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Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

214 | PRACTITIONERS

214 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6judicially. 815 The principle that the information must be provided in aform that is accessible, may require, in the case of migrants, that it betranslated. 816Reasons for detention must be provided promptly. Although whetherinformation is conveyed sufficiently promptly will depend on the individualcircumstances of each case, they should in general be providedwithin hours of detention. 817 The right to be provided with reasons fordetention has been found to have been violated, for example, wherereasons were provided only after 76 hours. 818 It is not essential howeverthat the information be provided at the very moment in which someoneis taken into detention. 819A “bare indication of the legal basis” for the detention is not sufficient;in addition, there must also be some indication of the factual basis forthe detention. 820 The responsibility of the State to inform the detaineeof the grounds for detention is not discharged where the detainee hasmanaged to infer from the circumstances or various sources, the basisfor the detention. In such circumstances, there remains an obligationon the State to provide the information. 821For asylum seekers who are subject to accelerated asylum procedures,and who are detained pending expulsion in accordance with those procedures,the right to reasons for detention applies without qualification. Ata regional European level, this right is affirmed in the Council of EuropeGuidelines on Human Rights Protection in the Context of AcceleratedAsylum Procedures, Guideline XI.5 of which states that “[d]etained asylumseekers shall be informed promptly, in a language which they understand,of the legal and factual reasons for their detention, and theavailable remedies.”815 Abdolkhani and Karimnia v. Turkey, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 627, paras. 136–137; Shamayev andOthers v. Georgia and Russia, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 434, paras. 413–414. See, Yvon Neptunev. Haiti, IACtHR, op. cit., fn. 624, paras. 106–107; Vélez Loor v. Panama, IACtHR, op. cit.,fn. 536, para. 116.816 Body of Principles for the Protection of all persons deprived of their liberty, Principle 14:a person who does not adequately speak the language used by the authorities, is entitled toreceive this information in a language he understands. See also, Rahimi v. Greece, ECtHR,op. cit., fn. 703, para. 120, where the information sheet on remedies was in Arabic when theapplicant spoke only Farsi. The Court found that this led to a violation of the right to habeascorpus under Article 5.4 ECHR.817 Shamayev and Others v. Georgia and Russia, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 434, paras. 413–416; Fox,Campbell and Hartely v. United Kingdom, ECtHR, Applications Nos. 12244/86; 12245/86;12383/86, Judgment of 30 August 1990, para. 42; Kerr v. United Kingdom, ECtHR, ApplicationNo. 40451/98, Admissibility Decision, 7 December 1999.818 Saadi v. United Kingdom, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 625, paras. 81–85.819 Shamayev and Others v. Georgia and Russia, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 434, paras. 413–416.820 Fox, Campbell and Hartley v. United Kingdom, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 817, para. 41; Vélez Loorv. Panama, IACtHR, op. cit., fn. 536, para. 116.821 Shamayev and Others v. Georgia and Russia, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 434, para. 425.

MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW | 2152. Safeguards following detentiona) Right of access to a lawyerMigrants brought into detention have the right to prompt access to alawyer, and must be promptly informed of this right. 822 Internationalstandards and guidelines also state that detainees should have accessto legal advice and facilities for confidential consultation with their lawyerat regular intervals thereafter. Where necessary, free legal assistanceshould be provided. 823 Translation of key legal documents, as wellas interpretation during consultations with the lawyer, should be providedwhere necessary. Facilities for consultation with lawyers shouldrespect the confidentiality of the lawyer-client relationship. 824Although Article 5 ECHR does not expressly provide for the right ofdetainees to have access to a lawyer, the European Court of HumanRights has held that failure to provide any or adequate access to alawyer, or measures taken by the State to obstruct such access, mayviolate Article 5.4 ECHR where they prevent the detainee from effectivelychallenging the lawfulness of detention. 825 Interference with theconfidentiality of lawyer/client discussions in detention has also beenfound to violate the right to challenge the lawfulness of detention underArticle 5.4. 826 In the case of Suso Musa v. Malta, the European Courtheld that, “although the authorities are not obliged to provide free legalaid in the context of detention proceedings [. . .], the lack thereof, particularlywhere legal representation is required in the domestic contextfor the purposes of Article 5, § 4, may raise an issue as to the accessibilityof such a remedy.” 827822 Concluding Observations on Australia, CCPR, Report of the Human Rights Committee to theGeneral Assembly, 55 th Session, Vol. I, UN Doc. A/55/40 (2000), para. 526, where the Committeeexpressed concern “at the State Party’s policy, in this context of mandatory detention,of not informing the detainees of their right to seek legal advice and of not allowing access ofnon-governmental human rights organisations to the detainees in order to inform them of thisright.” See also, Article 17.2(d), CPED; WGAD, Annual Report 1998, op. cit., fn. 643, para. 69,Guarantees 6 and 7; WGAD, Annual Report 1999, op. cit., fn. 643, Principle 2; EuropeanGuidelines on Accelerated Asylum Procedures, CMCE, op. cit., fn. 119, Guideline XI.5 and 6.823 Vélez Loor v. Panama, IACtHR, op. cit., fn. 536, paras. 132–133, 146. The IACtHR hasheld that the provision of legal assistance is an obligation inherent to Article 7.6 (rightto habeas corpus) and Article 8 (due process), and that in cases involving detentionfree legal assistance is an “imperative interest of justice” (para. 146, our translation).824 UNHCR Guidelines on Detention, op. cit., fn. 633, Guideline 7(ii): “Free legal assistanceshould be provided where it is also available to nationals similarly situated, and should beavailable as soon as possible after arrest or detention to help the detainee understand his/her rights”; Body of Principles for the Protection of all persons deprived of their liberty, Principle18.825 Öcalan v. Turkey, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 807, para. 72, endorsed by the judgment of the GrandChamber, op. cit., fn. 47, para. 70.826 Istratii v. Moldova, ECtHR, Applications Nos. 8721/05, 8705/05 and 8742/05, Judgment of27 March 2007, paras. 87–101.827 Suso Musa v. Malta, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 680, para. 61.

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    ISBN 978-92-9037-151-X

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