J. J. WALSH: Disaster Education in US Schools - Nexus-idrim.net

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J. J. WALSH: Disaster Education in US Schools - Nexus-idrim.net

Disaster Education in U.S. Schools9th IIASA-DPRIon Integrated Disaster RiskManagement (IDRiM)Kyoto, JapanOctober 12-16, 16, 2009John Walsh, Assistant DirectorNational Center for Emergency PreparednessVanderbilt UniversityNashville, TN, USA


U.S. Disaster EducationDevelopment and Delivery Formats1. Federal government development of disaster-relatedrelatededucational materials• Federal Resources for Educational Excellence – Teaching andlearning resources from federal agencies• FEMA for Kids (Federal Emergency Management Agency)2. Collaborative efforts between Non-GovernmentOrganizations (NGOs) and private corporations• The American Red Cross and Allstate Insurance developed adisaster education curriculum (Masters(of Disasters) ) aimed atchildren in grades K through 8 (1999).2


U.S. Disaster EducationDevelopment and Delivery Formats3. State Departments of Education incorporation of outsidesource curriculum• California Department of Education – 9-1-11 for Kids;Firefacts.org• Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services –Ready in 34. Teacher support groups• SuccessLink – a not-forfor-profit, teacher-support group thatconducts workshops and places free lesson plans online forteacher access.3


Examples of Outside Source Curriculum CurrentlyUsed in U.S. Disaster School Education• 9-1-11 for KidsTeaches children how to save lives and propertythrough the proper use of 9-1-1, 9 1, the UnitedStates’ universal emergency telephone number• FEMA for KidsFederal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)has developed lecture materials, suggestedclassroom exercises and sources of moreinformation in support of disaster reduction4


Examples of Outside Source Curriculum CurrentlyUsed in U.S. Disaster School Education• Firefacts.orgFire safety information for parents and educators• Team SAFE-TAnnualized school-based education materials,supported by Master of Disaster from theAmerican Red Cross; teaches age-appropriateappropriateemergency information and preparedness skillsfor students in grades kindergarten throughtwelve5


Examples of Outside Source Curriculum CurrentlyUsed in U.S. Disaster School Education• Masters of DisastersCurriculum to help teachers integrate importantdisaster safety instruction into their regular coresubjects such as language arts, math, science,and social studies. Curriculum is aligned with theNational Education Standards, supplements thelessons teachers are already teaching. It alsoprovides students with information to help themprepare for disasters and stay safe during andafter a disaster in their home, school, orcommunity6


Examples of Outside Source Curriculum CurrentlyUsed in U.S. Disaster School Education• Teen CERTThe Teen CERT program is an in-class,curriculum-based program that provides studentswith knowledge on the effects of natural andhuman-caused disasters and their emotional,social, and economic impacts. It builds decision-making and problem solving skills and strategiesto help students make informed decisionsregarding readiness, response, recovery andmitigation efforts to reduce loss of life andproperty7


U.S. Disaster School EducationEmphasis• Development of school disaster managementplanning• Disaster training for staff and students• Preparedness efforts related to emergency drillsand crisis exercises for staff, students andemergency responders• Utilization of existing outside developedresources: curriculum and educational materials8


Selected Practices School DistrictsTake to Prepare for EmergenciesRecommended practices• Allocate time to emergency managementplanning.• Conduct an assessment of vulnerabilities.• Conduct regular drills.• Identify and acquire equipment to mitigate andrespond to emergencies.• Identify a storage location and replenishemergency supplies on a regular basis.Source: GAO analysis of Education, DHS, and HHS guidance and training documents.9


Selected Practices School DistrictsTake to Prepare for EmergenciesRecommended practices● Develop an emergency management plan andupdate the plan on a regular basis.• Identify and address a range of events andhazards specific to the district or schools.• Develop roles and responsibilities and proceduresfor school community members.• Develop roles and responsibilities for firstresponders and community partners.Source: GAO analysis of Education, DHS, and HHS guidance and training documents.10


Selected Practices School DistrictsTake to Prepare for EmergenciesRecommended practices• Develop procedures for communicating with keystakeholders such as parents and students,including those who are limited-English proficient.• Develop procedures for special needs students.• Develop procedures in the plan for recoveringfrom an incident, including continuing studenteducation during an extended school closure.• Determine lessons learned after an incident ortraining.Source: GAO analysis of Education, DHS, and HHS guidance and training documents.11


Selected Practices School DistrictsTake to Prepare for EmergenciesRecommended practices• Develop multi-purpose manuals, with emergencymanagement information, that can be tailored tomeet individual school needs.• Include community partners such as localgovernment and public health agencies inplanning.• Coordinate the school district’s s emergencyprocedures with state and local governments.• Practice the emergency management plan withfirst responders and community partners on aregular basis.Source: GAO analysis of Education, DHS, and HHS guidance and training documents.12


Sample Emergency PreparednessCurriculum Currently Used in U.S.Disaster School EducationPRIMARY GRADES• A very young child can absorb basic emergencypreparedness instruction.• A child needs to know that emergencies can happen toanyone and that there are measures that should be taken inself protection.• Teacher may introduce concepts of emergency and self-helpby relating instructions to the child’s s everyday experiences.• Depending upon the rural or urban character of acommunity, a teacher should give priority to that whichchildren are most apt to experience in their home or schoolenvironment.Source: Utah State Office of EducationUtah School Safety Committee13


Example of Tips for Teachers(Primary Grades)• Take advantage of the many free materialsdeveloped for primary grade emergencypreparedness curricula• Invite speakers from emergency service groups,and visit the emergency management office, firedepartment, etc., on short field trips• Add a few emergency related words to the weeklyspelling lesson• Make up math problems involving emergencyresponse times• Have children make maps of their community,designating hazardous areas as they perceivethem.14


INTERMEDIATE ANDSECONDARY GRADES• As children get older, they need more detailedinformation about the hazards of living• Children in the secondary grades are ready toview events in a continuum from cause to effect• They should be ready to approach the subjectsof natural and man caused disasters15


INTERMEDIATE ANDSECONDARY GRADES• Unlike the younger children, secondary gradestudents are more able to relate to things on aworld scale• By the time they have reached junior and seniorhigh school, they should be well aware of theglobal relationships and repercussions of naturaland man caused phenomena• They also should have a well developed sense oftheir own place in the scheme of things andconfidence that they have direction and controlof their lives16


Example of Tips for Teachers(Intermediate and Secondary Grades)• Science - Relate disasters to physical change,conservation, ecology, and environmentalscience• Social Studies - Study the interdependenceand cooperation of people, organizations, andnations when disaster strikes• Health and Physical Education - These areideal courses for teaching safety and survivaltechniques, basic first aid, etc. Have studentssimulate a disaster situation and take turnsplaying victim and rescue workers. Practicesimple carry/stretcher improvisation, etc.17


Example of Tips for Teachers(Intermediate and Secondary Grades)• Reading - Give the class a list of readingmaterials about disasters and emergencies• Music and Art - Have students make safetyposters and display them during schooldisaster awareness week18


Future Considerations for U.S.Disaster School Education• Identify educational strategies designed to impactpreparedness and knowledge related to response,recovery and resiliency• Develop more youth-focus disaster educationbased on systematic research design• Better define the role children can play indeveloping community preparedness andresiliency19


Questions ?Contact Information:John Walsh, Assistant DirectorNational Center for Emergency PreparednessVanderbilt University461 21 st Avenue, SouthNashville, TN, USA 37240-1104Phone: 001-615615-322-1553Fax: 001-615615-322-582820

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