Child’s General Comment No. 6 (2005):Treatment of Unaccompanied and Separated Children Outside of TheirCountry of Origin. 225e) Problems linked with family reunification: dependencyIn many countries the residence permit of a person who enters a countryfor the purposes of family reunification is premised on either (a) theexistence and validity of the permit, whether for work or internationalprotection reasons, of a primary permit holder, i.e. usually someone whomigrated there first, or (b) his or her family relationship with a citizenof the country. In both cases the migrant’s residence will depend on thestability of the relationship with that person. In some countries, thosewho migrate for purposes of family reunion have no right to work, andthe fact that their residence in the destination State is so strongly linkedto the person holding the primary permit or the national family membermay lead them to a situation of dependency, where they are unable toexercise or claim protection for their human rights. In case of divorceor separation from the principal residence permit holder, they may findthemselves at risk of deportation or, in the absence of a valid residence220 Article 2.2 CRC. See also, OHCHR Study, op. cit., fn. 219, paras. 21–22.221 Article 3.1 CRC.222 See, CRC, General Comment No. 6, op. cit., fn. 138, para. 20 (emphasis added).223 See, ibid., para. 21.224 “Unaccompanied children” are children who have been separated from their parents andother relatives and are not cared for by an adult responsible, by law or custom, for them.A “separated child” is separated from the parents or any legal or customary caregiver, but notnecessarily from other relatives. Definitions provided for by the CRC in ibid., paras. 7 and 8.225 See, ibid.

  • Page 1 and 2:

    Migration andInternational Human Ri

  • Page 3 and 4:

    Migration andInternational Human Ri

  • Page 5 and 6:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 7 and 8:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 9 and 10:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 11 and 12:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 13 and 14:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 15 and 16:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 17 and 18:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 19 and 20:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 21 and 22:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 23 and 24:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 25 and 26:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 27 and 28:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 29 and 30:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 31 and 32:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 33 and 34:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 35 and 36:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 37 and 38:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 39 and 40:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 41 and 42:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 43 and 44:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 45 and 46:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 47 and 48:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 49:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 52 and 53:

    36 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of ri

  • Page 54 and 55:

    38 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the i

  • Page 56 and 57:

    40 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6• A

  • Page 58 and 59: 42 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6heigh
  • Page 60 and 61: 44 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6worke
  • Page 62 and 63: 46 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6activ
  • Page 64 and 65: 48 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6rent
  • Page 66 and 67: 50 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAPT
  • Page 68 and 69: 52 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6terri
  • Page 70 and 71: 54 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the U
  • Page 72 and 73: 56 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The A
  • Page 74 and 75: 58 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ii) G
  • Page 76 and 77: 60 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6gende
  • Page 78 and 79: 62 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Note
  • Page 80 and 81: 64 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6A lim
  • Page 82 and 83: 66 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The U
  • Page 84 and 85: 68 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box 3
  • Page 86 and 87: 70 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6be su
  • Page 88 and 89: 72 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6right
  • Page 90 and 91: 74 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the a
  • Page 92 and 93: 76 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6isfy
  • Page 94 and 95: 78 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In pa
  • Page 96 and 97: 80 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6and i
  • Page 98 and 99: 82 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6It is
  • Page 100 and 101: 84 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Under
  • Page 102 and 103: 86 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6lies
  • Page 104 and 105: 88 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the p
  • Page 106 and 107: 90 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6evolv
  • Page 110 and 111: 94 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6permi
  • Page 112 and 113: 96 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6es in
  • Page 114 and 115: 98 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6State
  • Page 116 and 117: 100 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 65. S
  • Page 118 and 119: 102 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Unde
  • Page 120 and 121: 104 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6tion
  • Page 122 and 123: 106 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6they
  • Page 124 and 125: 108 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP
  • Page 126 and 127: 110 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6has
  • Page 128 and 129: 112 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6for
  • Page 130 and 131: 114 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6prot
  • Page 132 and 133: 116 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6to s
  • Page 134 and 135: 118 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ment
  • Page 136 and 137: 120 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also
  • Page 138 and 139: 122 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6nati
  • Page 140 and 141: 124 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6(iv)
  • Page 142 and 143: 126 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6char
  • Page 144 and 145: 128 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In t
  • Page 146 and 147: 130 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6this
  • Page 148 and 149: 132 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6thro
  • Page 150 and 151: 134 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In t
  • Page 152 and 153: 136 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6proh
  • Page 154 and 155: 138 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6mate
  • Page 156 and 157: 140 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6just
  • Page 158 and 159:

    142 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6“p

  • Page 160 and 161:

    144 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 63. t

  • Page 162 and 163:

    146 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Furt

  • Page 164 and 165:

    148 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6poss

  • Page 166 and 167:

    150 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 168 and 169:

    152 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6proc

  • Page 170 and 171:

    154 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 172 and 173:

    156 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6expu

  • Page 174 and 175:

    158 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box

  • Page 176 and 177:

    160 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 178 and 179:

    162 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6have

  • Page 180 and 181:

    164 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6At t

  • Page 182 and 183:

    166 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box

  • Page 184 and 185:

    168 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 186 and 187:

    170 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6exec

  • Page 188 and 189:

    172 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6huma

  • Page 190 and 191:

    174 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6“i

  • Page 192 and 193:

    176 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Arti

  • Page 194 and 195:

    178 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6to r

  • Page 196 and 197:

    180 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6suff

  • Page 198 and 199:

    182 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Righ

  • Page 200 and 201:

    184 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 202 and 203:

    186 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6vent

  • Page 204 and 205:

    188 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6One

  • Page 206 and 207:

    190 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6tion

  • Page 208 and 209:

    192 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6orde

  • Page 210 and 211:

    194 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ICCP

  • Page 212 and 213:

    196 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6gans

  • Page 214 and 215:

    198 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6one

  • Page 216 and 217:

    200 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6his

  • Page 218 and 219:

    202 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6For

  • Page 220 and 221:

    204 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6c) A

  • Page 222 and 223:

    206 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 224 and 225:

    208 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6race

  • Page 226 and 227:

    210 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ing

  • Page 228 and 229:

    212 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6left

  • Page 230 and 231:

    214 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6judi

  • Page 232 and 233:

    216 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6b) R

  • Page 234 and 235:

    218 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6upon

  • Page 236 and 237:

    220 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6well

  • Page 238 and 239:

    222 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 240 and 241:

    224 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Wher

  • Page 242 and 243:

    226 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 244 and 245:

    228 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6This

  • Page 246 and 247:

    230 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 248 and 249:

    232 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6law

  • Page 250 and 251:

    234 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a re

  • Page 252 and 253:

    236 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Huma

  • Page 254 and 255:

    238 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 256 and 257:

    240 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6same

  • Page 258 and 259:

    242 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6civi

  • Page 260 and 261:

    244 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6As f

  • Page 262 and 263:

    246 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6priv

  • Page 264 and 265:

    248 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 266 and 267:

    250 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6has

  • Page 268 and 269:

    252 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 270 and 271:

    254 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6allo

  • Page 272 and 273:

    256 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6stre

  • Page 274 and 275:

    258 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6is c

  • Page 276 and 277:

    260 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6educ

  • Page 278 and 279:

    262 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 280 and 281:

    264 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ther

  • Page 282 and 283:

    266 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6not

  • Page 284 and 285:

    268 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 286 and 287:

    270 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also

  • Page 288 and 289:

    272 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Wher

  • Page 290 and 291:

    274 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 292 and 293:

    276 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6port

  • Page 294 and 295:

    278 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 296 and 297:

    280 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6irre

  • Page 298 and 299:

    282 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6any

  • Page 300 and 301:

    284 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6serv

  • Page 302 and 303:

    286 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6d) P

  • Page 304 and 305:

    288 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Cent

  • Page 306 and 307:

    290 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ANNE

  • Page 308 and 309:

    292 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ANNE

  • Page 310 and 311:

    294 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of w

  • Page 312 and 313:

    296 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Amer

  • Page 314 and 315:

    298 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6righ

  • Page 316 and 317:

    300 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of a

  • Page 318 and 319:

    302 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a re

  • Page 320 and 321:

    304 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6prov

  • Page 322 and 323:

    306 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6one,

  • Page 324 and 325:

    308 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6When

  • Page 326 and 327:

    310 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Ther

  • Page 328 and 329:

    312 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 330 and 331:

    314 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 332 and 333:

    316 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6dire

  • Page 334 and 335:

    318 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6II.

  • Page 336 and 337:

    320 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Comm

  • Page 338 and 339:

    322 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Admi

  • Page 340 and 341:

    324 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6fina

  • Page 342 and 343:

    326 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 63. E

  • Page 344 and 345:

    328 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6asks

  • Page 346 and 347:

    330 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 348 and 349:

    332 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6subm

  • Page 350 and 351:

    334 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ligh

  • Page 352 and 353:

    336 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 354 and 355:

    338 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a) B

  • Page 356 and 357:

    340 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6resp

  • Page 358 and 359:

    342 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Spec

  • Page 360:

    344 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6(d)

  • Page 364:

    ISBN 978-92-9037-151-X

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng
Universal-ESCR-PG-no-8-Publications-Practitioners-guide-2014-eng
Universal-PG-13-Judicial-Accountability-Publications-Reports-Practitioners-Guide-2016-ENG
Universal-Fight-against-impunity-PG-no7-comp-Publications-Practitioners-guide-series-2015-ENG
Universal-PG-11-Asylum-Claims-SOGI-Publications-Practitioners-Guide-Series-2016-ENG
Universal-PG-13-Judicial-Accountability-Publications-Reports-Practitioners-Guide-2016-ENG
presentation-2014-eng-screen
18784-PG-Prospectus---ENG-final-web
PG Urban Conservation - University of Leicester
Universal-Enforced-Disappearance-and-Extrajudicial-Execution-PGNo9-Publications-Practitioners-guide-series-2015-ENG
2014-12-04-Camput-Prelim-Program-Eng
PG Engineering Brochure - The University of Nottingham, Malaysia ...
Security Forces send-off|pg. 6 - 102nd Intelligence Wing ...
Breakfast for Keiki >> pg 6 Pregnancy and Flu Shot ... - AlohaCare
What makes this unit 'special' pg 6-7 - Hurlburt Field
The Cool Kid with the Cool Dog pg. 6 - Can Do Canines
ENG 0XX - University of Maine at Augusta
idc-digital-universe-2014
European-facts-and-the-Global-status-report-on-violence-prevention-2014-Eng
HIPS-2014-Annual-Report-ENG.
pg 59-80 - Western Michigan University Athletics Department
March 6-8, 2014 - Pacific Dental Conference
Birth to 6 Years - Winter 2014 - KidsAbility