Views
3 years ago

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

310 | PRACTITIONERS

310 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6There is an exception for the Human Rights Committee, which appliesthis rule only to complaints pending before another international procedure.If the other procedure has ended, it is still possible for the HumanRights Committee to hear the same case. 1339 Article 31.2(c) also refersonly to pending complaints, which suggests that the Committee onEnforced Disappearances may align its approach to that of the HumanRights Committee. 1340d) Significant disadvantageProtocol 14 to the ECHR introduced a new admissibility requirement forthe European Court of Human Rights: that of “significant disadvantage”.Protocol 14 to the ECHR now allows the Court to declare inadmissible anapplication when “the applicant has not suffered a significant disadvantage,unless respect for human rights as defined in the Conventionand the Protocols thereto requires an examination of the application onthe merits and provided that no case may be rejected on this groundwhich has not been duly considered by a domestic tribunal”. 1341Applying the new criterion, the European Court of Human Rights has heldcases inadmissible for lack of significant disadvantage where alleged violationsof fair trial guarantees or the right to property had led to pecuniarylosses of 150, 90 or 1 euros and the financial situation of the applicantwas not “such that the outcome of the case would have had a significanteffect on his personal life”. 1342 The Court held that it must take into consideration“both the applicant’s subjective perceptions and what is objectivelyat stake in a particular case”, 1343 and it recognised that “a violationof the Convention may concern important questions of principle and thuscause a significant disadvantage without affecting pecuniary interest”. 1344Furthermore, the Court will also have to ascertain whether the examinationis, nonetheless, required by the respect for human rights as definedin the Convention and the Protocols. The Court has found this notto be the case when “the relevant law has changed and similar issueshave been resolved in other cases before it”. 1345 Finally, the Court will1339 Correia de Matos v. Portugal, CCPR, Communication No. 1123/2002, Views of 18 April 2006,para. 6.2.1340 Articel 31.2(c), CPED.1341 Article 35.3(b) ECHR (emphasis added). The requirement has been interpreted up to nowin Petrovich Korolev v. Russia, ECtHR, Application No. 25551/05, Admissibility decision of1 July 2010; Mihai Ionescu v. Romania, ECtHR, Application No. 36659/04, Admissibilitydecision of 1 June 2010; Rinck v. France, ECtHR, Application No. 18774/09, Admissibilitydecision of 19 October 2010.1342 Mihai Ionescu v. Romania, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 1341, para. 35.1343 Petrovich Korolev v. Russia, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 1341.1344 Ibid.1345 Mihai Ionescu v. Romania, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 1341, para. 37.

MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW | 311verify whether the case has not been duly considered by a domestic tribunal,which has been interpreted as a duty to ascertain that no denialof justice occurred at the domestic level. 1346According to the OP-ICESCR, the CESCR “may, if necessary, decline toconsider a communication where it does not reveal that the author hassuffered a clear disadvantage, unless the Committee considers thatthe communication raises a serious issue of general importance”. 1347However, this provision does not constitute an admissibility criterium.The wording “if necessary” means that the “clear disadvantage” testis discretionary and likely to be used by the Committee on Economic,Social and Cultural Rights only in exceptional circumstances.e) Other groundsAll UN Treaty Bodies, the ECtHR, the IACHR, and the ACHPR will rejectas inadmissible petitions which are anonymous, which constitute anabuse of right of submission, or that are incompatible with the provisionsof the human rights treaty of their concern. 1348 CAT, CEDAW,CESCR, the European Court, and the IACHR explicitly exclude from admissibilitycomplaints which are manifestly unfounded or insufficientlysubstantiated, 1349 although this requirement will be considered also bythe other treaty bodies.The OP-ICESCR excludes, moreover, complaints which are exclusivelybased on reports disseminated by mass media. 1350 The ACHPR willnot consider communications written in disparaging or insulting languagedirected against the State concerned or its institution or to theOrganisation of African Unity. 1351The ECSR provides two specific grounds of inadmissibility, due to thecollective complaint system:• Subject-matter: non-governmental organisations may lodge acomplaint only in respect of those matters regarding which theyhave been recognised as having particular competence. 13521346 Petrovich Korolev v. Russia, ECtHR, op. cit., fn. 1341.1347 Article 4 OP-ICESCR (emphasis added).1348 Article 3 OP-ICCPR; Rule 96(a), (c) and (d), CCPR Rules of Procedure; Article 3.2(d) to(g) OP-ICESCR; Article 22.2 CAT; Rule 113(b) and (c), CAT Rules of Procedure; Rule 91,CERD Rules of Procedure; Article 4.2 OP-CEDAW; Article 77.2 ICRMW; Article 7(a), (b), (c)OP-CRC-CP; Article 2(a) and (b) OP-CRPD; Article 31.2(a) and (b) CED; Articles 35.2(a) and35.3(a) ECHR; Article 47 ACHR; Article 34, IACHR Rules of Procedure; Article 56.1 ACHPR.1349 Article 4.2(c) OP-CEDAW; Article 22.2 CAT; Rule 113(b) and (c), CAT Rules of Procedure;Article 3.2(d) to (g) OP-ICESCR; Article 7(f) OP-CRC-CP; Article 2(e) OP-CRPD; Articles35.2(a) and 35.3(a) and (b) ECHR; Article 47 ACHR; Article 34, IACHR Rules of Procedure.1350 Article 3.2(d) to (g) OP-ICESCR.1351 Article 56.3 ACHPR.1352 Article 3 AP-ESC.

  • Page 1 and 2:

    Migration andInternational Human Ri

  • Page 3 and 4:

    Migration andInternational Human Ri

  • Page 5 and 6:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 7 and 8:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 9 and 10:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 11 and 12:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 13 and 14:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 15 and 16:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 17 and 18:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 19 and 20:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 21 and 22:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 23 and 24:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 25 and 26:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 27 and 28:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 29 and 30:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 31 and 32:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 33 and 34:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 35 and 36:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 37 and 38:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 39 and 40:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 41 and 42:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 43 and 44:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 45 and 46:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 47 and 48:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 49:

    MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN R

  • Page 52 and 53:

    36 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of ri

  • Page 54 and 55:

    38 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the i

  • Page 56 and 57:

    40 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6• A

  • Page 58 and 59:

    42 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6heigh

  • Page 60 and 61:

    44 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6worke

  • Page 62 and 63:

    46 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6activ

  • Page 64 and 65:

    48 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6rent

  • Page 66 and 67:

    50 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAPT

  • Page 68 and 69:

    52 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6terri

  • Page 70 and 71:

    54 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the U

  • Page 72 and 73:

    56 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The A

  • Page 74 and 75:

    58 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ii) G

  • Page 76 and 77:

    60 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6gende

  • Page 78 and 79:

    62 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Note

  • Page 80 and 81:

    64 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6A lim

  • Page 82 and 83:

    66 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The U

  • Page 84 and 85:

    68 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box 3

  • Page 86 and 87:

    70 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6be su

  • Page 88 and 89:

    72 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6right

  • Page 90 and 91:

    74 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the a

  • Page 92 and 93:

    76 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6isfy

  • Page 94 and 95:

    78 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In pa

  • Page 96 and 97:

    80 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6and i

  • Page 98 and 99:

    82 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6It is

  • Page 100 and 101:

    84 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Under

  • Page 102 and 103:

    86 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6lies

  • Page 104 and 105:

    88 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the p

  • Page 106 and 107:

    90 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6evolv

  • Page 108 and 109:

    92 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also

  • Page 110 and 111:

    94 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6permi

  • Page 112 and 113:

    96 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6es in

  • Page 114 and 115:

    98 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6State

  • Page 116 and 117:

    100 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 65. S

  • Page 118 and 119:

    102 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Unde

  • Page 120 and 121:

    104 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6tion

  • Page 122 and 123:

    106 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6they

  • Page 124 and 125:

    108 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 126 and 127:

    110 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6has

  • Page 128 and 129:

    112 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6for

  • Page 130 and 131:

    114 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6prot

  • Page 132 and 133:

    116 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6to s

  • Page 134 and 135:

    118 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ment

  • Page 136 and 137:

    120 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also

  • Page 138 and 139:

    122 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6nati

  • Page 140 and 141:

    124 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6(iv)

  • Page 142 and 143:

    126 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6char

  • Page 144 and 145:

    128 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In t

  • Page 146 and 147:

    130 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6this

  • Page 148 and 149:

    132 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6thro

  • Page 150 and 151:

    134 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6In t

  • Page 152 and 153:

    136 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6proh

  • Page 154 and 155:

    138 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6mate

  • Page 156 and 157:

    140 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6just

  • Page 158 and 159:

    142 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6“p

  • Page 160 and 161:

    144 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 63. t

  • Page 162 and 163:

    146 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Furt

  • Page 164 and 165:

    148 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6poss

  • Page 166 and 167:

    150 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 168 and 169:

    152 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6proc

  • Page 170 and 171:

    154 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 172 and 173:

    156 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6expu

  • Page 174 and 175:

    158 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box

  • Page 176 and 177:

    160 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 178 and 179:

    162 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6have

  • Page 180 and 181:

    164 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6At t

  • Page 182 and 183:

    166 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Box

  • Page 184 and 185:

    168 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 186 and 187:

    170 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6exec

  • Page 188 and 189:

    172 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6huma

  • Page 190 and 191:

    174 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6“i

  • Page 192 and 193:

    176 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Arti

  • Page 194 and 195:

    178 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6to r

  • Page 196 and 197:

    180 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6suff

  • Page 198 and 199:

    182 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Righ

  • Page 200 and 201:

    184 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 202 and 203:

    186 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6vent

  • Page 204 and 205:

    188 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6One

  • Page 206 and 207:

    190 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6tion

  • Page 208 and 209:

    192 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6orde

  • Page 210 and 211:

    194 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ICCP

  • Page 212 and 213:

    196 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6gans

  • Page 214 and 215:

    198 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6one

  • Page 216 and 217:

    200 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6his

  • Page 218 and 219:

    202 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6For

  • Page 220 and 221:

    204 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6c) A

  • Page 222 and 223:

    206 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 224 and 225:

    208 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6race

  • Page 226 and 227:

    210 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ing

  • Page 228 and 229:

    212 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6left

  • Page 230 and 231:

    214 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6judi

  • Page 232 and 233:

    216 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6b) R

  • Page 234 and 235:

    218 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6upon

  • Page 236 and 237:

    220 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6well

  • Page 238 and 239:

    222 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 240 and 241:

    224 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Wher

  • Page 242 and 243:

    226 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP

  • Page 244 and 245:

    228 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6This

  • Page 246 and 247:

    230 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 248 and 249:

    232 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6law

  • Page 250 and 251:

    234 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a re

  • Page 252 and 253:

    236 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Huma

  • Page 254 and 255:

    238 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the

  • Page 256 and 257:

    240 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6same

  • Page 258 and 259:

    242 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6civi

  • Page 260 and 261:

    244 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6As f

  • Page 262 and 263:

    246 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6priv

  • Page 264 and 265:

    248 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•

  • Page 266 and 267:

    250 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6has

  • Page 268 and 269:

    252 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The

  • Page 270 and 271:

    254 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6allo

  • Page 272 and 273:

    256 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6stre

  • Page 274 and 275:

    258 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6is c

  • Page 276 and 277: 260 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6educ
  • Page 278 and 279: 262 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6CHAP
  • Page 280 and 281: 264 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ther
  • Page 282 and 283: 266 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6not
  • Page 284 and 285: 268 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•
  • Page 286 and 287: 270 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6also
  • Page 288 and 289: 272 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Wher
  • Page 290 and 291: 274 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•
  • Page 292 and 293: 276 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6port
  • Page 294 and 295: 278 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The
  • Page 296 and 297: 280 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6irre
  • Page 298 and 299: 282 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6any
  • Page 300 and 301: 284 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6serv
  • Page 302 and 303: 286 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6d) P
  • Page 304 and 305: 288 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Cent
  • Page 306 and 307: 290 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ANNE
  • Page 308 and 309: 292 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ANNE
  • Page 310 and 311: 294 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of w
  • Page 312 and 313: 296 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Amer
  • Page 314 and 315: 298 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6righ
  • Page 316 and 317: 300 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6of a
  • Page 318 and 319: 302 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a re
  • Page 320 and 321: 304 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6prov
  • Page 322 and 323: 306 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6one,
  • Page 324 and 325: 308 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6When
  • Page 328 and 329: 312 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6•
  • Page 330 and 331: 314 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6the
  • Page 332 and 333: 316 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6dire
  • Page 334 and 335: 318 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6II.
  • Page 336 and 337: 320 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Comm
  • Page 338 and 339: 322 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Admi
  • Page 340 and 341: 324 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6fina
  • Page 342 and 343: 326 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 63. E
  • Page 344 and 345: 328 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6asks
  • Page 346 and 347: 330 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The
  • Page 348 and 349: 332 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6subm
  • Page 350 and 351: 334 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6ligh
  • Page 352 and 353: 336 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The
  • Page 354 and 355: 338 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6a) B
  • Page 356 and 357: 340 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6resp
  • Page 358 and 359: 342 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6Spec
  • Page 360: 344 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6(d)
  • Page 364: ISBN 978-92-9037-151-X
Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng
Universal-ESCR-PG-no-8-Publications-Practitioners-guide-2014-eng
Universal-PG-13-Judicial-Accountability-Publications-Reports-Practitioners-Guide-2016-ENG
Universal-Fight-against-impunity-PG-no7-comp-Publications-Practitioners-guide-series-2015-ENG
Universal-PG-13-Judicial-Accountability-Publications-Reports-Practitioners-Guide-2016-ENG
Universal-PG-11-Asylum-Claims-SOGI-Publications-Practitioners-Guide-Series-2016-ENG
dcu-pg-prospectus-2014
pg. 6 - SAIF Corporation
presentation-2014-eng-screen
18784-PG-Prospectus---ENG-final-web
Universal-Womens-accesss-to-justice-Publications-Practitioners-Guide-Series-2016-ENG
Universal-Womens-accesss-to-justice-Publications-Practitioners-Guide-Series-2016-ENG
PG Urban Conservation - University of Leicester
Universal-Enforced-Disappearance-and-Extrajudicial-Execution-PGNo9-Publications-Practitioners-guide-series-2015-ENG
HIPS-2014-Annual-Report-ENG.
Pgs 25-26 - Salisbury University
A-Picture-of-the-Nation-2014-Eng
Post-partum management of gestational diabetes Pg.6