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Official Journal of the Florida Turfgrass Associationtable of contentsSeptember/October 2011VOL. 28/NO. 5IrrigationComplianceFTGA EventsIrrigationBest Management Practices:The Old and the New13Achieving Regulatoryand EnvironmentalCompliance20FTGA 59th AnnualConference & Show...One for the Books23More FeaturesAwardsGeorge H. Snyder, Ph.D. Awarded Wreath of Grass..............................................30Darren J. Davis Awarded Wreath of Grass.............................................................. 31Future LeadersFTGA 2011 Scholarship Recipients....................................................................... 32DepartmentsPresident’s Message ...................................................................................................... 6From the Executive Director ........................................................................................ 8News from the FTGA .................................................................................................. 10Index of Advertisers ................................................................................................... 34PUBLISHER Leading Edge CommunicationsMANAGING EDITOR MJ PlasterTECHNICAL ADVISOR J. Bryan Unruh, Ph.D.EDITOR EMERITUS Darren J. Daviswww.ftga.orgThe Florida Turfgrass Association (FTGA)serves its members in the industry througheducation, promotion and representation.The statements and opinions expressedherein are those of the individual authorsand do not necessarily represent the viewsof the association, its staff, or its board ofdirectors, Florida Turf Digest, or its editors.Likewise, the appearance of advertisers, orFTGA members, does not constitute anendorsement of the products or servicesfeatured in this, past or subsequent issues ofthis bimonthly publication. Copyright ©2011by the FTGA. Florida Turf Digest, is publishedbimonthly. Subscriptions are complimentary toFTGA members. POSTMASTER: Send changeof address notification to FTGA, 120 East PineStreet, Suite 1, Lakeland, FL 33801. Postageguaranteed. Presorted standard postage ispaid at Nashville, TN. Printed in the U.S.A.Reprints and Submissions: Florida Turf Digest,allows reprinting of material published here.Permission requests should be directed to theFTGA. We are not responsible for unsolicitedfreelance manuscripts and photographs.Contact the managing editor for contributioninformation. Advertising: For display andclassified advertising rates and insertions, pleasecontact Leading Edge Communications, LLC,206 Bridge Street, Franklin, TN 37064,(615) 790-3718, Fax (615) 794-4524.4florida turf digest • september/october 2011


From the Executive DirectorBy Pete Snyder,Executive DirectorYears from now, the yarns that will be spun about the 59th AnnualConference & Show will add to the growing lore of the FTGA. Likeall good “fish stories,” these yarns will grow with age. So what willcatch the fancy of our future storytellers? Let me suggest the followingentries. The unofficial kick-off of the C&S was the Young Professional’sSocial Tuesday evening. This group was started just a year ago, but theyhave already shown their commitment to networking. Nearly 60 individualstook part in the event, which was a success.However, as executive director of the FTGA, I must express my concernfor how hard this industry seems to be on our younger members. Manyof them look far beyond 40. By the number of receding hairlines (or nohairlines) and gray hair, clearly our younger folks are showing the wearand tear of this industry.Wednesday afternoon’s golf tournament will also be good for storytelling.The PGA’s elite course, The Champion, stood up to its reputation. The fourpersonScramble had a three-way tie for First Net at 54, and a two-way tie forSecond Gross at 61. Both needed the back-nine tiebreaker to determine places.It should be noted that the top Net Score team was Paul Fox, Steve Miller,Chad Burkett and Mike Burak. Second place went to Richard Stolpman, KippSchulties and Sean Ayduk. And third place was Matt Taylor, David Dore-Smith,Billy Gamble and Jack Randall.The top Gross Score team (shooting 59) was Renze Berg, Andrew Bell,Lee Crosby and Preston Stephenson. Craig Smith, Roger Welker, Scott Belland Matt Tacilauskas took second in the tiebreaker over Bobby Ellis, JasonNugent, Mark Guyer and Jeff Fabry. I am told that Bobby Ellis did not employ“Polk County Rules” (whatever they are); otherwise, a better showing mayhave been possible.The Individual Stroke tournament was won by Robert Harper with a 72.Brian Robinson finished second with a 73, then Deron Zendt at 75. Closest tothe pin on #5 was Matt Taylor at 2' 6".Thursday’s Prayer Breakfast & Annual Meeting featured Wreath of Grassawards to George H. Snyder and Darren J. Davis. Both men were thanked fortheir contributions to the association and the industry.It will also be remembered for D.D. Lewis’ keynote talk. The former DallasCowboys linebacker played for 13 seasons, including five Super Bowl appearancesand two Super Bowl wins. He “had it all,” and according to D.D., “lost itall,” including his wife and children because of drugs and alcohol abuse.D.D. says that he is still on the road to recovery but knows he will make itdue to a strong belief in God, quiet prayer and an excellent therapist whotold D.D., “Your mind is a dark, scary place; do not go in there alone.” I willadd that he also has an excellent sense of humor that left us laughing.Plans are already underway for next year’s Conference & Show. Please giveus your opinions, even if you missed this year’s event; we want to know whatyou think about location, activities and timing. Please take the time to fill outthe C&S survey at www.ftga.org. Thank you. b8florida turf digest • september/october 2011


Florida Turf Digest is theofficial publication of theFlorida Turfgrass Association120 East Pine StreetSuite 1Lakeland, FL 33801(800) 882-6721 or(863) 688-9413Fax: (863) 688-9610info@ftga.orgwww.ftga.orgPublished byLeading Edge Communications206 Bridge StreetFranklin, TN 37064(615) 790-3718Fax: (615) 794-4524info@leadingedgecommunications.comFTGA Executive DirectorPete Snyderpete@ftga.orgFTGA Marketing & Events CoordinatorHeather Russoheather@ftga.orgFTGA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEEPresidentArmando Campos, CCA, CTPNutrient Technologies LLC(407) 610-7563acampos2009@cfl.rr.comVice PresidentMac BrileyCity of Ocoee(407) 877-5803abriley@ci.ocoee.fl.usSecretary/TreasurerErin Boyd WilderSod Solutions(850) 510-5412eboyd@sodsolutions.comImmediate Past PresidentMac CarrawaySMR Farms LLC(941) 708-3322mac.carraway@smrfarms.com


News from the FTGAYoung Professionals NetworkGAINING MOMENTUMFTGA Young Professionals gather at the 59th Annual Conference & Show.Young Professionals at the North Central Florida Field Day.By Erin Boyd WilderLast year the FTGA started the YoungProfessionals Network (YPN) to encouragethe involvement of professionals40 and under. As someone who fallswell within that age group, a newer memberof the FTGA board and the recently electedSecretary/Treasurer, I’m well qualified tocommunicate with this group. My boardpresence is just one of the indicators thatthe FTGA membership and leaders are welcomingthe younger generations and newprofessionals! It is vital to the turf industrythat we continue to build leaders and inspireGeneration X & Y to be involved at all levels.The FTGA YPN is dedicated to providingcareer-minded individuals under the age of40 with opportunities to develop socially,professionally and civically. We are stillgrowing, yet we already meet several timesper year.The first-ever YPN meeting was held at theCaribe Royal in Orlando at the 2010 FTGAConference & Show. We have since met threemore times, with each meeting bringing inmore Young Professionals than the last! Weheld socials prior to the UF North CentralFlorida Turfgrass Field Day, at the 2011 FTGAConference & Show and another, most recently,at the 2011 Landscape Show. Not onlywere these excellent opportunities to network,but they also served as an affirmation of ourvalue to each other and as a membership setwithin the FTGA.The YPN committee has lots of excitingevents under development such as a DoveHunt and leadership development seminars;we are enthusiastic about the interest and potentialin this program. Our goal is to provideindividuals with the opportunity to network,build relationships, build personal and professionalstrength and learn how to becomemore involved.If you would like to join the YPN or becomea sponsor, please contact the FTGA officetoday by calling or emailing Heather Russoat 1-800-882-6721 or Heather@FTGA.org. b10florida turf digest • september/october 2011


FTGA DirectorsMaureen ClarkDow AgroSciences LLC(317) 345-2691mcclark@dow.comRobby ClemenziBayer Environmental Science(352) 494-2552Robby.Clemenzi@Bayer.comRalph DainGCSAA(785) 312-3607rdain@gcsaa.orgVera GaspariniQuali-Pro(407) 920-2463vgasparini@quali-pro.comWilliam T. Hiers, CGCSThe Old Collier Golf Club(239) 593-8522thiers@theoldcolliergc.comAl HofferAl Hoffer’s Termite-Lawn-Pest(954) 753-1222al@alhoffer.comBill KistlerTampa Palms Golf & Country Club(813) 972-3375bill.kistler@ourclub.comWilliam J. LanthierGolf Ventures(772) 486-1701blanthier@golfv.comSteve MariniTruGreen(772) 561-5167stevemarini@trugreenmail.comJohn MascaroTurf-Tec International(850) 580-4026john@turf-tec.comBetsy McGillFlorida Sod GrowersCooperative(863) 675-2144flsodgrowers@aol.comMatt ShookHarrell’s Fertilizer(863) 687-2774mshook@harrells.comFrank WardenThe TORO Company(850) 776-6925frank.warden@toro.comW. Craig WeyandtThe Moorings Club Inc.(772) 231-4996superintendent@themooringsclub.com


IrrigationFigure 3. Monthly gross irrigation requirement for a 100-acre golf course inNorth Florida with 3 acres of greens and tees. Total annual irrigation applicationshown in million gallons (MG) and inches per year.Figure 2. Map of irrigation applied from onecycle on a fairway. Red colors highlight “hotspots” where depth of water applied is substantiallylower than the rest of the course.Dark blue areas indicate excessive depth.This map was based on catch-can data, butsoil moisture could be mapped as well.Although specific to golf courses,these irrigation BMPs are generallyapplicable to any irrigation system. Inbrief, these BMPs are as follows:• Use the lowest quality wateravailable for irrigation. Potentialsources of low-quality waterinclude reclaimed water and brackishwater. In addition, surfacewater sources will generally be oflower quality than groundwater.• Proper irrigation system design.Obviously, this aspect must bedone for new courses or duringmajor renovations. Proper designconsists of the following:• Pump systems designed tosupply adequate pressure undertypical operating conditions.• Spacing of heads and nozzleselection to optimize waterdistribution uniformity.• Separate irrigation controlcapability (i.e. separate zones)for slopes and areas surroundinggreens.• Individual head control aroundgreens.• Separate irrigation zones forroughs. Consider eliminatingirrigation on roughs whereappropriate and practical.• Irrigation scheduling using realtimeconditions such as weathermeasurements or soil moisturemeasurements.• A maintenance program to correctbroken or clogged heads on aroutine basis.As you might have guessed by now,there aren’t too many “new” aspectsto this list of irrigation BMPs; however,implementing these BMPs canlead to substantial water savings whilemaintaining good turf quality.Irrigation efficiency is the ratioof water applied to water needed forbeneficial use. Beneficial use consistsmostly of plant water requirementsalong with an additional amount toaccount for acceptable irrigation losses.Irrigation efficiency consists of twomajor components: 1) the “hardware”such as head spacing, nozzle selection,operating pressure, etc., and 2) whatI call the “software,” which refers to14florida turf digest • september/october 2011


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Performing correctiveactions to improveirrigation uniformitycan lead to substantialreductions in irrigationwater required.irrigation scheduling. The hardwareaspect of efficiency consists of decisionsthat are made during the system designand also aspects associated with maintenance.Good maintenance programswill quickly detect clogs, leaks, wornnozzles, etc. These issues are allreadily “fixable,” and this is one steptoward a highly efficient system.Moving heads to adjust spacing is agreater task but can be done givensufficient resources. Mapping of soilmoisture on golf holes or performingcatch-can tests (Figure 1) can be usedto determine potential problem areas(Figure 2).Performing corrective actionsto improve irrigation uniformitycan lead to substantial reductionsin irrigation water required. Forexample, increasing low quarterdistribution uniformity from poor(DU lq = 0.60) to acceptable (DU lq =0.70) could result in 14 percent lessirrigation required. For a 100-acrecourse (Figure 3), this reductionwould save 14 million gallons peryear. Additional improvement witha DU lq of 0.80 would result in anadditional savings of more than 10million gallons per year. Reducedenergy costs associated with lesspumping could be substantial as well.We have recently finished worktabulating net irrigation requirementsof warm season turfgrasses inFlorida at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae482. This information can be usedby turfgrass managers as target values.The net requirements must be dividedby an anticipated efficiency value toget the gross irrigation requirement.For example, in West Palm Beach, theannual average net irrigation requirementfor turfgrass with an eight-inch16florida turf digest • september/october 2011


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oot zone is 35.9 inches/yr. Atan excellent efficiency level of80 percent, 43.8 inches/yr (119MG/yr) would be required. Thesenumbers could be used as an initialbenchmark. Additional irrigationwould be needed for areas underheavy use such as greens and tees.Now that you have a system thatis tuned up and applies water asuniformly as practically possible,how do you apply water at the righttime and in the right amount? This“software” aspect of irrigation efficiencyis less straightforward thanobvious hardware changes. How doesone know if irrigation is being appliedin the right amount and at the righttime? The best way to track this is witha soil water budget. In this budget,the plant/soil system is treated as acontainer for water storage and inputs(rainfall, irrigation) and outputsevapotranspiration (ET) are addedand subtracted to the container. Forexample, Figure 3 shows monthlyirrigation requirements for a fictitiousgolf course based on a soil waterbudget. This is the gross irrigationrequirement, which is based on historicalweather data and rainfall withan allowance for non-uniformity andvaries from poor to excellent. Weatherdata can be used to compute turfgrassET demands. Many irrigation controlsystems have this capability and cancalculate and track irrigation requirements.Over time, this tracking willallow the manager to determineanomalies in application and to trackpotential reductions as a result ofupgrades.The goal of proper irrigation schedulingis to apply just enough waterand at just the right time (Figure 4).If irrigation is applied in an amountor rate higher than the plant/soil“container” can hold, this water willbe lost to drainage through the profileor surface runoff (water applied abovefield capacity in Figure 4). In particular,in shallow-rooted turfgrass systemson sand, very little water can be held.For instance, a six-inch root zone in18florida turf digest • september/october 2011


The goal of properirrigation schedulingis to apply just enoughwater and at just theright time.sand has no more than 0.5 inches ofstorage capacity. However, the entire0.5 inches cannot be used withoutnegatively impacting turfgrass quality.Thus, only about 0.25 to 0.35 incheswould be allowed to deplete prior torequiring irrigation (readily availablewater line in Figure 4).Implementing irrigation BMPsdiscussed here will lead to the mostefficient use of water and shouldprepare irrigation managers fortimes when water supplies are reducedor restricted. bFigure 4. Soil moisture content diagram showing excessive irrigation events (spikes abovefield capacity, FC) leading to drainage. Deficit moisture conditions (water content belowmaximum allowable depletion, MAD limit). Irrigation management should aim to keepmoisture in the readily available water (RAW) zone and should never allow completedepletion to permanent wilting point (PWP).florida turfgrass association • www.ftga.org19


ComplianceAchievingRegulatory andEnvironmentalComplianceBy Burt McKee, Safety/Security/Environmental Compliance Manager, Harrell’s LLCThebest way toachieve complianceis througha concept knownas eyewash. In this case, eyewash is nota device used to irrigate the eyes duringa chemical exposure; it is the firstimpression of your company. Goodappearance has value, and it may paydividends during a regulatory inspection.The first step is to instill ownershipin employees. An employee can put oilin a mower, or an employee can put oilin a mower and oil on the floor. Oil onthe floor can cause slip and falls, givesthe shop a sloppy appearance and wastesresources. Improperly used pesticidescan result in potential employee injury,regulatory and environmental issuesand also a loss of resources.The second step is to take off therose-colored glasses and take a goodlook at your operations. Do you haveunlabeled or mislabeled containers,do you have evidence of spills in andaround shop areas, do you have usedbatteries, used oil or used oil filters thatare not properly stored for recycling?The third step is to examine yourpurchasing practices. Do you purchasewhat you need, or do you purchasewhat is nice to have. If you have purchaseda product that you know youare not going to use, deal with it now.Time will not improve the efficacy orappearance of the product, and you runthe chance of being required to disposeof it as a waste at some future point.The final step is to establish accountabilityand responsibility. If employeesare not held accountable for theiractions, everything will soon revertback to its previous condition. Whenyou get your “eyewash” in place, takephotographs of shops, mix/load areasand storage areas. Place these picturesin a conspicuous location and informemployees that this is the standard forthe operation.It is important to note that safetyand compliance go hand-in-hand. Acompany that presents a good appearanceis usually a company that practicesgood safety and compliance techniques.Companies that do not present a goodappearance often draw additionalscrutiny by regulatory agencies. Eyewashis a major key to success. b20florida turf digest • september/october 2011


FTGA 59th AnnualConference& Show…TheC&S Roundup59th AnnualConference &Show is history, and the realwork of “Charting a NewCourse” begins now. Butthere’s still time for a fondlook back at “the week thatwas” at the PGA National inPalm Beach Gardens. Joinus as we reminisce about theweek that started us on thisnew course.{One for the Books{That Was the Week that Was!Poolside at thePGA National.florida turfgrass association • www.ftga.org23


C&S RoundupRight: Eric Brown,former boardmember, pausesfor a moment at anetworking event.Far Right: FTGAExecutive DirectorPete Snyder(Middle) poses fora quick shot withtwo FTGA members.Far Left: Tim Hierstalking with Dr. LaurieTrenholm (L) and Dr.Eileen Buss (R) at theOpening Reception.Left: A moment to relaxand network at theOpening Reception.Below: The Corn Boiland Auction for the FTRFwas packed and a “funtime was had by all!”24florida turf digest • september/october 2011


C&S RoundupRight: Mac Brileypresenting theSecretary/Treasurer’sreport at breakfast.Far Right: Mac Carraway(L) presents the Wreathof Grass award toDarren J. Davis (R).Far Left: Darren J. Davis, Mark Jarrelland Greg Pheneger at the Corn Boil.Left: D.D. Lewis entertains and elucidatesat the Prayer Breakfast.Below Left: The new executive committee(L-R) Erin Boyd Wilder, ArmandoCampos, Mac Briley and Mac Carrawayat the ribbon-cutting ceremony, whichofficially opened the C&S Trade Show.Below Right: Outgoing President MacCarraway (L) goes back to life as heonce knew it as he passes the gavel toincoming President Armando Campos (R).26florida turf digest • september/october 2011


Section C&S Roundup NameThe FTGA would like to take thisopportunity to thank each and everyone of the sponsors of the 59thAnnual Conference & Show. Withoutyour support, the C&S would neverhappen. It is with an extreme senseof gratitude that we thank you foryour support of the FTGA membershipand the work that the associationperforms on behalf of the turfgrassindustry. We are partners in our effortto “Chart a New Course.”Presenting Sponsors:• Golf Ventures• Harrell’s Fertilizer Inc.• Howard Fertilizer & Chemical Co.• John Deere Golf (ShowTurf)• TORO (Hector & Wesco)Top Right: The PikeCreek Turf booth at theTrade Show.Middle: Craig Weyandtdrops by the FloridaSuperior Sand booth atthe Trade Show.Bottom: Dale Mitchell (L)and Richard Coyler (R),both from Golf AgronomicsSupply and Handling(GASH), presenting acheck for the FTGA toArmando Campos as MacCarraway looks on.Gold Sponsors:• BASF Corporation• Horizon DistributorsSilver Sponsors:• DuPont Professional Products• Quali-Pro• SMR Farms LLC• Syngenta Professional ProductsBronze Sponsors:• Nutrient Technologies LLC• Pike Creek Turf Inc.• Sea Isle Supreme GrowersAssociationSpecial Sponsors:• Agrotain International• Amvac Environmental Products• Becker Underwood• Bethel Farms• GreenTechnologies LLC• John’s Island Club• King Ranch Turfgrass• Monsanto Company• Precise Path Robotics• Quality Turf LC• The Andersons Inc.• TriEst Ag Group Inc.• Yara North America Inc.28florida turf digest • september/october 2011


AwardsGeorge H. Snyder, Ph.D.,Awarded FTGA Wreath of Grass%It’snot often that FTGAawards two Wreathof Grass awards in thesame year. This year,FTGA awarded one of the Wreath ofGrass awards to a very special recipientwith decades of service to the Floridaturfgrass industry: Dr. George H.Snyder, Professor Emeritus, Universityof Florida. FTGA Immediate Past PresidentMac Carraway and Dr. John Cisar,UF, made the presentation at the 59thFTGA Conference & Show.Originally from Evanston, Ill.,Snyder first studied engineering at theUniversity of Cincinnati before earninga bachelor’s degree in agronomy fromOhio State University. He completedpost-graduate work at Ohio State as well,earning both his master’s and doctoratein soil science there.After receiving his doctorate, Snyderrelocated to Florida in 1967 and joinedthe University of Florida at the EvergladesResearch and Education Center(REC) in Fort Lauderdale. There, inaddition to teaching, he studied soil,water, fertilizer and pesticide managementto optimize crop production andminimize losses of nutrients and pesticides.His research focused on theorganic and sand soils of South Floridaand involved vegetables, pasture, sugarcane,rice and turfgrass. His coursesand labs focused on soil science, soilfertility and fertilizers as part of theundergraduate degree program at theFort Lauderdale REC. In recent years,Snyder worked in the area of bestmanagement practices (BMPs) toreduce nutrient leeching in homelawnturfgrasses.Over the years, Dr. Snyder has beenactive in industry associations. As amember of the American Society ofAgronomy, Soil Science Society ofAmerica, he served as Associate Editorof Crop Science and division chair, CropScience Society of America. He servedas treasurer of the International TurfgrassSociety as well as coordinatingchairman for 1993 InternationalTurfgrass Research Conference. Amember of the Florida Soil and CropScience Society, he served as programchair. In addition to his membershipin FTGA, he was also a member of theFlorida State Horticultural Society.As a prolific writer and frequentconference and symposium speaker,Snyder has crossed the globe onbehalf of soil science. He has receivedmany awards and honors over theyears, too numerous to list. Some ofhis past honors and awards include alisting in American Men and Womenof Science, Fellow of the AmericanSociety of Agronomy, Fellow of theSoil Science Society of America, Universityof Florida InterdisciplinaryTeam Award and Florida SenateMedallion of Excellence.FTGA is proud to count Dr. GeorgeH. Snyder among their best andbrightest, one who has made a lastingcontribution to both the industry andthe association. b30florida turf digest • september/october 2011


Darren J. DavisAwarded FTGA Wreath of Grass%Florida Turfgrass AssociationPast President Darren J.Davis was awarded theWreath of Grass award atthe FTGA Conference & Show at theAnnual Prayer and Awards Breakfast.Davis was the recipient of theFTGA’s highest award, presentedto recognize both personal andprofessional dedication to Florida’sturfgrass industry.A long-time resident of Florida,Davis has served as golf course superintendentat the Olde Florida GolfClub in Naples, Fla., since 1992. Priorto accepting this position, he servedas assistant golf course superintendentat the Loxahatchee Club in Jupiter,Fla. Early in his career, he workedat Augusta National Golf Club as anapprentice superintendent in 1990and returned as the IPM technicianin 1991.Davis has spent two decades inservice to the turfgrass and golf coursemanagement industries. Currently, heserves as president of the EvergladesGolf Course Superintendents Association,as a director of the MusserInternational Turfgrass Foundationand has just concluded his term onthe FTGA board of directors and aseditor-in-chief of the Florida TurfDigest, the official publication of theFTGA. He has been a member of theFlorida Golf Course SuperintendentsAssociation since 1991. His name wasrecently placed into nomination for aposition on the Golf Course SuperintendentsAssociation of America boardof directors. Previously he served aspresident of the FGCSA.From 1995–2008, Davis authored,assisted in production and served ashost of the Superintendents’ Video Workshop,a series of golf course managementtraining videos. He is a prolific authorand has numerous articles published inThe Florida Green, the trade journal ofthe FGCSA, Golf Course Management,the trade journal of the GCSAA andPlatinum Coast Golf, a regional golf publicationas well as the Florida Turf Digest.Davis is no stranger to industry andassociation honors and awards. In 2004,he received the FGCSA DistinguishedService Award, the association’s highesthonor. He twice received the LeoFeser Award, presented annually by theGCSAA for the best superintendentwrittenarticle published in GolfCourse Management in 1997 and 2002.In 1995, Davis received the annualGCSAA National EnvironmentalStewardship Award in the privatecourse division, for excellence inenvironmental leadership. bEditor’s Note: I want to take this opportunityto publicly thank Darren for hisservice to the Florida Turf Digest. It hasbeen my distinct pleasure to work withhim as his managing editor over the pastfive-plus years. All of us at Leading EdgeCommunications will miss Darren as hemoves on to other endeavors, but I suspectand hope that he will never be a strangerto the Digest. MJ PlasterImmediate Past President Mac Carraway presents the Wreath of Grassaward to Darren J. Davis.florida turfgrass association • www.ftga.org31


Future LeadersFTGA 2011 Scholarship Recipients(L to R: Ryan Adams, Max J. McQuade Scholarship recipient; Tyler Broderick, Col. Frank Wade Memorial Scholarship recipient; Jan BelJan, chair, Scholarship Committee; Michael Fasy, Hans Schmeisser Memorial Scholarship recipient; and Eric Dixon, James L. BlackledgeMemorial Scholarship recipient.FTGAhas a long tradition ofcultivating and nurturingturfgrass industry leadersof tomorrow. This is thespirit in which the scholarship funds have been establishedand are awarded. This year’s recipients were honored at theAll-Attendee Luncheon at the Conference & Show.University of Florida Scholarship RecipientsCol. Frank Wade Memorial Scholarship - $2,000Tyler Broderick learned to love turfgrassas a youngster who relished soccermost when he could play on well-turfedfields. He is a senior at the Universityof Florida and a six-year veteran of theU.S. Air Force. Tyler works two otherjobs as well as working as an intern atJuliette Falls Golf Course under SuperintendentSteve Keller. He has maintaineda high GPA, is a UF Turf Clubmember and has worked at the MarkBostick Golf Course at the University of Florida under GolfCourse Manager Pete Mariano. Tyler is a Floridian whosegoal is to stay in Florida with his wife and two children andadvance to a golf course superintendent position.Max J. McQuade Scholarship - $1,000Ryan Adams, an Iowa State Universitygraduate in turgrass science andNorth Carolina native brought toFlorida a background in cool-seasonturfgrasses. During his undergraduatecareer, he has worked or interned atThunderbird Hills GC (Huron, Ohio),Ames CC (Ames, Iowa), Charlotte CC(Charlotte, N.C.), Pinehurst CC #5(Pinehurst, N.C.) and Shoal CreekCC (Birmingham, Ala.). In 2010, Ryaninterned for a week with USGA Agronomist Bud White. Itwas White who influenced Ryan to pursue graduate studies.Ryan has maintained the Envirotron grounds, and as a graduatestudent working with Dr. J. Bryan Unruh, he is devotedto his study on Bermudagrass run-off and leaching. He will32florida turf digest • september/october 2011


present his findings at the American Society of Agronomy inSan Antonio, Texas, in October 2011.Florida Gateway College (formerly Lake CityCommunity College) Scholarship RecipientsHans Schmeisser Memorial Scholarship - $1,500Michael Fasy startedplaying golf at theage of nine. As ateenager, he beganworking at TierraVerda Golf Club inArlington, Texas. A2008 summer internshipenlightenedMichael aboutcareer possibilitiesin turf. Superintendent Mark Claburnencouraged him to pursue an education inturf so that he could couple his knowledgeof golf with agronomics. Michael is FloridaGateway’s Turf Club student president, hasvolunteered at the 2009, 2010 and 2011FTGA Conference & Show and embracesAudubon International aspects of golf coursemanagement. In 2010, Michael interned atthe Sanctuary Golf Club on Sanibel Islandunder Kyle Sweet and in 2011 at Grey OaksCC in Naples, Fla., under the direction ofDavid Pagel. Dedicated, deserving andpassionate are words used to describe him.Michael’s ambition is to have a career as asuperintendent in Florida.2010, Eric interned at the only “organic” golf course in the U.S.,The Vineyard GC in Edgartown, Mass., under Jeffery Carlson,CGCS. His 2011 internship was at the Mark Bostick Golf Coursein Gainesville, Fla., under the direction of Todd Wilkinson.Eric is determined to secure licenses in pesticide applicationand irrigation auditing. His hero is another golf coursesuperintendent—his father, Mark Dixon. Eric and his wifeare expecting their first child this November. bJames L. Blackledge MemorialScholarship - $1,500Eric Dixon excelsin academics andpersistence. Heparticipated in theGCSAA Turf Bowlcompetition andhas worked in thegolf course industryfor 11 years at WestEnd Golf Club inGainesville, Fla. Ericearned an A.A. degree in business administrationfrom Santa Fe College and has usedhis leadership, organizational and businessskills to take the lead on FGC’s golf courserenovation and grow-in through the school’sTurf Club, where he serves as treasurer. Inflorida turfgrass association • www.ftga.org33


Index of AdvertisersAerification Plus........................................ 21www.aerificationplus.comAgrium AdvancedTechnologies............................................ 15www.agriumat.comAqua-Aid, Inc........................................... 34www.aquaaid.comBASF......................................................... 5www.basf.comBay Breeze Farms....................................... 9www.celebrationturf.comBayer...................................................... 29www.bayerprocentral.comCountry Club Services............................... 11www.countryclubservices.netDean’s Soil Solutions................................ 12www.deanssoilsolutions.comDupont Professional Products..................... 33www.proproducts.dupont.comGrigg Brothers ....................Inside Front Coverwww.griggbros.comHarrell’s Custom Fertilizer............................ 7www.harrells.comHumate International, Inc.......................... 16www.humateintl.comJohn Deere Landscapes................ Back Coverwww.johndeerelandscapes.comKing Ranch Florida .................................. 17www.kingranchturfgrass.comNewLife Turf, Inc. .................................... 20www.newlifeturf.comPike Creek Turf, Inc................................... 18www.pikecreekturf.comQuali-Pro................................................. 25www.quali-pro.comQuality Turf Nurseries................................ 34www.qualitygrassing.comSea Isle Supreme/Pike Creek Turf, Inc......... 22www.pikecreekturf.comSipcamAdvan........................................... 11www.advanllc.comSMR Farms, LLC......................................... 9www.smrfarms.comSouthern Agricultural Insecticides, Inc......... 16www.southernag.comSyngenta Professional Products.................. 27www.syngentaprofessionalproducts.comThe Turfgrass Group.................................... 3www.theturfgrassgroup.comUpstart Products, Inc............Inside Back Coverwww.upstartproducts.comVigiron.................................................... 18www.vigiron.comWood Bay Turf Technologies..................... 19www.woodbayturftech.com34florida turf digest • september/october 2011

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