December/January 2005 - International Technology and ...

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December/January 2005 - International Technology and ...

FEATURE ARTICLEFigures 4 and 5 show a linear movement of X or Y-axes plots during an earthquakesimulation.Figure 4. Table Linear DisplacementFigures 6 and 7 show the curved movement of X and Y-axes displacement plots thatproduce twist angles on the Z-axis during an earthquake simulation.Figure 6. Table Twist Displacementmovement with twist angles. Theforce displacement is based on thecalculation: F (Force) = K (BungeeCord Spring Constant) x X(Displacement); and the energycalculation is based on: K (KineticEnergy) = ? K (Bungee Cord SpringConstant) x X 2 (Displacement 2 ) (Hu,Liu, & Dong, 1996). Due to the designconstraint, the twist angle in thissimulation does not include the up anddown motion (Z axis). There are twistangles on X, Y, and Z-axes, and anycombination of those create theharshest damages from naturalearthquakes on buildings.SummaryActivities can be used to increasestudents’ understanding of knowledgein science, technology education, andmathematics. By using such activities,students apply different intelligences.Through hands-on learning usingengineering activities, students shouldFigure 5. Linear Displacement PlotsFigure 7. Twist Angle DisplacementPlotsbe able to gain more knowledge andtransfer this learning among schoolsubjects. The science and engineeringcommunities are familiar with STEMinitiatives. Through these activities,educators may notice that students’standards test scores can improve.ReferencesAmerican Society of MechanicalEngineering. (2002). Position statement– 2002. Retrieved March 24, 2004.from http://www.asme.org/gric/ps/2002/02-32.htmlBabcock, D. & Morse, L. (2002). Managingengineering and technology. EnglewoodCliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Bransford, J. D., Brown, A.L., & Cocking,R.R. (Eds). (1999). How people learn:Brain, mind, experience, and school.Washington, DC: National AcademyPress.Bjork, R.A. & Richardson-Klavhen, A.(1989). On the puzzling relationshipbetween environmental context andhuman memory. In C. Izana (Ed.)Current Issues in Cognitive Processes:The Tulane Floweree Symposium onCognition (pp. 313-344). Hillsdale, NJ:Erlbaum.Cormier, S. & Hagman, J. (1987). Transferof learning. San Diego, CA: AcademicPress.CORD. (1999a). Teaching mathematicscontextually. Retrieved April 8, 2004,from www.cord.org/lev2.cfm/87CORD. (1999b). Teaching sciencecontextually. Retrieved April 8, 2004,from www.cord.org/lev2.cfm/87Crawford, M.L. (2001). Teachingcontextually: Research, rationale, andtechniques for improving studentmotivation and achievement inmathematics and science. Waco, TX:CCI Publishing, Inc.Hu, Y-X., Liu, S-C., & Dong, W. (1996).Earthquake engineering. London:Chapman & Hall.International Technology EducationAssociation. (2000/2002). Standards fortechnological literacy: Content for theStudy of Technology. Reston, VA:Author.National Council of Teachers ofMathematics. (2000). Principles andstandards for school mathematics.Reston, VA: Author.National Research Council. (1996). Nationalscience education standards. , DC:National Academy Press.Singley, M.K., & Anderson, J.R. (1989).Transfer of cognitive skill. Cambridge,MA: Harvard University Press.Dr. Robert Q.Berry, III is anassistant professorof MathematicsEducation in theDepartment ofEducationalCurriculum andInstruction at theDarden College ofEducation at OldDominion University, Norfolk, VA. Hespecializes in equity in MathematicsEducation.Dr. Philip A. Reedis an assistantprofessor ofTechnologyEducation in theDepartment ofOccupational andTechnical Studiesat the DardenCollege ofEducation at OldDominion University, Norfolk, VA. Hespecializes in communication technologyand technology teaching methodsand curriculum development.28 December/January 2005 • THE TECHNOLOGY TEACHER

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