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Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

Universal-MigrationHRlaw-PG-no-6-Publications-PractitionersGuide-2014-eng

330 | PRACTITIONERS

330 | PRACTITIONERS GUIDE No. 6The Secretary of the Court notifes the application to the President andthe judges of the Court, the respondent State, the Commission, whenit is not the applicant, the alleged victim, his or her representatives orthe Inter-American defender, if applicable. 1466 When the application hasbeen notified to the alleged victim, or his or her representatives, theyhave a non-renewable period of two months to present their pleadings,motions and evidence to the Court. 1467 The State will also have anon-renewable term of two months to answer. 1468Preliminary Objections Stage: The State’s preliminary objectionsmay only be filed in the response to the first application. The documentsetting out the preliminary objections must set out the facts on whichthe objection is based, the legal arguments, and the conclusions andsupporting documents, as well as any evidence which the party filingthe objection may wish to produce. Any parties to the case wishing tosubmit written briefs on the preliminary objections may do so within30 days of receipt of the communication. When the Court considers itindispensable, it may convene a special hearing on the preliminary objections,after which it shall rule on the objections. The Court may decideon the preliminary objections and the merits of the case in a singlejudgment, under the principle of procedural economy. 1469Additional written pleadings: Once the application has been answered,and before the opening of the oral proceedings, the partiesmay seek the permission of the President to enter additional writtenpleadings. In such a case, the President, if he sees fit, shall establishthe time limits for presentation of the relevant documents. 1470Hearing and Merits Phase: The hearings of the IACtHR are public,although when exceptional circumstances warrant it, the Court maydecide to hold a hearing in private. 1471 The date of the hearings will beannounced by the Presidency of the Court and follow the procedure indicatedby Articles 45 to 55 of the Rules of Procedure. 1472 After the hearings,the victims or their representatives, the State and the Commissionmay submit their final written arguments. 1473Friendly Settlement: If the victims, their representatives, the Stateor the Commission inform the Court that a friendly settlement has been1466 See, Article 39, ibid.1467 See, Article 40, ibid.1468 See, Article 41, ibid.1469 See, Article 42, ibid.1470 See, Article 43, ibid.1471 See, Article 15, ibid.1472 See, Articles 45–55, ibid. See also, Articles 57–60 on admission of evidence.1473 See, Article 56, ibid.

MIGRATION AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW | 331reached, the Court will rule on its admissibility and juridical effects.It may also decide to continue the case, nonetheless. 1474Judgement: If the Court finds that there has been a violation of a rightor freedom protected by the Convention, the Court shall rule that theinjured party be ensured the enjoyment of the right or freedom thatwas violated. It shall also rule, if appropriate, that the consequencesof the measure or situation that constituted the breach of such right orfreedom be remedied and that fair compensation be paid to the injuredparty. 1475 The judgments of the Court are final and the States Parties tothe Convention are bound to comply with them. Compensatory damagesprovided with by the Court are executive in the State Party. 1476Interpretative Rulings: The Court may accept request of interpretationof its previous judgments by any of the parties within 90 days fromthe notification of the judgment. 14776. African Commission on Human and Peoples’ RightsPreparatory Stage: The Secretary of the Commission transmits to theCommission for its consideration any communication submitted to him.The Commission, through the Secretary, may request the author of acommunication to furnish clarifications on the communication. 1478Admissibility Stage: Communications are examined by the Commissionin private. 1479 The Commission may set up one or more working groupsof maximum three members to submit recommendations on admissibility.1480 The Commission determines questions of admissibility pursuantto Article 56 of the Charter. 1481 The Commission or a working group mayrequest the State Party concerned or the author of the communicationto submit in writing additional information or observations relating tothe issue of admissibility of the communication. If the Commission decidesthat a communication is inadmissible under the Charter, it mustmake its decision known as early as possible, through the Secretary tothe author of the communication and, if the communication has beentransmitted to a State Party concerned, to that State. If the Commissiondecides that a communication is admissible under the Charter, its decisionand text of the relevant documents shall, as soon as possible, be1474 See, Article 63 and 64, ibid.1475 Article 63.1 ACHR. See, Articles 65–67, IACtHR Rules of Procedure.1476 Articles 67–68 ACHR.1477 Article 67 ACHR. See, Article 68, IACtHR Rules of Procedure.1478 See, Articles 102–105, ACHPR Rules of Procedure.1479 See, Article 106, ibid. See also, Article 59.1 ACHPR.1480 See, Article 115, ibid.1481 See, Article 116, ibid.

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