Keeping Pace with Changes in Health Education Credentialing ...

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Keeping Pace with Changes in Health Education Credentialing ...

Keeping Pace with Changes in HealthEducation Credentialing: What Faculty andPractitioners Need to KnowJune 22-24, 2010This event is sponsored by :National Implementation Task Force on Accreditation in Health Education


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Continuing Education• Today’s session has been approved for 1.0 Category I continuing education contacthours (CECHs) for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES). SOPHE, including itschapters, is a designated multiple event provider of CECHs by the NationalCommission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC).• Fees:• $ 7 for SOPHE members• $ 14 for non-members• Forms can be downloaded from SOPHE’s Continuing Education, Webinars page at:www.sophe.org/webinars.cfm• Completed applications, evaluations, and fees should be sent to:Society for Public Health Education10 G Street NE; Suite # 605Washington, DC 20002Fax: 202.408.9815


Keeping Pace with Changes in HealthEducation Credentialing: What Facultyand Practitioners Need to Know• Moderator• David Birch, PhD CHES• Co-chair, National Implementation TaskForce on Accreditation in Health Education


Three-Part Noon Webinar SeriesJune 22New Developments in Accreditation forSchool Health EducationJune 23New Developments in Accreditation forPublic/Community Health EducationJune 24Aligning Competencies and Certification


Today’s Agenda:Time Activity Presenter12:00 pm Welcome & Instructions Sarah Leonard12:05 pm Health Education Quality AssuranceMovement: A Brief Synopsis 2000-1012:15 pm The 2010 Health Educator: Are TheseCompetencies in Your Skill Set?12:30 pm So You Want to be a Master CertifiedHealth Education Specialist (MCHES)?David BirchElaine AuldLinda Lysoby12:45 pm Q & A Led by David Birch12:48 pm Wrap Up/Adjourn David Birch


ObjectivesAt the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:• Identify at least four new or expanded areas in which healtheducators should be competent to practice, as revealed by the2010 Health Educator Job Analysis survey.• Explain how to apply to become a Master Certified HealthEducation Specialist and the rationale and benefits of MCHES.


Strengthening Quality Assurance in Health Education• SOPHE and AAHE began effort in 2000 to examinemechanisms to strengthen and unify QA efforts, addressproblems• 3 Task Forces working over 10 years• Efforts focused in both accreditation of professional prepprograms and individual certification


National Task Force on Accreditation in HealthEducation Principles• Accreditation to be the quality assurance mechanism• 2 parallel, coordinated mechanisms for school andcommunity (NCATE & CEPH)• Accreditation built on best practices of existing systems• Graduate level students perform competencies at graduatelevel proficiency


Credentialing of Individual Health Educators &Professional Preparation ProgramsINDIVIDUALCERTIFICATION/LICENSUREPROFESSIONALPreparation ProgramAccreditation or ApprovalTeacherLicensure(StateControlled)CertifiedHealthEducationSpecialist(NCHEC)CertifiedPublicHealth(NBPHE)SABPACUndergradHealth Ed.ProfessionalPrepProgramsCEPHUndergradPub Health& MPHProgramsNCATE &TEACUndergradTeacherPrep.ProgramsEntry LevelAdvancedLevelAccreditationTask Forces


Selected Task Force Recommendations• All health educators should seek CHES status and MCHESstatus if applicable and when available• Undergraduate school health education professionalpreparation programs should seek NCATE/TEACaccreditation• Masters level community and public health programsshould seek CEPH accreditation• Undergraduate community/public health programs affiliatedwith a MPH program should seek CEPH accreditation• Undergraduate community/public health programs notaffiliated with a MPH program should seek SABPAC approval


The 2010 Health Educator: Are TheseCompetencies in Your Skill Set?• Presenter• M. Elaine Auld, MPH, CHES• Chief Executive Officer, Society for PublicHealth Education


The 2010 Health Educator:Are These Competencies inYour Skill Set?M. Elaine Auld, MPH, CHESSociety for Public Health EducationJune 24, 2010


Objectives• Provide brief overview of a nationwide jobanalysis of health educators in all practicesettings– Health Educator Job Analysis – 2010• Discuss implications of HEJA 2010 for thehealth educator’s toolbox


HEJA PartnersProfessionalExaminationService (PES)• Contracted by NCHEC• Standards/best practices:– American Educational ResearchAssociation– American PsychologicalAssociation– National Council on Measurementin Education© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Health Educator Competencies StudiesRoleDelineationStudy• 1980-1985• Volunteer• Donations &grantsCompetenciesUpdate Project• 1998-2005• Primarilyvolunteer• Donations, grants& NCHECHealthEducator JobAnalysis• 2008-2009• Contractedvendor• Funded bypublication profits© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Health Educator Job Analysis - HEJAPURPOSETo validate the contemporary practice of entryleveland advanced-level health educators.To re-define core knowledge and competenciesfor health education practice.© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Job Analysis Task Force© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


The Health Educator Job Analysis Process1-Phoneinterviews2-Task forcemeeting #110-Analysis/interpretationPESProfessionalExaminationService3-Terminologyreview(subcommittee)9-Full survey/data collectionSCSteeringCommitteeTF4-Task force:independentreview8-Instrument pilotTask Force5-Contentreconciliation(subcommittee)7-Task forcemeeting #26-Subject MatterExperts:Independentreview© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Online SurveyCreated list through invitations- CNHEO organizations- CHES database1,022 completed the survey- 21.5% response rate- All practice settings representedAvg survey time: 1 hour- Rated 246 sub-competencies: Frequency &Importance- Rated 115 knowledge items: Levels of use (Bloom’staxonomy)© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Overall HEJA OutcomesVerified CUP findings regarding…Hierarchical Model• Advanced-level builds on entry-levelDifferentiation of entry vs. advancedbased on 5-years experience7 Areas of Responsibility© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


HEJA Outcomes (cont’d)Ethics incorporated withinseveral responsibilitiesVerified knowledge items forthe first timeDetermined that evaluationand research remain withinone area of responsibility© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Responsibilities, Competencies &Sub-CompetenciesCUP 2006• 7 Areas ofResponsibility• 29 Competencies• 163 Sub-competencies– 82 Entry– 81 AdvancedHEJA 2010• 7 Areas ofResponsibility• 34 Competencies• 223 Sub-competencies– 162 Entry– 61 Advanced© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Areas of ResponsibilityCUP MODEL 2006 HEJA Model 2010I. Assess individual and communityneeds for health educationII. Plan health education strategies,interventions,and programsIII. Implement health educationstrategies, interventions, andprogramsIV. Conduct evaluation and researchrelated to health educationV. Administer healtheducation strategies, interventions,and programsVI. Serve as a health educationresource personVII. Communicate and advocatefor health and health educationI. Assess needs, assets, and capacity forhealth educationII: Plan health educationIIII. Implement health educationIV. Conduct evaluation and researchrelated to health educationV. Administer and manage healtheducationVI. Serve as a health education resourcepersonVII. Communicate and advocate forhealth and health education© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Selected New Competencies• Area I:– Plan the assessment process• Area V:– Manage human resources• Area VII:– Deliver messages using a variety of strategies, methods andtechniques– Engage in health education advocacy


Area I: Assess needs…A: Plan theassessmentprocessEntry1. Identify existing and neededresources to conductassessmentsAdvanced2. Apply theories and modelsto develop assessmentstrategies3. Develop plans for datacollection, analysis, andinterpretation4. Integrate research designs,methods, and instrumentsinto assessment plans


Area I: Assess needs…A: Plan theassessmentprocessEntryIdentify existing and neededresources to conductassessmentsAdvanced1. Identify stakeholdersto participate in theassessment processApply theories and models todevelop assessment strategies2. Engage stakeholdersto participate in theassessment processDevelop plans for data collection,analysis, and interpretationIntegrate research designs,methods, and instruments intoassessment plans


Area V: Administer & manage…D: ManagehumanresourcesEntry1. Develop volunteeropportunities2. Demonstrate leadership skillsin managing human resources3. Apply human resource policiesconsistent with relevant lawsand regulations4. Evaluate qualifications of staffand volunteers needed forprograms5. Recruit volunteers and staff6. Apply appropriate methods forteam development7. Model professional practicesand ethical behavior8. Evaluate performance of staffand volunteersAdvanced


Area V: Administer and manage…A: ManagehumanresourcesEntry1. Develop volunteer opportunities2. Demonstrate leadership skills inmanaging human resources3. Apply human resource policiesconsistent with relevant laws andregulations4. Evaluate qualifications of staffand volunteers needed forprograms5. Recruit volunteers and staff6. Apply appropriate methods forteam development7. Model professional practices andethical behavior8. Evaluate performance of staffand volunteersAdvanced1. Employ conflictresolution strategies2. Develop strategies toenhance staff andvolunteers’ careerdevelopment3. Implement strategies toenhance staff andvolunteers’ careerdevelopment


Area VIII: Communicate & advocate…C: Delivermessagesusing avariety ofstrategies,methodsandtechniquesEntry1. Use techniques thatempower individuals andcommunities to improvetheir health2. Employ technology tocommunicate to prioritypopulationsAdvanced3. Evaluate the delivery ofcommunication strategies,methods, and techniques


Area VIII: Communicate & advocate…C: Delivermessagesusing avariety ofstrategies,methodsandtechniquesEntry1. Use techniques that empowerindividuals and communitiesto improve their health2. Employ technology tocommunicate to prioritypopulations3. Evaluate the delivery ofcommunication strategies,methods, and techniquesAdvancedN/A


Area VIII: Communicate & advocate…D: Engage inhealtheducationadvocacyEntry1. Engage stakeholders inadvocacy2. Develop an advocacy plan incompliance with local, state,and/or federal policies andprocedures.3. Comply with organizationalpolicies related to participatingin advocacy.4. Communicate the impact ofhealth and health education onorganizational and socioecologicalfactors5. Use data to support advocacymessages6. Implement advocacy plans7. Incorporate media andtechnology in advocacy8. Participate in advocacyinitiativesAdvanced


Area VIII: Communicate & advocate…D: Engage inhealtheducationadvocacyEntry1. Engage stakeholders in advocacy2. Develop an advocacy plan incompliance with local, state,and/or federal policies andprocedures.3. Comply with organizationalpolicies related to participating inadvocacy.4. Communicate the impact ofhealth and health education onorganizational and socioecologicalfactors5. Use data to support advocacymessages6. Implement advocacy plans7. Incorporate media and technologyin advocacy8. Participate in advocacy initiativesAdvanced1. Lead advocacyinitiatives2. Evaluate advocacyefforts


HEJAKnowledgeAreas•First timeverified•113 areasvalidatedEXAMPLES• Education theory• Communication theory• Health behavior theory• Marketing theory• Systems theory• Community organization• Professional code of ethics• Informatics• Legislative process andpolitical structures• Advocacy techniques• Policy developmentprocesses© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Framework PublicationA Competency-based Framework for HealthEducation Specialists – 2010Coming Late Summer 2010© NCHEC, AAHE SOPHE, 2010


Sharpening Your Toolbox• Tools of the Trade 1 & 2• Health PromotionPrograms: From Theoryto Practice• SOPHE Journals – SelfStudy


Sharpening Your Toolbox• SOPHE SummerWebinar Series• SOPHE Chapter Events• www.sophe.org• SOPHE 61 st AnnualMeeting– November 4-6, 2010– Denver, CO


14 th Annual Advocacy Summit• MARCH 5-7, 2011• WASHINGTON COURT HOTEL,WASHINGTON DC• 2 ½ DAYS OF ADVOCACYTRAINING & HILL VISITS• ENTRY- TO ADVANCED-LEVELADVOCACY SKILL DEVELOPMENT• >200 PRACTITIONERS, FACULTY,STUDENTSwww.healtheducationadvocate.org


So You Want to be a Master CertifiedHealth Education Specialist (MCHES)?• Presenter• Linda Lysoby, MS, CHES, CAE• Executive Director, National Commissionfor Health Education Credentialing, Inc.


So You Want to be aMaster Certified HealthEducation Specialist(MCHES)?Linda Lysoby, MS, CHES, CAEExecutive Director, NCHECKeeping Pace with Changes in HealthEducation Credentialing: What Faculty andPractitioners Need to KnowSOPHE Webinar SeriesJune 24, 12:00© NCHEC, 2009


Presentation ObjectivesBy the end of the presentation attendees will beable to:• Summarize the development of the MCHES,advanced-level certification.• Explain MCHES exam details, such as eligibilitycriteria, projected fees, and continuingeducation contact hours; and• Formulate any concerns regarding MCHES© NCHEC, 2009


CHES Certification• Three Components:– Meet Academic Eligibility Standards– Pass Written Examination– Continuing Education Requirements -75 in 5 years• Voluntary• National in Scope• Based on Generic Health Education Responsibilitiesand Competencies• Verified through a Job Analysis• Meets NCCA standards• Over 8,500 Active CHES© NCHEC 2010


Why an Advanced Credential?• Continuing comments from health educators thatcurrent CHES credential is “entry-level” and,therefore, not reflective of the scope of practice ofmany health education specialists.© NCHEC, 2010• Official recommendations of the National TaskForce on Accreditation• Findings of CUP revealed advanced levels amonghealth educators in their practice. This wasconfirmed by the Job Analysis Project.• 2006 Feasibility Study Survey: 2/3 of respondentsindicated that an advanced level certification willbenefit the profession


Why an Advanced Credential?To help advanced - level CHES:identifypromoteand advance their skills.© NCHEC, 2010


Advanced Certification:2005History Summary• The Competency Update Project (CUP) results released:• Entry: Baccalaureate/master’s. 5 years’ experience• Advanced 2: Doctorate and >5 years’ experience2006• 2/06: Pilot Survey at the Dallas Congress200720082009• The Advanced Credential Feasibility Study results indicated that anadvanced level certification would benefit the profession• NCHEC BOC voted to proceed with advanced credential• April: NCHEC Position Statement about Advanced Certification• August: Call for Comments (67% favorable)• April: NCHEC Board of Commissioners approved PolicyStatement about the Advanced Certification© NCHEC, 2010


Reasons to become MCHES• Validation that you are skilled in advanced-levelresponsibilities and competencies for a healtheducation specialist• Provides advanced-level continuing educationopportunities, in order for health education specialist tostay abreast of the latest research and practice in thefield• Increases professional confidence because you havevalidated your knowledge and application of the coreMCHES responsibilities• Recognition of experience and expertise in yourchosen field• Differentiate experienced professionals from entrylevelpractitioners© NCHEC, 2010


Certified Health Education Specialist(CHES) CredentialExam Eligibility:Establishes professional identityMinimum Bachelors degreeMajor and/ordegree inhealtheducationORAcademic transcriptreflecting 25 semester hrsaddressing the SevenAreas of Responsibility ofHealth Educators© NCHEC, 2010


Master Certified Health EducationSpecialist (MCHES) CredentialConfirms professional development / career ladder1 st MCHES EXAM: October 15, 2011ELIGIBILITY:CHESMinimum of thepast 5continuous yrsactive statusMaster’s degree or higherin Health EdORMaster’s degree or higherwith transcript reflecting25 semester hrsaddressing the SevenAreas of ResponsibilityNon-CHESOr CHES


Exam Fees & Recertification• MCHES Exam application fees : range from $250-$390 basedon type of application and submission deadlineFEES1 st deadline6/1/112 nd deadline7/1/113 rd deadline8/1/11Final deadline9/1/11Exam (CHES) $250 $260 $290 $340Exam (Non-CHES) $300 $310 $340 $390Recertification/RenewalAnnual renewal fee (after 1 st year): $55.00Continuing Education• 75 CECH in 5 years (minimum 45 Cat 1, Max 30 Cat 2)•30 CECH must be linked to advanced Sub-competencies (Cat 1 or 2)© NCHEC, 2010


MCHESExperience DocumentationOpportunity (EDO)•CHES ≥ 5 years continuous active status•6 month period (October 2010 to April 2011) only•If successful, applicants will not have to take the exam© NCHEC, 2010


MCHESExperience DocumentationOpportunity (EDO)Experience Self Appraisal –Document AdvancedActivityDeadlinesFees12/11/10 $200Two “Testamentof Practice”Recommendations01/15/11 $21003/01/11 $24004/16/11 $290Resume/CV© NCHEC, 2010


Self-appraisal & Testament ofPracticeCompletion of one form is a two-step process aspart of the MCHES EDO application1) The applicant completes a self-appraisal ofhis/her advanced-level experience and forwardsit to two recommenders for completion2) The recommenders review and respond tothe self-appraisal and return it to the applicant.© NCHEC, 2009


Sample: Experience Self AppraisalName of Advanced Activity:Co-chair of the state-wide StrokeRehabilitation Work GroupYear advanced activitycompleted:(within thepast 5 years) 2009Area of Responsibility:Area I: Asses Needs, Assets,and Capacity for HealthEducationAdvanced-level Subcompetency:Engagestakeholders to participatein the assessment processName of Documentation: (4 page limit)Purpose, goals, objectives, and means to achieve resultsfor the Stroke Rehabilitation Working Group© NCHEC, 2009


Description of applicants’ role in advanced activity(


Timeline MCHES CertificationSummer2010• Revised CHES Study Companion released• Release of Revised Framework PublicationOct. 2010 –April 2011• MCHES Experience Documentation Opportunity (EDO) PeriodOct.2010• MCHES Exam Study Materials availableApril2011• First MCHES credential conferred from EDO• New CHES Exam administered on updated CompetenciesOct..2011• First MCHES exam© NCHEC, 2010


•Communications•Promote CHES & MCHES•Continued information on Website•Mailing to EDO eligible CHES•EDO Forms available by September•Marketing strategies to employers•Live Webinar on September 17, 2010•Next Stepsfor NCHEC© NCHEC, 2010


Frequently Asked Questions• CHES numbers• Retired status eligible• Employer recognition• MCHES back to CHES• Designated Providers of AdvancedCECH• Your questions© NCHEC, 2009


www.nchec.orgDetails and updates canbe found on the NCHECnews pageNCHEC CommunicationDirector:mrehrig@nchec.org© NCHEC, 2010


Questions?• To submit a question, click on the ? button and type in yourquestion.


For More Information:• Website• www.healthedaccred.org• Elaine Auld• eauld@sophe.org• Linda Lysoby• llysoby@nchec.org• David Birch• dbirch@ecu.edu


Thank You!• This session was recorded and will be available on the SOPHEwebsite within two weeks at: www.sophe.org/webinars.cfm• Please complete the feedback form!• CHES credits• 1.0 category I CECH• Fees: $7.00 SOPHE members; $14 non-members• Completed applications, evaluations, and fees to:SOPHE10 G St. NE; Suite 605Washington, DC 20002

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