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Copyright @ United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) andBuilding and Construction Authority (BCA), SingaporeJune 2011DisclaimerThis publication may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form foreducational or non-profit purposes without special permission from the copyrightholder, provided acknowledgement of the source is made. UNEP and BCA wouldappreciate receiving a copy of any publication that uses this publication as asource.No use of this publication may be made for resale or for any other commercialpurpose whatsoever without prior permission in writing from the UNEP and BCA.While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that the contents of thispublication are factually correct, UNEP and BCA does not accept responsiblilityfor the accuracy and completeness of the information used in this publication,and shall not be liable for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly orindirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the contents of this publication. Theopinions indicated in this publication should not necessarily be considered asreflecting the views or carrying the imply endorsement by the UNEP and BCA.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTWe would like to thank the following for their support, contributions and inputs in thedevelopment of the Regional Status Report and this Country Profile:Ms Liana BRATASIDAAssistant MinisterGlobal Environment Affairs and International CooperationMinistry of Environment


DRAFTCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGPOLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIAOVERVIEWCHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION1.1. Indonesia Overview1.1.1. Building Stock1.1.2. Geography1.1.3. Population1.1.4. Economy1.1.5. Climate1.2. Resources1.2.1. Energy1.2.2. Water1.2.3. Material1.2.4. Indoor / Outdoor Environmental QualityCHAPTER 2 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK2.1. National Plans2.1.1. National Energy Conservation Master Plan2.1.2. The National Energy Management Blueprint2.1.3. The National Energy Policy2.1.4. Energy Conservation Policy2.1.5. Green Energy Policy2.2. National Organisations2.2.1. Ministry of Environment2.2.2. Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (MEMR)2.2.3. Ministry of Public Works2.2.4. Directorate General of Electricity and Energy Utilization (DGEEU)2.2.5. Directorate of New Renewable Energy and Energy conservation2.2.6. Sub-Directorate of Energy Conservation2.2.7. Directorate General of Electricity2.2.8. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Clearing House Indonesia (EECCHI)2.2.9. Ministry of Energy & Mining2.2.10. National Energy Council2.2.11. National Electric Company Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN)2.2.12. Green Building Council Indonesia (GBC Indonesia)2.2.13. GTZ – Policy Advice for Environment and Climate Change (PAKLIM)2.2.14. Clinton Climate Initiative Indonesia2.2.15. Indonesian Hotel Engineers Association2.2.16. Indonesian Building Engineer AssociationCHAPTER 3 POLICY INSTRUMENTS IN INDONESIA3.1. Overview of Policy Instruments3.2. Policies and Initiatives3.2.1. Category 1 Voluntary Instruments: 13 initiatives3.2.2. Category 2 Fiscal Instruments: 3 initiatives3.2.3. Category 3 Regulatory Instruments: 20 initiatives3.2.4. Category 4 Market-Based Instruments: Nil3.3. Building Rating System3.3.1 GREENSHIP / GBCICOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 4


DRAFTCHAPTER 4 BEST PRACTICE4.1. Buildings4.1.1. Wisma Dharmala (Intiland Tower)4.4.2. Indonesia‘s Ecohome, ATMI IDC4.4.3. Ministry of Public Works, Republic of Indonesia (Kementerian Perkerjaan Umum,Republik Indonesia)4.1.4. The Austrian Embassy in Jakarta4.1.5. Grand Indonesia Office Tower-Jakarta4.1.6. Natura Resort and Spa4.1.7. Plaza BII4.1.8. Grha Wonokoyo4.1.9. Novotel Lombok Hotel4.1.10. Ubud Hanging Gardens Hotel4.2. Technologies/Products4.2.1. AC Unit Equipped with Heat Pipe for Tropical Climate4.2.2. Water Jet Nozzle for Air-conditioning Unit4.2.3. Using Shell and Core Building Concept, Airfoil Roof and Pitch-roof Construction,Jet Nozzles and Active Heat Pipe AC4.2.4. Chilled Water System AC Unit Equipped with Passive Heat Pipe, Variable SpeedPump and Fan, PT.Metropolitan Bayu Industri of Indonesia4.2.5. Active Heat pipe Installed in Air-conditioning UnitAPPENDIX 1 WEBSITE LINKS OF THE KEY NATIONAL PLANS AND ORGANISATIONS ININDONESIAAPPENDIX 2 WEBSITE LINKS OF THE KEY SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ANDINITIATIVES UNDER THE FOUR CATEGORIES IN INDONESIACOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 5


DRAFTOVERVIEWThe United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in partnership with the Buildingand Construction Authority (BCA) of Singapore is preparing a regional status reportwithin the framework of the global status reporting on sustainable buildings, launched bythe United Nations Environment Programme - Sustainable Buildings and ClimateInitiative (UNEP-SBCI). The regional status reporting will collate the current status andtrends from sustainable buildings initiatives in the region, with the aim of publishing theRegional Status Report on Sustainable Building Policies in South-East Asia.The Regional Status Report on Sustainable Building Policies in South-East Asia willprovide an overview of the policies and initiatives put in place in various South-EastAsian countries on promoting the development of sustainable buildings, with a first focuson Energy Efficiency related initiatives. The report is being conducted by BCA‘s Centrefor Sustainable Buildings and Construction (CSBC).Countries participating in the Regional Status Report on Sustainable Building Policies inSouth-East Asia are: Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar,The Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.The Country Profile on Sustainable Building Policies on Energy Efficiency in BruneiDarussalam is part of the series of country profiles linked to the Regional Status Reporton Sustainable Building Policies in South-East Asia.The Country Profile on Sustainable Building Policies on Energy Efficiency, collated as ofJune 2011, aims to profile country‘s sustainable building policies and initiativesaccording to the four category classification of policy instruments developed by UNEP-SBCI, stated in the publication of the ―Assessment of Policy Instruments for ReducingGreenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings, 2007‖. These four types of policyinstruments cover the whole range from voluntary to regulatory.The four policy instruments categories are:• Category 1: Voluntary Instruments• Category 2: Fiscal Instruments• Category 3: Regulatory Instruments• Category 4: Market-based InstrumentsCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 6


DRAFTCHAPTER 1INTRODUCTION1.1. Indonesia OverviewThis section provides an overview of building stock, geography, population, economyand climate of Indonesia.1.1.1. Building stockReferences from Biro Statistic Center (BPS) on construction value in Indonesia from2004-2009: Construction value that have been finished according province, 2004 – 2009(000 rupiah):http://www.bps.go.id/tab_sub/view.php?tabel=1&daftar=1&id_subyek=04¬ab=1 Construction value that have been finished according Title of Work, 2004 – 2009(000 rupiah):http://www.bps.go.id/tab_sub/view.php?tabel=1&daftar=1&id_subyek=04¬ab=2 Number of Construction Company according Province, 2004 – 2009:http://www.bps.go.id/tab_sub/view.php?tabel=1&daftar=1&id_subyek=04¬ab=31.1.2. GeographyIndonesia is located at the Southeastern Asia, it is the largest archipelago in the worldextending 5,120 Kilometers (east to west), and 1,760 Kilometers (north to south). Itconsists of five major islands and about 30 smaller groups. The figure for the totalnumber of islands is 17,508 according to the Indonesian Naval Hydro-Oceanographicoffice. The archipelago is on a crossroads between two oceans, the Pacific and theIndian Ocean, and bridges two continents, Asia and Australia. The geographiccoordinates is 5 00 S, 120 00 E. This strategic position has always influenced thecultural, social, political and economic life of the country.The Indonesian sea area is four times greater than its land area, which is about1,904,569 sq. km. Out of the total area; it has a land area of 1,811,569 km 2 and waterarea of 93,000 km 2 . The five main islands are: Sumatra, which is about 473,606 sq. km.in size; the most fertile and densely populated islands, Java/Madura, 132,107 sq. km;Kalimantan, which comprises two-thirds of the island of Borneo and measures 539,460sq. km; Sulawesi, 189,216 sq. km; and Irian Jaya, 421,981 sq. km, which is part of theworld's second largest island, New Guinea. Indonesia's other islands are smaller in size.The islands of Indonesia were formed in the Miocene age (12 million years BC);Palaeocene age (70 million years BC); Eocene age (30 million years BC); Oligacene age(25 million years BC). As people from Asia started to migrate, it is believed thatIndonesia existed since the Pleistocene age (4 million years BC). The islands have agreat effect on the change of the Australian and Pacific tectonic plate. The Australianplate changes slowly with an upward movement into the small plates of the Pacific platethat moves southward. Between these lines, the islands of Indonesia are stretched out.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 7


DRAFTThis makes Indonesia as one of the most changing geological area in the world. Thereare 400 volcanic mountains – which 100 of them are active- that dot the islands ofIndonesia. Every day Indonesia experiences three vibrations, at least one earthquake aday and one volcanic eruption in a year.For more info:http://www.asianinfo.org/asianinfo/indonesia/pro-geography.htmhttps://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/id.htmlhttp://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2748.htmhttp://indonesia.go.id/en/indonesia-glance/geography-indonesia.htmlhttp://www.deplu.go.id/Pages/TipsOrIndonesiaGlanceDisplay.aspx?IDP=1&l=en1.1.3. PopulationSource: http://www.geographicguide.com/pictures/maps/indonesia-map.jpgAs of July 2009, the total population in Indonesia is 240.3 million. Estimated in 2009, theAnnual population growth rate is 1.136%. There are five ethnic groups in Indonesia, theJavanese, Sundanese, Madurese, Minangkabau and others. Based on 2000 census, thepopulation distribution of the Javanese is 40.6%, Sundanese 15%, Madurese 3.3%,Minangkabau 2.7% and others of 38.4%.The population of Indonesia can be divided into two major groups: in the western regionmost of the people are from the Malay ethnicity while in the eastern region there are thePapuans originating from the Melanesian Islands. Indonesia also recognizes specificethnic groups that come from a certain province/area and have specific language forexample the Javanese from Central or East Java, the Sundanese from West Java or theBatak ethnicity from North Sumatra.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 8


DRAFTIn addition, there are also minority ethnicities derived from Chinese, Indian and Arabicdescendents. These people travelled as merchants through trade exchange since the8th century BC and migrated to Indonesia. Approximately 3% of the population is fromChinese ethnicity, although the exact percentage is not known as the last ethnicitycensus was held in the 1930s.Islam is the major religion of 85.2% of the population, designating Indonesia as thelargest Moslem country in the world. The remaining population consists of Protestants(8.9%); Catholics (3%); Hindus (1.8%); Buddhists (0.8%) and other religion (0.3%).Many Indonesians speak their ethnic language as their mother tongue. However, theIndonesian language is the official language and it is taught at all schools and mostIndonesians are proficient in using the language for communication.For more info:http://www.deplu.go.id/Pages/TipsOrIndonesiaGlanceDisplay.aspx?IDP=1&l=enhttp://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2748.htmhttp://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/PROJECTS/0,,contentMDK:22879554~menuPK:64282137~pagePK:41367~piPK:279616~theSitePK:40941,00.html1.1.4. EconomyIndonesia has achieved remarkable economic development success over decade anduntil the first half of 1990s was among the best performing East Asian economies,having growth rate of 7.1% between 1985 and 1995.In the face of financial crisis in the mid of 1997, the Indonesian economic growth movedvery low, even reached minus 13.13 % in 1998. Purchasing power parity of Indonesianpeople set back by ten years and its per capita income decreased to US$ 467 in 1998,while a condition before crisis (1996) stood at US$ 1,141. A huge depreciation Rupiahagainst US dollar furthermore has also brought some difficulties to Indonesian economy,such as the increasing of burden of debt payment in foreign currency and the interestrate as well as the escalation of cost of production due to the higher prices of importedgoods for production process.In order to overcome the economy problems, the Indonesian government has taken theeconomic recovery program which has brought some positive result and development.Several years after its program, Indonesian economic indicators demonstrated a positiveresult as reflected in economic growth (GDP) which was rose 4.7% annually during 2001– 2005 and GDP per capita increased 17% annually during the same period orincreased from US$ 675 in 2001 to 1,267 in 2005.For Indonesia, GDP growth has steadily risen this decade, achieving real growth of 6.3%in 2007 and 6.1% growth in 2008. Although growth slowed to 4.5% in 2009 givenreduced global demand, Indonesia was the third-fastest growing G-20 member, trailingonly China and India. Growth has rebounded in 2010, with the consensus forecast forgrowth of 6.0%. Poverty and unemployment have also declined despite the globalfinancial crisis, with the poverty rate falling to 13.3% (March 2010) from 14.2% a yearearlier and the unemployment rate falling to 7.4% (February 2010) from 7.87% (August2009).COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 9


DRAFTFor more info:http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2748.htmhttp://www.deplu.go.id/Pages/TipsOrIndonesiaGlanceDisplay.aspx?IDP=1&l=en1.1.5. ClimateIndonesia has a tropical climate with only two the seasons throughout the year, ―dry‖ and―rainy‖ season. The East Monsoon which happens from June to September brings dryweather. While the West Monsoon which happens from December to March is moistureladen and brings rain. The transitional period between these two seasons is interspersedby the occasional heavy rain shower.Temperatures range from 21C (70 degrees Fahrenheit) to 33C (190 degreesFahrenheit). In parts of the country with higher altitudes, the temperatures are generallycooler. Heaviest rainfalls usually occur in December and January. Humidity level isnormally between 75% and 100%For more info:http://www.deplu.go.id/Pages/TipsOrIndonesiaGlanceDisplay.aspx?IDP=2&IDP2=4&Name=Topic&l=en1.2. ResourcesThis section provides an overview of resources in Indonesia in the following categories:energy, water, material, indoor / outdoor environmental quality.1.2.1. EnergyEnergy resource is mainly using coal and petroleum (fossil fuel) for energy consumptionon building. Based on report from National Electric Company (PLN):http://www.pln.co.id/pro00/tentang-pln/bidang-usaha.htmlThere are several sources of energy that being used:1. Steam power plant (PLTU) based on coal, natural gas or petroleum2. Water power plant (PLTA) based on water movement to move the turbine3. Gas power plant (PLTG) based on natural gas and petroleum4. Geo thermal power plant (PLTP) based on geo thermalNational Electric Company (PLN) also bought electricity from private power plant.For link and data on Power plant from Private sector, this is a list from Ministry of Energyand mineral Resource Indonesia (ESDM):www.esdm.go.id/listrik/doc.../494-daftar-pembangkit-listrik-swasta.htmlEnergy consumption growth rate in the period of 1995-2000 at an average of 7% peryear, compared with a world energy use on average 1.2% per year and the APECcountries by 2.6% per year.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 10


DRAFTChallenge for Indonesia is how to decrease usage of fossil fuel and started a shift torenewable and alternative energy for reducing glass house emission. For alternativeenergy, this has been developed by BPPT such as:Biodiesel and Bio energy from Jarak Oil :http://b2te.bppt.go.id/jarak.htmlPic. 1.1 Extraction Machine - source BPPT websitePic. 2.2 Jarak Fruit – source BPPT websiteCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 11


DRAFTBio gas made from organic waste : http://b2te.bppt.go.id/biogas.htmlPic 2.1 A unit of Bio Gas – Source website BPPTAlthough energy demand in the commercial and building sector is only 4% of totalnational energy demand, energy efficiency in this sector remains a priority. The types ofcommercial buildings that use large amounts of energy include office buildings, shoppingcenters, hotels and hospitals. Generally, energy used by commercial buildings is for airconditioning and lighting. Improvements in energy efficiency in buildings promisebenefits from energy savings. Potential savings that could be achieved depend on theamount of the investment made.Measures to increase energy efficiency in the commercial and building sector can bedivided into:Existing BuildingFor existing buildings, increasing energy efficiency can be achieved through improvedbuilding performance. To know the specific measures, an energy audit needs to bedone which may include identification and analysis of overall energy efficiency issues inthe building such as building operational system or HVAC (Heating, Ventilating, and AirConditioning), level of comfort and building maintenance. The steps that are usuallyapplied are retrofitting, upgrade in technology and equipment, and the practice ofenergy-efficient behaviors for building occupants.New BuildingIf energy efficiency is considered since the initial phase of designing new buildings, thennew buildings should have more opportunities to save energy compared to existingbuildings. Indonesian National Standards relating to energy conservation in buildings(lighting systems, air conditioning systems and building envelopes) must be appliedwhen designing the building.Buildings with airtight envelopes (outer walls, windows, roof and floor) are more energyefficient. Similarly, a good building insulation can also help reduce heat conductionthrough the outer walls. Improving the efficiency of building envelopes is a low-costprocess but promises high profits through energy savings.For more info:http://energyefficiencyindonesia.info/energy-conservation-and-efficie/energy-efficiencyin-buildingsCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 12


DRAFT1.2.2. WaterThe amount of water in Indonesia fluctuates by season and is distributed differentlyamong the regions. In general, most Indonesian regions have an annual rainfall of about2 000 - 3 500 mm (60 percent), Indonesia has a total territory of 1.9 million km 2 and hasan average annual rainfall of 2 700 mm. Of this, only an average of 278 mm (10 percent)infiltrates and percolates as groundwater. The remaining (larger) portion flows as runoffor surface water (1 832 mm). If this water - groundwater and surface water - can bemanaged properly, it would be readily available with a total amount of about 2 100 mmannually or equal to the discharge of irrigation water of about 127 775 m 3 /sec.Total water storage capacity in terms of area in Indonesia is about 13.75 million ha -consisting of lake storage (1.777 million ha or 13 percent), dam and reservoir storage(50 000 ha or 0.4 percent), rivers (2.895 million ha or 21 percent) and inlandswamp/polder (9 million ha or 65 percent).Usage of clean water on buildings is especially to accommodate consumption activity.This usage includes tap water for cooking and sanitation purpose. Source of this water isfrom ground water.For more info:http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/ac623e/ac623e0g.htmhttp://www.pu.go.id/satminkal/dit_sda/data/RENCANA%20STRATEGIS1.asp1.2.3. MaterialThere are a number of types of cement produced in Indonesia. The main type is OPC(Ordinary Portland cement) or Portland Cement Type I which accounts for 80% of thecountry's total production. Another main type is composite cement. Other types areproduced in small quantity.The improvement in the country's economic condition in 2010 has boosted developmentof the country's cement industry. Work in a number of infrastructure and propertyprojects, shelved earlier, has been resumed. The residential building projects have beenthe largest consumer of cement in the country. Many people build and renovate houseswith the improvement in the people's welfare.In 2009, cement industry suffered a setback. Demand for cement was weak amid theglobal slump followed the crisis late 2008. It was shown in the cement production thatshrank 3.6% to 36.9 million tons in 2009 from 38.3 million tons in the previous yeardespite an increase in production capacity. The country's cement productioncapacity was 47.9 million tons per year in 2009, up 9% from 44 million tons in 2008. Thecement industry, therefore, had large idle capacity in 2009.Based on estimation until 2010 , Building in Indonesia, 85% material come from LocalManufacture and Industries, and the rest of 15% mostly using imported-materialsconcerning to upper class strata who using just for aesthetical aspect in private buildingand their technologies.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 13


DRAFTIn 2011, strong growth in demand for building materials, inflationary pressures and highenergy costs will generate upward price pressure. Favorable economic conditions inIndonesia will also continue to drive growth for building materials.For more info:http://www.datacon.co.id/Cement-2010Industry.htmlwww.allbusiness.com/science-technology/earth.../15286934-1.htmlKey Trends going into 2011Strong growth in demand for building materials will generate upward price pressure.Favourable economic conditions in Indonesia, will continue to drive growth for buildingmaterials. Inflationary pressures and high energy costs will make further upward pricemovements likely, in Indonesia particular. Short-Term Adversity, Adverse weather andheavy flood in South and South East Asia between July 2010 and September 2010,while a seasonal occurrence, has had a greater than normal impact on demand forbuilding materials given its effect on the region's construction sector. This extremeweather has impacted construction projects across the region, including Indonesia. As aresult some continued downward pressure on cement and steel (about half of which isconsumed by the construction sector) prices is likely over the near term.Based our estimation until 2010 , Building in Indonesia, 85% material come from LocalManufacture and Industries, and the rest of 15% mostly using imported-materialsconcerning to upper class strata who using just for aesthetical aspect in private buildingand their technologies.1.2.4. Indoor / Outdoor Environmental QualityAir pollution is a problem in big cities, including Jakarta province, the capital of theRepublic of Indonesia. The pollution is due to increased human activities, populationgrowth, the increasing number of industries, and transportation. Monitoring of ambientair quality parameters, such as total suspended particles (TSP), sulfur dioxide, nitrogenoxide, carbon monitrogen oxideide, hydrocarbons, and lead, in Jakarta indicates that thecondition is concerning.Transportation is the main source of ambient air pollution in Jakarta, which has 10million people. It is larger than any other municipality in Indonesia with 15,000 peopleper square kilometer. According to the Statistic Central Agency, the number of vehiclesin Jakarta in 2003 was 3.4 million motorcycles, 1.99 million passenger cars, 467,000trucks, and 392,000 buses. Meanwhile, oil fuel consumption increased. In 2003, oil fueluse was 68 percent of total energy consumption. In 2004–2005, the demand for gasolinein Jakarta rose, resulting in increased air pollution. Ambient air pollution has a significantimpact on the health and economic sectors. Health care costs increase by US$3.8million per year. On average, people have only 18 "good air" days in a year. In 2004,46 percent of all illness cases in Jakarta were respiratory related.Source: http://www.esri.com/news/arcnews/fall07articles/addressing-ambient-air.html.Based on 2010 Environmental Performance Index, Indonesia got a score of 44,6 in AsiaPasific Regions , Rank of 22 nd which had be able tracking in the area of environmentaldata and monitoring.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 14


DRAFT2005 - Measures effects of air pollution as well as level air pollution, coal consumptionpercapita, Anthropogenic NO2, SO2, and VOC emission per populated land area andvehicle in use.2006 - Measures air quality : percent of household using solid fuels, urban solid fuels,urban particulatesand regional ground level ozone concentration 2007 - Measuresatmospheric conditions pertaining to both human and ecological health.Indoor air pollution, and urban particulates, Ecosystems – Regional ozone, sulfurdioxide, Nitrogen oxides, and NMVOC emissions (as proxy for its ecosystem impactswhen deposited) plus estimates environmental burden of disease directly using reportsfrom WHO, urban particulate concentration, indoor air pollution, access to drinkingwater, and access to sanitationFor more info: http://epi.yale.edu/Countries/IndonesiaFor Indoor air quality, Indonesia had focused on regulation regarding hospital andhealthcare facility. The regulation is Keputusan Menteri Kesehatan Republik Indonesiano 1204/MENKES/SK/X/2004 on Persyaratan Kesehatan Lingkungan Rumah Sakit(Health Requirement for Hospital Neighborhood).For data submission is from each hospital (individual) and used for their evaluation dueto Hospital Acquired Infection (HAI) inspection. There were no data or regulation forIndoor environment on common buildings.For outdoor environment there are rules regulate this matter based on Report of Ministryof Health http://www.depkes.go.id/downloads/Udara.pdf and from Ministry of NaturalEnvironment http://www.proxsis.com/perundangan/LH/doc/uu/E00-1999-00041.pdfMost of this regulation is to control outdoor environment from Industry Area.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 15


DRAFTCHAPTER 2SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK2.1. National PlansThis section provides the key national plans on climate change, sustainabledevelopment and sustainable buildings and construction in Indonesia.2.1.1. National Energy Conservation Master PlanThe National Energy Conservation Master Plan (2005) by Rencana Induk KonservasiEnergi Nasional (RIKEN) states that Indonesia‘s goal is to decrease energy intensity byaround 1% per year on average until 2025.The National Energy Conservation Master Plan is a guideline for central and regionalgovernment to participate in energy conservation activities: To appoint energy manager for certain energy consumer. To plan and implement energy conservation program. To conduct energy audit periodically. To report the implementation of energy conservation program periodically. To reduce energy intensity of 1% per year.The future tasks are: To make energy audit as mandatory for plants and buildings that use energyintensively. To introduce energy management system.2.1.2. National Energy Management BlueprintThe National Energy Management Blueprint - PEN (2006)14 explains that the goal ofRIKEN is to realise Indonesia‘s energy saving potential through energy efficiency andconservation (EE&C) measures, and thus avoid wasteful energy use in Indonesia.Energy use is projected to increase rapidly under a base case to 41% of total primaryenergy supply (TPES) in 2025, without RIKEN.Draft Blueprint for National Energy Management 2005-2025:The Plan emphasizes on the utilization of energy in efficient, equitable and sustainableway and widens public accessibility for energy sufficiency with reasonable price. ThePlan targeted that RE contribute 4% of the country‘s electricity demand by 2025. As acriticism of the Plan, the Indonesian Forum for Environment (WALHI) promoted theJakarta seminar whose conclusions were pushing for the Blueprint to be redrafted withthe aim of achieving around 20% of RE by 2025.2.1.3. National Energy PolicyThe National Energy Policy (2006)15 states that Indonesia‘s goal is to achieve energyelasticity of less than 1 in 2025. In its national energy policy for the years 2005-2020, theIndonesian government further aims to increase energy efficient, promote renewableenergy, implement Demand Side Management and use cleaner fuels.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 16


DRAFTNote: energy elasticity is defined, in this case, as the rate of change of total primaryenergy supply, over the rate of change of GDP. Presidential Decree No 5/2006.2.1.4. Energy Conservation PolicyEnergy conservation is integrated into the national energy policy, which establishes theobjectives and priorities of energy development in Indonesia in the medium- and longterms.The national energy policy is enforced by the Presidential Decree No 5 of 2006.The energy conservation policy is aimed to reduce national energy consumption ratewithout lessening national development growth. The success of the energy measure willalso help to reduce the Indonesian dependency on oil. To enforce the implementation ofenergy conservation policy, the Government of Indonesia (GOI) is also enactedPresidential Instruction No 10 of 2005 which defines the means and institutional set-up,identifying the responsibilities of state bodies and their coordination with users and otherorganizations.The GOI, through the Energy and Mineral Resources Minister Decree No 31 of 2005,also provided a guideline for achieving the energy saving potential. Above all, the GOIestablished the National Blueprint on Energy Conservation to outline the national energyconservation measures and the subsequent programs as well as activities, under theEnergy and Mineral Resources Minister Decree No. 100.K/48/M.PE/1995.2.1.5. Green Energy PolicyThe Green Energy Policy includes the roadmap and guidelines for the development ofrenewable energy technologies for Indonesia, including the need for the relatedregulatory instruments: Implementing the maximum utilization of renewable energy Efficient utilisation of energy Public awareness in energy efficiency2.2. National OrganisationsThis section provides the key national organisations on climate change, sustainabledevelopment and sustainable buildings and construction in Indonesia.2.2.1. Ministry of EnvironmentThe Office of State Minister of Environment (Men-LH) was established in 1993 with Ir.Sarwono Kusumaatmadja as the minister to be more focus on environmentalmanagement. State Ministry of Environment brings together various sectors, region andpartners to create synergy and commit to strengthen local environmental institutions andcapacity of environmental institutions in the region, and the development of variousstrategic programs such as: earth sustainability, clean river, clean city, blue sky andothers.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 17


DRAFT2.2.2. Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (MEMR)Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (MEMR) is one of the major governmentowned organization of Indonesia, which deals with the geological studies andresearches of the country.Geological Agency (GLA) is under the direct control of the MEMR and in charge of thefollowing activities:-Geological investigation and research workConducting geological explorationDiscovering the mineral resource reserve of the countryActing as an advising body to the government and other inrested partiesCollecting geological data and maintaining the database by regularly updating itAdvising the mining sectorPredict and study the geological hazard common in the south-east Asiancountries like Indonesia2.2.3. Ministry of Public WorksMinistry of public works, formerly called the ‗Ministry of Settlements and RegionalDevelopment‘ (1999-2000), is a department in charge of the Government of Indonesiapublic works matters.The Ministry of Public Works is responsible for spatial planning and oversees theimplementation of law 26/2007. This law stipulates explicitly the authority of provincialgovernments and of district governments in spatial planning.2.2.4. Directorate General of Electricity and Energy Utilization (DGEEU)The DGEEU that exists within the structure of the Department of Energy and MineralResources (DEMR) is responsible for planning and regulating the electricity sector.However, the DGEEU also plays roles as an executive and regulator and this there is nodistinct planning body in the electricity sector. Legislative capacity of the power sectorfalls to Commission VII of the Indonesian Legislative assembly 2004-2009. Legislativecapacity in the power sector is supported by ample human and financial resources withwell defined rights. However, all these capacities are not supported by routine meetings.2.2.5. Directorate General of New Renewable Energy and Energy ConservationOriginal known as Directorate of New Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation, itwas renamed to Directorate General of New Renewable Energy and Energyconservation in August 2010.In the move to accelerate development of new and renewable energy (EBT), thegovernment has set up Director General for Renewable Energy and EnergyConservation, a new unit of the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry (ESDM). Thenew directorate general unit‘s duties will be mainly on formulating as well asimplementing policies and technical aspects of the new and renewable energy as well asenergy conservation.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 18


DRAFT2.2.6. Sub-Directorate of Energy ConservationThe Directorate General of Electricity and Energy Utilisation (DGEEU) is responsible forthe energy and electricity sectors. Its remit covers both policy formulation and regulationof such issues as indus-try structure, tariffs, service quality, safety etc. There are fivedirectorates within DGEEU. The areas covered by this component fall under one ofthem; namely the Directorate of New Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation(DEBTKE) which has five sub directorates, three of them working with in areas relevantto energy efficiency.2.2.7. Directorate General of ElectricityThe Directorate General of Electricity is under and responsible to the Minister of Energyand Mineral Resources. It has the task to formulate and implement policies and technicalstandardization in the field of Electricity.In carrying out the task as intended, the Directorate General of Electricity has thefunctions:Policy formulation in the electricity sector;Implementation of policies in the electricity sector;Preparation of norms, standards, procedures, and criteria in the electricity sector;Providing technical guidance and evaluation in the electricity sector;Implementation of the administration of the Directorate General of Electricity.2.2.8. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Clearing House Indonesia (EECCHI)Energy Efficiency and Conservation Clearing House Indonesia (EECCHI) is a servicefacility under the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources of Indonesia, which aims topromote and enhance energy conservation and energy efficiency in Indonesia.EECCHI systematically collects and processes information about energy efficiency andconservation in Indonesia. EECCHI also provides information services in the field ofenergy efficiency and conservation in the household, industrial, commercial andtransportation sector. EECCHI plays an active role in raising public awareness toimplement energy conservation and energy efficiency through various outreachprograms, training, workshops, conferences and seminars.2.2.9. Ministry of Energy & MiningNew Ministry of Mines and Energy regulations establish procedures for provinces toissue mining permits for investment, exploration and production in areas lying within twoor more districts and up to 12 miles offshore from their coasts. Initially, some regionsmay find it difficult to meet previous standards in issuing permits and inspectingenvironmental performance. If some regions are unable to control the environmentaldegradation associated with illegal mining, this could undermine public support for theoperations of legitimate miners.2.2.10. National Energy CouncilCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 19


DRAFTThe government has issued Presidential Regulation No. 26 of 2008 to facilitate theimplementation of Articles 12 and 13 of Law No. 30 of 2007 on Energy as these Articlesrelate to the establishment of the National Energy Council.The National Energy Council is a national, independent, and permanent body whosemain responsibilities relate to the formulation of a national energy policy.This Presidential Regulation establishes the National Energy Council. The Members ofthe Council will include 7 government officials and 8 stakeholders.2.2.11. National Electric Company Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN)PLN is an Indonesian government-owned corporation which has a monopoly onelectricity distribution in Indonesia. The corporation‘s vision is to be recognised as worldclass company growing flowers, superior and reliable relying on human potential.Their missions are to:- Run business electricity and other related fields, oriented to customersatisfaction, member of the company and shareholders. Menjadikan tenaga listrik sebagai media untuk meningkatkan kualitas kehidupanmasyarakat.Make electricity as a medium to improve the quality of communitylife. Mengupayakan agar tenaga listrik menjadi pendorong kegiatan ekonomi. Strivefor power to drive economic activity. Menjalankan kegiatan usaha yang berwawasan lingkungan. Run environmentallyfriendly business activities.2.2.12. Green Building Council Indonesia (GBC Indonesia)Green Building Council Indonesia (GBC Indonesia) focuses on climate change,sustainable development and sustainable buildings in Indonesia. The city is expected to reveal a revised by law on building permits that will lay thefoundation for a new certification scheme for environmentally friendly buildings. The new government regulation on green building is expected to help the citymeet the carbon dioxide emission cut target for 2020. Through leadership collaboration the global property industry will transformtraditional building practices and fully adopt sustainability as the means by whichour environments thrive, economies prosper, and societies grow to ensure thefuture health of our planet. Inter-government Communication Panel for become an executive forum tocontinuously apply strategic plan that has been legalize in a forum to stressingimportance of involving all stakeholders on communication process betweenprivate sector and government sector – local and nationally, also academicforum.2.2.13. GTZ – Policy Advice for Environment and Climate Change (PAKLIM)PAKLIM is an Indonesian – German cooperation programme advising and supportingthe national government, local governments and industries with climate changemitigation and adaptation initiatives. As one of the world‘s largest emitters of greenhousegases, Indonesia needs to put well planned and coordinated strategies into practice inCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 20


DRAFTCHAPTER 3POLICY INSTRUMENTS IN INDONESIA3.1. Overview of Policy InstrumentsIndonesia has a package of policy measures spread out over the four categories: Category 1: Voluntary Instruments: 13 initiatives Category 2: Fiscal Instruments: 3 initiatives Category 3: Regulatory Instruments: 20 initiatives Category 4: Market-based Instruments: NilKEY SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES AND INITIATIVESON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011CATEGORY 1VOLUNTARYINSTRUMENTSCATEGORY 2FISCALINSTRUMENTSCATEGORY 3REGULATORYINSTRUMENTSCATEGORY 4MARKET-BASEDINSTRUMENTSProduct and buildingstandards4 initiatives 1 initiative 14 initiatives Total19Public initiatives 1 initiative 2 initiatives 2 initiatives Total5Private and privatepublicinitiativesEducational andawareness raisinginitiatives2 initiatives 4 initiatives Total66 initiatives Total6Total 13 Total 3 Total 20 Total 0 Total 36TOTAL 36 INITIATIVESCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 22


DRAFTKey sustainable building policies and initiatives on energy efficiency in Indonesia in2010/2011 are categorised in table below:Product andbuildingstandardsCATEGORY 1VOLUNTARYINSTRUMENTSVoluntary certificates3.2.1.1.GREENSHIP / GBCIVoluntary labels3.2.1.2.Energy EfficiencyLabelling SystemCATEGORY 2FISCALINSTRUMENTSTaxationTax exemptions / reductions3.2.2.1.Tax and Customs Facilitiesfor the Utilization of RenewableEnergyCATEGORY 3REGULATORYINSTRUMENTSAppliance standards3.2.3.1.Indonesian NationalStandard (SNI)3.2.3.2.Energy audit mobile unit /BPPTCATEGORY 4MARKET-BASEDINSTRUMENTSMarket-based programs[concerning products andservices]3.2.1.3.Barrier removal to thecost effective development andimplementation of energyefficiency standards andlabelling project (BRESL)3.2.1.4.Regulation on EnergyEfficiency LabellingVoluntary audits3.2.3.3.Minimum energyperformance standards (MEPS)for electrical appliances3.2.3.4.Minimum energyperformance testing standards(EPTS) for electrical appliances3.2.3.5.Energy Saving BuildingStandardsBilling and disclosureprograms3.2.3.6.Energy Building StandardsBuilding codes3.2.3.7.Energy ConservationRegulation No. 70/20093.2.3.8.Presidential Instruction No10/2005 on Energy Efficiency3.2.3.9.Ministerial of Energy andMineral Resources Regulation No.0031/2005 on Procedure ofEnergy Efficiency Implementation(i) (r) (c)3.2.3.10.Presidential RegulationNo. 5/2006 on National EnergyPolicy3.2.3.11.Law No 30/2007 onEnergy3.2.3.12.Presidential InstructionNo 2/2008 on Energy and WaterSaving 20083.2.3.13.Law No. 30/2009 onElectricityMandatory certificatesMandatory labelsMandatory audits3.2.3.14.Government Regulationon Energy Efficiency 2009 (draftonly)Mandatory billing anddisclosure programsCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 23


DRAFTPublicinitiativesPublic leadership programs,awardsExecutive leadershipprogramsAwards3.2.1.5.ASEAN Energy AwardIncentives3.2.2.2.Government incentives thatinclude tax exemption and fiscalincentives on imports of energysaving equipment and appliances(near future)3.2.2.3.Government subsidies andbudgetary measures are providedfor energyconservation programsMandatory public sectorprograms3.2.3.15. Mandatory EnergyConservation of GovernmentOffice Buildings3.2.3.16.State-owned EnergyService Company (ESCO)Kyoto flexibilitymechanismsPrivate leadershipprograms, awardsExecutive leadershipprogramsAwardsGrantsFundsCapital subsidiesPrivate andprivate-publicinitiativesVoluntary and negotiatedagreements3.2.1.6.Public-PrivatePartnership Program on EnergyConservation3.2.1.7.National Program - LongTerm AgreementPublic benefit chargesProcurement regulationsEfficiency obligations andquotas (EOs)3.2.3.17.Public-PrivatePartnership Program on EnergyConservationPerformance contractingCooperative procurementEfficiency certificateschemes3.2.3.18.Energy ConservationClearinghouseUtility demand-sidemanagement programs3.2.3.19.Terang Program (2002)3.2.3.20.Peduli Program (2003)EducationalinitiativesAwarenessraisinginitiativesEducational programs3.2.1.8.National EnergyEfficiency Movement (MEMR)3.2.1.9.Energy managers FormaltrainingAwareness raising programsVoluntary programs3.2.1.10.ASEAN Cooperation :EE & C - SSN3.2.1.11.Clean and LeanTransportation Initiative (CALTI)3.2.1.12.Greenhouse GasEmission Reduction (GERIAP)3.2.1.13.Indonesia IntegratedSoild Waste Management(GALFAD)CompetitionsConferencesCampaignsEducational programs Educational programs Educational programsAwareness raising programs Awareness raising programs Awareness raisingprogramsCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 24


DRAFT3.2. Policies and Initiatives3.2.1. Category 1 Voluntary Instruments: 13 InitiativesIndonesia has voluntary certificate that is the green building rating tool, voluntary labelson energy and water efficiency, ASEAN energy award, voluntary and negotiatedagreements on energy conservation and audits for energy consumption. The countryalso has educational programs on energy conservation awareness and training,awareness raising voluntary programs on energy efficiency, alternative vehicle fuels andreduction of greenhouse gas emission.3.2.1.1. GREENSHIP/ GBCIGREENSHIP was introduced in Indonesia as a rating tool for green buildings, followingthe establishment of the Green Building Council of Indonesia in 2008. Indonesia willsoon have a green building rating tool, a voluntary environmental rating system thatevaluates the environmental design and construction of buildings, amid growing concernabout urban environmental degradation. The rating tool, which is called Greenship, is inthe pipeline as a follow up to the establishment of the Green Building Council ofIndonesia (GBCI) in 2008.The rating tool features several key elements - sustainable site, energy, water and wastemanagement, material resources, indoor quality, innovation, transportation and socialeconomy that are divided into credits. Points are awarded in each credit.3.2.1.2. Energy Efficiency Labelling SystemIndonesia‘s energy labelling program began in 1999. A dual energy rating system wasconsidered for electrical appliances, initially for refrigerators. The energy labellingsystem design shows: Information about the kWh per year energy consumption of a product and itsrelative position on a line from the lowest to highest case of kWh per year ofsimilar products in the market (Indonesia), and An energy consumption star rating - of four stars - that shows the product‘senergy efficiency rank, relative to similar products in the market (Indonesia) atthe time of assessment. This energy labelling system was discontinued,however, to be replaced by a new energy labelling system and design.A new energy labelling system is currently being developed. The design will provideinformation on : The absolute energy efficiency or performance of a product; and An energy efficiency star rating of four stars.The star rating is to be assigned by an independent and accredited test facility thattested the product, for example the energy label for compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs)provides information on the lumens produced per watt.Energy Efficiency Labelling Program is aimed at directing consumers to know clearly theenergy efficiency level of electrical appliances they will use. Energy efficiency, in thisCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 25


DRAFTcase, related to the energy performance of appliances that helps consumers in selectingproducts and equipments.Energy labelling is communicated to consumers through information disseminationwhich includes the important direction of energy efficiency level struck on the label.3.2.1.3. Barrier Removal to the cost effective development and implementation ofEnergy efficiency Standards and Labelling project (BRESL)To remove barriers in implementing Energy Standards and Labelling (ES&L), Indonesiais currently participating in the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)- GlobalEnvironment Facility (GEF) project. The program involves six developing economies ofAsia.BRESL has five major programs in promoting ES&L. The programs are: Policy making, Capacity building, Manufacture support, Regional cooperation, and Pilot projects.3.2.1.4. Regulation on Energy Efficiency LabellingThe standard of Energy Saving Level Label for Electrical Household Appliances, SNI 04-6958-2003, is to identify energy saving level for electrical household appliances and itskinds.The standard includes: form, size, color and symbol significance of the energy savinglevel label, location for the energy saving level label, criteria of the energy saving label,energy saving level score and amount of star.Implementations of Energy Efficiency Labelling are as follows: CFL – Compact Fluorosence Lamps Standard Reference: IEC 60969 : 1988 – Self-ballasted lamps for general lightingservice -performance requirements. RefrigeratorsStandard Reference:SNI 04-6710-2002, SNI 04-6711-2002, SNI 04-6958-2003 TelevisionStandard Reference: JIS C 6101-1, IEC 60107-1 AirconStandard Reference: ISO 5151:1994, JIS C 9612 Air Circulating FanStandard Reference: IEC 879 (1986)3.2.1.5. ASEAN Energy AwardIndonesia is an active participant in the ASEAN Energy Award program, specifically theBest Practice Competition for Energy Efficient Buildings and Best Practice Competitionfor Energy Management in Buildings and Industries. Indonesia has won several awardsin these programs including National Energy Conservation Awards for building in 2007COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 26


DRAFTand ASEAN Energy Award 2007 Best Practices Building Competition and EnergyManagement for Buildings and Industry Competition.3.2.1.6. Public-Private Partnership Program on Energy ConservationThis program is the government policy on energy conservation that focused on energyefficiency improvement for energy intensive industries and buildings. The purpose of theprogram is to improve energy efficiency by an average of 20% in the companies thatinterested in and joined the program.Government supports such as training, free of charge energy audit, technical assistanceand seminar/workshop. Company‘s commitments are commitment of the individualcompany; agree to conduct energy audit on factory energy equipments and processes;agree to implement the energy saving measures; and support the activity of energyconservation forum.3.2.1.7. National Program - Long Term AgreementThe National Program – Long Term Agreement is an agreement of industry andcommercial building to be audited for their energy consumption and to implement theaudit recommendations. Within the program, 23 companies from Industry andCommercial Building (2003 – 2004) have participated in the programme.3.2.1.8. National Energy Efficiency Movement (MEMR)The National Energy Efficiency Movement (MEMR) implemented by the Ministry ofEnergy and Mineral Resources promotes energy conservation awareness throughseminars and workshops, talk shows, public advertisements, brochures and leaflets; it isdirected at households, specific industries and transport.3.2.1.9. Energy Manager Formal TrainingThe Centre of Education and Training on Electricity and Renewable Energy within theMinistry of Energy and Mineral Resources actively organises training related to energyefficiency and conservation activities. The centre is also responsible for training energymanagers and energy auditors.Formal training of energy managers and the accreditation of energy managers are beingdeveloped. Training is given to government officials responsible for mandatory energysavings and reporting of energy use in government office buildings. Voluntary capacitybuilding on energy efficiency in industry and commercial buildings is being implemented.3.2.1.10. ASEAN Cooperation: EE & C - SSNPromotion of Energy Efficiency and Conservation (PROMEEC)ASEAN Best Practice Competition for Energy Efficient Buildings (ASEAN EnergyAwards)ASEAN Energy Manager Accreditation Scheme (AEMAS)COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 27


DRAFT3.2.1.11. Clean and Lean Transportation Initiative (CALTI)This is a pilot program with emission testing on companies‘ vehicles, covering emissiontesting on vehicles by applying bio-diesel oil as an alternative fuel (2004).3.2.1.12. Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction (GERIAP)The Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction (GERIAP) from industry in the Asia andPacific to reduce GHG emission from energy intensive industry. Six industries wereaudited in 2003 (fertilizer, cement, iron and steel, pulp and paper).3.2.1.13. Indonesia Integrated Solid Waste Management (GALFAD)The Project involves the construction and operation of a ―GALFAD® (GAsification,LandFill gas and Anaerobic Digestion)‖ plant at the TPA Suwung landfill site in Bali,which will treat and recover energy from municipal solid waste.The Project will derive energy from municipal solid waste through: The recovery of landfill gas extracted from the landfill The recovery of biogas extracted from the anaerobic digester, fed with highmoisture content organic waste; The pyrolysis-gasification of dry organic waste. The recovered energy will beused to supply electricity to the local grid. In doing so, the project will contributeto greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions in two ways. The first is through thedestruction of methane that would have been emitted from the landfill site in theabsence of the Project. The second is through the displacement of fossil fuelbasedgrid electricity generation with the Project‘s carbon-neutral electricity."COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 28


DRAFT3.2.2. Category 2 Fiscal Instruments: 3 InitiativesIndonesia has fiscal instrument on tax reductions for entrepreneurs who deal withrenewable energy utilization business, and incentives for energy conservation.Government subsidies and budgetary measures are provided for energy conservationprograms and fiscal incentives for imports of energy saving equipment and appliances,and special low interest rates on investments in energy conservation.3.2.2.1. Ministerial Regulation: Tax and Customs Facilities for the Utilisation ofRenewable EnergyThe aims of this Ministerial Regulation are to support the deployment of renewableenergy and to secure energy supply, to attract investor and increase the renewableenergy business sector by giving the tax and customs facilities for the entrepreneurswho deal with renewable energy utilization business.These facilities namely: Income Tax facilities, such as: reduction from investment; acceleration ofdepreciation; lower tax tariff for dividend; and compensation of losses Free of Income Tax for import machineries and equipment, not including spareparts Free of Value Added Tax Free of Import Duty Tax paid by governmentThe implementation of these facilities will comply with applicable preceding tax and fiscalregulations.3.2.2.2. Government incentives that include tax exemption and fiscal incentiveson imports of energy saving equipment and appliances (near future)In accordance with the action plan [Governmental Regulation No. 70 in year 2009], thegovernment is expected to introduce government incentives that include tax exemptionand fiscal incentives on imports of energy saving equipment and appliances, and speciallow interest rates on investments in energy conservation in the near future.3.2.2.3. Government subsidies and budgetary measures are provided for energyconservation programsGovernment subsidies and budgetary measures are provided for energy conservationprograms such as the partnership program on energy conservation in energy auditing,(2)the lighting program - for eligible households in relation to demand-side management(DSM) programs and saving energy, BRESL and other programs such as for informationdissemination.The government seeks to gradually remove energy subsidies. However, substantialgovernment subsidies continue to be applied with regard to: lower octane gasoline (RON88 octane), which is the gasoline grade most consumed in Indonesia; diesel fuel fortransport; kerosene for households, as the government is expanding the kerosene-to-LPG conversion program in households; and subsidies to certain classes of electricity ofCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 29


DRAFTlow capacity supply contracts in households and small businesses, this group constitutea large share of electricity demand. Direct government subsidies on fuels could totalmore than USD 6 billion, in 2010.3.2.3. Category 3 Regulatory Instruments: 20 InitiativesThe initiatives in Indonesia under Regulatory instruments can be categorised intoappliances standards on energy saving, building codes and regulations by thegovernment on energy and water conservation, mandatory audits on energyconservation and information in commercial and government buildings, utility demandsidemanagement programs on reducing energy consumption particularly in lamps.Indonesia has a mandatory energy conservation to implement best practice energysaving measures for government buildings. The government also issued aGovernmental Regulation on Energy Conservation. The Indonesian National Standard(SNI) is the only standard nationally applicable in Indonesia, it is intended to createuniform mechanisms and implementation for the development of the SNI and createharmonious orderliness with the international practices.3.2.3.1. Indonesian National Standard (SNI)The Indonesian National Standard is the only standard nationally applicable inIndonesia. SNI was formulated by the Technical Committee and defined by NationalStandardization Agency (BSN).The Indonesia National Standards Guideline of 2007 is intended to: create uniform mechanisms of the development of SNI; create harmonious orderliness with the international practices; furnish the implemental reference of the development of SNI.This guideline is a revised PSN 01-2005, the Development of Indonesia NationalStandards by referring to ISO/IEC Directive Part 1:2004, Procedure for the technicalwork. Basic change in this guideline is the determination of the rules for formulating SNIadjusted to the rules for formulating international standards (ISO and/or IEC).3.2.3.2. Energy Audit Mobile Unit / BPPTThe Agency for Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT) had developed anenergy audit mobile unit, for energy auditing and assessment of energy efficiency inindustrial energy use and energy use in commercial buildings. The Centre of Educationand Training on Electricity and Renewable Energy conducts testing of compactfluorescent lamps.3.2.3.3. Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) for Electrical AppliancesIndonesia has some minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for electricalappliances based on the Standar Nasional Indonesia (SNI). Purpose is to specify thegeneral requirements for energy labelling and to improve energy efficiency andconservation. They are applicable to appliances, lighting and equipment.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 30


DRAFTSNI is drafted and registered under the strict system and guidelines of the NationalStandardization Agency (Badan Standardisasi Nasional - BSN). Additional energystandards on electrical appliances are being developed.3.2.3.4. Minimum Energy Performance Testing Standards (EPTS) for ElectricalAppliancesIndonesia has some technical standards on energy performance testing standards(EPTS) for electrical appliances. Purpose is to specify the general requirements forenergy labelling and to improve energy efficiency and conservation. They are applicableto appliances, lighting and equipment.SNI is drafted and registered under the strict system and guidelines of the NationalStandardization Agency (Badan Standardisasi Nasional—BSN). Additional energystandards on electrical appliances are being developed.3.2.3.5. Energy Saving Building StandardsEnergy efficiency inevitably brings double impact, for example, a washing machine cansave both electricity and water. Efficiency can also frequently give higher comfort. Ahouse with good air circulation will bring a warm feeling in a cold season and is certainlybetter for health. In other words, efficiency offers something more with something little.In the context of climate change, efficiency brings great potentials. Whether or not werealize, changing non energy saving old refrigerator or non fuel saving car with energysaving one influence everything in the house, everything in the car, even all systems inlife. It means, energy saving and efficiency will bring great effects consistently.In addition to following the government recommendation, energy saving should alsobecome the public attitude in their daily life.3.2.3.6. Energy Building StandardsGovernment Regulation No. 36/2005 explains that under Law No. 28/2002 on Buildingsall buildings must comply with existing standards. Indonesia has four energy standards(SNI) for buildings, the standards cover: The building envelope Air conditioning, Lighting, and Building energy auditing.Energy building standards have yet to be mandated. However, voluntarily energyconservation and efficiency measures in commercial buildings have been widelyimplemented. Funding is from the government budget and international donor agencies.SNI 03-6389-2000 - Energy conservation for building envelope of building structuresSNI 03-6390-2000 - Energy conservation for air conditioning systems in buildingStructuresSNI 03-6196-2000 - Energy auditing procedure for building structuresSNI 03-6197-2000 - Energy conservation for lighting systems in building structuresCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 31


DRAFTPurpose is to improve energy efficiency performance of existing and new buildings andstructures. They are applicable to residential and commercial sectors.The standards outline: Building envelope: design criteria, design procedures, Energy conservation air conditioning systems: technical calculation, selection,measurement and assessment, Energy conservation lighting systems: lighting guidelines for optimal and efficientoperation, Energy audit procedure: energy audit procedures for offices, hotels, shoppingcentres, hospitals, apartments and residences.The standards also provide recommendations that take into account productivity,comfort and cost. At this moment, the standard will be implemented in Jakarta throughJakarta Province Government Regulation for building construction license (IMB).3.2.3.7. Energy Conservation Regulation no. 70/2009On 16 November 2009, the government issued Governmental Regulation (PeraturanPemerintah) No. 70/2009 on Energy Conservation, as called for by the Energy Law.Regulatory measures included: The formulation of a National Energy Conservation Master Plan (RIKEN,Rencana Induk Konservasi Energi Nasional), which is to be updated every fiveyears, or annually, as required. the mandatory assignment of an energy manager, energy auditing, and theimplementation of an energy conservation program for users of final energy of6000 TOE (tonnes of oil equivalent) or more.The mandatory energy-efficiency standards and energy labelling.The implementation of government incentives, including tax exemptions andfiscal incentives for imports of energy-saving equipment and appliances, andspecial low interest rates for investments in energy conservation.The implementation of government disincentives, including written notices tocomply, public announcements of non-compliance, monetary fines, andreductions in energy supply for noncompliance.At the time of writing, the government was drafting specific rulings and regulatoryframeworks to implement Governmental Regulation No. 70/2009 regarding EnergyConservation in Indonesia.Government Regulation No. 70/2009 on Energy Conservation regulates theresponsibility and the role of the central government, local government, private sectorand communities on energy efficiency, standardization and labeling, and implementationof energy efficiency i.e. implementing energy management for buildings and industriesthat consume energy intensively. This regulation also mandates the development ofGeneral Plan of Energy Conservation (RIKEN) as the guideline for the stakeholders toimplement energy efficiency and conservation in Indonesia.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 32


DRAFTThis Government Regulation obliges the large energy consumer, namely with theminimum consumption of 6000 TOE per year to implement energy managementthrough: Appointing energy manager; Develop energy conservation program within the company; Conduct regular energy audit; Implement the energy audit recommendation; and Report the result of energy management program to the authorities.This Regulation also stipulates the obligation for producers or importer of energyappliances to implement energy efficiency labelling.3.2.3.8. Presidential Instruction No 10/2005 on Energy EfficiencyThis Presidential Instruction No 10/2005 on Energy Efficiency is currently in force andmandatory. The Presidential Instruction (Impres) called on Ministers, Governors, Mayorsand other government officials to use energy efficiently. The Ministerial Regulationfollowed up on the Impres with details of implementation of energy efficient processesand policies. It also included a report of the energy consumption of each institution. Thepurposes of this instruction are:To implement the energy efficiency measures in its institutions including lighting,air conditioning, electrical appliances and vehicles‘ office.To urge and communicate energy efficiency implementation to the people.To monitor the implementation of energy efficiency measures and report toPresident through Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources.3.2.3.9. Ministerial of Energy and Mineral Resources Regulation No. 0031/2005 onProcedure of Energy Efficiency ImplementationTo guide procedure of energy efficiency implementation in government office,commercial building, industry, transportation, household and others.3.2.3.10. Presidential Regulation No. 5/2006 on National Energy PolicyPromoting utilisation of renewable source of energy: biofuels, solar energy, windenergy, ocean wave and current energy, geothermal etc.Promoting energy efficiency and conservation and optimalisation on energyproduction.Reduction of subsidy on fuel price.Reduction of energy elasticity.3.2.3.11. Law No 30/2007 on EnergyLaw No. 30/ 2007 on Energy is issued in 10 July 2007 with special attention on newrenewable energy development and energy conservation. This Law stipulates that theprovision and utilization of new renewable energy should be increased by governmentand local government within their authorities. Provision and utilization of new renewableenergy can get incentives from government/local government for a certain period until itreaches economical development stage.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 33


DRAFTThis Law also stipulates that energy conservation is the responsibility of the people andshould be conducted from upstream to downstream. Central and local government willprovide incentive and disincentive for the energy efficiency and conservationimplementation by the energy consumer and producer of energy efficient equipments.International cooperation will be conducted to ensure national energy security, domesticenergy supply and improving national economy.Central and regional government, energy producers and energy consumer areresponsible for the implementation of energy conservation program. Energyconservation is conducted from up-stream to downstream activities. Government willprovide incentive and disincentive for the energy efficiency and conservationimplementation of energy consumer and producer of energy efficient equipment.3.2.3.12. Presidential Instruction No 2/2008 on Energy and Water Saving 2008The Presidential Instruction No 2/2008 on Energy and Water Saving 2008 instructs thehead of central and regional governments to: Implement energy and water efficiency measures in their respective institutions,which includes electrical appliances and fuel efficiency in official transportation;and Establish task force in each institution to monitor energy and water efficiencyimplementation.3.2.3.13. Law No. 30/2009 on ElectricityThis Law is the update of previous Law No. 18/ 1985 on Electricity, which took intoconsideration the current energy situation; transformation of social condition, such aslocal government autonomy; and other regulatory and directive on good governance.The main purpose of electricity development in Indonesia is the security of electricitysupply in sufficient amount, good quality and affordable price for the people welfaretoward sustainable development.In supporting renewable energy, this Law prioritizes the utilization of locally availablerenewable energy resources for electricity generation. Procurement process to buyelectricity generated from renewable energy from private entities can be done throughdirect selection or without tendering process.3.2.3.14. Government Regulation on Energy Efficiency 2009 (draft only)Obligation for large energy consumer to conduct energy audit and designateenergy manager.Application of energy efficiency labeling for home appliances.3.2.3.15. Mandatory Energy Conservation of Government Office BuildingsGovernment departments and agencies and regional governments are mandated toimplement best practice energy saving measures as explained in the government‘sguidelines and directives on energy saving in government buildings, and are mandatedCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 34


DRAFTto report their monthly energy use in buildings to the National Team on Energy andWater Efficiency every six-months. (Presidential Decree No. 2/2008 on Energy andWater Efficiency).3.2.3.16. State-owned Energy Service Company (ESCO)The state-owned ESCO (established in 1986) is expected to take a leading role inproviding energy conservation related services, particularly to industry. The governmentexpects its ESCO to maintain forefront expertise in the field of energy efficiency andconservation in Indonesia, and to encourage a greater role for private-sector ESCOs inthe future.3.2.3.17. Public-Private Partnership Program on Energy ConservationThe Partnership Program on Energy Conservation is a government-funded energy auditprogram that is available to industries and commercial buildings. Participating industriesand commercial buildings are required to implement the recommended energy savingmeasures identified in the energy audit.3.2.3.18. Energy Conservation ClearinghouseIt was created for the purpose of data and information exchange on energy efficiencyand conservation, particularly for the industry sector and commercial buildings.3.2.3.19. Terang Program (2002)This program aimed at reducing electricity consumption by encouraging the installmentof energy saving 8 Watt compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) in household (


DRAFT3.3. Building Rating System3.3.1. GREENSHIP / GBCIIndonesia has a green building rating tool, a voluntary environmental rating system thatevaluates the environmental design and construction of buildings, amid growing concernabout urban environmental degradation.The rating tool features several key elements - sustainable site, energy, water and wastemanagement, material resources, indoor quality, innovation, transportation and socialeconomy that are divided into credits. Points are awarded in each credit.GREENSHIP guidelines for New Building version 1GREENSHIP guidelines for Existing Building version 1Draft GREENSHIP guidelines for Interior Space version 13.3.1. Bibliografi Rules of THE GREENSHIP RATING TOOLSBadan Standarisasi Nasional. 2000. SNI 03-6197-2000Badan Standarisasi Nasional. 2000. SNI 03-6386-2000Badan Standarisasi Nasional. 2001. SNI 03-6575-2001Badan Standarisasi Nasional. 2005. SNI 03-7065-2005Badan Standarisasi Nasional. 2005. SNI 19-0232-2005Badan Standarisasi Nasional. 2009. SNI 2547-2008Kementerian Kesehatan Republik Indonesia. 1990.Peraturan Menteri Kesehatan No. 416 Tahun 1990Kementerian Negara Lingkungan Hidup. 2008.Keputusan Menteri Kesehatan Republik Indonesia No. 1204/MENKES/SK/X/2004. 2004.Peraturan Gubernur DKI Jakarta No. 88 Tahun 2010. 2010.Peraturan Menteri Pekerjaan Umum No. 5/PRT/M/2008. 2008.Peraturan Menteri Kehutanan No. 3 tahun 2004. 2004.Peraturan Menteri Pekerjaan Umum No. 30/PRT/M/2006. 2006.Peraturan Menteri Pekerjaan Umum Nomor 06/PRT/M/2007. 2007.Peraturan Pemerintah No.18 tahun 1999. 1999.Peraturan Pemerintah No.85 Tahun 1999. 1999.Peraturan Pemerintah Republik Indonesia No 19 Tahun 2003. 2003.For more info:http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/25/indonesia-have-green-building-ratingtool.htmlPlease refer to Appendix 2 for the Website Links of the Key SustainableBuilding Polices and Initiatives under the four categories in IndonesiaCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 36


DRAFT4 BEST PRACTICEThis chapter provides an overview of the best practices in Indonesia under thecategories of buildings, technologies/products and others.4.1. Buildings4.1.1. Wisma Dharmala (Intiland Tower)Project NameWisma Dharmala (Intiland Tower)Building Category Country/City Jakarta Building Type Commerical Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing Existing Sector PrivateBuilding Info Building Size (storeys) 24 storeys Occupancy (visitors) Stockbrokers, embassies consultants and auditors Plot Size 0.84 Hectares Building Owner PT Intiland Development Tbk Time of Completion 1987Project DescriptionOne of Paul Rudolph‘s building, Wisma Dharmala has beenconsidered as one of the best sustainable building inJakarta, Indonesia. In addition, the government cited it to bean example of how other buildings should be design topreserve local environment. Its highly complex geometricalpieces was designed to meet more than just the estheticmerit, but also to gain a better natural air flow and lighting inorder to greatly reduce the need for air conditioner andartificial lightings. Rudolph said, ―Indonesian traditionalarchitecture offers a wide variety of solution to the problem ofa hot and humid climate. The unifying element in this richdiversity is the roof. It is true, that Indonesian traditionaleloquently solved the problems posed by the humid hotclimate.Building System Features Overhangs at each floor are covered with vines making thewalls of the courtyard green. The office towers starts somethirty meters above the base, allowing light and air topenetrate all parts of the buildings.Indoor Environmental Quality Natural air flowed was coaxed through their structures byfollowing the simple laws of hot air rising, leaving cooler airat the occupant‘s level, venture-like openings followed thelaws of air dynamic both horizontally and vertically. Thepassage of air was achieved by raising structures above theground, breezeways, venture openings in walls and roofs,controlled windows openings, manipulation of shade,shadow and light modulated in breathtaking array of roofs.Each floor of the office building has its own roof-spandrelwith overhang to protect the glass from the direct rays of thesun. There are typical floors, which twist and turn as thebuilding ascend to the top. This geometry allows the façadeCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 37


DRAFTOutdoor Environmental QualityData Referenceand the roof‘s to form balconies and terraces for many of theoffices floors.The base of the buildings provides a covered entry undercourtyard with exterior steps leading to a sunken terracesurrounded by varying kinds or restaurants. This courtyard isessentially a breezeway shaded by the mass of officebuilding overhead, so each floor of the courtyard steps backforming a balcony for the offices that floor. Thus the space atcourtyard expands with each floor forming an inverted funnelto catch the natural daylight.http://www.mgbc.org.my/Resources/Day%202/GBC%20Indonesia%20Presentations/Country%20Paper%20-%20GBC%20Indonesia%20Presentation%20Paper.pdfhttp://www.intiland.com/projects.php?id=c-itjPicture of Wisma Dharmala (Intiland Tower)COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 38


4.1.2. Indonesia’s Ecohome, ATMI IDCDRAFTProject NameIndonesia’s Ecohome, ATMI IDCBuilding Category Country/City Surajarta Building Type Residential Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing New Sector Private : Eco-HomeBuilding Info Building Size (storeys) 2 storeys Time of Completion 6 monthsEnergyThose begin with site understanding and optimization ofpassive design solution, whereby the building responds tothe existing sun orientation, induces airflow and specifiesfinishes that absorbs less heat. Cooling in a building takesup to 70% of its total energy consumed during its operation.Insulation and air-tightness of air conditioning becomes veryimportant key factors to reduce the energy consumption,matched with the installation of smart appliances.WaterMaterialIndoor Environmental QualityOutdoor Environmental QualityData ReferenceAt The Eco-home, some of the interlink water managementfeatures the catchment of rainwater into the groundwatertank, proper grey and black-water treatment, purification anddrink water treatment, the use of advanced water applicationlike grease trap and relevant low rate water appliances whichleads into a water efficiency up to 46%, 42% self sufficientwater supply and reduction of storm water.Its construction also use building materials produced inhouse solution outlet, so it is more efficient from a variety ofthings: reducing the use of woods, faster processing andlack of the use of discarded materials.The Eco-home optimizes its domestic waste managementthrough both changing the mindset of the occupants andalso providing the system to allow easier management. Theoccupant needs to understand the importance of classifyingwaste which will be channeled to recycling industry inSurakarta.And the last is renewable energy sources with theimplementation of integrated systems since a-well performedhome needs to be built with quality building resources likematerial that will sustain and ensure the building‘s durability.It is also important to select building materials that canrenewable and have minimum impacts to the environmentand enhance efficient installation methods.http://www.mgbc.org.my/Resources/Day%202/GBC%20Indonesia%20Presentations/Country%20Paper%20-%20GBC%20Indonesia%20Presentation%20Paper.pdfCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 39


DRAFTPicture of Indonesia’s Ecohome, ATMI IDCCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 40


DRAFT4.1.3. Green Building Pilot Projects: Ministry of Public Works, Republic ofIndonesia (Kementerian Perkerjaan Umum, Republik Indonesia)Project NameMinistry of Public Works, Republic of Indonesia(Kementerian Perkerjaan Umum, Republik Indonesia)Building Category Country/City Jakarta - Indonesia Building Type Government Climate Zone Humid Tropical Climate New/Existing New Sector PublicBuilding Info Building Size (storeys) 18 storeys Occupancy (visitors) 400 People (User and Visitors) Plot Size 4165,25 m 2 Time of Completion 2011 Rating System applied GREENSHIP New Building Version 1 CostProject DescriptionIn Workshop on Energy Efficient Building Launch WeekEECCHI in Jakarta on March 22, 2011, Director ofConservation of Energy, Maryam Ayuni stated that theBuilding Centre for Research and Technological Developmentof Oil and Gas (PPPTMGB) "Lemigas" included in the eightbuildings are being proposed to obtain certification as a greenbuilding pilot project.The same proposal given to a number of buildings, namely theGrand Indonesia Shopping Centre, German Centre, SuryaTOTO, Office of the Ministry of Public Works (PU), and theEmbassy of Austria.Certification of green building pilot project requires sevencriteria that must be considered, among others, the level ofefficiency, water use, waste management and materials usedto construct the building. The seven elements are calculatedbased on the rating and, if appropriate conditions can get acertificate. Previously Director-General of New RenewableEnergy and Conservation, Luluk Sumiarso states, the energyconsumption for buildings in Indonesia are still very high. Andshopping centers and office buildings in Jakarta has a largepotential for energy savings.A building constructed with energy-saving concept, can reduceenergy consumption up to 20-30%, equivalent to a new powerplant is enough to light thousands of homes in Jakarta. DGEBTKE explained various efforts for energy conservation inbuildings is done by active and passive design measures. Onthe design is done by utilizing a variety of inverter technologyand others, while passive measures include designemphasizes on building designs that support the use of lowerenergy, such as minimizing theCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 41


DRAFTentry of sunlight so it can save energy.To support energy conservation program, the DirectorateGeneral of New Energy, Renewable and Energy Conservation(DG EBTKE) would have formed Team Social Engineering(TSE), in charge of disseminating the value of saving energyand love of new renewable energy.EnergyData ReferenceThe building of the Ministry of Public Works, Indonesia has anEEI of 155 kWh/m 2 /year, as compared to 250 kWh/m 2 /year foran average office, achieving an energy saving of 38%.http://www.pu.go.idhttp://www.scribd.com/doc/58858255/Ir-Rana-Yusuf-Nasir-Greenship-Rating-ToolsCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 42


4.1.4. The Austrian Embassy in JakartaDRAFTProject NameThe Austrian Embassy in JakartaBuilding Category Country/City Jakarta Building Type Government Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing New Sector PublicBuilding Info Building Owner Government of Austria Time of Completion 2011 Cost USD $1.7 millionProject DescriptionThe building is the first green Austrian Embassy in the worldand also the first green building in the capital city of Jakarta.Green concepts were applied not only in the design of thebuilding but also during the construction project. No wastewas produced during the process. The liquid waste fromconcrete mix was recycled and use of wood was reduced asfar as possible.EnergyWaterIndoor Environmental QualityThe new Austrian Embassy building was designed byViennese architect Fritz Oettl, who teamed up with localarchitect Jatmika Suryabrata and local contractor companyPT Pembangunan Perumahan (PP).The application of green technology in the building couldreduce energy consumption by up to 75 percent. Theprevious Austrian Embassy in Jakarta consumed 110kilovolt-amperes (kVa) while the new building currentlyconsumes only 60 kVa.Fresh water is collected from rainwater stored in tanks,which is also used in the septic system and garden irrigation.The design of the building was based on principles ofeffective shading which enables rooms sufficient naturaltemperature and light.The building is using concrete core temperature controlwhere the structure is utilized for storing thermal energy inorder to release it when required. The cool air stored in theconcrete core is then transferred to the room.Data ReferenceMost rooms are not air-conditioned but instead relied on theradiant cooling system where a temperature-controlledsurface cooled indoor temperatures by removing sensibleheat.http://www.bmeia.gv.at/botschaft/jakarta/aktuelles.htmlhttp://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011/06/23/austrianembassy-jakarta%E2%80%99s-first-green-building.htmlhttp://www.austrian-embassy.or.id/COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 43


DRAFTPicture of The Austrian Embassy in JakartaCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 44


DRAFT4.1.5. Grand Indonesia Office Tower-JakartaProject NameGrand Indonesia Office Tower-JakartaBuilding Category Country/City Indonesia Building Type Commercial - Office Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing New Sector PrivateBuilding Info Building Size (storeys) 56 storeys Building Owner PT DjarumProject DescriptionMenara BCA is prominently located in the Grand Indonesiadevelopment and on completion will be the tallest officebuilding in Indonesia.The Building will comprise of the latest design andtechnology while providing amazing views of Jakarta andample natural light via full height glazing.Data ReferenceThe Menara BCA was created by Darryl Yamamoto, AIA,director of Austin Veum Robbins Partners (AVRP) and MixedUse Studio. Yamamoto was formerly with RTKL, where hedesigned the project.http://www.grand-indonesia.com/http://www.mediaarchitecture.org/the-grand-indonesia-tower/http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Indonesiahttp://www.regus.com/locations/ID/Jakarta/JakartaMenaraBCAGrandIndonesia.htmPicture of Grand Indonesia Office Tower-JakartaCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 45


DRAFT4.1.6. Natura Resort and SpaProject NameNatura Resort and SpaBuilding Category Country/City Indonesia Building Type Commercial - Resort/ Hotel Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing ExistingBuilding Info Building Size (storeys) 1 storey with 1 semi-basement, in total 14 buildings villas Plot Size Total GFA:1,712.6 m 2Total site area: 7,250 m 2 Site Context Urban Time of Completion 1999Project DescriptionDesigned by Popo Danes. The primary consideration in thedesign of Natura was energy efficiency. An importantconsideration was to build a tropical building that addressesthe prevailing climate with minimum use of air-conditioning.Building System Features The small island of Bali, where the building is locate, gets60% of its electricity from Java‘s energy system and 40%from the island‘s generator.EnergyEnergy Efficiency Index:-Air conditioned area: 61.2kWh/m 2 /yrEnergy consumption:-Electricity: 250kWh/m 2 /yrFuel 420 liters/ 12 hoursLiters/yr (not for electricity generation)The type of water heater used in guestrooms was vital insaving electricity. Electric water heater is used solely forhand shower while gas heater is reserved for the bathtub.The latter heats water faster and this ideal for bathtub use.Data ReferenceEach villa has its own electricity system, which automaticallyturns on air-conditioning, water heater and lighting only whenthe villa is occupied.http://tinyurl.com/3ga2bqhhttp://tinyurl.com/3btxy27Picture of Natura Resort and SpaCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 46


DRAFT4.1.7. Plaza BIIProject NamePlaza BIIBuilding Category Country/City Indonesia Building Type Commercial -Office Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing ExistingBuilding Info Building Size (storeys) 2 towers of 39 storeys and 12 storeys office building Plot Size 80,000 m 2 Site Context Urban Building Owner BIIProject DescriptionThe Plaza BII building is located on the most prestigiousboulevard in Jakarta, Jalan M.H. Thamrin.Building System Features John Budi Harjanto Listijono, from the ATMA Jaya University,highlighted building features where the building is orientedfacing north-south, the use of solar reflective glass walls, aflexible air-conditioning system that responds to the fluctuatingneeds of the tenants based on sensors and tenantparticipation.EnergyEnergy-Efficiency Operational Discipline and Procedure: Rescheduling and reduction of some essentialelectrical loads for equipment rooms. Eliminating some of the building‘s ornamental, vicinityand perimeter lighting.Retrofitting: Upgrading the building automation system byinstalling outside temperature sensors. The systemcan adjust the chilled water supply of the air handlingunit based on the outdoor temperature. Modifying the power outlet circuit and integrating itwith the operating schedule of floor lighting. Installation of door switches to all equipment roomsthat switch off the room lighting when the door isclosed. Opening up a part of the parking building wall to allownatural air and light into the area.Tenants Participation in the Conservation of Energy: Lighting is switched off during the noon-time breakfrom 12:15 to 12:45 daily, Monday to Friday Setting up a fixed room temperature of 25 degreeCelsius on one of the floors, at the request of theJapanese tenants who occupy that floor.These measures enabled the building operator to achieve a22% savings in electricity consumption and contribution to arise in the occupancy rate from 84% before 2002 to 96% in2006.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 47


DRAFTData Referencehttp://www.asiabusinesscouncil.org/docs/BEE/BEEBookPartII.pdfPicture of Plaza BIICOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 48


DRAFT4.1.8. Grha WonokoyoProject NameGrha WonokoyoBuilding Category Country/City Indonesia Building Type Commercial - Office Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing NewBuilding Info Building Size (storeys) 10 storeys Building Owner Wonokoyo GroupProject DescriptionMost energy efficient building in Indonesia and third inASEAN.Graha Wonokoyo is located in Raya Darmo protocol street,Taman Bungkul Surabaya, which is in the area of colonialhousing building conservation area, well-known as Darmosite.Building System FeaturesEnergyData ReferenceThe building mass is stacked step by step, starting from theopening building of 2-storeys mezzanine with the sameheight as its neighborhood, elongated from east to west.Then four-storeys transition building as gallery hall andcollective meeting rooms in the middle, ended with a 10-storeys tower elongated from north to south matching to thesite as the climax.Some of the features are energy-efficient site planning, highperformanceglass and energy consumption monitoringsystem.Saving energy of 56%, consuming only about 88kWh/m 2 /yr,which is at a far lower rate than the Asean standard of200kWh/m 2 /yr.http://fineartscairoegypt.com/papers/023.pdfhttp://rwienuniverse.blogspot.com/2009/07/energyexpert.htmlhttp://www.planetmole.org/indonesian-news/greenwashingjakarta-west-java.htmlhttp://wikimapia.org/3611430/Graha-WonokoyoPicture of Grha WonokoyoCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 49


DRAFT4.1.9. Novotel Lombok HotelProject NameNovotel Lombok HotelBuilding Category Country/City Indonesia Building Type Commercial -Hotel Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing ExistingBuilding Info Plot Size 20,000 m 2 Site Context Urban Time of Completion 1997Project DescriptionThe Novotel Lombok is the first hotel completed in 1997 inthe Mandalika resort complex. It has 23 traditional villas and85 block rooms, an open air restaurant, a seafood restaurantand an air bar with a total gross floor area of 8,197m 2.EnergyData ReferenceIts architecture is adopted from the traditional ‗sasak‘ housewhich is energy-efficient and uses natural, environmentfriendlymaterials.The Novotel Lombok hotel recorded an energy saving of39%http://services.inquirer.net/print/print.php?article_id=20070922-90056http://www.hydrocarbons21.com/content/articles/101520100528.phpPicture of Novotel Lombok HotelCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 50


DRAFT4.1.10. Ubud Hanging Gardens HotelProject NameUbud Hanging Gardens HotelBuilding Category Country/City Indonesia Building Type Commercial - Hotel Climate Zone TropicalBuilding Info Building Size (storeys) 1 storey of 38 villas Plot Size 34144.9 m 2Project DescriptionThe 2008 ASEAN energy award was won by the UbudHanging Gardens Hotel because it an excellent example ofhow developers have not destroyed the environment toestablish a tourist resort.Building System Features Less than half the resort area is covered by buildings,allowing generous water absorption as villas sit perched offa cliff on pillars.EnergyOnly 29 percent of the buildings use air conditioning andthe hotel's water heater system uses gas instead ofelectricity. And the hotel operator turns all lighting off at 11p.m., Hotel lighting is only turned on from 5 a.m. to 6 a.m.and again at 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.In all, the hotel saves an estimated 115.94 kWh ofelectricity per day, or 42,318.1 kWh per year compared to aconventional hotel that occupies the same land size.Data Referencehttp://www.baliblog.com/accommodation/ubud-hanginggardens-hotel-wins-2008-asean-energy-award.htmlhttp://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2008/08/28/ubudhanging-gardens-hotel-wins-energy-award.htmlhttp://www.balialpes.com/content/us/bali-news/bali-august-2008-news/ubud-hanging-garden-hotel-wins-energyaward/39/6/15.htmlPicture of Ubud Hanging Gardens HotelCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 51


DRAFT4.2. Technologies / Products4.2.1. AC Unit Equipped with Heat Pipe for Tropical ClimateThe air-conditioning unit equipped with heat-pipe for tropical climate is a special projectof PT Metropolitan Bayu Industri to solve the problem of high humidity in buildings,especially in crowded areas such as the restaurant, hotel, meeting room, hall,supermarket, department store, hospital, library, etc.Technology/Product TitleAC Unit Equipped with Heat Pipe for Tropical ClimateTechnology/Product Category Country/City Indonesia Technology Category Tropical Climate building Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing NewTechnology/Product Description The air-conditioning unit equipped with heat-pipe fortropical climate is the ideal solution to the hot and humidclimate of tropical countries in the region.EnergyHeat pipe is a passive energy recovery device consisting ofa pipe heat exchange divided into an evaporator to pre-coolthe air before it enters the cooling coil and a condenser toreheat the air from the cooling coil. There are no movingparts in the heat pipe, and the energy absorbed in theevaporator during the pre-cooling process is balanced byexpelling heat from the condenser during the reheatingprocess. Therefore, the process has no energyrequirement.Data Referencehttp://tinyurl.com/4ywnklgCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 52


DRAFT4.2.2. Water Jet Nozzle for Air-conditioning UnitGroup of Energy conservation team of the University of Catholic Atma Jaya Jakarta atMechanical Engineering Department developed a water jet nozzle installed in thecondenser coil of the residential Air conditioning units to reduce the power consumptionof the electricity by 22% and increase the cooling capacity by 5%.Technology/Product TitleWater Jet Nozzle for Air-conditioning UnitTechnology/Product Category Country/City Indonesia Technology Category Special submission Climate Zone TropicalTechnology/Product Description The air conditioning system can be divided into 2 systems: Air cooled system Water cooled systemMost of the residential air conditioning units belong to aircooled system. The big difference of these 2 systems is intheir COP (coefficient of the performance).EnergyThis water jet nozzle can be installed in any residential airconditioning unit in a minute and gives an instant solutionof energy conservation of the existing unit to reduce therapid increase demand of the electricity in developingcountry such as Indonesia.Changing the air cooled air conditioning system having asimilar or approaching the water cooled air conditioningsystem by changing the condensing temperature orpressure, then we can reduce the energy consumption ofthe air cooled air conditioning system at the same timeincrease a bit the cooling capacity. This idea inspires theconcept of installing water nozzle in air cooled airconditioning unit in the residential usage.Pictures of Water Jet Nozzle for Air-conditioning UnitCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 53


DRAFT4.2.3. Using Shell and Core Building Concept, Airfoil Roof and Pitch-roofConstruction, Jet Nozzles and Active Heat Pipe ACPT Metropolitan Bayu Industri has developed a new integrated design concepts usingShell and Core building, Airfoil roof and Pitch roof construction, Jet Nozzles and ActiveHeat-pipe Air conditioning units to be applied in crowded areas such as Church, Ballroom,meeting room, infoor stadium, exhibition halls etc and can save operation cost by50%.This design concept is very suitable for tropical climate in South East Asia countrieswhere the ambient air is very hot and humid. The building construction material at thewhole can be reduced and no need to use sophisticated and expensive materials. Airducting construction can be reduced by 80%.Using Shell and Core Building Concept, Airfoil RoofTechnology/Product Title and Pitch-roof Construction, Jet Nozzles and ActiveHeat Pipe ACTechnology/Product Category Country/City Indonesia Technology Category Special submission category Climate Zone Tropical New/Existing NewTechnology/Product Description Shell and Core Building:Shell and Core building concept design is a design of core(inside) building which is covered or surrounded by shell(perimeter) building. This shell building (can be airconditioned or non air conditioned) is used to prevent thesolar heat gain from exterior walls and windows (buildingenvelope) to enter to the core building, using this conceptthe total heat gain of the core building can be reduced by25-30%.Data ReferenceJet nozzles:Jet Nozzles are used to replace the conventional airducting distribution system which cools the whole airvolume of the buildings or rooms. Jet nozzles are installed3m -5m height in the perimeter wall of the corebuildings/rooms blow horizontally to create horizontal aircurtain. This horizontal air curtain will block the hot air inthe upper part (near the ceiling) of the building to enter tothe occupant area but can let hot air from occupantsbuoyancy up to ceiling or roof as a result reduce thecooling load by 20%.http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/20612879/1605382412/name/Special+submission+2009-final+pdf.pdfhttp://www.indonesiadesign.com/v2/top.php?resolve=4&edition=060035&main=6COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 54


DRAFTPictures of Using Shell and Core Building Concept, Airfoil Roof and Pitch-roof Construction,Jet Nozzles and Active Heat Pipe ACCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 55


DRAFT4.2.4. Chilled Water System AC Unit Equipped with Passive Heat Pipe, VariableSpeed Pump and Fan, PT. Metropolitan Bayu Industri of IndonesiaChilled Water System AC Unit Equipped with PassiveTechnology/Product Title Heat Pipe, Variable Speed Pump and Fan, PT.Metropolitan Bayu Industri of IndonesiaTechnology/Product Category Country/City Indonesia Technology Category Special submission Climate Zone TropicalTechnology/ProductDescriptionThe objective of this system is to invent an air-conditioningunit for chilled water system which can control bothtemperature as well as humidity similar with the airconditioningunits equipped with active heat pipe for DXsystem. This chilled water system air-conditioning is alsovery suitable for use in the tropical climate, without the needfor any electric heater or heating coil.EnergyChilled water system air-conditioning unit equipped withpassive heat pipe, variable speed pump and fan can reducethe operation cost by up to 40%.Indoor Environmental Quality AHU equipped with passive heat pipe, variable speed pumpand variable speed fan can give a significant benefit in airquality as well as operation cost in South West Asiancountries.The weather condition of ASEAN countries are hot andhumid and the moisture content ranging from 19 gr/(kg dryair) to about 23 gr/(kg dry air) whereas in sub tropical climatethe moisture contents is less than 16 gr/(kg dry air).If the relative humidity of the conditioned room is above 60%,then according to research and survey:- Rapid growth of fungi, mold and other micro-organism –resulting in foul odor, allergy and bad air quality insidethe room Rapid deterioration of furniture, carpet, wall paper etc Increased risk of asthma and other respiratory-relatedillnessPicture of Chilled Water System AC Unit Equipped with Passive Heat Pipe,Variable Speed Pump and Fan, PT. Metropolitan Bayu Industri of IndonesiaCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 56


DRAFT4.2.5. Active Heat Pipe Installed in Air-conditioning UnitTechnology/Product TitleActive Heat Pipe Installed in Air-conditioning UnitTechnology/Product Category Country/City Indonesia Technology Category Special submission Climate Zone TropicalTechnology/ProductDescriptionObjective is to invent an air-conditioning unit which issuitable for the tropical climate hot and humid.The active heat pipe consists of:- A pre-cool part Reheat part Solenoid valve Humidity control (humidistat)EnergyThe cooling coil is placed between the pre-cool part andreheat part of the active heat pipe, and the solenoid valve isinstalled in the connection pipe between the pre-cool partand reheat part. Humidistat is installed in the conditionedroom to control the relative humidity of the conditioned room.Active heat-pipe installed in air conditioning unit can reducethe operation cost by up to 60%.The unique processes of the active heat pipe are:- The heat absorbed by pre-cool part is the same with theheat expelled by reheat part. Therefore there is noenergy added in this process unlike the conventional airconditioning unit, in which we have to add electricheater or heating coil. Consequently the operationenergy will be reduced. The sensible heat absorbed inthis pre cool part will also reduce the heat transfer areaof the cooling coil needed to saturate the air, thereforethere will be more heat transfer area in the cooling coilto be used to condense the water vapor or latent heat,which means the cooling coil heat transfer area ismainly used for latent heat absorption.COUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 57


DRAFTAPPENDIX 1WEBSITE LINKS OF THE KEY NATIONAL PLANS AND ORGANISATIONS ININDONESIAINDONESIA – KEY NATIONAL PLANS2.1.1. National Energy Conservation Master Planhttp://www.asiaeec-col.eccj.or.jp/st-takes/pdf/indnsa/1_3_a.pdfhttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf2.1.2. National Energy Management Blueprinthttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdfwww.ieagia.org/documents/GIA2005AnnualReportDraftWairakei4Dec2006Gina5Dec06_000.pdf2.1.3. The National Energy Policyhttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdfhttp://www.jst.go.jp/astf/document2/en_25doc.pdf2.1.4. Energy Conservation Policyhttp://www.resourcesaver.com/file/toolmanager/O105UF1947.pdf2.1.5. Green Energy Policyhttp://projects.wri.org/sd-pams-database/indonesia/ministerial-decree-no-0002-2004-greenenergy-policyINDONESIA - KEY NATIONAL ORGANISATIONS2.2.1. Ministry of Environmenthttp://www.menlh.go.idhttp://www.greenassembly.net/indonesia/indonesia-ministry-of-environment/http://www.theredddesk.org/resources/organisations/ministry_of_environment_indonesiahttp://www.theredddesk.org/redd_basics2.2.2. Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (MEMR)www.esdm.go.idhttp://www.indonesia.go.id/en/ministries/ministers/ministry-of-energy-and-mineral-resources.html2.2.3. Ministry of Public Workshttp://www.indonesia.go.id/enHttp://www.pu.go.idhttp://www.indonesia.go.id/en/ministries/ministers/ministry-of-public-work/1664-profile/180-kementerian-pekerjaan-umum.html2.2.4. Directorate General of Electricity and Energy Utilization (DGEEU)http://www.aseanenergy.org/energy_organisations/some_gov/some-gov.htmlhttp://pdf.wri.org/egi_report_indonesia.pdfhttp://www.adb.org/Documents/TACRs/INO/tacr-ino-2430.pdf2.2.5. Directorate General of New Renewable Energy and Energy Conservationwww.esdm.go.id/directorate-general-of-new-energy-renewable-and-energy-conservation.htmlwww.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdfhttp://energyefficiencyindonesia.info/about-eecchiwww.theindonesiatoday.com/.../3511-govt-sets-up-new-directorate-general-for-renewableenergy-at-energy-ministry.htmlwww.ebtke.esdm.go.id2.2.6. Sub-Directorate of Energy Conservationwww.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdfwww.esp2indonesia.org/html/Tools/DownloadFile.aspx?did=252.2.7. Directorate of General Electricitywww.djlpe.esdm.go.idCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 58


DRAFT2.2.8. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Clearing House Indonesiahttp://www.energyefficiencyindonesia.info/www.koservasienergiindonesia.info2.2.9. Ministry of Energy & Mininghttp://indonesia.elga.net.id/govweb.htmlhttp://www.dfat.gov.au/publications/indonesia/Ind_chp9.pdf2.2.10. National Energy Councilhttp://www.den.go.idhttp://carpediemindonesia.blogspot.com/2008/08/national-energy-council.html2.2.11. National Electric Company Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN)http://www.pln.co.idhttp://waspada.co.id/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=195527:pln-2358-mwpltas-enter-construction-stage&catid=30:english-news&Itemid=1012.2.12. Green Building Council Indonesia (GBCI)www.gbcindonesia.orgOverview of other national organisations concerning sustainable buildings and construction ofIndonesia:2.2.13. GTZ - Policy Advice for Environment and Climate Change (PAKLIM):www.paklim.org2.2.14. Clinton Climate Initiative Indonesia:www.clintonfoundation.orghttp://www.climatechange.gov.au/government/initiatives/international-forest-carboninitiative/action.aspx2.2.15. Indonesian Hotel Engineers Associationwww.asathi.org2.2.16. Indonesian Building Engineer Associationwww.bea-indonesia.orgCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 59


DRAFTAPPENDIX 2WEBSITE LINKS OF THE KEY SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ANDINITIATIVES UNDER THE FOUR CATEGORIES IN INDONESIAINDONESIA - CATEGORY 1 VOLUNTARY INSTRUMENTS: 13 INITIATIVES3.2.1.1. GREENSHIP/ GBCIhttp://www.gbcindonesia.org3.2.1.2. Energy Efficiency Labelling Systemhttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.1.3. Barrier Removal to the cost effective development and implementation of Energyefficiency Standards and Labelling project (BRESL)http://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.1.4. Regulation on Energy Efficiency Labellinghttp://eneken.ieej.or.jp/data/en/data/pdf/491.pdfhttp://tinyurl.com/3km9bwk3.2.1.5. ASEAN Energy Awardhttp://www.aseanenergy.org/download/projects/promeec/2007-2008/energyman/country/ID_DGEEU.pdf3.2.1.6. Public-Private Partnership Program on Energy Conservationhttp://www.resourcesaver.com/file/toolmanager/O105UF1255.pdf3.2.1.7. National Program - Long Term Agreementhttp://www.resourcesaver.com/file/toolmanager/O105UF1255.pdf3.2.1.8. National Energy Efficiency Movement (MEMR)http://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.1.9. Energy Manager Formal Traininghttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.1.10.ASEAN Cooperation: EE & C – SSNhttp://www.resourcesaver.com/file/toolmanager/O105UF1255.pdf3.2.1.11.Clean and Lean Transportation Initiative (CALTI)http://www.resourcesaver.com/file/toolmanager/O105UF1255.pdf3.2.1.12.Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction (GERIAP)http://www.resourcesaver.com/file/toolmanager/O105UF1255.pdf3.2.1.13.Indonesia Integrated Soild Waste Management (GALFAD)http://cdm.unfccc.int/Projects/DB/DNV-CUK1171518300.93INDONESIA - CATEGORY 2 FISCAL INSTRUMENTS: 3 INITIATIVES3.2.2.1. Ministerial Regulation: Tax and Customs Facilities for the Utilisation of RenewableEnergyhttp://www.aipasecretariat.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Ec-Indonesia-Clean- Energy.pdf3.2.2.2. Government incentives that include tax exemption and fiscal incentives on imports ofenergy saving equipment and appliances (near future)http://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.2.3. Government subsidies and budgetary measures are provided for energy conservationprogramshttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdfCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 60


DRAFTINDONESIA - CATEGORY 3 REGULATORY INSTRUMENTS: 20 INITIATIVES3.2.3.1. Indonesian National Standard (SNI)http://www.bsn.go.id/bsn/profile.php3.2.3.2. Energy Audit Mobile Unit / BPPThttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.3.3. Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) for electrical applianceshttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.3.4. Minimum Energy Performance Testing Standards (EPTS) for electrical applianceshttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.3.5. Energy Saving Building Standardshttp://www.bsn.go.id/bsn/success_story.php?id=775&language=en3.2.3.6. Energy Building Standardshttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.3.7. Energy Conservation Regulation no. 70/2009http://eeasia.unescap.org/PDFs/energy-efficiency-in-INDONESIA.pdfhttp://www.aipasecretariat.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Ec-Indonesia-Clean-Energy.pdfhttp://tinyurl.com/3z87r9dhttp://projects.wri.org/sd-pams-database/indonesia/national-energy-conservation-plan-riken3.2.3.8. Presidential Instruction No 10/2005 on Energy Efficiencyhttp://ace2.aseanenergy.org/download/projects/promeec/2007-2008/energyman/country/ID_DGEEU.pdfhttp://projects.wri.org/sd-pams-database/indonesia/presidential-instruction-no-10-2005-ministerial-regulation-permen-esdm-nohttp://www.resourcesaver.com/file/toolmanager/O105UF1954.pdf3.2.3.9. Ministerial of Energy and Mineral Resources Regulation No. 0031/2005 on Procedure ofEnergyhttp://www.cleanenergyasia.net/.../regulation-minister-energy-and-mineral-resources-no-00312005-technical-procedures-energy-sav3.2.3.10.Presidential Regulation No. 5/2006 on National Energy Policyhttp://faolex.fao.org/docs/pdf/ins64284.pdfhttp://projects.wri.org/sd-pams-database/indonesia/presidential-regulation-no-5-2006-nationalenergy-policy3.2.3.11.Law No 30/2007 on Energyhttp://www.aipasecretariat.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Ec-Indonesia-Clean-Energy.pdfhttp://eneken.ieej.or.jp/data/en/data/pdf/491.pdf3.2.3.12.Presidential Instruction No 2/2008 on Energy and Water Saving 2008http://www.aipasecretariat.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Ec-Indonesia-Clean-Energy.pdf3.2.3.13.Law No. 30/2009 on Electricityhttp://www.aipasecretariat.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Ec-Indonesia-Clean-Energy.pdf3.2.3.14.Government Regulation on Energy Efficiency 2009 (draft only)http://eneken.ieej.or.jp/data/en/data/pdf/491.pdf3.2.3.15.Mandatory Energy Conservation of Government Office Buildingshttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.3.16.State-owned Energy Service Company (ESCO)http://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.3.17.Public-Private Partnership Program on Energy Conservationhttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.3.18.Energy Conservation Clearinghousehttp://www.ieej.or.jp/aperc/CEEP/Indonesia.pdf3.2.3.19.Terang Program (2002)http://ace2.aseanenergy.org/download/projects/promeec/2007-2008/energyman/country/ID_DGEEU.pdfCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 61


DRAFT3.2.3.20.Peduli Program (2003)http://ace2.aseanenergy.org/download/projects/promeec/2007-2008/energyman/country/ID_DGEEU.pdfINDONESIA - CATEGORY 4 MARKET-BASED INSTRUMENTS: NilCOUNTRY PROFILE ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN INDONESIA 2010/2011 Page 62

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