Ben kwee khioen boen 1927-2008 - ukibc

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Ben kwee khioen boen 1927-2008 - ukibc

6 |PRAYINGWITH MARYWhen we think of Mary, many wonderful thoughtscome to mind…An innocent, sinless virgin; a quiet, contemplativemother-to-be; a faithful, devoted wife and mother; even a“woman clothed with the sun” who is taken up into heaven(Revelation 12:1). Yet all these images run the risk ofmaking us forget how human she was. Like any of us,Mary enjoyed many happy times with her family, as well asmany challenges and difficulties. She experienced the joyof seeing her son grow and learn, as well as the everydaydemands of wife and mother in her day. At the same time,she was also forced to cope with situations in which asword pierced her very soul (Luke 2:35).While Scripture tells us precious little about Mary,there are enough episodes to help us come to a fewconclusions about her life of prayer – and about her role asa model for our own prayer lives.A Magnificat Disposition. Mary’s Song, called theMagnificat, tells us more than any other gospel story justhow Mary approached prayer (Luke 1:46-55). Mary hadheard that her long-barren cousin Elizabeth was pregnant,and so she went to visit her. When they met, the baby inElizabeth’s womb jumped for joy, and Elizabeth herselfproclaimed Mary as “most blessed” among women (1:39-45). Mary was so moved by all that was happening aroundher that this beautiful prayer practically tumbled out ofher – a prayer of praise and gratitude for the God who wasdoing such marvelous things.At the beginning of her song, Mary expresses herlove for God by saying, “My soul proclaims the greatnessof the Lord” (Luke 1:46). Then she goes on to express akey spiritual principle that Scripture illustrates over andover again: God chooses the lowly and the humble over theproud, even though the proud are often more educatedand more qualified. Mary saw that God reaches out tothe needy. She understood that God sends his strength tothose who know that they are weak, and his grace to thosewho know they cannot survive without it. By contrast, heleaves those who do not see any need for him empty andbarren (1:52-53).

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