Views
3 years ago

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

94 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE

94 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6permit, face increased vulnerability to exploitation. These situations cangive rise to a range of human rights issues for those concerned, andin particular women migrants who enter the country for purposes ofmarriage or family reunification. 226 For example, they may be unable orunwilling to seek protection from domestic violence or to leave abusiverelationships because their legal right to remain in a country is premisedon the relationship concerned. The limited rights often associatedwith family-reunification permits significantly can limit the ability ofholders to seek educational and/or employment opportunities, which inthe case of women who migrate for family reunification can perpetuatestereotyped gender-roles and give rise to integration difficulties. On theother hand, women who are the primary permit-holder may be at risk ofparticular violence if they seek to end relationships with partners whoseresidency rights are wholly connected with the relationship. 227As discussed at greater length in Chapter 6, similar risks can arise formigrants whose residency permit is linked to a particular employer, andwho may face heightened risks of violence and abuse at work and/ormay be unable or unwilling to seek legal protection. Indeed, CEDAWprovides in Article 2(f) that “when residency permits of women migrantworkers are premised on sponsorship of an employer or spouse, Statesparties should enact provisions relating to independent residency status.Regulations should be made to allow for the legal stay of a womanwho flees her abusive employer or spouse or is fired for complainingabout abuse”. 228As for the family members of a migrant worker, Article 50 ICRMW establishesthat, “[i]n the case of death of a migrant worker or dissolutionof marriage, the State of employment [of the migrant worker] shallfavourably consider granting family members of that migrant workerresiding in that State on the basis of family reunion an authorization tostay; the State of employment shall take into account the length of timethey have already resided in that State”.In recognition of the particular risks of human rights violations andabuses which may arise in these contexts, the Council of Europe, theCommittee of Ministers has recommended to Member States that, “aftera period of four years of legal residence, adult family members shouldbe granted an autonomous residence permit independent of that of theprincipal”, and that, “in the case of divorce, separation or death of theprincipal, a family member having been legally resident for at least oneyear may apply for an autonomous residence permit. Member States226 See, CEDAW, General Recommendation No. 26, op. cit., fn. 8, para. 22.227 E.g. see facts of Yildirim v. Austria, CEDAW, Communication No. 6/2005, Views of 6 August2007.228 See CEDAW, General Recommendation No. 26, op. cit., fn. 8, para. 26(f).

MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW | 95should give due consideration to such applications. In their decision,the best interest of the children concerned shall be a primary consideration”.229Dependency on a principal resident permit holder may also hinder theaccess of the migrant to an effective remedy to prevent, or to seekreparation for, of a human rights violation committed by their sponsor,relative or spouse. This is problematic, as States may infringe theirobligation to provide individuals with an effective remedy for humanrights violations (see, Chapter 2, Section 4). On the particular situationof women migrant victims of violence, the Committee of Ministers ofthe Council of Europe has recommended that States “ensure that allservices and legal remedies available for victims of domestic violenceare provided to immigrant women upon their request” 230 and that theyshould “consider, where needed, granting immigrant women who havebeen/are victims of domestic violence an independent right to residencein order to enable them to leave their violent husbands without havingto leave the host country”. 231Box 8. Mandatory residence assignment for refugeescannot impair their family lifeThe European Court of Human Rights has recently held thatan asylum programme which assigns mandatory residence inone particular region of the country, thereby making very difficultthe maintenance of family links between two refugees,is in breach of their right to family life under Article 8 ECHR,as no legitimate reason of equitable distribution of refugeeswithin the country for economic reason can override the refugees’right to family life. The case originated in the practice ofSwitzerland to assign refugees to a particular canton outsideof which they cannot reside. 2324. Victims of TraffickingEach year many people are trafficked by organisations that by use offorce or other forms of coercion, deception or abuse, gain control overthem and arrange their transfer abroad, for various exploitative purpos-229 Recommendation Rec(2002)4, CMCE, op. cit., fn. 179, Article III.230 Recommendation Rec(2002)5, CMCE, op. cit., fn. 79, Article 24.231 Ibid., Article 59.232 Mengesha Kimfe v. Switzerland, ECtHR, Application No. 24404/05, Judgment of 29 July2010.

  • Page 1 and 2:

    Migration andInternational Human Ri

  • Page 3 and 4:

    Migration andInternational Human Ri

  • Page 5 and 6:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 7 and 8:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 9 and 10:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 11 and 12:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 13 and 14:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 15 and 16:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 17 and 18:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 19 and 20:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 21 and 22:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 23 and 24:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 25 and 26:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 27 and 28:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 29 and 30:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 31 and 32:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 33 and 34:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 35 and 36:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 37 and 38:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 39 and 40:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 41 and 42:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 43 and 44:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 45 and 46:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 47 and 48:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 49:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 52 and 53:

    36 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of ri

  • Page 54 and 55:

    38 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the i

  • Page 56 and 57:

    40 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6• A

  • Page 58 and 59:

    42 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6heigh

  • Page 60 and 61: 44 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6worke
  • Page 62 and 63: 46 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6activ
  • Page 64 and 65: 48 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6rent
  • Page 66 and 67: 50 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAPT
  • Page 68 and 69: 52 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6terri
  • Page 70 and 71: 54 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the U
  • Page 72 and 73: 56 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The A
  • Page 74 and 75: 58 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ii) G
  • Page 76 and 77: 60 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6gende
  • Page 78 and 79: 62 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Note
  • Page 80 and 81: 64 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6A lim
  • Page 82 and 83: 66 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The U
  • Page 84 and 85: 68 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box 3
  • Page 86 and 87: 70 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6be su
  • Page 88 and 89: 72 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6right
  • Page 90 and 91: 74 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the a
  • Page 92 and 93: 76 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6isfy
  • Page 94 and 95: 78 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In pa
  • Page 96 and 97: 80 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6and i
  • Page 98 and 99: 82 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6It is
  • Page 100 and 101: 84 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Under
  • Page 102 and 103: 86 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6lies
  • Page 104 and 105: 88 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the p
  • Page 106 and 107: 90 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6evolv
  • Page 108 and 109: 92 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also
  • Page 112 and 113: 96 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6es in
  • Page 114 and 115: 98 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6State
  • Page 116 and 117: 100 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 65. S
  • Page 118 and 119: 102 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Unde
  • Page 120 and 121: 104 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6tion
  • Page 122 and 123: 106 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6they
  • Page 124 and 125: 108 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP
  • Page 126 and 127: 110 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6has
  • Page 128 and 129: 112 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6for
  • Page 130 and 131: 114 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6prot
  • Page 132 and 133: 116 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6to s
  • Page 134 and 135: 118 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ment
  • Page 136 and 137: 120 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also
  • Page 138 and 139: 122 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6nati
  • Page 140 and 141: 124 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6(iv)
  • Page 142 and 143: 126 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6char
  • Page 144 and 145: 128 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In t
  • Page 146 and 147: 130 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6this
  • Page 148 and 149: 132 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6thro
  • Page 150 and 151: 134 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In t
  • Page 152 and 153: 136 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6proh
  • Page 154 and 155: 138 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6mate
  • Page 156 and 157: 140 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6just
  • Page 158 and 159: 142 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6“p
  • Page 160 and 161:

    144 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 63. t

  • Page 162 and 163:

    146 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Furt

  • Page 164 and 165:

    148 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6poss

  • Page 166 and 167:

    150 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 168 and 169:

    152 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6proc

  • Page 170 and 171:

    154 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 172 and 173:

    156 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6expu

  • Page 174 and 175:

    158 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box

  • Page 176 and 177:

    160 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 178 and 179:

    162 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6have

  • Page 180 and 181:

    164 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6At t

  • Page 182 and 183:

    166 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box

  • Page 184 and 185:

    168 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 186 and 187:

    170 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6exec

  • Page 188 and 189:

    172 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6huma

  • Page 190 and 191:

    174 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6“i

  • Page 192 and 193:

    176 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Arti

  • Page 194 and 195:

    178 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6to r

  • Page 196 and 197:

    180 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6suff

  • Page 198 and 199:

    182 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Righ

  • Page 200 and 201:

    184 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 202 and 203:

    186 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6vent

  • Page 204 and 205:

    188 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6One

  • Page 206 and 207:

    190 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6tion

  • Page 208 and 209:

    192 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6orde

  • Page 210 and 211:

    194 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ICCP

  • Page 212 and 213:

    196 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6gans

  • Page 214 and 215:

    198 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6one

  • Page 216 and 217:

    200 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6his

  • Page 218 and 219:

    202 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6For

  • Page 220 and 221:

    204 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6c) A

  • Page 222 and 223:

    206 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 224 and 225:

    208 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6race

  • Page 226 and 227:

    210 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ing

  • Page 228 and 229:

    212 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6left

  • Page 230 and 231:

    214 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6judi

  • Page 232 and 233:

    216 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6b) R

  • Page 234 and 235:

    218 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6upon

  • Page 236 and 237:

    220 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6well

  • Page 238 and 239:

    222 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 240 and 241:

    224 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Wher

  • Page 242 and 243:

    226 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 244 and 245:

    228 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6This

  • Page 246 and 247:

    230 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 248 and 249:

    232 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6law

  • Page 250 and 251:

    234 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a re

  • Page 252 and 253:

    236 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Huma

  • Page 254 and 255:

    238 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 256 and 257:

    240 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6same

  • Page 258 and 259:

    242 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6civi

  • Page 260 and 261:

    244 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6As f

  • Page 262 and 263:

    246 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6priv

  • Page 264 and 265:

    248 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 266 and 267:

    250 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6has

  • Page 268 and 269:

    252 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 270 and 271:

    254 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6allo

  • Page 272 and 273:

    256 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6stre

  • Page 274 and 275:

    258 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6is c

  • Page 276 and 277:

    260 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6educ

  • Page 278 and 279:

    262 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 280 and 281:

    264 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ther

  • Page 282 and 283:

    266 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6not

  • Page 284 and 285:

    268 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 286 and 287:

    270 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also

  • Page 288 and 289:

    272 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Wher

  • Page 290 and 291:

    274 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 292 and 293:

    276 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6port

  • Page 294 and 295:

    278 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 296 and 297:

    280 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6irre

  • Page 298 and 299:

    282 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6any

  • Page 300 and 301:

    284 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6serv

  • Page 302 and 303:

    286 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6d) P

  • Page 304 and 305:

    288 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Cent

  • Page 306 and 307:

    290 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ANNE

  • Page 308 and 309:

    292 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ANNE

  • Page 310 and 311:

    294 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of w

  • Page 312 and 313:

    296 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Amer

  • Page 314 and 315:

    298 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6righ

  • Page 316 and 317:

    300 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of a

  • Page 318 and 319:

    302 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a re

  • Page 320 and 321:

    304 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6prov

  • Page 322 and 323:

    306 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6one,

  • Page 324 and 325:

    308 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6When

  • Page 326 and 327:

    310 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Ther

  • Page 328 and 329:

    312 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 330 and 331:

    314 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 332 and 333:

    316 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6dire

  • Page 334 and 335:

    318 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6II.

  • Page 336 and 337:

    320 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Comm

  • Page 338 and 339:

    322 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Admi

  • Page 340 and 341:

    324 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6fina

  • Page 342 and 343:

    326 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 63. E

  • Page 344 and 345:

    328 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6asks

  • Page 346 and 347:

    330 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 348 and 349:

    332 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6subm

  • Page 350 and 351:

    334 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ligh

  • Page 352 and 353:

    336 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 354 and 355:

    338 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a) B

  • Page 356 and 357:

    340 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6resp

  • Page 358 and 359:

    342 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Spec

  • Page 360:

    344 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6(d)

  • Page 364:

    ISBN 978-92-9037-151-X

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng
Universal-ESCR-PG-no-8-Publications-Practitioners-guide-2014-eng
Universal-Fight-against-impunity-PG-no7-comp-Publications-Practitioners-guide-series-2015-ENG
Universal-PG-13-Judicial-Accountability-Publications-Reports-Practitioners-Guide-2016-ENG
Universal-PG-13-Judicial-Accountability-Publications-Reports-Practitioners-Guide-2016-ENG
Universal-PG-11-Asylum-Claims-SOGI-Publications-Practitioners-Guide-Series-2016-ENG
dcu-pg-prospectus-2014
pg. 6 - SAIF Corporation
Universal-Womens-accesss-to-justice-Publications-Practitioners-Guide-Series-2016-ENG
Universal-Womens-accesss-to-justice-Publications-Practitioners-Guide-Series-2016-ENG
presentation-2014-eng-screen
18784-PG-Prospectus---ENG-final-web
HIPS-2014-Annual-Report-ENG.
Pgs 25-26 - Salisbury University
Post-partum management of gestational diabetes Pg.6
A-Picture-of-the-Nation-2014-Eng
Session 6 - Sara Dorow - Institute for Public Economics - University ...
dewalt xmas 2015 all 6 pgs