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the arch old reptonian newsletter - Repton School

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Issue Nº 315<br />

THE ARCH<br />

OLD REPTONIAN<br />

NEWSLETTER<br />

October 2009


OFFICERS OF THE<br />

OLD REPTONIAN SOCIETY 2009<br />

Executive Committee<br />

President: Richard A. Hutton (H 1956)<br />

President Elect: John N. Kirkland (O 1951)<br />

Vice President: Robert A. Holroyd – Headmaster<br />

Chairman: James M. Ross (Hall 1968)<br />

Treasurer: John S. Wallis (Latham 1971)<br />

Governors’ Representative:<br />

Robert M. Kirkland (Orchard 1959)<br />

Secretary: Mike Stones (Staff)<br />

Assistant Secretary: Jan Cobb (Staff)<br />

Elected Committee Members<br />

Nicola M. Oborn (Garden 1991) – Staff – Appointed 2007<br />

Simon J. Oborn (Orchard 1989) – Appointed 2005<br />

James T. Leavesley (New 1975) – Appointed 2005<br />

J.M. Guy Levesley (Hall 1975) – Appointed 2009<br />

Peter H. Neil (Priory 1975) – Appointed 2006<br />

Adam M. Sinclair (Latham 1978) – Appointed 2006<br />

Paul A. Windridge (Priory 1969) – Appointed 2006<br />

John F.M. Walker (Hall 1946 and ex Staff) – Life Member<br />

Louise P. Howarth (Garden 1996) – Appointed 2007<br />

Sarah R.E. Taylor (Field 1998) – Appointed 2008<br />

Ex Officio Members<br />

Simon D. Armstrong (Cross 1963) – Lancs & Cheshire<br />

Sanjiv Basu (Orchard 1989) – Fives<br />

Anthony E. Bishop (Priory 1972) – Golf Club<br />

Hamer J.E. Boot (<strong>School</strong> 1995) – Football Club<br />

Martin G. Grayshon (Cross 1961) – Yorkshire<br />

Charles Michael Keep (Orchard 1969 & Staff) – Hockey Club<br />

Nicholas Peter Le Poidevin (Cross 1964) – Law Society<br />

Richard C.E. Low<strong>the</strong>r (Brook 1985) – Tennis Club<br />

Thomas Richard Pepper (Hall 1949) – Midlands<br />

Francis W.S. Russell (Orchard 1969) – Pilgrims<br />

John F.R. Hird (Priory 1960) – Masonic Lodge<br />

Cathy Twigg – Staff – Marketing & Development Director<br />

The Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian Society<br />

The Hall, <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong><br />

<strong>Repton</strong>, Derbyshire DE65 6FH<br />

Tel: 01283 559320 Fax: 01283 559250<br />

Email: or@repton.org.uk<br />

Website: www.orsociety.com<br />

<strong>School</strong> Website: www.repton.org.uk<br />

Editorial Team: Mike Stones & Jan Cobb<br />

THE OR AGM AND DINNER 2009<br />

This year’s AGM and Annual Dinner will be held on<br />

Saturday 14th November in Pears <strong>School</strong>, <strong>Repton</strong>. It is<br />

hoped that Mike and Melody Kettle, also Roger and<br />

Rosemary Thompson, will be our guests on this<br />

occasion to mark <strong>the</strong>ir long service to <strong>the</strong> school.<br />

DRINKS IN THE CITY<br />

The Royal Thames Yacht Club is <strong>the</strong> venue for <strong>the</strong> 2010<br />

Drinks in <strong>the</strong> City on February 16th.<br />

Booking forms for both events are enclosed and if you<br />

would like any o<strong>the</strong>r information please call us in <strong>the</strong><br />

OR office on 01283 559320, or email or@repton.org.uk<br />

YOUNG ORs CHRISTMAS BALL<br />

Saturday December 19th 2009.<br />

For ORs who left between 1998-2009.<br />

Invitations will be sent out soon.<br />

Front Cover: Dick Morgan, John Billington, Pat Norwood, Mike<br />

Charlesworth, John Fishley (all ex staff), in Pears <strong>School</strong>, Gaudy 2009<br />

(2)<br />

PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY 2009<br />

RICHARD A. HUTTON (H’56)<br />

TO BE A PILGRIM<br />

My year in office, which is not yet<br />

over, has been far less arduous than<br />

I imagined. Fears that I would never<br />

make <strong>the</strong> 9am Saturday morning<br />

meetings of <strong>the</strong> Executive<br />

Committee were allayed at an early<br />

stage by being informed that it<br />

would be most unusual for <strong>the</strong><br />

President to attend <strong>the</strong>se. I cannot,<br />

<strong>the</strong>refore, give you a first hand<br />

account of what goes on in <strong>the</strong><br />

inner sanctum of your Society, but<br />

on <strong>the</strong> outside much has happened<br />

during <strong>the</strong> year of which Richard Hutton, 2009 President<br />

<strong>Repton</strong>ians can feel proud.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> spring, we lifted <strong>the</strong> celebrity television dancing competition,<br />

courtesy of Tom Chambers, who was regaled in <strong>the</strong> May issue, and for<br />

much of <strong>the</strong> summer we had high hopes of <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong> Pilgrims doing<br />

<strong>the</strong> same with <strong>the</strong> Cricketer Cup. After putting out last year’s winners<br />

in <strong>the</strong> first round, <strong>the</strong> team progressed smoothly through <strong>the</strong> next three,<br />

accompanied by a growing support, which by <strong>the</strong> final constituted a<br />

large assembly. The team got off to a flyer, reaching 140 for 1 at <strong>the</strong><br />

halfway point, and hopes were high that <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims would register<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir third championship, even more satisfyingly by overcoming <strong>the</strong><br />

school that in <strong>the</strong> 41-year history of <strong>the</strong> competition had competed in<br />

20 finals, winning 13 of <strong>the</strong>m.<br />

Disappointingly, <strong>the</strong> middle order was enfeebled by <strong>the</strong> Old<br />

Tonbridgians’ ‘pie-throwers’ and <strong>the</strong> innings subsided, despite some late<br />

hitting, to a barely competitive total, which <strong>the</strong> opposition knocked off<br />

for <strong>the</strong> loss of only three wickets.<br />

Victory would have been a crowning glory, even more so as my bro<strong>the</strong>r<br />

John is in <strong>the</strong> midst of his two-year reign as President of <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims.<br />

Both of us feel a strong attachment to this competition because we<br />

were part of <strong>the</strong> team that won <strong>the</strong> trophy in its inaugural year of 1967.<br />

Never<strong>the</strong>less, we were very proud of <strong>the</strong> team’s performance and feel<br />

sure that it will continue to give a good account in <strong>the</strong> years ahead.<br />

Much of this is due to <strong>the</strong> efforts of Frank Watson, who has recently<br />

completed a 10-year stint as master-in-charge of cricket at <strong>the</strong> school,<br />

and his predecessor Mike Stones. Apart from ensuring that <strong>the</strong>ir pupils<br />

have been brought up in <strong>the</strong> best traditions of <strong>Repton</strong> cricket, <strong>the</strong>y have<br />

instilled a desire and a commitment among <strong>the</strong>ir charges to continue<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir association with <strong>the</strong> school by representing <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims. A strong<br />

nucleus now exists around which to build.<br />

I think that <strong>the</strong>re is a good case to be made for extending membership<br />

of <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims beyond those that form <strong>the</strong> cream of <strong>the</strong> school’s 1st XIs<br />

to all that have represented <strong>the</strong> school in lower elevens and give service<br />

in a non-playing capacity. Membership could be extended to o<strong>the</strong>rs who<br />

now and in <strong>the</strong> future have an affection for <strong>the</strong> game and enjoy<br />

following and supporting those that play it. In time, this could lead to<br />

an enlargement of <strong>the</strong> fixture list, and increasing opportunities for<br />

<strong>Repton</strong>ians to enjoy one ano<strong>the</strong>r’s company.<br />

O<strong>the</strong>r events during <strong>the</strong> year must not be overlooked. Although<br />

February seems a long time ago, <strong>the</strong> drinks party in <strong>the</strong> City University<br />

Club was a good opportunity to meet some of those now toiling<br />

through <strong>the</strong> worst financial crisis in living memory. I was interested to<br />

meet a member of a particularly modern species, a hedge fund<br />

manager, who still had a shirt on his back.<br />

In April, I joined a small group of <strong>Repton</strong>ians living in France for a<br />

convivial evening at Le Sergent Recruteur on <strong>the</strong> Ile St Louis in Paris,<br />

ably organised by Reverend James Barnett (H’59), whom I had not seen<br />

for 45 years. The venue has a past record in press-ganging its customers,<br />

encouraging <strong>the</strong>m to drink <strong>the</strong>mselves into oblivion, to find <strong>the</strong>mselves<br />

on wakening to have joined <strong>the</strong> foreign legion. No such fate awaited<br />

our party, although a certain amount of wallet-emptying was called for.<br />

Despite some miserable wea<strong>the</strong>r, which confined activities to indoors,<br />

<strong>the</strong> Gaudy in June was well attended. The highlight was <strong>the</strong> service to<br />

commemorate <strong>the</strong> foundation of <strong>the</strong> chapel 150 years ago. The school<br />

choir was in top form, and readings of <strong>the</strong> words of several of <strong>the</strong><br />

school’s notable past churchmen and a pithy sermon by <strong>the</strong> Bishop of<br />

Derby produced a varied and uplifting programme.<br />

And so, to <strong>the</strong> annual dinner in November – see you <strong>the</strong>re.


OCTOBER 2009<br />

3rd Boys’ 1st XI, U15A v Kimbolton<br />

Girls’ 1st XI, 2nd v Worksop (a)<br />

Fashion Show, Pears <strong>School</strong>, 6.30 pm and 8.30 pm<br />

7th Boys’ 1st XI (ISFA Cup Round 2)<br />

Senior Lit. Soc. Play: This Woman’s Work,<br />

Studio Theatre, 7.30 pm<br />

Subscription Concert: Morgan Szymanski<br />

(Classical Guitar), Music <strong>School</strong>, 7.45 pm<br />

8th Senior Lit. Soc. Play: This Woman’s Work,<br />

Studio Theatre, 7.30 pm<br />

Wind and Brass Concert, Beldam Hall, 7.30 pm<br />

10th Girls’ 1st XI, 2nd, 3rd, U16A v Oundle<br />

13th Boys’ 1st XI (ESFA Cup)<br />

14th Girls’ U16 County netball tournament 2.30 pm<br />

Field and Latham House Play, The Kidnap,<br />

by Charles Robertson, Studio Theatre, 7.30 pm<br />

15th Field and Latham House Play, The Kidnap,<br />

by Charles Robertson, Studio Theatre, 7.30 pm<br />

Informal Concert, Music <strong>School</strong>, 9.15 pm<br />

16th Half-term begins, 4.30 pm<br />

NOVEMBER 2009<br />

1st Half-term ends. Winter timetable begins<br />

3rd Boys’ 1st XI, 2nd, U14A v Wolverhampton GS<br />

4th Subscription Concert: Graham Oppenheimer with<br />

Leading International Artists, Music <strong>School</strong>, 7.45 pm<br />

5th Girls’ 1st XI, U16A v Dean Close<br />

Junior Lit Soc and Chamber Choir Concert,<br />

Library, 9.05 pm<br />

6th Public & B Block Lecture: Beldam Hall, 7.15 pm<br />

7th Sale of Work<br />

Boys’ 1st XI v Cambridge United<br />

10th 1st XI (ESFA Cup)<br />

DIARY OF EVENTS 2009/2010<br />

CHAIRMAN OF THE SOCIETY 2009/2010 - James Ross (H’68)<br />

A Hall House contemporary, Martin Rowley, stayed with me recently. Over a convivial glass of beer or two Martin<br />

raised <strong>the</strong> question as to what Sir John Port would have made of all <strong>the</strong> modern <strong>Repton</strong> triumphs. Cricket 20/20<br />

champions and national champions in both girls’ hockey and football. We came to <strong>the</strong> conclusion that he would<br />

probably be mildly surprised but justifiably proud of his legacy.<br />

We also speculated as to what he would have made of having an OR as <strong>the</strong> current h<strong>old</strong>er of <strong>the</strong> Strictly Come<br />

Dancing title. Our considered view was again one of surprise but with this much talent and success that had Britain’s Got Talent<br />

not clashed with A Levels <strong>the</strong>n <strong>Repton</strong> would have had that title in <strong>the</strong> bag too.<br />

As a cricket fanatic it has been great fun watching The Pilgrims in this year’s Cricketer Cup which is played amongst <strong>the</strong> thirty two<br />

leading public schools. At <strong>the</strong> time of writing we are in <strong>the</strong> semi-final versus Eton Ramblers. The side has had as many as nine players<br />

at one time under <strong>the</strong> age of twenty three which augurs well for <strong>the</strong> future. There is also room for experience and this has been<br />

exemplified by ano<strong>the</strong>r contemporary Tony Stubbs, Charlie Wall and Jon Batty <strong>the</strong> current Surrey wicket keeper and this season’s<br />

beneficiary. Jon is always willing to play for <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims when county duties allow. A tribute to <strong>the</strong> Club and <strong>School</strong>.<br />

I very much hope that <strong>the</strong> success of <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims inspires o<strong>the</strong>r young ORs to participate for all OR clubs and achieve similar feats<br />

in <strong>the</strong> competitions that <strong>the</strong>y enter. The following this season that <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims have engendered from all OR age groups and<br />

parents has been greatly appreciated by <strong>the</strong> team and provided a great deal of enjoyment and camaraderie. Sir John Port would<br />

not be surprised.<br />

James Ross (H’68)<br />

(3)<br />

NOVEMBER 2009 ‘Continued<br />

10th Girls’ 1st XI, U16A, U15A v Uppingham (a)<br />

14th OR Society AGM, 6.00 pm followed by<br />

OR Society Annual Dinner, Pears <strong>School</strong>, 7.30 pm<br />

17th Boys’ 1st XI v Charterhouse<br />

19th <strong>School</strong> Play, 400 Hall, 7.30 pm<br />

20th <strong>School</strong> Play, 400 Hall, 7.30 pm<br />

Public Lecture: Martha Holmes ‘The Making of Life’,<br />

Beldam Hall, 7.15 pm<br />

21st Boys’ 1st XI, U16, U15A v Bolton (a)<br />

<strong>School</strong> Play, 400 Hall, 7.30 pm<br />

24th Boys’ 1st XI, U16, U14A&B v Manchester GS (a)<br />

28th Boys’ 1st XI, 2nd, 3rd, 4th v Liverpool Ramblers<br />

29th <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong> Music Society Concert:<br />

Handel’s Messiah, Pears <strong>School</strong>, 7.45 pm<br />

DECEMBER 2009<br />

5th Boys’ 1st XI, U15A&B, U14A&B v Shrewsbury<br />

6th Carol Service for Parents, Staff and Parish, 6.30 pm<br />

followed by reception in <strong>the</strong> Undercroft<br />

9th Christmas Band Concert, Pears <strong>School</strong>, 7.30 pm<br />

10th Christmas Band Concert, Pears <strong>School</strong>, 7.30 pm<br />

11th Term ends 2.30 pm<br />

19th Young OR Ball in Pears <strong>School</strong><br />

JANUARY 2010<br />

4th Lent Term begins<br />

FEBRUARY 2010<br />

16th OR Society, Drinks in <strong>the</strong> City,<br />

Royal Thames Yacht Club<br />

JUNE 2010<br />

12th OR Gaudy Day, Years 1962-1972<br />

and pre 1950 (tbc)<br />

Dates correct at time of publication


Thomas Auden (O’99) has been awarded a First Class<br />

Honours Degree from Edinburgh University in Ancient History.<br />

Tom started <strong>the</strong> PwC graduate training programme in<br />

Edinburgh in September.<br />

OLD REPTONIAN NEWS - SNIPPETS<br />

Roger Behn (H’43) has<br />

been awarded one of <strong>the</strong><br />

2009 British Columbia<br />

Community Achievement<br />

Awards for his efforts in<br />

establishing both a local<br />

museum and earlier a<br />

regional library system.<br />

At <strong>the</strong> time <strong>the</strong> library<br />

served 150,000 people<br />

spread over an area <strong>the</strong><br />

size of <strong>the</strong>n Western<br />

Germany.<br />

Richard Brooksbank (N’79) has offered to be <strong>the</strong> OR<br />

overseas link in Johannesburg, his email address is<br />

richard.brooksbank@wits.ac.za.<br />

John R.M. Cook (O’74) On October 7th 2008 The Reverend<br />

John Cook was instituted, inducted and installed as Vicar of<br />

Wargrave with Knowl Hill in <strong>the</strong> Berkshire, Oxford Diocese.<br />

Mike Dryden (M'84) was<br />

a visitor to <strong>Repton</strong> in early<br />

August with his family.<br />

He is currently a Graphics<br />

Designer and lives in<br />

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.<br />

Mike Stones met <strong>the</strong>m<br />

and showed <strong>the</strong>m around<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>. The 2 Mikes<br />

are pictured here at The<br />

Arch with Mike Dryden's<br />

wife, Jennifer, and <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

son, Jonathan.<br />

Jonathan Edmonds (N’70) is a Major at Sandhurst and <strong>the</strong><br />

Chief Instructor of <strong>the</strong> Late Entry Officers course. In<br />

September he was posted to <strong>the</strong> Defence College of Electro-<br />

Mechanical Engineers as <strong>the</strong>ir Training Operations Officer<br />

which is a Tri Service organisation (Royal Navy, Army, Royal Air<br />

Force).<br />

Arthur Schankler (P'72) writes – “I noted on <strong>the</strong> list of<br />

missing ORs, <strong>the</strong> name of Elbert Gates, (H’72). Both Al and I<br />

were "exchange" students from America that year and we<br />

both in fact had gone to <strong>the</strong> same school in <strong>the</strong> U.S.,<br />

Cranbrook, prior to coming to <strong>Repton</strong>. I regret to inform you<br />

that Elbert passed away in Montreal a few years ago after a<br />

long illness. After <strong>Repton</strong>, he attended Yale University and<br />

went on to become a law professor in New York City. For<br />

those who knew him at <strong>Repton</strong> in his brief time <strong>the</strong>re, <strong>the</strong>y<br />

should know he remained <strong>the</strong> very unique and well-liked<br />

individual that I am sure <strong>the</strong>y remember”<br />

(4)<br />

Three ORs met up at Le Mans..<br />

From left to right: Steve Hazell-Smith (O’67), John<br />

Cameron (O’66), Tim Barrett (N’66).<br />

Joanna Haxby (A’92) married Andrew Perkins in 2003 and<br />

have 2 children, Millie born in 2005 and George born in<br />

2007. They are now living in Suffolk.<br />

William Haxby (M’87) married Kat in December 2004 and<br />

have 2 children, Toby born in 2006 and Jemima born May<br />

2009. They are now living in Northamptonshire.<br />

Nicholas Hillman (B’85) has written an article in Conference<br />

and Common Room magazine on ‘Surviving <strong>the</strong> ‘60s’.<br />

Edward Hine (B’72) celebrated his<br />

50th birthday on 19th M<strong>arch</strong> 2009,<br />

his two bro<strong>the</strong>rs, Charles (B’69)<br />

who now lives in San Francisco and<br />

Andrew (B’77) who lives in<br />

London both attended <strong>the</strong> party in<br />

Colton Bassett.<br />

Jamie Macrea (H’71) is a Member for Planning and<br />

Development on Macclesfield Borough Council and Portfolio<br />

H<strong>old</strong>er for Prosperity at Cheshire East Council.<br />

Richard MacPherson (N’00) graduated as a Master in<br />

Engineering, having obtained a first class honours degree in<br />

Aeronautical Engineering from Durham University. For his<br />

dissertation and in recognition of his outstanding<br />

contribution to aerospace rese<strong>arch</strong>, he was awarded <strong>the</strong><br />

Institution of Mechanical Engineers Project Award. He also<br />

gained <strong>the</strong> highest mark within his year for his Rese<strong>arch</strong> and<br />

Development Report, <strong>the</strong> findings of which are being used by<br />

industry to continue <strong>the</strong><br />

onward development of<br />

turbo machinery. Richard<br />

has now joined Airbus,<br />

which is part of <strong>the</strong><br />

European Aeronautic<br />

Defence and Space<br />

Company, as a Structural<br />

Stress Engineer and will<br />

participate in <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

Graduate Development<br />

Programme based initially<br />

at both Bristol and<br />

Toulouse.


Alexandra Morton (F’99) graduated from Durham<br />

University last year with a first-class degree in French and<br />

Italian. She is now taking part in a French law exchange,<br />

working for a French law firm in a scheme organised by <strong>the</strong><br />

College of Law in Birmingham and L’Ecole des Avocats in<br />

Lyon.<br />

Christopher Paget (P’01) has been awarded a BA Honours<br />

degree in Ancient History and Archaeology from Durham<br />

University and achieved Class II Division 1 (Honours )<br />

classification.<br />

Joe Steele (P’00) has been awarded a First Class Honours<br />

Degree in Fine Art at Newcastle University.<br />

Peter Stones (L'05) teamed up<br />

with Ken Tatham (C’59) for a<br />

month during his summer<br />

holidays to embark upon a major<br />

renovation project in <strong>the</strong> village<br />

where Ken is Mayor, St. Ceneri in<br />

Normandy. The project was<br />

fruitful and <strong>the</strong> local paper included an interview with <strong>the</strong><br />

visitor dubbed , Pierre Pierre, under <strong>the</strong> title ‘Musicien<br />

Bricoleur . How is your French?’<br />

Xavier Teasdale-Firth (O’00) has passed out from The Royal<br />

Military Academy Sandhurst and has been awarded a<br />

commission in The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.<br />

Simon Blunt (N’79) and Christabel Blunt (née Stanton)<br />

(G’92) a daughter Jemima born 4th November 2008.<br />

Simon, Christobel, son Charlie pictured above at Jemima’s<br />

Christening.<br />

Richard Bradbury (O’81) and his wife Celia are delighted to<br />

announce <strong>the</strong> arrival of Tabitha Lilly Bradbury, born 9th July<br />

2009. A granddaughter to Brian Bradbury (O’46).<br />

Edward Cursham (H’75) and Karen, a son, Harry George<br />

Curzon born on 29th August 2007.<br />

Born to Edmund Millensted (C’95) and Hannah, a<br />

daughter, on August 10th, named Emma Olivia.<br />

OLD REPTONIAN NEWS - SNIPPETS<br />

CONGRATULATIONS<br />

(5)<br />

Martin Priestley (C’81), Headmaster of Warminster <strong>School</strong><br />

is completing a sponsored 24-hour ‘Squashathon’ in support<br />

of <strong>the</strong> Children’s Hospice South-West. Martin writes: ‘I play<br />

for 24 hours - non-stop. The rules of squash allow a minute’s<br />

break between games - I start at 12 noon on Friday 18<br />

September on <strong>the</strong> school’s pristine restored squash court<br />

(can’t think who authorised that!) and will finish at noon on<br />

Saturday 19 September. The students of Warminster <strong>School</strong><br />

play, in half-hour slots, and provided <strong>the</strong> bulk of <strong>the</strong><br />

opposition. Jonah Barrington, one of <strong>the</strong> greatest players in<br />

<strong>the</strong> history of <strong>the</strong> game, agreed to play <strong>the</strong> final half-hour<br />

against me - a huge honour for me as a humble club player,<br />

and a real sign of how much he too was inspired by CHSW.<br />

The Children’s Hospice South-West (CHSW) exists to support<br />

children who are affected by life-limiting conditions (meaning<br />

that <strong>the</strong>y will not reach adulthood) and also <strong>the</strong> families of<br />

<strong>the</strong>se children. Martin is hoping to reach a target of £10,000.<br />

This is an ambitious target - but one which would make a real<br />

difference to <strong>the</strong> wonderful work of <strong>the</strong> CHSW. If you<br />

would like to donate <strong>the</strong> ‘JustGiving’ website is still open.<br />

All you need to do is follow this link:<br />

www.justgiving.com/squashathon-warminster-school<br />

MESSAGE FROM THE OR OFFICE<br />

We are updating our records for <strong>the</strong> ORs. On <strong>the</strong> reverse<br />

of <strong>the</strong> address sheet, that came with this magazine, are <strong>the</strong><br />

details we h<strong>old</strong> of you. If any are incorrect, please, would<br />

you kindly amend and return back to us. Thank You.<br />

Just to prove that you’re never too<br />

<strong>old</strong>, my wife Lori and I are<br />

delighted to announce that we<br />

have recently become proud<br />

adoptive parents to McKenzie<br />

Qiao Hilton (now 2 years <strong>old</strong>, her<br />

birthday is February 2nd 2007)<br />

who came to us from China after<br />

a three and a half year wait -<br />

which is longer than an elephant<br />

is pregnant for! I must be mad at 54 years <strong>old</strong> but we are<br />

both absolutely over <strong>the</strong> moon!<br />

Andy Hilton (B’68)<br />

Simon Oborn (O’89) and Madeline are delighted to<br />

announce <strong>the</strong> birth of <strong>the</strong>ir second daughter Grace on <strong>the</strong><br />

20th M<strong>arch</strong> 2009.<br />

‘<br />

Melissa (née Needs) (A’90) and Stuart Helmer, a son Charlie<br />

born 5th April 2009 to boost <strong>the</strong> Helmer rugby / cricket<br />

team: George (6 years) and Tommy (3 years).<br />

Mark Sutcliffe (N’85) and his wife Michelle are delighted to<br />

announce <strong>the</strong> birth of <strong>the</strong>ir first child Mat<strong>the</strong>w Alexander.<br />

Born on 4 April 2008.


The engagements are announced of:<br />

Craig Lloyd Clarke (S’96) to Maria-Fe Ventura (pictured<br />

below) of Lima, Peru. The wedding will take place in Peru,<br />

April 2010.<br />

Nicholas Pooler (M’97) married<br />

Margaret Strong (G’97) at Our Lady<br />

and St Cadoc Church, Kidwelly on 21st<br />

February 2009.<br />

ENGAGEMENTS<br />

MARRIAGES<br />

Tom Auden (O’99) to Ca<strong>the</strong>rine McCubbin of Calstone<br />

Wellington, Wiltshire.<br />

Tom Bennett (N’86) to Miss Anna Goodfellow.<br />

Fiona Harding (A’93) to Tom Har<strong>old</strong> on Sunday 19th April<br />

2009.<br />

Duncan Mills (B’86) to Linnea Jonsson of Moira, Sweden.<br />

Tessa Sheldon (G’97) to Tim Horton. The wedding will take<br />

place on 19th December 2009 in St Wystans Church, <strong>Repton</strong>.<br />

Richard Talbot (P’89) to Hilary Coleman. The wedding is<br />

planned for April 2010 in Hampshire.<br />

Pictured above, ORs attending from left to right:<br />

Henry Brown (S’00), Christopher Chapman (S’97),<br />

David Storer (M’97), Alastair MacBain (M’97),<br />

Thomas Shardlow (M’00), Jonathan Strong (H’63), Margaret Strong (G’97),<br />

Nicholas Pooler (M’97), Christopher Strong (G’96), Anne Strong (G’00),<br />

Lucy Gell (G’00).<br />

(6)<br />

Sarah Bracegirdle (A’94) married Ben Nichols at St<br />

Oswalds Church, Lower Peover.<br />

ORs attending are from left to right:<br />

Sam Gardner (O’93), Charlotte Richards (A’99 ),<br />

Camille Dollamore née Su<strong>the</strong>rland (F’97),<br />

Head Usher - Nick Jones (N’95), Andrew<br />

Dollamore (N’93), Rosie Gardner (A’00 ), Charles<br />

Bracegirdle (O’07), Oliver Jones (P’95),<br />

The Bride - Sarah Nichols née Bracegirdle (A’94),<br />

Jean-Paul Gordon (S’94), Best Man - Joe Gardner<br />

(O’95), Harriet Cavill (A’96), Robert Goode<br />

(P’96), Mat<strong>the</strong>w Bracegirdle (O’96),<br />

Nick Gardner (O’00 ), Tim Jones (C’96), Tim<br />

Smith (N’96), Hannah Edwards (G’96), Jessica<br />

Womersley (A’02), Lucy Womersley (A’00), Lucy<br />

Gardner (A’97).


Gemma Wheatley<br />

(A’92) married Dr<br />

Graham Barker at St<br />

Peter’s Church, Thorner,<br />

on 17th April 2009<br />

ORs in attendance were<br />

Melissa Wheatley<br />

(A’91), Laura Drake<br />

(A’92), Lizzie Tebbs<br />

(née Waller) (A’92)<br />

and Hannah Corrie<br />

(A’92).<br />

Toby Martin (L’90)<br />

and Amelie Gerard<br />

were married on<br />

24th May 2008 in<br />

<strong>the</strong> Ca<strong>the</strong>dral Notre-<br />

Dame-de-Strasbourg,<br />

France.<br />

Charlie Pepper (B'90)<br />

married Ruth Lawson on 7th<br />

February 2009 at St<br />

Stephen's Church in North<br />

Mundham, West Sussex.<br />

Old <strong>Repton</strong>ians in<br />

attendance were David<br />

Pepper (H'53), Lol Pepper<br />

(H'55), Adrian Pepper<br />

(H'83), Mat<strong>the</strong>w Needham<br />

(P'80), Julia Needham<br />

(née Pepper) (A'84), Heidi<br />

Pepper (A'90), Bill<br />

Burleigh (H'51) and<br />

Mark Anselm (C'86).<br />

MARRIAGES<br />

Sarah Harding (A’91) married John<br />

Jones on 4th April 2009 at St Saviour’s<br />

Church, Foremarke, followed by a<br />

reception in Pears <strong>School</strong><br />

ORs in attendance were:<br />

Front row from left to right:<br />

Fiona McLaren ( G’91), Hannah<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>r (A’92), Kate Tomlinson<br />

(A’91), Nicola Harding (A’97),<br />

Clare Chambers (A’91), Sarah Jones<br />

(A’91), Fiona Harding A’93),<br />

Melissa Wheatley (A’91). Back row<br />

from left to right: Tom Chambers (N’90), Alex Kington (N’91),<br />

Chris Cavey (P’96), Rob Fish (H’91), Ben Cavey (P’92), Verity Tate<br />

(A’94), Paul Tate (N’92).<br />

(7)<br />

Ian Hall (N’90) married Laura English at St<br />

Saviour’s Church, Foremarke, on 11th April<br />

2009.<br />

OR’s in attendance, pictured below, were:<br />

Richard Talbot (P’89), Adam Dewhirst<br />

(N’90), Nicholas Burns (N’90),<br />

Duncan Bell (N’90), Isy McQueen (née<br />

Adams) (A’92), Ian and Laura, Ben<br />

Greeves (N’92), David Hart (N’90),<br />

Robert Fish (H’91) and Russell Muir.


BROOK<br />

Robin Leaper Fenton (B’43) died peacefully at home<br />

in Edinburgh on 24th May 2009.<br />

Paul Alexander Baglee (B’65) died in December 2008.<br />

LATHAM<br />

Michael Bernard Butler-Cole (L’22) died in his<br />

101st year on 18th May 2009.<br />

HALL<br />

Robert Hamilton Scriven (H’32) on 6th December 2008<br />

Alfred Trevor Manton Harwood (H’42) on 29th M<strong>arch</strong><br />

2009 aged 80.<br />

Noel Watts (H’42) on 22nd January 2009.<br />

Lawrence George Maxwell Pepper (H’55) died on<br />

19th M<strong>arch</strong> 2009.<br />

MITRE<br />

John Clifford Hubble (M’46) on 15th April 2009<br />

at Stoke Poges.<br />

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENTS<br />

OBITUARIES - BRUCE FOX (N’32)<br />

NEW<br />

Peter Laurence Hogg (N’34) on Saturday 25th of July 2009<br />

aged 89.<br />

John Norman Badminton (N’47) on 7th M<strong>arch</strong> 2009.<br />

ORCHARD<br />

Har<strong>old</strong> Woolley (O’26) on 20th April 2009 aged 97.<br />

PRIORY<br />

John Webster (P’41) on 28th April 2009.<br />

Wilfred Burkinshaw (P’50) on 28th April 2009, aged 72.<br />

FORMER STAFF<br />

Cyril Granshaw, 14th May 2009. Cyril was <strong>the</strong> senior<br />

technician in <strong>the</strong> Biology department.<br />

Rosemary Booth, on 22nd June 2009. Rosemary was <strong>the</strong><br />

Accountant/Office Manager in <strong>the</strong> Bursary for over 30 years.<br />

Bruce Fox on 13th July in his home at Ruretse, Gaborone, Botswana.<br />

His daughter Jill Fraser writes: He was over 90 years of age and born on 27.09.1918. I believe that he was captain of cricket and<br />

played in <strong>the</strong> first soccer team. I am not sure if he was captain of soccer or not. He was <strong>the</strong> Chairman of his family company,<br />

Fox's Glacier Mints Ltd., moved to Greece in 1969, to Kenya in 1980 and to Botswana in 2001. Throughout his time in Africa he<br />

always spent three months of <strong>the</strong> African winter in Greece for <strong>the</strong>ir Summer with his younger daughter, Gail Sofianos and <strong>the</strong><br />

rest of <strong>the</strong> year in Africa with his elder daughter, Jill Fraser. He had a good innings<br />

OBITUARIES - JOHN HARWOOD CASH LINNEY (O’31)<br />

Mr N S Linney writes:<br />

John Harwood Cash Linney was born in 1918, <strong>the</strong> eldest son of Stanley and Rhoda Linney (née<br />

Cash). He was educated at Seacroft <strong>School</strong> and <strong>Repton</strong>. After leaving school Harwood spent<br />

a year at a specialist school in Bonn, Germany and learnt to speak German fluently. He was<br />

also fluent in French.<br />

He joined <strong>the</strong> family business of Harwood Cash & Co Ltd in 1936 and was trained for three<br />

years in all aspects of <strong>the</strong> cotton doubling industry. In 1936 he joined <strong>the</strong> Royal Corps of<br />

Signals as a territorial s<strong>old</strong>ier and was commissioned as lieutenant. At <strong>the</strong> beginning of <strong>the</strong><br />

1939-1945 war he was immediately called up to be a permanent officer. Serving for seven<br />

months in France, he took part in <strong>the</strong> Dunkirk evacuation and was mentioned in dispatches for<br />

rowing a boat from <strong>the</strong> beach to various ships for 23 hours continuously until his colonel<br />

ordered him to evacuate. He returned to England and was responsible for regrouping and<br />

retraining his signals battalion.<br />

Harwood suffered a serious motor bike accident in 1941 and was eventfully invalided out of military service. He made a steady<br />

recovery and rejoined Harwood Cash & Co Ltd in Mansfield. In 1942 he married Pamela Jobson from Duffield in Derbyshire.<br />

He continued his career with Harwood Cash & Co Ltd, eventually becoming chairman.<br />

In 1994 he was appointed a director of W & J Linney Ltd, owner of <strong>the</strong> Mansfield Advertiser and Linney’s shop and printing business.<br />

During <strong>the</strong> war years he acquired a sound knowledge of <strong>the</strong> business and arranged for his bo<strong>the</strong>r Ian, on demobilisation, to purchase<br />

half of <strong>the</strong> business which was owned by a Mansfield businessman, Arthur Gregg, a cousin, <strong>the</strong>reby ensuring that <strong>the</strong> Linney family<br />

were <strong>the</strong> only shareh<strong>old</strong>ers.<br />

Harwood acted as an advisor to his bro<strong>the</strong>r and <strong>the</strong>y amalgamated with <strong>the</strong> Mansfield Chronicle owned by F Willman.<br />

The newspaper was renamed <strong>the</strong> Mansfield Chad. After five years Harwood took a back seat in <strong>the</strong> business and concentrated<br />

Continued<br />

(8)


OBITUARIES - JOHN HERBERT LANCELOT BELL (H’41)<br />

John Bell was a music scholar and school prefect and was awarded <strong>the</strong> Sawyer Prize at <strong>the</strong> Royal College of Organists, and<br />

became ARCO. He served in <strong>the</strong> Royal Irish Fusiliers from 1945-48, reaching <strong>the</strong> rank of lieutenant. He was organ scholar at<br />

Corpus Christie College Cambridge in 1948, following Graham Price (1935-40). He did fur<strong>the</strong>r study in Munich and his first<br />

professional engagement took him to Regensburg as conductor and choir director. He <strong>the</strong>n became a conductor with Carl Rosa<br />

Opera Company, a touring company. After fur<strong>the</strong>r opera engagements in Kaiserslautern and Munster, he was appointed<br />

assistant music director and conductor at <strong>the</strong> International Youth Festival of Die Feen (The Fairies) and das Liebesverbot (<strong>the</strong> Ban<br />

of Love) by Richard Wagner. He recorded <strong>the</strong> overture to Der Schmied von Marienburg (The Blacksmith of Marienburg) by<br />

Siegfried Wagner and Preludio from Respighi’s Suite in G for organ and strings with <strong>the</strong> Sinfonisches Orchestra, Berlin. In 1983<br />

he was appointed artistic director of <strong>the</strong> Bavarian Symphony Orchestra in Krefeld. He conducted his last concert with this<br />

orchestra on 31st May 1997 in Dunkirk. He died in May 2006 in Bavaria.<br />

Anthony Shillingford<br />

OBITUARIES - JOHN HARWOOD CASH LINNEY (O’31) Continued<br />

running <strong>the</strong> family farm in Farnsfield and building Harwood Cash & Co Ltd into <strong>the</strong> largest cotton doubling facility in Europe,<br />

eventually selling <strong>the</strong> business to Courtaulds, a large public company in 1985. In leisure time he enjoyed sailing and, with his wife,<br />

building an equestrian Arab stud – called The Farnsfield Stud. This became very well known and produced many winners, including<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir greatest horse Mikeno who went on to become <strong>the</strong> Arab champion of <strong>the</strong> world!<br />

Harwood was an expansive character with a friendly manner. Many people from our business knew him and have enjoyed his<br />

company at various events over <strong>the</strong> years; <strong>the</strong>y were never to be bored, more fascinated by his grasp of current affairs, and stories<br />

of <strong>the</strong> past. He was a keen supporter of local affairs both from a business point of view in Mansfield and from a home point of<br />

view in Farnsfield. His home, Farnsfield Hall was <strong>the</strong> setting for many village events, lunches and dinners. Harwood Linney died<br />

peacefully at home on 21st April 2008.<br />

We have all lost a great character but should enjoy <strong>the</strong> memories…<br />

OBITUARIES - TIM HOLLOWAY (L’48)<br />

Patrick Hecks (L’48) writes:<br />

Richard Caton (L’48) and I both met Tim at <strong>the</strong> start of <strong>the</strong> Summer term 1948, when we joined<br />

Latham House, and were firm friends from <strong>the</strong>n onwards, soon to be dubbed ‘<strong>the</strong> triumvirate’ by<br />

our housemaster, BW Thomas!<br />

Tim was born in London and <strong>the</strong>n moved with his family near Rye. It was <strong>the</strong>re that he met and<br />

married his beloved Elaine, his wife for 51 years. After <strong>the</strong>ir two children, Jonathan and Sally, were<br />

born <strong>the</strong>y settled in <strong>the</strong> Cotsw<strong>old</strong>s, where <strong>the</strong>y remained.<br />

Tim, of his own admission, was not a great scholar but, after much hard study, he passed <strong>the</strong><br />

necessary exams to enter his chosen profession, that of a Chartered Auctioneer. From his early<br />

training as an agricultural auctioneer, Tim diversified into <strong>the</strong> antique and fine art side of <strong>the</strong><br />

profession and built up a highly successful business in Banbury and Streatley, and he earned a justifiable national reputation as a<br />

respected expert in his field.<br />

Tim had a lifelong passion for vintage motor bikes and cars and owned many during his lifetime. He proudly drove his Jowett<br />

Bradford van, in <strong>the</strong> Holloway livery, on a television programme on vintage vehicles for Channel 4. A few years ago he rode his<br />

vintage Matchless motorbike over to <strong>the</strong> First World War battlefields on an organised trip to see where his fa<strong>the</strong>r had fought at<br />

Passchendael.<br />

He was a Churchwarden of his parish church in Churchill for some 20 years and not only was he instrumental in overseeing <strong>the</strong><br />

complete refurbishment of <strong>the</strong> interior of <strong>the</strong> church but was always on hand to visit <strong>the</strong> sick and give advice and help when<br />

needed. Tim’s charitable work was legendary, not only for <strong>the</strong> church but also through <strong>the</strong> Banbury Lions Club of which he was<br />

a Charter Member. He conducted many charitable auctions and was always an enthusiastic organiser of vintage car and motorbike<br />

shows which brought large sums of money .<br />

Richard and I were both privileged to spend time with Tim less than 24 hours before he died of meso<strong>the</strong>lioma and, although he<br />

was very weak, his indomitable spirit shone through as we reminisced over all <strong>the</strong> adventures and good times that we had shared,<br />

both at <strong>Repton</strong> and in later years. He kept in touch with John Griffiths (L’48) and John Smith (L’48), both of whom attended<br />

<strong>the</strong> funeral toge<strong>the</strong>r with <strong>the</strong> two of us, and also by e-mail with Bill Kirkham (L’48) and Lyle Thomas (L’48), both of whom live<br />

in Australia. <strong>Repton</strong> friends to <strong>the</strong> end!<br />

He died peacefully, free from pain surrounded by his family and fortified by his steadfast faith. His funeral was attended by over<br />

450 people.<br />

(9)


24th May 1935 - 21st June 2009<br />

OBITUARIES - ROSEMARY BOOTH (STAFF)<br />

Rosemary was born in <strong>Repton</strong>. She went to Burton High <strong>School</strong> but was from a generation for whom university was not an option,<br />

and after school she went on to work in statistics for British Celanese in Spondon. During this time she met Alf at a village dance,<br />

and <strong>the</strong>y were married at St Wystan’s in 1956, living first in Milton Road, and <strong>the</strong>n in Springfield Road.<br />

A vacancy arose for an errand girl at <strong>the</strong> bursar’s office at <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong>. From <strong>the</strong>re, she soon rose to become <strong>School</strong> Clerk.<br />

When she started, <strong>the</strong>re were only four working in <strong>the</strong> office, including <strong>the</strong> bursar and a part-time clerk of works. Rosemary<br />

enjoyed school life. She was <strong>the</strong> right-hand man of four bursars, earning <strong>the</strong>ir trust and loyalty. She learned accountancy and kept<br />

<strong>the</strong> accounts in her immaculate hand. More than that, she was a mo<strong>the</strong>rly guide, patiently explaining <strong>the</strong> intricacies of <strong>Repton</strong> to<br />

many a new, young member of staff.<br />

Some 25 years ago, she and Alf moved to Newton Solney, where <strong>the</strong>y made friends and were very happy. Throughout <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

marriage, <strong>the</strong>ir passion was walking, to which <strong>the</strong>y devoted <strong>the</strong>ir weekends. They were members of Derby CHA & HF Rambling<br />

Club, with whom <strong>the</strong>y went all over Europe and most of Britain.<br />

Chris Lloyd<br />

Geoffrey’s daughter, Jane Bamgbola, writes;<br />

OBITUARIES - GEOFFREY WILLATT (B’24)<br />

My fa<strong>the</strong>r, Geoffrey Willatt, who has died aged 98, was a veteran of <strong>the</strong> Second World War and of <strong>the</strong> prisoner of war camp Stalag<br />

Luft III. He was also an artist and keen sportsman. He was born in Nottingham, <strong>the</strong> second of three bro<strong>the</strong>rs. His <strong>old</strong>er bro<strong>the</strong>r,<br />

Sir Hugh Willatt, was a former secretary general to <strong>the</strong> Arts Council and his younger bro<strong>the</strong>r, Guy, had been Captain of Derbyshire<br />

county cricket team. As a boy, Geoffrey showed an aptitude for sport and played football and hockey for his school, <strong>Repton</strong>. He<br />

played briefly for both Nottingham Forest and Ipswich just before <strong>the</strong> war and later played hockey and tennis at county level for<br />

Bedfordshire and Sussex respectively.<br />

He volunteered for <strong>the</strong> RAF in 1939, becoming a bomb aimer in Bomber Command 106 squadron. When his Lancaster was shot<br />

down in 1943, he was <strong>the</strong> sole survivor. Captured while attempting to walk out of Germany, he was sent to Stalag Luft III. The<br />

“Great Escape” happened while he was <strong>the</strong>re but he had been unsuccessful in <strong>the</strong> draw that determined who would escape<br />

through <strong>the</strong> famous tunnel. Later with <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r PoWs from <strong>the</strong> camp, he was on <strong>the</strong> forced m<strong>arch</strong> that ended in <strong>the</strong>ir liberation<br />

by Allied forces.<br />

Geoffrey’s diary from that time forms <strong>the</strong> basis of a book, Bombs and Barbed Wire, that he published about his experiences as PoW.<br />

It is illustrated with sketches that he drew at <strong>the</strong> time, he loved to talk about his wartime experiences and was keen that <strong>the</strong>re should<br />

not be a legacy of bitterness towards Germany.<br />

After <strong>the</strong> war he qualified as a chartered surveyor and worked for <strong>the</strong> civil service. Throughout his life he pursued many interests,<br />

notably art, <strong>the</strong>atre, reading, entertaining friends, holidays abroad and sport. He was a painter both in oils and watercolour. He<br />

was also an etcher and became a Royal academician. He continued to paint until weeks before his death and had exhibited widely.<br />

His wife, Audrey, to whom he was happily married for 63 years, died three years ago. They were very fond of all <strong>the</strong>ir family,<br />

particularly as it grew and began to include members from around <strong>the</strong> world. He is survived by his two children, Nicholas and me,<br />

and his many grand and great-grandchildren.<br />

OBITUARIES - ERRATA<br />

The daughter of Archbishop Sir John Basil Rowland Grindrod would like <strong>the</strong> following amendments to be noted.<br />

• The date of my fa<strong>the</strong>r's death to 4th January 2009 not 3rd January.<br />

(As my fa<strong>the</strong>r died on <strong>the</strong> cusp of midnight of Saturday 3rd January, <strong>the</strong> doctors recorded <strong>the</strong> official date as<br />

Sunday 4th January 2009).<br />

• John Grindrod's fa<strong>the</strong>r was Basil Grindrod.<br />

• Lincoln Theological College was in Lincoln (not at Liverpool University as stated in ‘The Age’newspaper).<br />

• John Grindrod's first wife, Ailsa Newman, was from Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.<br />

(10)


BRANCHES OF SOCIETY - FOOTBALL<br />

NICK WALFORD (B’69) - CHAIRMAN HAMER BOOT (S’95) - TEAM ORGANISER<br />

DAVE HART (N’90) - TREASURER OLLIE HASTIE (S’03) - FIXTURES SECRETARY<br />

EDWARD PERKS(S’93) - SECRETARY ALASTAIR MERRY(H’90)/RICHARD WYNNE (P’92) - SOCIALS<br />

OLLIE FORD(O’97) - CLUB CAPTAIN DALE BILSON(L’03)/CLAYTON PENNY (P’97) - RECRUITMENT<br />

2008/9 was ano<strong>the</strong>r mixed season for <strong>the</strong> Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian Football Club: There were highs and lows in equal measure; <strong>the</strong>re were<br />

some performances of great skill, some of great determination and o<strong>the</strong>rs that serve only as a reminder that as a club we still<br />

have a long way to go to emulate <strong>the</strong> Championship-winning sides of several years ago. However whilst <strong>the</strong> games often lacked<br />

<strong>the</strong> desired result in our favour, <strong>the</strong>y were never short on drama.<br />

Following some excellent performances early on in <strong>the</strong> season, including a 5-0 demolition of Bradfield away, our exit in <strong>the</strong> Dunn<br />

on a bleak November Saturday in Winchester was an early low point in <strong>the</strong> season.<br />

2008/2009 Season<br />

Division 2, Final League Position: 6th<br />

Top Scorer: Hamer Boot (S’95)<br />

Player of <strong>the</strong> Season: Oliver Ford (O’97)<br />

Ollie Ford (O’97) Clayton Penny (P’97) Mark Stretton (H’75)<br />

Dunn success is <strong>the</strong> measure of <strong>the</strong> great teams in <strong>the</strong> Arthurian League and that is what we must be striving for in <strong>the</strong> long<br />

term. With home fixtures on <strong>the</strong> Square at <strong>Repton</strong> in <strong>the</strong> first two rounds of <strong>the</strong> 09/10 competition, we will be looking for a<br />

much stronger <strong>Repton</strong> performance this season.<br />

Better performances did follow in <strong>the</strong> league and <strong>the</strong> club picked up important points with home victories and away draws over<br />

both Radley and Old Kings Scholars. However after being edged out 2-3 and 1-2 by Shrewsbury and fur<strong>the</strong>r losses to Aldenham<br />

and Haileybury, ORFC needed a win against our Dunn conquerors Old Wykehamists on <strong>the</strong> last day of <strong>the</strong> season to guarantee<br />

survival. A creative and dynamic team performance with a midfield boasting 150 years’ experience (despite containing a 22 year<br />

<strong>old</strong>) and goals from Mark Stretton (H’75), Hamer Boot (S’95), Clayton Penny (P’97) and Ollie Ford(O’97), helped <strong>the</strong> ORs<br />

to a 4-2 victory, keeping <strong>Repton</strong> I in Division 1.<br />

Veterans’ team Captain Nick Walford (B’69)<br />

walfordn@yahoo.co.uk<br />

07590828719<br />

The Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian Football Club plays in <strong>the</strong> Arthurian League,<br />

a League of Public <strong>School</strong> alumni teams that is based in London. The<br />

Club also competes in <strong>the</strong> illustrious Arthur Dunn Cup each year as<br />

well as regional London competitions. We always need players for our<br />

main Arthurian League teams, <strong>the</strong> Dunn side and our Veterans team,<br />

so please get in touch if you would like to play.<br />

(11)<br />

Ollie Hastie (S’03) & Dale Bilson (L’03)


OR EVENTS - GAUDY 6th JUNE 2009<br />

Despite an inclement day <strong>the</strong> Gaudy this year was very well attended with a<br />

guest list of approximately 220 Old <strong>Repton</strong>ians coming from <strong>the</strong> years 1951-61<br />

and 1984-94. The policy of mixing <strong>the</strong> age-groups was once again a success<br />

and helped to create a special atmosphere of reminiscence. There were also a<br />

number of former staff at <strong>the</strong> event ( see front cover ). It is always a pleasure to<br />

welcome <strong>the</strong>m.<br />

The day began with a special Remembrance Service to commemorate <strong>the</strong><br />

150th Anniversary of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> Chapel (more is said about this elsewhere in<br />

this issue).This was followed by a drinks reception in <strong>the</strong> 400 Hall. The school<br />

Jazz Band entertained us for 20 minutes loudly and royally to start <strong>the</strong><br />

proceedings with a swing. They were much appreciated by many of <strong>the</strong> guests.<br />

Lunch was in Pears <strong>School</strong>, after which <strong>the</strong> Headmaster, Robert Holroyd, gave<br />

an account of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>’s achievements and outlined plans for <strong>the</strong> future.<br />

Guests were <strong>the</strong>n invited to take part in tours of <strong>the</strong> school which were kindly<br />

conducted by current pupils and which ended up in Houses for tea thanks to<br />

<strong>the</strong> generosity of Housemasters and Housemistresses.<br />

The Society has once more received many expressions of appreciation from ORs<br />

who enjoyed <strong>the</strong> day very much. It should perhaps also be said that staff, pupils<br />

and officers of <strong>the</strong> Society enjoyed <strong>the</strong>ir day too!<br />

Mike Stones<br />

(12)


OR EVENTS - GOLF<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> v Old <strong>Repton</strong>ians<br />

Little Aston Golf Club, Sunday May 3rd, Match Report<br />

First and foremost our unending thanks go to Glynn, Little Aston’s brilliant secretary, without whose generosity <strong>the</strong> event would<br />

not have taken place. No one could remember a better turnout for this event, and it seems that we have found just <strong>the</strong> right<br />

weekend for future years. A fine sunny day’s golf was made slightly difficult by a stiff breeze.<br />

Twelve players on each team made for a character and fun-filled day. The ranks of <strong>the</strong> O.R.G.S. were swelled by two new<br />

members, David Sharpe (N’75) and Jim Olsen (C’89). <strong>Repton</strong> had players from staff and both <strong>the</strong> Upper and Lower Sixth as<br />

well as four members of O block.<br />

<strong>Repton</strong>’s top pair, Russell Embery (Staff) and John Jones (L’03), with a combined handicap of 12, obviously play <strong>the</strong>ir golf on<br />

much more open courses than Little Aston as <strong>the</strong> trees ra<strong>the</strong>r got <strong>the</strong> better of <strong>the</strong>m; allowing Olsen & Bishop a 2 & 1 victory.<br />

Despite <strong>the</strong> loss, a happy smile never left John Jones’ face - what a great guy to play golf with!<br />

O.R’s Swift & Staley were solidly beaten by Robert Keep (Mike’s son) & Huw Rees Jones (Diana Soper’s son). They both play off 18<br />

with every promise of lower future handicaps. New O.R.G.S. member David Sharpe (son Tom starts in New House in September)<br />

& Jon Gough, a partnership in waiting for <strong>the</strong> last 30 years, managed a two-hole win over Nick O’Brien & Laurence Webster.<br />

<strong>Repton</strong>’s Ma<strong>the</strong>w Hodges & Toby Griffiths faired well on <strong>the</strong> longest-drives and nearest-<strong>the</strong>-pins but lost by two holes to Phil<br />

Davies & Richard Gillham. <strong>Repton</strong>’s Declan Blackwood & Harry Croft had a gritty battle with OR’s Brown & Kirk that finished all<br />

square. Result of <strong>the</strong> day was <strong>Repton</strong>’s Samuel Deichmann & Mat<strong>the</strong>w Kumeta beating O.R’s Liam Foster and David James 7 & 6<br />

(known as a dog licence to some of <strong>the</strong> <strong>old</strong>er golfers!).<br />

Tony Bishop (P’72) Philip Davies (C’72) of <strong>the</strong> ORGS<br />

present top scoring <strong>Repton</strong> pair Huw Rees-Jones<br />

(Latham) and Robert Keep (Latham) with <strong>the</strong>ir prizes<br />

Tony Bishop (P’72)<br />

Tony has set up a web page for all OR<br />

golfers:<br />

www.<strong>old</strong><strong>reptonian</strong>golfingsociety.co.uk.<br />

The society welcomes all new<br />

members, please log on for fur<strong>the</strong>r<br />

details.<br />

ORGS teams: <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong> Teams<br />

Tony Bishop (P’72) & Jim Olsen (C’89) Russell Embery (Staff) & John Jones (L’03)<br />

Jon Gough (H’74) & David Sharpe (N’75) Nick O’Brien (N) & Laurence Webster (L)<br />

Nigel Brown (L’73) & Simon Kirk (O’91) Declan Blackwood (O) & Harry Croft (P)<br />

Phil Davies (C’72) & Richard Gillham (P’87) Toby Griffiths (O) & Mat<strong>the</strong>w Hodges (O)<br />

Liam Foster (C’89) & David James (M’76) Samuel Deichmann (P) & Mat<strong>the</strong>w Kumeta (P)<br />

Alan Swift (N’75) & Jeremy Staley (C’69) Robert Keep (L) & Huw Rees-Jones (L)<br />

(13)<br />

Final Results<br />

Team Matchplay: O.R.G.S. won by 3 & ½ - 2 & ½.<br />

Team better-ball stableford scores: 1st (43points) Rees-Jones & Keep<br />

2nd (40points) Deichmann & Kumeta<br />

3rd (38points) Hodges & Griffiths<br />

Longest Drives on hole: 2 Toby Griffiths<br />

8 Nick O’Brien<br />

16 Laurence Webster<br />

Nearest <strong>the</strong> Pin on hole: 5 Mat<strong>the</strong>w Hodges<br />

9 Laurence Webster<br />

13 Mat<strong>the</strong>w Kumeta


You are warmly invited to join members of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>’s<br />

community in a plaque dedication service at St George’s<br />

Memorial Church, Ypres.<br />

St George’s was built (1927-29) as a place where relatives of<br />

those who died in <strong>the</strong> Great War and surviving s<strong>old</strong>iers could<br />

go for prayer and remembrance. Many regiments,<br />

organisations and schools have plaques to commemorate<br />

those who fell during <strong>the</strong> war and it recently came to our<br />

attention that <strong>the</strong>re is no <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong> plaque.<br />

The dedication of <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong> plaque will take place<br />

during Evensong at St George’s on Sunday 25th October at<br />

6pm. The <strong>School</strong> choir will be singing at what is sure to be a<br />

memorable event.<br />

OR EVENTS - YPRES<br />

IN PRINT<br />

(14)<br />

We would be grateful if anyone intending to join us could let<br />

us know so we have an idea of numbers to give <strong>the</strong> Chaplain<br />

of St George’s.<br />

In addition <strong>the</strong>re will be a Battlefield tour for ORs on <strong>the</strong><br />

Sunday afternoon (2pm - 4pm) by Major John Cotterill, a<br />

current parent and Chairman of <strong>the</strong> Sherwood Foresters<br />

Western Front Memorial Committee. The tour will leave from<br />

<strong>the</strong> town square in Ypres at 2pm and will require walking<br />

shoes/boots and foul wea<strong>the</strong>r clothing and your own<br />

transport.<br />

To commemorate <strong>the</strong> event an exhibition of OR letters,<br />

photographs and memorabilia during <strong>the</strong> First World War will<br />

be on display in Ti<strong>the</strong> Barn during October and November<br />

A report of <strong>the</strong> day will be in <strong>the</strong> May edition of The Arch.<br />

Seeing a photograph of <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong>’s First X1 in 1908 inspired cricket enthusiast Steven Larmour to write a booklet, 100 years<br />

on, about <strong>the</strong> remarkable, talented team. Almost half <strong>the</strong> side went on to play first-class cricket with F.S.G. Calthorpe playing<br />

for Cambridge University, Sussex, Warwickshire and eventually captaining England against <strong>the</strong> West Indies in 1929-30. The book<br />

records <strong>the</strong> 1908 season and <strong>the</strong>n examines what happened to each player. If you would like a copy, send £5 plus £1 pp to<br />

Steven Larmour at Flat 3, 44 Limehill Road, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, TN11LL.<br />

Brian O’Neill (M’49) broke his leg in<br />

November 1953. Francis Forman Fisher sent<br />

him <strong>the</strong> following poem, on Hall notepaper,<br />

and Brian replied on All Saints Day 1953.<br />

The Hall<br />

Telephone, <strong>Repton</strong> 375. <strong>Repton</strong><br />

Station, <strong>Repton</strong> (LMR) Derbyshire<br />

We regret <strong>the</strong> condition of B.J.O’Neill, with his leg wrapped in plaster<br />

from knee-cap to heal.<br />

He was runnin’ along just getting a goal,<br />

When Wilkinson S.F. in his usual roll<br />

Hit him hard, on <strong>the</strong> run and he went down like a peg,<br />

And is now in <strong>the</strong> San with a badly hurt leg<br />

I am asked on behalf of <strong>the</strong> general lot,<br />

To send greetings + wishes to <strong>the</strong> poor little clot,<br />

We hope he will soon return healthy and fit,<br />

To entertain all with his sparklin’ wit,<br />

For without <strong>the</strong> Irish in Classroom one,<br />

The Scottish are being a bit overdone.<br />

Poems copied from original documents.<br />

FROM THE ARCHIVES<br />

THE REPLY<br />

The state of my wounds, <strong>the</strong> relief of my lassitude,<br />

Enable me now to pen lines of gratitude<br />

To friends in <strong>the</strong> form, whe<strong>the</strong>r ancient or young.<br />

Lines to be chanted, recited or sung.<br />

I’m somewhat embarrassed, though quite an <strong>old</strong> stager,<br />

At addressing remarks to Frank, <strong>the</strong> b<strong>old</strong> major.<br />

I’ll sink lower in flight and have my wee say<br />

To that gaggle of clots, my pals day by day.<br />

To save myself trouble, with habitual sloth,<br />

I’ll pen my remarks to each all and both<br />

And joyfully tell, with leg swa<strong>the</strong>d in plaster<br />

That of Wilkinson’s crack I am now nearly master.<br />

The surgeon’s attentions and <strong>the</strong> skill of his craft<br />

Did a good job of work – a true Pulvertaft.<br />

Now, free from <strong>the</strong> clutches of that clever bone-setter<br />

The aforementioned limb gets better and better.<br />

And so, my dear friends, here’s <strong>the</strong> state of <strong>the</strong> poll –<br />

You’ll soon have me back, quite hearty and whole.<br />

If that doesn’t thrill you, you bunchof (sic) <strong>old</strong> wrecks,<br />

It won’t be cracked ankles – <strong>the</strong>re’ll be broken necks.<br />

All Saints Day 1953<br />

(Appropriately enough) B.J.O’N


A poem about <strong>School</strong> life, 1875<br />

To <strong>the</strong> bell at early morning<br />

Clanging, ringing in our ears<br />

Snatches us from arms of Morpheus<br />

To our usual daily cares.<br />

First thought, is it a whole scho<strong>old</strong>ay?<br />

No! ‘tis Saturday, hurrah!<br />

Stay! This afternoon <strong>the</strong>re’s something<br />

That our happiness may mar.<br />

Never mind, come let us hasten;<br />

Soon <strong>the</strong> second bell will ring,<br />

And being late for prayers or breakfast<br />

Eighty lines will surely bring.<br />

Breakfast and first lesson over!<br />

Happy, ye in lower forms!<br />

FROM THE ARCHIVES Continued<br />

Even while <strong>the</strong> clock is striking<br />

Out ye come in merry swarms.<br />

Time enough; so let us hurry<br />

To <strong>the</strong> meadow, one and all<br />

There we’ll play while time remaineth<br />

At <strong>the</strong> game we love, football.<br />

<strong>School</strong> till dinner; dinner over,<br />

Sixpence richer than before:<br />

Fives till three; and <strong>the</strong>n you’ll see us<br />

Waiting at <strong>the</strong> school-room door.<br />

From three till five o’ clock you’ll find us<br />

In <strong>the</strong> field at football playing,<br />

Save some few unlucky fellows<br />

In <strong>the</strong> dingy schoolroom staying.<br />

Extract from, A Day of a Fag's Life at <strong>Repton</strong>, by his Master: The <strong>Repton</strong>ian 1878<br />

(15)<br />

There <strong>the</strong>y sit for sins atoning,<br />

Sins committed in <strong>the</strong> week,<br />

Writing, writing, ever writing<br />

Scarcely daring e’en to speak.<br />

Tea at six; our games are over,<br />

Exercise and supper done;<br />

Prayers at nine; sweet dreams awaiting,<br />

And upstairs again we run.<br />

Thus we spend our days at <strong>Repton</strong>,<br />

Such a life as this we lead.<br />

Think you brighter days await us<br />

From its calls and rules when freed?<br />

A fag is sweeping a study). When he had nearly choked me with dust I remonstrated with him, so with <strong>the</strong> most ill-judged<br />

alacrity he rushed down stairs, and returned with a jug full of water, with which he plentifully besprinkled <strong>the</strong> study, paying<br />

great attention to flood my corner, and in doing so souse my legs. He <strong>the</strong>n brushed it again, till he had covered <strong>the</strong> study<br />

floor ( we have no carpet, as he has burnt, wetted, and cut it so that it had to be discarded as useless) with a uniform layer<br />

of fine mud, admirably adapted for sowing mustard and cress in, but not for <strong>the</strong> healthy development of <strong>the</strong> human plant.<br />

60 YEARS OF REPTON MEMORIES<br />

I feel that I must have blue and yellow blood coursing through my veins. It all started with my fa<strong>the</strong>r T.C. Pepper (H’18) and my<br />

uncle H.M.Pepper (H’23) being sent to <strong>Repton</strong>. Then starting with my second cousin G.T.Pepper (N’47) <strong>the</strong>re was a period of<br />

12 years when <strong>the</strong>re was always a Pepper in <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>. I, T.R.Pepper (H’49) arrived, to be followed by my bro<strong>the</strong>r E.J.Pepper<br />

(H’51) and my two cousins D.I.Pepper (H’53) and L.G.M. Pepper (H’55).<br />

Happily <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> survived this invasion. I thoroughly enjoyed my 4 years as I know did all <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>rs. The younger generation<br />

being represented by my cousin David’s 4 children and my 2. The first to arrive was Adrian (A.N.S. Pepper, H’83) followed by his<br />

sister Julia (J.J. Pepper, A’84), <strong>the</strong>n came my daughter Francesca (F.L. Pepper, A’89) and Heidi (H.M. Pepper, A’90). The final<br />

pair were Charlie (C.D.S. Pepper, B’90) and my son Oliver (O.R.C. Pepper, B’90).<br />

My involvement with <strong>Repton</strong> took off again in 1963 with <strong>the</strong> Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian Golfing Society, which my uncle Max Pepper had<br />

re-organised in <strong>the</strong> late 1950’s when he asked me to succeed him as Honorary Secretary. After 25 years in 1988 I retired and<br />

Bruce Knight (H’72) took over (my best action I am t<strong>old</strong>). Then <strong>the</strong> Society was kind enough to invite me to become President -<br />

a role I thoroughly enjoyed for 20 years until 2008 <strong>the</strong>reby surviving 45 years of social and golfing rigours of wonderful<br />

friendship, during which time <strong>the</strong> Society won both <strong>the</strong> Halford Hewitt and Grafton Morrish twice.<br />

The next highlight came in 2003, when <strong>the</strong> Headmaster, Graham Jones, asked me to become President of <strong>the</strong> Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian<br />

Society for that year, a singular honour. The highlight, thanks to Carole Blackshaw (H’70) being Lady Mayoress of <strong>the</strong> City of<br />

London, were that both <strong>the</strong> Drinks in <strong>the</strong> City and <strong>the</strong> Annual Dinner were held in The Mansion House. It proved to be an<br />

eventful year, mainly because of <strong>the</strong> change of Headmaster with Graham Jones retiring after 16 successful years being succeeded<br />

by Robert Holroyd. Then, sadly were <strong>the</strong> deaths of 4 highly prominent ORs and <strong>the</strong> Foundation Benefactor, Robert Beldam.<br />

The first to depart was Sir Duncan Oppenhiem (B’18) who had entered <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>the</strong> same year as my fa<strong>the</strong>r - a Memorial<br />

Service being held in <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> Chapel.<br />

He was followed by D.B.Wilkinson (H’46). The <strong>Repton</strong> legend, that David undoubtedly was, had been a Prefect when I entered<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> and subsequently became a much admired Master and Housemaster. He was followed by Guy Willatt (B’31), an<br />

accomplished county cricketer and a <strong>Repton</strong> master for 4 years (1951-1955).<br />

Next came Alan Lee (H’50) a contemporary and an admirable Headmaster of Solihull <strong>School</strong> for 13 years. The final departure<br />

was that of <strong>Repton</strong>’s Foundation Benefactor, Robert Beldam, without whose magnificent generosity <strong>Repton</strong> would be so much<br />

poorer. His funeral in <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> Chapel and subsequent interment next to C.B. Fry and S.A. Pears was unforgettable with <strong>the</strong><br />

route from Chapel to Graveside being lined by <strong>the</strong> Boys and Girls with <strong>the</strong>ir heads bowed.<br />

I intend coming to <strong>the</strong> O.R. Society Dinner on <strong>the</strong> 14th November and hope that a number of 1949 Hall contemporaries will as<br />

well. “Floreat Repandunum”<br />

Richard Pepper (H’49)<br />

C.W. Hannay, Upper Vth, 1875<br />

Reproduced in The <strong>Repton</strong>ian of M<strong>arch</strong> 1936


NEW HOUSE - MEMORIES<br />

Congratulations on your centenary this year! I am a ghost of times past, New House being my home between 1953 - 1968.<br />

I am <strong>the</strong> son of Ewart Butchers, Housemaster, who died in 1990. You might like some reminiscence from those times:<br />

I was five when we moved in from White Cottage in Monsom Lane. I immediately started building a den on <strong>the</strong> tennis court (<strong>the</strong><br />

higher bit of garden which <strong>the</strong> newer part of <strong>the</strong> private quarters has been built in). My bedroom was at <strong>the</strong> top of <strong>the</strong> house next<br />

to <strong>the</strong> stairs which went up from next to <strong>the</strong> bathroom (I expect that's all changed now). I used to have nightmares about <strong>the</strong> ash<br />

tree falling down on me and I proved to Fa<strong>the</strong>r that it was possible by measuring <strong>the</strong> height of <strong>the</strong> tree with scout poles (6' staves).<br />

I see from Google earth that it still stands, although <strong>the</strong> extensive vegetable garden behind seems to have been grassed over. Fa<strong>the</strong>r<br />

used to feed <strong>the</strong> house plentifully from <strong>the</strong>re!<br />

We used to keep chickens in <strong>the</strong> orchard and <strong>the</strong> school fire engine was housed next door in a large shed next to <strong>the</strong> house garage.<br />

Both were accessed along <strong>the</strong> drive next to <strong>the</strong> squash courts. For a small boy <strong>the</strong> whole house and garden were a delight. There<br />

was nowhere that I didn't explore from <strong>the</strong> roof void above <strong>the</strong> bedders to <strong>the</strong> floor void under <strong>the</strong> main passageway (mostly<br />

occupied by cockroaches!). The only TV in <strong>the</strong> house was <strong>the</strong> cook's in her bedroom and we used to watch it with her all <strong>the</strong> time.<br />

Poor dear, she never had any time to herself!<br />

By far <strong>the</strong> most exotic quarters in <strong>the</strong> house were <strong>the</strong> Matron's at <strong>the</strong> top over <strong>the</strong> main kitchen. Those big windows overlooking<br />

<strong>the</strong> Trent Valley were magnificent. It wasn't until <strong>the</strong> early sixties that <strong>the</strong> little infill private kitchen was built for my mo<strong>the</strong>r, Betty,<br />

opposite <strong>the</strong> dining room. Before that <strong>the</strong> big kitchen was used. These mass catering facilities taught me much about how to<br />

manage including how to wash and dry up plates for 50 boys, by hand, in next to no time!<br />

Heating was quite a novelty too. We initially had one enormous coke boiler for hot water which had to be stoked twice a day. When<br />

we got central heating ("just to remove <strong>the</strong> damp, dear") we got ano<strong>the</strong>r enormous coke boiler to stoke twice a day. I became<br />

very expert at that! However, I preferred to keep warm in front of <strong>the</strong> drawing room fire (I see from <strong>the</strong> house website that it is still<br />

<strong>the</strong> same). I used to break up large lumps of coal in <strong>the</strong> cellar for this and split large logs. One day when my grandfa<strong>the</strong>r was<br />

staying and he was ra<strong>the</strong>r <strong>old</strong> and demented he nearly burnt <strong>the</strong> house down by putting all <strong>the</strong> dried Christmas decorations on <strong>the</strong><br />

fire and flames flew up to <strong>the</strong> ceiling!<br />

My rock climbing skills were born out of participating in <strong>the</strong> house fire drills. In those days <strong>the</strong> top bedders (I suppose <strong>the</strong>y don't<br />

exist now, just private rooms) had to evacuate one at a time on a curious rope and pully device down <strong>the</strong> outside of <strong>the</strong> building<br />

and we all had to practise. Most boys would have died had <strong>the</strong>re been a fire as it was very slow.<br />

In 1957, for <strong>the</strong> 400th anniversary of <strong>the</strong> school Harry Wheatcroft, <strong>the</strong> flamboyant rose nurseryman who had been in <strong>the</strong> house,<br />

presented my fa<strong>the</strong>r with <strong>the</strong> first Super Star rose to leave <strong>the</strong> nursery. Fa<strong>the</strong>r planted it in <strong>the</strong> rose garden behind <strong>the</strong> hedge next<br />

to <strong>the</strong> ash tree at <strong>the</strong> end of <strong>the</strong> tennis court. I wonder if is still <strong>the</strong>re?<br />

From New House I went first to St Wystan's kindergarten in <strong>the</strong> High Street, <strong>the</strong>n on to Foremarke (note, it has changed it's spelling!)<br />

and <strong>the</strong>n on to Clifton College in Bristol. Our terms were always shorter than <strong>Repton</strong>'s, so I could always take part in any end of<br />

term festivities with <strong>the</strong> boys in <strong>the</strong> house.<br />

In all I had just as good an education living in New House in 15 years as any boy who paid to come. Life was very free and easy for<br />

a small boy and I wandered far and wide unhindered. It was all very happy, or at least interesting.<br />

Good luck and best wishes for your festivities and may New House flourish in <strong>the</strong>se difficult times.<br />

Jonathan Butchers<br />

To The Editor<br />

The re-union on Sunday 31st May<br />

was most enjoyable. I was in <strong>the</strong><br />

company of an <strong>old</strong> boy again <strong>the</strong><br />

o<strong>the</strong>r day who thought we should<br />

send you ‘before’ and ‘after’ photos<br />

of <strong>the</strong> six ‘boys’ who started toge<strong>the</strong>r<br />

in Sept 1952. We all attended <strong>the</strong><br />

re-union where <strong>the</strong> second photo<br />

was taken.<br />

We are placed in <strong>the</strong> same position<br />

on both and for some of us it was<br />

<strong>the</strong> first re-union since 1956.<br />

Christopher Mosley<br />

Top left to right: Christopher Mosley; John Larard; Peter Boult<br />

Front ditto: Kerry Brooksbank; Andrew Bannerman; Geoffrey Gyte.<br />

(16)


Andrew M. Williamson (N’59) says this is a particularly<br />

poignant occasion for those of us who entered <strong>the</strong> House in<br />

September 1959 (Richard W. Barrett, Andrew H. Quick,<br />

John O. G<strong>old</strong>smith, David F.B. Swallow, Philip F.B.<br />

Swallow, Andrew M. Williamson).<br />

As I recall, we were <strong>the</strong> principal protagonists of <strong>the</strong> 50th<br />

anniversary celebration in <strong>the</strong> dining room on <strong>the</strong> last night of<br />

<strong>the</strong> Michaelmas Term, for which Michael Charlesworth<br />

(O’41) and Bill Agnew ( N’45), and <strong>the</strong>n Assistant Director of<br />

Music) wrote a musical show, <strong>the</strong> Matron (Mrs Rickards)<br />

coached us, and a stage was especially constructed between<br />

<strong>the</strong> jam cupboard and <strong>the</strong> servery. The show-stopping title<br />

song was “Lock up your daughters, New House is here!”. Our<br />

junior House Tutor, Richard Grew (O’46), undoubtedly had a<br />

hand in it.<br />

My memory of <strong>the</strong> inside of New House is very hazy and, of<br />

lavatory lane especially, not entirely positive- I’m sure it has<br />

improved dramatically. I wonder if some former and current<br />

residents of New House would be interested in supporting<br />

CORD’s international peace building work in places like<br />

Darfur/Chad border, Burundi, Nor<strong>the</strong>rn Uganda and<br />

Cambodia? We’re just about to launch an innovative “toilet<br />

twinning” concept whereby, for a relatively nominal amount of<br />

money, locks of toilets in New House could be twinned with<br />

some of our latrines in Africa. Alternatively, unwanted<br />

jewellery, phones, keys, coins in one of our treasure chests<br />

which we can <strong>the</strong>n recycle and turn into cash<br />

Richard Dickson(N’73)<br />

Footnote - See OR Profile<br />

Dear New House Housemaster<br />

NEW HOUSE - MEMORIES Continued<br />

The notice in The ‘Arch’ <strong>newsletter</strong> of your centenary has prompted me, as one of your senior alumni (N’32-7), to send you<br />

congratulation and some reflections. I was surprised by Richard Hutton’s comments on taking over as President: life in The Hall, he<br />

says, was hard and drab in 1956. That is not my recollection of New House twenty-five years earlier! Fagging for Fallows, Head<br />

of House, only involved lighting his study fire and making his toast. The food was better than at prep school (except <strong>the</strong>re was no<br />

supper on Saturdays: I bought bananas and cream from Ma Daimer’s just down <strong>the</strong> road). I enjoyed singing in <strong>the</strong> Chapel choir<br />

with G.G. Stocks at <strong>the</strong> brilliant new organ. Bullying? New boys had to climb up through wooden triangles in <strong>the</strong> dormitory ceiling,<br />

which could be hazardous. A memorable occasion was an assembly in <strong>the</strong> dining hall when we listened live to <strong>the</strong> King’s abdication<br />

speech. Oh, and at house prayers we were not allowed to choose <strong>the</strong> hymn “A noble army, men and boys, <strong>the</strong> matron and <strong>the</strong><br />

maid…” because <strong>the</strong>y were with us!<br />

MMO was an amiable but distant figure, my football prowess disappointed him, but he selected me to be <strong>the</strong> football correspondent<br />

for <strong>the</strong> Times, involving long telegrams most Saturdays. Many staff of high calibre come to mind: John Christie, who prepared us<br />

for confirmation; Cyril Proctor, classics and later Chaplain (Frank Fisher and Richard Sale were also in <strong>the</strong> classical fourth); Col.<br />

Strickland and Michael Milford, Maths; ‘Batty’ Mackenzie, Physics; Donald Lindsay, who coached me as ‘Everyman’ in <strong>the</strong> morality<br />

play in <strong>the</strong> parish church. I could go on… There were many excellent role models for my future teaching in Uganda.<br />

In clearing my files to celebrate my ninetieth birthday I came across this article from <strong>the</strong> Uganda New Day that I thought might be<br />

of interest. Kings College Budo (often styled ‘The Eton of East Africa’ much to <strong>the</strong> disgust of my Harrovian predecessor, Tim Cobb)<br />

owed several new ‘traditions’ to <strong>Repton</strong> - ‘ Ticking’ staff; bone-offs; blue books; ‘standard’ sports. And <strong>the</strong> visits of <strong>the</strong> Fishers are<br />

still fresh in my mind - <strong>the</strong>y used to stay with us on <strong>the</strong>ir way to South Africa, and were welcomed by staff and pupils.<br />

Best Wishes for a fine day on <strong>the</strong> 31st - please greet anyone from my years - and every blessing for <strong>the</strong> next hundred!<br />

Rev Ian Robinson (N’32)<br />

(17)<br />

I arrived in September 1934 as 3rd Scholar (worth some £60<br />

p.a., I believe - top scholarship was £120 p.a.) thinking I would<br />

be well up <strong>the</strong> ranking, but was soon to find out that I was<br />

entirely wrong! I was lucky in having <strong>the</strong> late Neil Elliott to teach<br />

me <strong>the</strong> ropes, and we remained in touch until his death a few<br />

years ago. I did have contact with a few o<strong>the</strong>rs, but Michael<br />

Roberts (J.M. Roberts, N’34) with whom I revived <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong><br />

Field Club, is <strong>the</strong> last of my contemporaries with whom I have<br />

contact.<br />

Morgan-Owen was <strong>the</strong>n Housemaster, followed fairly soon by<br />

Maynard, whom I did not find ‘simpatico’ - <strong>the</strong> feeling may well<br />

have been mutual. Morgan-Owen was quite entertaining - he<br />

did not, for instance, want to hear any “cotton-wool stories”.<br />

I left in July 1938, abandoning <strong>the</strong> idea of working for a science<br />

degree (Industrial Chemistry) when my fa<strong>the</strong>r was threatened<br />

with total blindness, and joined <strong>the</strong> family shipowning and<br />

shipbroking business founded by my fa<strong>the</strong>r and his friend T G<br />

Smith in May in 1904 as Smith, Hogg & Co, just five years<br />

before New House was built. (Fa<strong>the</strong>r, who was born in 1879,<br />

died just short of 92 having retained <strong>the</strong> sight of one eye<br />

through treatment in Vienna just before <strong>the</strong> “Anschluss”).<br />

Peter L Hogg (N’34)<br />

Doctor Brian Johnson (T.B.W Johnson (N’54)) wishes to thank<br />

Mr Will Odell and Mrs Odell for <strong>the</strong> excellent reception for New<br />

House Centenary on <strong>the</strong> afternoon of Sunday May 31st; most<br />

thoroughly and purposefully set out for <strong>the</strong> comfort and relaxed<br />

entertainment of something approaching 100 Alumni.


I love Paris in <strong>the</strong> springtime. So do a couple of dozen Old <strong>Repton</strong>ians who<br />

once again assembled at L’auberge du Sergent Recruteur on <strong>the</strong> ile St. Louis<br />

one Saturday evening in April for <strong>the</strong> third such dinner. Guests included our<br />

current President, Richard Hutton ( who bumped into your Secretary in <strong>the</strong><br />

unlikely setting of <strong>the</strong> Louvre!), next year’s President, John Kirkland, and former<br />

Governors, Edward Wilkinson, and John He<strong>the</strong>rington.<br />

A fine French evening of ample and superior food and drink was sampled by all<br />

and thanks must be expressed to James Barnett who once again organised <strong>the</strong><br />

whole thing. Mike Stones read out a message of good wishes from <strong>the</strong><br />

Headmaster but declined to sing a song for <strong>the</strong> assembled ga<strong>the</strong>ring despite<br />

<strong>the</strong> latter’s suggestion ! However, despite <strong>the</strong> lack of musical entertainment,<br />

everyone enjoyed <strong>the</strong> occasion immensely and looks forward to <strong>the</strong> next one<br />

perhaps in 2 years time.<br />

If you missed this one, do come along!<br />

Mike Stones<br />

Back in M<strong>arch</strong>, adding a detour to a short holiday in <strong>the</strong> Indian<br />

Ocean, my wife and I were made very welcome at <strong>the</strong> new<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong> in Dubai. Situated on <strong>the</strong> edge of <strong>the</strong> desert, a<br />

few miles from <strong>the</strong> city, <strong>the</strong> school is a masterpiece of modern<br />

construction with <strong>the</strong> widest possible range of state-of-<strong>the</strong>-art<br />

facilities for its 1,200 pupils. The senior school has just completed<br />

its first full year of operation and a successful future for <strong>the</strong><br />

whole project seems assured. The new school is keen to<br />

encourage <strong>the</strong> interest of <strong>Repton</strong>ians, but it would be advisable<br />

not to turn up all at once.<br />

Richard Hutton (H’56)<br />

PARIS DINNER 27th JULY 2009<br />

Edward (C’46)) and Joy Wilkinson<br />

The Arch, <strong>Repton</strong> Dubai<br />

DUBAI<br />

The 25-metre competition-sized swimming pool with six lanes and<br />

spectator seating for over 200 is ano<strong>the</strong>r example of <strong>the</strong> highest<br />

standard of facilities that <strong>the</strong> school provides.<br />

(18)<br />

Richard Hutton (H’ 56) and Charmaine Hutton<br />

John Kirkland (O’51), John He<strong>the</strong>rington<br />

(ex Governor) and Hannah Jarrett (A’98)<br />

The President, accompanied by boarding housemaster Nigel<br />

Kew, admires <strong>the</strong> vast playing field, made entirely from <strong>the</strong><br />

highest grade Astroturf, and comprising pitches for football,<br />

cricket and hockey, practice nets and tennis courts.


LORDS - ASHES TEST 2009 (Editor’s Challenge)<br />

I was fortunate to attend <strong>the</strong> first 2 days of this memorable cricket match and found that I met numerous ORs on that occasion .<br />

Here is an attempted summary of <strong>the</strong> list of OR cricketers / cricket fans whom I encountered.<br />

Donald Carr (Latham) Mark Smith (Orchard)<br />

Richard Hutton (Hall) Mark Jerman (Hall)<br />

John Hird (Priory) Sam Hird (Priory)<br />

Tom Hird (Priory) Tony Wesson (Hall)<br />

John Walker (Hall) Geoffrey Piper (Brook)<br />

Joe Bridgeman (Hall) Guy Turner (Priory)<br />

Alan Basnett (Priory) Chris Anderson (Mitre)<br />

John Ballinger (Priory) Michael Henderson (New)<br />

Jonathan Fry (Hall)<br />

Apart from being able to pick a fair <strong>old</strong> team from <strong>the</strong>ir ranks, we in <strong>the</strong> OR office would like to issue a challenge to anyone who<br />

thinks <strong>the</strong>y can identify <strong>the</strong> years of entry to <strong>Repton</strong> of <strong>the</strong> above 17. If you add all <strong>the</strong> years of entry toge<strong>the</strong>r, (using <strong>the</strong> last<br />

two digits of <strong>the</strong> year) what total would you end up with?<br />

Answers to <strong>the</strong> OR office, please, to ei<strong>the</strong>r me or Jan Cobb.<br />

Good luck !<br />

Mike Stones<br />

A NEAR PERFECT 2009 FOR THE PILGRIMS<br />

REPTON PILGRIMS CC<br />

After reaching <strong>the</strong> semi-final stage in 2006, <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims finally reached <strong>the</strong>ir first final of <strong>the</strong> millennium in <strong>the</strong> marvellous<br />

surroundings of <strong>the</strong> Deer Park, Richmond. Our adversaries were Tonbridge, <strong>the</strong> most successful Cricketer Cup side and finalists 6<br />

times since 2000. So <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims had to play to <strong>the</strong>ir full potential to achieve victory.<br />

But first let’s remember how we won through <strong>the</strong> earlier rounds and who contributed to our success along <strong>the</strong> way. A home draw<br />

against <strong>the</strong> 2008 winners, <strong>the</strong> Old Malvernians, was an enticing first round encounter for new captain Chris Paget. After winning<br />

<strong>the</strong> toss, he decided to bat. The opener Charlie Sindrey put on a stylish 54, while <strong>the</strong> no 3 and wicketkeeper Tom Poynton accelerated<br />

past him to reach 60, in a marvellous partnership of 98. Ed “Woody” Bridgeman’s 44 steadied <strong>the</strong> middle of <strong>the</strong> innings and<br />

allowed youngsters Lamb & Corbett to hit rapid 20’s in setting a high total of 261-9.<br />

The opener Franklin, with 58, & no 3 Gifford, with 64, kept <strong>the</strong> Old Malvernians in <strong>the</strong> hunt until <strong>the</strong> 30th over, however <strong>Repton</strong>’s<br />

varied array of bowling prevented capitalisation by <strong>the</strong> middle order, & <strong>the</strong> opponents fell 15 runs short with 6 balls to spare.<br />

Special mention to Jim Blackwell - 3-29 off 8.5 overs<br />

- and Jack Lamb - 3-53 off 8 overs including <strong>the</strong> first<br />

wicket. The crucial second wicket was taken by Tony<br />

Stubbs in his spell of 2-37.<br />

Tom Poynton stepped in as captain for <strong>the</strong> visit to<br />

Stowe. Secretary Frank Russell was very grateful to<br />

Jon Batty, rejoining <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims when not required by<br />

Surrey, young Eldred, who bowled well on his debut,<br />

star oarsman Simon French, and <strong>old</strong> campaigners<br />

Tom Swerling and David O‘Gram. Batty (97) &<br />

Poynton (81) batted beautifully in a match-winning<br />

partnership of 158, & <strong>the</strong> total of 290-8 always<br />

looked challenging.<br />

French bought <strong>the</strong> openers, finishing with 2-54 off 7<br />

overs, while Charlie Wall bowled with deadly<br />

accuracy - 8 overs for 8 runs. The spinners Scott<br />

Chilman & Tony Stubbs pinned down <strong>the</strong> batsmen in<br />

<strong>the</strong> middle of <strong>the</strong> innings, leading to 2 vital run outs.<br />

FULL SQUAD: J N Batty, J W Blackwell, P M Borrington, E A R Bridgeman, S K Chilman,<br />

E Corbett, S H J French, L T Harvey, R C Kniveton, J E Lamb, A W Mace, D J O’Gram, C D Paget,<br />

T Poynton, J F Sheard, C R H FSindrey, A C Stubbs, T A Swerling, C E Wall, R F Williamson.<br />

(19)


REPTON PILGRIMS CC Continued<br />

Finally, Eldred bowled at <strong>the</strong> death to take a superb 4-61 off 7.4 overs, as <strong>the</strong> Templars finished on 252 all out.<br />

The quarter-final was at Uppingham, with Chris back in charge, and <strong>the</strong> main change was Ricky Kniveton behind <strong>the</strong> stumps<br />

(flown in from <strong>the</strong> Isle of Man) as Tom was busy with England U19. Paul Borrington repaid his captain’s decision to bat with a<br />

very fine opening 112, ably supported by Alex Mace, who hit 64 quick runs in a partnership of 124. Paul maintained a run-rate<br />

of 5 per over throughout <strong>the</strong> innings and was unlucky to be caught in <strong>the</strong> 49th over, but his innings allowed <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims to post<br />

a se<strong>arch</strong>ing total of 265-9.<br />

The Rovers were frustrated early on by ano<strong>the</strong>r fine spell from Charlie Wall of 10 overs, 1-28, and, despite a 95-run partnership,<br />

<strong>the</strong>y needed 140+ off <strong>the</strong> final 20 overs. Paget proved to be very adept at buying wickets, finishing with 5-69, <strong>the</strong> first bowler<br />

to take 5+ wickets since 1992. Fortunately Tony Stubbs, <strong>the</strong> voice of experience and captain of his county over-50’s side, was<br />

bowling more economically at <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r end and picked up 2 wickets for 35 off 8 overs. When Lamb took <strong>the</strong> final wicket in his<br />

first over, Uppingham ended 221 all out in <strong>the</strong> 47th over.<br />

Rain washed out <strong>the</strong> proposed match at home, with Eton very happy to hear that Jon Batty would be unable to play <strong>the</strong> next<br />

week, and <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims delighted to hear that Scott Chilman would be available! Chris Paget again won <strong>the</strong> toss (does he have a<br />

lucky coin?) and decided to bat on a damp morning.. On a slow outfield Charlie Sindrey’s opening 54 was worth its weight, as<br />

he and Chris (37) accumulated 95 runs off 24 overs. After a flurry of wickets Jack Lamb kept a steady head in a stand of 50 with<br />

Charlie Wall (24), hitting a controlled 41 until a rush of blood in <strong>the</strong> final over. By <strong>the</strong>n <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims had reached 201, all out<br />

with one ball to spare.<br />

Charlie Wall bowled with outstanding craft and accuracy on a drying pitch to finish his spell with 3-18 off his 10 overs with 5<br />

maidens, and leave <strong>the</strong> Ramblers in serious trouble at 64-4 off 20 overs. Paget & Stubbs kept <strong>the</strong> runs in check & took fur<strong>the</strong>r<br />

wickets, largely due to Tom Poynton’s reactions behind <strong>the</strong> stumps. Jack Lamb came on in <strong>the</strong> 33rd over to end Eton’s hopes<br />

with <strong>the</strong> removal of captain Loudon. As <strong>the</strong> Ramblers finished on 135 all out in <strong>the</strong> 41st over, Lamb picked up a haul of 3-17,<br />

Poynton joined <strong>the</strong> select list of keepers who have taken 4+ catches/stumpings in a match.<br />

So to <strong>the</strong> final. Chris inevitably won <strong>the</strong> toss and chose to bat on a day which started overcast and became red hot in midafternoon.<br />

Paul Borrington (31) & Charlie Sindrey (69) again gave us an excellent start of 60, and Charlie went on to partner Jon<br />

Batty (41) in a fur<strong>the</strong>r stand of 78 to take <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims to 139-2 off 32 overs. The team knew <strong>the</strong> run-rate had to increase from<br />

here to set Tonbridge a challenging total, and unfortunately this led to a flurry of wickets with Batty seventh out in <strong>the</strong> 42nd over<br />

for 166. Lamb (33 not out) & Wall (25 not out) concentrated on survival first until <strong>the</strong> last over, whereupon <strong>the</strong>y launched<br />

<strong>the</strong>mselves at every ball to hit 25 runs, including 3 sixes. The total set was 219.<br />

Charlie Wall repeated his opening sparse spell, 10 overs for 29 runs on this occasion, & was joined by spinner Scott Chilman,<br />

who finished with 9 overs for 28 runs. However, it was <strong>the</strong> introduction of Chris Paget which induced Ed Smith to sky one<br />

straight to Jon Batty. The Pilgrims continued to fight hard and were rewarded with <strong>the</strong> wickets of captain Walsh & wicketkeeper<br />

Shales, both caught behind off Lamb. At 109-3 off 31 <strong>the</strong> game was still in <strong>the</strong> balance. Unfortunately, no fur<strong>the</strong>r wickets were<br />

forthcoming, as Banes took charge and steered Tonbridge to victory with a masterful 88 not out. Paget mixed up <strong>the</strong> bowling as<br />

much as possible but <strong>the</strong> Old Tonbridgians were unfazed, and reached <strong>the</strong>ir target in <strong>the</strong> 48th over. However, <strong>the</strong> Pilgrims<br />

should take pride in <strong>the</strong>ir performances this year and in contributing to an eventful and exciting final.<br />

Angela Aulton<br />

OR PROFILES: ERIC MASCHWITZ (H’15)<br />

In <strong>the</strong> formative years of both radio and television OR Eric Maschwitz (H’15) was King of Light<br />

Entertainment’ and much more besides. He has written a few songs that people sing, a few<br />

plays that are still occasionally performed; he has had great happiness from women and made<br />

several good women unhappy, seen men die beside him in a war, worked hard at too many<br />

things, honoured his fa<strong>the</strong>r and mo<strong>the</strong>r and in general done his damnedest (which is perhaps<br />

a poor substitute for his best). He is congenitally incapable of jealousy and lamentably<br />

unsuspicious of o<strong>the</strong>r people’s motives; he laughs and weeps too readily and is considerably<br />

lacking in moral courage.<br />

That endearingly candid self-assessment was written by Eric Maschwitz OBE in his 1957<br />

autobiography No chip on my shoulder. His name is no longer recognised by <strong>the</strong> public at<br />

large, but in his day Maschwitz was a key figure in popular entertainment – a writer,<br />

broadcaster, lyricist, and broadcasting executive who was said to know ‘simply everyone in<br />

show business’<br />

Continued<br />

(20)


OR PROFILES: ERIC MASCHWITZ (H’15) Continued<br />

And <strong>the</strong> springboard for a thoroughly interesting life was a stimulating education in Derbyshire, for his first forays into <strong>the</strong> world<br />

of entertainment were made at <strong>Repton</strong>. There have been o<strong>the</strong>r <strong>Repton</strong> alumni whose names have enjoyed a more enduring profile,<br />

but few can equal Maschwitz for sheer breadth of contribution in that sentimental genre – now much-eroded-dubbed ‘light<br />

entertainment’.<br />

Albert Eric Maschwitz was born in Edgbaston, Birmingham, on 10th June 1901, <strong>the</strong> descendant of Silesian immigrants. He had a<br />

natural talent for employing <strong>the</strong> written and spoken word and was a frequent contributor of original material to The <strong>Repton</strong>ian.<br />

He also wrote a three-act play about an entire family that died of venereal disease.<br />

From <strong>Repton</strong> Maschwitz went to Caius College, Cambridge and from <strong>the</strong>re embarked on a career in entertainment which embraced<br />

<strong>the</strong> disciplines of radio, television, film, stage, music and <strong>the</strong> literary world. He began a stage acting career in <strong>the</strong> early 1920’s but<br />

soon turned to concentrating his efforts ‘behind <strong>the</strong> scenes’. He joined <strong>the</strong> BBC in 1926 and was quickly made Assistant Head of<br />

Outside Broadcasting. That same year he also married <strong>the</strong> English film and stage comedienne Hermione Ging<strong>old</strong>. In 1927 he<br />

became editor of Radio Times, relinquishing that post in 1933 when he was appointed Variety Director of <strong>the</strong> BBC - at that time<br />

<strong>the</strong> highest profile role in <strong>the</strong> British entertainment industry. His first contribution as a radio producer was <strong>the</strong> tremendously<br />

popular light entertainment show In Town Tonight – broadcast from 1933 to 1960 it became a national institution.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> late 1930’s, his reputation suitably enhanced, Maschwitz went to Hollywood under contract to <strong>the</strong> leading film company<br />

MGM, for whom he wrote <strong>the</strong> screenplays of several successful films. The best known and one with a fur<strong>the</strong>r <strong>Repton</strong> link was <strong>the</strong><br />

Oscar winning Goodbye Mr Chips (1939), part filmed at <strong>the</strong> school. Indeed <strong>the</strong> award of that role to his alma mater was largely<br />

engineered by Maschwitz.<br />

He undoubtedly drew upon his own experiences at <strong>Repton</strong> in interpreting James Hilton’s best selling novel, for a key <strong>the</strong>me in <strong>the</strong><br />

movie was <strong>the</strong> way in which <strong>the</strong> fictional school Brookfields was so greatly affected by <strong>the</strong> onset of <strong>the</strong> First World War. The title<br />

of Maschwitz’s autobiography – No Chip On My Shoulder – was a mischievous nod to this enduring success.<br />

The MGM experience gave Maschwitz a real taste of <strong>the</strong> glamorous trappings of Hollywood, but all too soon he became embroiled<br />

in <strong>the</strong> ra<strong>the</strong>r less frivolous arena of <strong>the</strong> Second World War, retuning to England to play his part. From August 1939 he was a postal<br />

censor based in Liverpool, and from November that year he served with <strong>the</strong> Secret Intelligence Service in <strong>the</strong>ir anti-sabotage arm<br />

In 1940 he was commissioned in <strong>the</strong> Intelligence Corps and <strong>the</strong>n sent to New York to work for <strong>the</strong> British Security Co-Ordinaton.<br />

He returned to London in 1942 and briefly supervised radio programmes for broadcasting to <strong>the</strong> troops. He ended <strong>the</strong> war as Chief<br />

Broadcasting Officer with <strong>the</strong> 21st Army Group and emerged as a Lieutenant-Colonel.<br />

Yet even in <strong>the</strong> midst of serious conflict – or perhaps partly because of it he continued to create sentimental material. In particular<br />

he turned his hand to writing lyrics, and his wider known legacy is provided by his popular songs; A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley<br />

Square (1940) and <strong>the</strong> earlier These Foolish Things (… Remind me of you….) Both songs are still well known and have enjoyed<br />

renewed exposure to new generations through <strong>the</strong>ir use as soundtracks in recent film and television productions.<br />

These romantic songs may have betrayed a certain unease with his own marital status, He divorced Hermione Ging<strong>old</strong> in 1945 and<br />

was quickly remarried <strong>the</strong> same year to <strong>the</strong> American actress Phyllis Gordon, a former star of <strong>the</strong> silent screen. She remained his<br />

wife until his death,<br />

Maschwitz also wrote <strong>the</strong> lyrics for many stage musicals and operettas. Amongst <strong>the</strong>m were Balalaika, Summer Song, and Love<br />

from Judy, but most successful was <strong>the</strong> 1951 stage musical Zip Goes A Million starring film comedian George Formby. Although<br />

widely tipped as a cast-iron flop, <strong>the</strong> phrase ‘turned out nice again’ was soon on every critic’s lips as <strong>the</strong> ‘gormless nor<strong>the</strong>rner’<br />

Formby earned nightly standing ovations from hardened London <strong>the</strong>atregoers.<br />

Even so, such excursions were mere diversions for Maschwitz, and in 1958, at <strong>the</strong> start of <strong>the</strong> BBC-ITV ratings war, he rejoined <strong>the</strong><br />

BBC as Head of Television Light Entertainment. His first contribution was to commission <strong>the</strong> hugely popular Black and White<br />

Minstrel Show, in those more innocent times Maschwitz developed this into a cult success which in time attracted regular audiences<br />

of 16 million viewers. It now languishes in <strong>the</strong> growing <strong>arch</strong>ive labelled ‘politically incorrect’. About his job Maschwitz said<br />

refreshingly: “I don’t think <strong>the</strong> BBC is a cultural organisation. We’ve got to please <strong>the</strong> people. The job of a man putting on a show<br />

is simply to get an audience”.<br />

His success in doing exactly that was soon acknowledged by <strong>the</strong> opposition. The more commercial television company of that era<br />

liked his style, and in 1963 Maschwitz left <strong>the</strong> BBC to join ITV. Despite being <strong>the</strong>n in his sixties, his success in attracting an audience<br />

continued. Aside from all of his ‘showbiz’ achievements, Maschwitz also found time to write several novels. One of his better ones<br />

was <strong>the</strong> detective story Death at Broadcasting House (1931) – spurning realism, <strong>the</strong> plot revolves around a radio play disrupted by<br />

<strong>the</strong> murder of one of <strong>the</strong> cast. Scanning shelves for Maschwitz titles may not prove fruitful, however, for when writing he often<br />

used <strong>the</strong> Americanised pseudonym Holt Marvell.<br />

After a fruitful life Eric Maschwitz died in London on 27th October 1969, aged 68. Amoung <strong>the</strong> multi-talented ranks of <strong>Repton</strong><br />

<strong>School</strong> alumni he may not be as well known today as some of his later counterparts, but who is to say that <strong>the</strong> Maschwitz legacy<br />

will not in <strong>the</strong> long run prove more enduring and perhaps more profound.<br />

Extracted from Derbyshire Life<br />

(21)


OR PROFILES: HENRY ‘HARRY’ VASSALL<br />

REPTON SCHOOLMASTER WAS PIONEER OF MODERN RUGBY UNION TACTICS.<br />

A former master and a pioneer of modern rugby union, only a handful still living could have met him. Harry<br />

Vassall was born in Tadcaster, Yorkshire, on October 22, 1860, but <strong>the</strong> greatest part of his life was spent in<br />

Derbyshire. He lived in <strong>Repton</strong> for 40 years, from 1985 until his death. An influential master and a fine<br />

forward, he played rugby union five times for England in <strong>the</strong> early 1880’s captaining <strong>the</strong> side once, and is<br />

considered one of <strong>the</strong> game’s great early thinkers. His initial proficiency was gained as a schoolboy at<br />

Marlborough College, Wiltshire, and he continued to pursue <strong>the</strong> game at Oxford in 1879, where he was an<br />

exhibitioner at Hertford College. He was in <strong>the</strong> University XV for four years, from 1879 to 1882, and captained<br />

<strong>the</strong> side in his final two seasons. Under his coaching, Oxford rugby gained great fame and <strong>the</strong> team at that<br />

time included a nucleus of players who were selected for England. No game of significance was lost during<br />

Vassall’s spell <strong>the</strong>re. Vassall played at club level for Blackheath, making his full England debut in 1882 in <strong>the</strong> side’s first ever<br />

international against Wales, marking <strong>the</strong> occasion by scoring a hat-trick of tries. He went on to serve from 1884 to 1894 as<br />

honourary treasurer of <strong>the</strong> Rugby Football Union. During his time at Oxford, he encouraged <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>n innovatory tactic of teamcombination<br />

and open play as an antidote to <strong>the</strong> huddled brute force mentality which had hi<strong>the</strong>rto reigned. As such, he is regarded<br />

by rugby historians as <strong>the</strong> man most responsible for introducing intelligence and refinement into <strong>the</strong> sport and has been labelled a<br />

pioneer of modern rugby methods. More specifically, he is credited with introducing <strong>the</strong> three three-quarter formation into rugby<br />

union instead of <strong>the</strong> traditional two three-quarters system. He also wrote an authoritative book on <strong>the</strong> game which is now very<br />

collectable. Henry Vassall came to <strong>Repton</strong> in 1885, appointed by Furneaux whose pupil he had been when in <strong>the</strong> Sixth at<br />

Marlborough; his serious playing days were behind him. Even so, <strong>the</strong> boys were fully aware of his sporting prowess and took to<br />

him readily. He was that rare breed admired equally by pupils and staff alike. Initially Hall Housemaster, he was appointed bursar<br />

in 1905. In 1900 he became Housemaster of The Priory (<strong>the</strong>n housed in <strong>the</strong> Old Priory). Apart from his regular teaching duties, he<br />

also took <strong>the</strong> Army class, became a self-appointed geology master and fronted <strong>the</strong> school’s own fire brigade. He was a man of action<br />

out of school, too, spending his holidays as a yachtsman, sailing in Scotland and off <strong>the</strong> coast of Norway. But he could also be deeply<br />

studious. When, in 1905, he was appointed secretary of <strong>the</strong> Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian Society, he took it upon himself to rese<strong>arch</strong> <strong>the</strong> early<br />

history of <strong>the</strong> school and its former pupils. By virtue of much detailed and scholarly rese<strong>arch</strong> into <strong>School</strong> <strong>arch</strong>ives he became <strong>the</strong><br />

chief authority on <strong>Repton</strong> history; he was responsible for <strong>the</strong> drawing up of <strong>the</strong> lists of <strong>the</strong> early Headmasters, and of boys in <strong>the</strong><br />

first hundred years of its existence. He also took a keen interest in <strong>arch</strong>aeology and antiquities and was responsible for unearthing<br />

a Danish axe-head from <strong>the</strong> vicinity of St Wystan’s crypt, which was considered a significant find.<br />

Known to many generations of <strong>Repton</strong>ians as ‘Jugs’, he was considered a great sport and a kindly figure, renowned for his booming<br />

laugh and geniality, In contrast to <strong>the</strong> more snooty <strong>Repton</strong> masters, he was totally at ease with <strong>the</strong> villagers and local children, for<br />

his great physical strength, and for his Homeric laughter. He was a kind and sympa<strong>the</strong>tic housemaster, admired by all for his<br />

forthright manliness and vigour, ready to leave <strong>the</strong> day-to-day routine of <strong>the</strong> house to his prefects, who knew well that he was always<br />

ready to support <strong>the</strong>m when <strong>the</strong>y wanted help."<br />

One of his party pieces was to entertain <strong>the</strong> younger ones by setting off his g<strong>old</strong> repeater watch.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong> history, published in 1957, it was said of him: “Joy was <strong>the</strong> keynote of Harry Vassall’s character. He has been<br />

fittingly compared with one of Robert Louis Stevenson’s ‘ideal men’, those who ‘with laughter, song and shout…spin <strong>the</strong> great wheel<br />

of earth about’…”<br />

“Though himself an international Rugby player, he put <strong>Repton</strong> on <strong>the</strong> map in Soccer, playing as well as coaching, hurling himself<br />

with elephantine energy and agility through <strong>the</strong> goalposts with three or four boys, besides <strong>the</strong> ball, adhering to his colossal chest.<br />

His sister, who used to visit <strong>Repton</strong> to stay with her famous bro<strong>the</strong>r, was aptly named Vaseline."<br />

Harry Vassall died on January 5, 1925 , aged 64. His grave lies just yards from that of fellow sporting celebrity C B Fry, yet few visitors<br />

are aware of Vassall’s presence, let alone his credentials.<br />

Extracted from: Peter Seddon writing in Derby Evening Telegraph 15.06.09, <strong>Repton</strong> Archives<br />

and from Rev R.F. Peachey, in a letter to Bernard Thomas, 1957.<br />

.<br />

Photographs kindly supplied by Peter Seddon.<br />

“Rugby Football" by Harry Vassall & Arthur Budd.<br />

The All England Series, published by George Bell and Sons.<br />

A mainly instructional book with additional<br />

chapters on professionalism, refereeing & <strong>the</strong> Nor<strong>the</strong>rn Union.<br />

78 pages. 1st Edition published 1889, 2nd Edition 1898<br />

(22)


OR PROFILES: GEORGE RAINSFORD (M’96)<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> has in recent years produced an impressive clutch of young <strong>the</strong>spians plying <strong>the</strong>ir trade with great distinction on <strong>the</strong><br />

screens and stages of our media-hungry nation, Nick Burns (Nathan Barley, Manstrokewoman, Benidorm) and Tom Chambers<br />

(Holby City, Strictly Come Dancing) being particularly familiar faces. The latest addition to <strong>the</strong> list is George Rainsford (M’96),<br />

currently completing a six-month stint as male lead Bertram in Marianne Elliott's highly acclaimed National Theatre production of<br />

Shakespeare’s “All’s Well That Ends Well” at <strong>the</strong> Olivier.<br />

George’s path to South Bank stardom was anything but pre-destined. Although a regular on <strong>the</strong> 400 Hall stage while at <strong>Repton</strong>,<br />

George concedes that it was only gradually that <strong>the</strong> smell of grease-paint became addictive. He cites one particular incident at<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> which was pivotal. “By <strong>the</strong> Upper Sixth form”, he remembers, “I was<br />

a member of <strong>the</strong> National Youth Theatre, and intended to spend <strong>the</strong> summer<br />

holiday before university working with <strong>the</strong>m. But Ben Cavey (P’92), who’s now<br />

Creative Director (Comedy) at Tiger Aspect Productions, came up one evening<br />

to The Mitre and persuaded me to throw my lot in with <strong>the</strong> Rep Theatre<br />

Company, which was taking Peter Shaffer’s Amadeus to <strong>the</strong> Edinburgh Fringe<br />

that August”.<br />

George was eventually cast in <strong>the</strong> leading role of Mozart in that <strong>Repton</strong>ian<br />

and OR-based production, and pays tribute to Cavey’s ongoing interest in his<br />

career and development. “He helped me to select and prepare audition<br />

pieces, to choose my university course (Drama, Manchester) and <strong>the</strong>n a drama<br />

school (LAMDA). He seemed to know instinctively what <strong>the</strong> right next step<br />

was for me personally”.<br />

For any young, aspiring actor, <strong>the</strong> “right next step” after drama school is<br />

simple - paid employment. The problem is <strong>the</strong> waiting - for auditions, <strong>the</strong><br />

agent’s call, <strong>the</strong> signed contract dropping on <strong>the</strong> doormat. Casual<br />

employment helps to pay <strong>the</strong> bills - George wryly recalls temping as a lift<br />

operator, painting toilets and selling gym membership in what actors call <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

“resting” periods - but is <strong>the</strong> big break, indeed any kind of break, ever<br />

coming?<br />

George is modestly downbeat about his own relatively rapid entry into <strong>the</strong> real<br />

world of <strong>the</strong> acting profession. “The right opportunities came up”, he comments, “and gradually I realised I could possibly make<br />

it happen”. They came up in <strong>the</strong> shape of D’Artagnan, <strong>the</strong> swashbuckling lead role in Bristol Old Vic’s production of “The Three<br />

Musketeers”, swiftly followed by his National Theatre debut in a contemporary double bill pairing Enda Walsh’s “Chatroom” and<br />

Mark Ravenhill’s “Citizenship”, including performances at <strong>the</strong> prestigious Hong Kong Arts Festival.<br />

From <strong>the</strong>re it was a first taste of television, playing <strong>the</strong> estranged, drug-addled son of Trevor Eve in <strong>the</strong> highly popular detective<br />

drama “Waking <strong>the</strong> Dead”. George admits to being “a bit nervous” working with Eve at first – who wouldn’t be, playing<br />

opposite one of Britain’s finest stage and screen practioners? – especially as he’d “not really done any telly” previously, and<br />

because it is “a genre you don’t really train for” at drama school.<br />

Eventually <strong>the</strong> National called again, with <strong>the</strong> “All’s Well” offer, in a production hailed in <strong>the</strong> national press as “a masterpiece<br />

of deep feeling and cutting intelligence” where “<strong>the</strong> performances are uniformly excellent”. The run culminates in a final<br />

performance on 1 October, to be filmed in high definition and broadcast live via satellite to approximately 65 UK cinemas and<br />

arts centres, and over 250 venues globally. Quite a way to bring down <strong>the</strong> final curtain....<br />

And after that, perhaps a well-earned holiday would be appropriate? Not a bit of it, because ano<strong>the</strong>r important debut beckons<br />

for George, this time with <strong>the</strong> Royal Shakespeare Company, as Jamie, one of two male leads in Roy Williams’ “Days of<br />

Significance”, a powerful and harrowing meditation on <strong>the</strong> effects of modern warfare which will tour to Newcastle upon Tyne,<br />

Oxford, Coventry, Poole, Cardiff and Salford in October and November.<br />

George in<br />

Shakespeare’s<br />

“All’s Well That<br />

Ends Well” at<br />

<strong>the</strong> National<br />

Theatre, 2009<br />

So George’s diary is pretty full at present, which is exactly how he likes it. “When you’re working,<br />

it’s brilliant”, he smiles, “when you’re not, it isn’t”. Can he actually envisage doing anything else<br />

for a living? “I’d be happy doing o<strong>the</strong>r things”, he claims, with at least a modicum of conviction.<br />

Safe to say, though, that if his career in acting continues to develop at its current rate of knots,<br />

it seems highly unlikely that he will one day have to.<br />

(23)<br />

George in Grease 1997


OR PROFILES: RICHARD DICKSON (N’73)<br />

Helping people build peace amongst <strong>the</strong> villages of eastern Burundi or in <strong>the</strong> rice-fields of rural Cambodia may seem a long way<br />

from <strong>the</strong> bedsits of New House and <strong>the</strong> summer comfort of watching cricket on The Square. However, that has been <strong>the</strong> journey<br />

of Richard Dickson (New ’73), who is now a Director of <strong>the</strong> international development charity CORD.<br />

Richard’s journey had an inauspicious start. “I didn’t focus hard enough on my A levels so failed to get <strong>the</strong> grades needed to go to<br />

Westminster Medical <strong>School</strong>. Instead, I got a business studies degree and initially pursued a career in <strong>the</strong> City.” It was only when<br />

Richard got involved with several charities organising cause-related marketing campaigns for Barclays Bank that he saw that his<br />

business skills could be used for a purpose o<strong>the</strong>r than just lining shareh<strong>old</strong>ers’ pockets.<br />

“I like to think that it had been at <strong>Repton</strong> that I’d learned something quite profound: about <strong>the</strong> awareness of <strong>the</strong> needs of o<strong>the</strong>rs<br />

and <strong>the</strong> need to use <strong>the</strong> talents and privileges that I’d been given for a wider benefit. However, <strong>the</strong> step into international<br />

development wasn’t easy – <strong>the</strong>re was so much to learn and also a financial cost too!”<br />

Richard in Cambodia, with one of <strong>the</strong> beneficiaries of a<br />

CORD-funded irrigation scheme.<br />

Now Richard spends his time travelling around those parts of Africa and<br />

south east Asia that have suffered, or are in danger of degenerating into,<br />

violent conflict, and also around <strong>the</strong> UK seeking support for CORD’s work.<br />

“In parts of Africa I’ve seen such absolute poverty where <strong>the</strong>re is no formal<br />

education, no electricity and no basic sanitation and yet <strong>the</strong> people are<br />

incredibly resourceful.”<br />

In Burundi, CORD is one of <strong>the</strong> very few British agencies that works<br />

amongst Hutu and Tutsi refugees who are coming home to find <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

homes, schools and businesses destroyed after <strong>the</strong> decade of conflict that<br />

ended in 2005. In four refugee camps on <strong>the</strong> Darfur/Chad border, in<br />

daytime temperatures that average 45°C, CORD is <strong>the</strong> largest UK charity in<br />

terms of <strong>the</strong> number of local people that it employs – mainly supporting<br />

Primary-level education work for <strong>the</strong> Darfuri and Chadian refugees. In<br />

Cambodia, 30 years after <strong>the</strong> end of <strong>the</strong> Khmer Rouge genocide, CORD is<br />

working with local groups to help <strong>the</strong>m build a peaceful civil society and address issues associated with land-grabbing, poor<br />

education and women’s rights.<br />

CORD’s values are very similar to <strong>the</strong> ethos of <strong>Repton</strong>. The charity has moved beyond <strong>the</strong> 1990’s models of aid and development<br />

that resulted in much waste and corruption. “We’re both in <strong>the</strong> business of capacity development – helping people to help<br />

<strong>the</strong>mselves. And we recognise that it’s our relationships with each o<strong>the</strong>r, and not our advertising or campaigning, which underpins<br />

our success. That’s why each year we spend less than 8% of our £2.5 million budget on all our UK administration.”<br />

However, it’s not all deathly virtuous for Richard. “I’ve just launched <strong>the</strong> world’s first toilet twinning initiative – a fun way of tackling<br />

<strong>the</strong> very serious issue that 40% of <strong>the</strong> world’s population doesn’t have access to a safe and hygienic toilet.”<br />

A long way from New House’s lavatory lane in <strong>the</strong> 1970s!<br />

A Primary <strong>School</strong> class in a refuge camp on <strong>the</strong> Darfur/Chad<br />

border<br />

(24)<br />

One of CORD’s ‘twinned’ toilets.<br />

For more information about toilet twinning visit<br />

www.toilettwinning.org or email rdickson@cord.org.uk


The Challenge was to walk up 24 Peaks in <strong>the</strong> Lake District (including 2 of England’s highest peaks, Sca Fell Pike and Hellvellyn),<br />

each over 2,400 ft, within 24 hours. The mileage to be covered in Day One would be around 17.5. Day Two would involve<br />

ano<strong>the</strong>r long day of mountain ridges, with <strong>the</strong> mileage covered around 14 miles. The total height to be climbed would be over<br />

13,000 feet. The aim was to raise £6,000 for Care International, a global humanitarian organisation which works with over 45<br />

million disadvantaged people in 70 of <strong>the</strong> world's poorest countries.<br />

On Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 June 2009, Louise Howarth (G’96) and Iain Wright ( L’82) from law firm Morgan Lewis along<br />

with 4 colleagues decided to attempt this challenge with <strong>the</strong> assistance of Louise’s bro<strong>the</strong>r as support crew. So straight out of<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir central London offices, <strong>the</strong> Morgan Lewis team jumped on a train up to Windermere to be met with glorious sunshine and<br />

stunning views. After about 4 hours’ sleep, we were up and on our way to <strong>the</strong> start point. After various checks, safety briefings<br />

and radio checks, <strong>the</strong> team set off at 5.10am. The going was good, a gentle stroll past <strong>the</strong> edge of Buttermere, and by 7am <strong>the</strong><br />

team had summitted <strong>the</strong>ir first peak, Red Pike - only 23 to go <strong>the</strong>n. At this stage <strong>the</strong> peaks were enshrouded in mist and our<br />

Duke of Edinburgh map reading skills were put to <strong>the</strong> test. In short, <strong>the</strong> team completed an extra peak before returning to <strong>the</strong><br />

correct course, to summit High Crag at about 8.11am, <strong>the</strong>n on to Great Gable for 11.19am - half way already! After a brief<br />

pause for lunch <strong>the</strong> team had Lingmell <strong>the</strong>n <strong>the</strong> mammoth Sca Fell Pike with which to contend. Still, no time to dwell on <strong>the</strong><br />

task as we were already thinking about Great End, and <strong>the</strong> long slow descent down Bow Fell. After a sudden thunderstorm,<br />

a cut head and various feet and knee problems we completed Day One at 7.27pm - 14 hours and 17 minutes<br />

after we set off in <strong>the</strong> early morning mist.<br />

Louise Howarth<br />

& Iain Wright<br />

OR NEWS: LOUISE HOWARTH (G’96) and IAIN WRIGHT (L’82)<br />

Day Two saw a team of very sleep deprived lawyers m<strong>arch</strong>ing through <strong>the</strong> Lake District with steely<br />

determination to make up <strong>the</strong> lost 20 minutes of Day One and complete <strong>the</strong> challenge within <strong>the</strong> 24 hours.<br />

5.10am and we were off up Red Screes. The day flew by in a wealth of games, songs and any activities that we<br />

could dream up to take our minds off <strong>the</strong> aches and pains. By 2.30pm, we had realised it was now do or die;<br />

we were all going to have to run <strong>the</strong> last kilometre to finish toge<strong>the</strong>r. I am very proud to say that having raised<br />

our £6,000, we all crossed <strong>the</strong> line within <strong>the</strong> time as <strong>the</strong> clock struck 23 hours and 58 minutes - a supreme<br />

team effort!<br />

Louise Howarth<br />

OR NEWS: FIONA STEVENSON (A’83)<br />

“Are you a pilot?” The question comes, not for <strong>the</strong> first time, as I sit in <strong>the</strong> departure lounge at Port Moresby airport, Papua New<br />

Guinea, waiting for a connecting flight to Mount Hagen.<br />

I am travelling in my uniform shirt as it can make <strong>the</strong> journey slightly easier, particularly with customs and security staff. My<br />

organisation has been working in Papua New Guinea for over 40 years where it is well known and respected for <strong>the</strong> assistance it<br />

has given.<br />

The logo is of an open Bible carried on two wings – with <strong>the</strong> words Mission Aviation Fellowship. MAF is a Christian organisation<br />

whose mission is to fly light aircraft in developing countries so that people in remote areas can receive <strong>the</strong> help <strong>the</strong>y need. Every<br />

three minutes an MAF plane is taking off or landing somewhere in <strong>the</strong> world. These flights enable crucial work by many development<br />

and aid agencies, missions, local churches and o<strong>the</strong>r national groups. The Good News of Jesus Christ is being spread by both word<br />

and deed as access is provided to medical care, adequate food, clean water and education.<br />

So, am I a pilot? No, actually I’m an accountant! I trained with KPMG in Newcastle and <strong>the</strong>n spent most of <strong>the</strong> following 15 years<br />

working at <strong>the</strong> Port of Tyne Authority. That was an enormously varied job, accounting for civil engineering projects, plant<br />

maintenance, tenancies and a haulage subsidiary as well as <strong>the</strong> more obvious ships’ dues and stevedoring. It was remarkably good<br />

training, in fact, for accounting at an airline with projects to build hangars or houses, maintenance of aircraft, some tenancies and<br />

a core business of moving people and cargo.<br />

I was still ra<strong>the</strong>r surprised, though, to find myself in a job (Regional Finance Manager for MAF International Asia Pacific region) which<br />

is based in Cairns when Australia was not even on my list of places to visit.<br />

I had had a number of unusual “holidays” in Africa from a project connected with a library bus in Ghana to visiting an elderly<br />

missionary director of a hospital in Uganda to doing some book-keeping for <strong>the</strong> Durham diocesan charity in Lesotho. Involvement<br />

with Guiding and Rotary also helped broaden my international outlook so when I was ready for a change from <strong>the</strong> Port, I went to<br />

specialist recruitment agency Mango to look for a job with a charity overseas. This organisation (Management Accountants for<br />

NGOs) is itself a charity which aims to improve <strong>the</strong> accounting within non-governmental organisations. Reviewing <strong>the</strong>ir vacancies<br />

and taking account of my experience and coeliac condition, <strong>the</strong> Cairns job was suggested and <strong>the</strong>n confirmed following several<br />

hours of interviews with MAF.<br />

(25)


I have now been here for 15 months with several changes to my role<br />

in that time. Initially I was accounting mainly for <strong>the</strong> Arnhem Land<br />

programme which is in a remote part of <strong>the</strong> Nor<strong>the</strong>rn Territory,<br />

working largely from <strong>the</strong> regional office in Cairns. Currently I am<br />

spending a high proportion of my time in Papua New Guinea until a<br />

full-time Finance Manager can be found for <strong>the</strong> country. Whilst<br />

<strong>the</strong>re, I oversee a department of 8 national staff, training <strong>the</strong>m and<br />

encouraging <strong>the</strong>m to apply good accounting procedures.<br />

Most of <strong>the</strong> time I am office based but I did manage a day<br />

accompanying one of <strong>the</strong> pilots in PNG. It started off as a cargo<br />

flight, carrying chicks (smelly) for an income-generating project at<br />

<strong>the</strong> Christian Leaders Training College and medical supplies for a<br />

clinic. After refuelling by hand-pump, <strong>the</strong> next stop was at<br />

Oksapmin, a remote village in <strong>the</strong> hills with a challenging grass<br />

airstrip where <strong>the</strong> whole community turned out to meet us. Here we<br />

delivered food for <strong>the</strong>ir store and picked up goods for market. At Tabubil, refuelling was by pump from <strong>the</strong> mobile bowser which<br />

was easier for <strong>the</strong> pilot – but here he and <strong>the</strong> ground staff had to reinstall <strong>the</strong> seats ready to take some passengers back from <strong>the</strong><br />

mine to <strong>the</strong>ir home village. This was ano<strong>the</strong>r grass airstrip with <strong>the</strong> community again out in force and this time hawkers were selling<br />

peanuts and short spears to <strong>the</strong> remaining passengers. After a fur<strong>the</strong>r refuelling by hand-pump we were on <strong>the</strong> final leg back to<br />

Hagen but by this time <strong>the</strong> wea<strong>the</strong>r had changed, as is usual, and <strong>the</strong> pilot had to try various routes before he could find a passage<br />

clear of <strong>the</strong> cloud and rain. In PNG, single-engine aircraft are legally obliged to fly by visual flights rules although <strong>the</strong> pilots are<br />

equipped with and trained to use instruments. We landed safely in a downpour after what had been a fairly routine day. Ano<strong>the</strong>r<br />

pilot might have been involved in a medical evacuation which is quite common, especially for pregnancy-related cases in a country<br />

where maternal healthcare is very limited.<br />

As you can imagine, <strong>the</strong> costs for which I am accounting are high, particularly maintenance, fuel, insurance and staff costs. Income<br />

comes partly from airfares but <strong>the</strong>se are subsidised to a greater or lesser extent depending on <strong>the</strong> type of passenger (Australian<br />

government is full-rate but a local church pastor highly subsidised). The balance comes from donations supporting particular staff<br />

members, general gifts and donations for specific projects such as a new aircraft.<br />

If you would like to support MAF in general or my work in <strong>the</strong> Asia Pacific region in particular, donations can be sent to Mission<br />

Aviation Fellowship, Castle Hill Avenue, Folkestone, Kent CT20 2TN where <strong>the</strong>y would be gratefully received. They could also give<br />

you more information on supporting MAF or me in prayer.<br />

Are you a pilot – or an engineer, an accountant, an IT or HR specialist? MAF could have a job for you too!<br />

Fiona Stevenson<br />

OR NEWS: FIONA STEVENSON (A’83) Continued<br />

OR NEWS: MOLLY TUDHOPE (G’92) and REPTON BOXING CLUB<br />

It was one of those jobs that I love doing, it hardly pays <strong>the</strong> bills but I get to spend a few weeks pondering on interesting titbits<br />

in <strong>the</strong> world. In this case I was hired as a production manager on a film crew commissioned by <strong>the</strong> Art Fund to make a series of<br />

Three Minute Wonders for Channel Four.<br />

The focus for each of <strong>the</strong> four films was different perspectives on art. We tackled documentaries regarding <strong>the</strong> public’s & <strong>the</strong><br />

artist’s perspectives gaining insights from <strong>the</strong> patrons of <strong>the</strong> Tate Modern gallery and <strong>the</strong> fascinating musings of Anthony<br />

Gormley respectively. For <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r two, we endeavoured to do something infinitely harder … drama pieces as opposed to<br />

documentary. It is a feat to tell a complete story in three short minutes. The ‘historical’ piece led to a fearsome night shoot in<br />

<strong>the</strong> National Gallery where one can only assume <strong>the</strong> ghosts of muses past roam <strong>the</strong> halls but it was <strong>the</strong> ‘teenage’ piece that<br />

grabbed my attention <strong>the</strong> most.<br />

This film is about a 17 year <strong>old</strong> lad who is a talented and dedicated boxer. After finishing a session he gets changed and heads<br />

off to <strong>the</strong> local art gallery to see his hero … an Andy Warhol poster of Muhammad Ali (As shown at <strong>the</strong> Wolverhampton Art<br />

Gallery). Happily, <strong>the</strong> atmospheric film worked out beautifully and of course <strong>the</strong> direction and tireless toil from <strong>the</strong> crew brought<br />

it all toge<strong>the</strong>r but <strong>the</strong> things that made it were <strong>the</strong> young actor, Sam, and <strong>the</strong> boxing gym in which he trained and we filmed.<br />

(26)<br />

Continued


OR NEWS: MOLLY TUDHOPE (G’92) and REPTON BOXING CLUB Continued<br />

We wanted to make it as au<strong>the</strong>ntic as possible and so my se<strong>arch</strong>es took me to <strong>the</strong> heart of London’s boxing world to seek out<br />

not only a pugilist who could act and identify with our project but a real <strong>old</strong> school boxing gym where you could believe you<br />

were smelling <strong>the</strong> sweat and canvas through <strong>the</strong> television screen. We recce-ed many places but eventually happed upon a<br />

place in Bethnal Green, <strong>the</strong> heart of London’s East End that was perfect. Just taking one step in <strong>the</strong> door was like taking a step<br />

back in time. There were fight posters still on <strong>the</strong> wall from all decades as early as <strong>the</strong> 1930’s, black and white victory photos<br />

with bloodied men h<strong>old</strong>ing heavy belts high over <strong>the</strong> heads and brown streaks and spatters covering <strong>the</strong> raised canvas of <strong>the</strong><br />

boxing ring. Not only did it look au<strong>the</strong>ntic but it was au<strong>the</strong>ntic. Talking to<br />

those that worked <strong>the</strong>re and indeed finding Sam , our young boxer/actor<br />

<strong>the</strong>re, it was palpable <strong>the</strong> importance of this institution to its local residence.<br />

Sam, a thoughtful and intelligent young man, was a picture of health and<br />

entirely focussed on his boxing with a championship bout looming a few short<br />

days after filming. He was off <strong>the</strong> streets, channelling his aggression into a<br />

skill and charming <strong>the</strong> socks of <strong>the</strong> crew. I think it is fair to credit much of this<br />

to <strong>the</strong> sage sporting establishment in which we stood … <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong> Boxing<br />

Club established by <strong>the</strong> school in 1884. (www.reptonboxingclub.com)<br />

Molly Tudhope<br />

REMEMBERED IN STONE<br />

When Lenin died in 1924 <strong>the</strong> Politburo created an Immortalization Commission to deify <strong>the</strong> memory of <strong>the</strong> lost leader.<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> has no such body but never<strong>the</strong>less abounds in various formal commemorations of <strong>the</strong> dear departed including<br />

scholarships, shields, cups, awards, prizes, plaques, portraits, photographs, boards, benches, screens, stained glass, <strong>the</strong> George<br />

Philipp Travel Award, <strong>the</strong> Lea<strong>the</strong>r Lecture, <strong>the</strong> Parker 100, <strong>the</strong> Kropacsy and Caroline Tyler Relays and, of course, <strong>the</strong> War<br />

Memorial. However, arguably <strong>the</strong> most signal and durable honour that can be paid to any individual connected with <strong>the</strong> school is<br />

to preserve his or her name in some room or building.<br />

It was not until Michaelmas 1917 that <strong>the</strong> practice of calling each house by <strong>the</strong> name of its current housemaster was<br />

abandoned. There was a very good reason why houses originally carried <strong>the</strong> name of <strong>the</strong> incumbent: his personality not only<br />

moulded <strong>the</strong> character of <strong>the</strong> house but all of <strong>the</strong> nineteenth-century houses which came after <strong>the</strong> Orchard were originally <strong>the</strong><br />

private property of <strong>the</strong> master who founded <strong>the</strong>m. Today Latham is <strong>the</strong> only house still to retain <strong>the</strong> name of its original<br />

housemaster: <strong>the</strong> Rev. Edward Latham. The only Headmaster similarly honoured is Steuart Adolphus Pears, our ‘Second Founder’,<br />

who is remembered in Pears <strong>School</strong> or, more properly, <strong>the</strong> Pears’ Memorial Hall. With <strong>the</strong> exception of <strong>the</strong>se illustrious names I<br />

sometimes wonder how many present-day <strong>Repton</strong>ians or ORs are familiar with <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r notables whose names are preserved<br />

here.<br />

In <strong>Repton</strong> to <strong>the</strong> End Kenneth Rose (O’39) provided a wonderful pen portrait of Laurence Arthur Burd, after whom <strong>the</strong> Burd<br />

Library is named. Peter Seddon’s piece on Henry Vassall, elsewhere in this issue, celebrates <strong>the</strong> man whose memory is enshrined<br />

in his beloved Old Priory. The restoration of <strong>the</strong> Undercroft, completed by 1927, was paid for largely with money collected by<br />

ORs as a memorial to Vassall; <strong>the</strong> remainder being spent on a portrait of him by R.G. Eves, which still hangs in <strong>the</strong> Vassall Room,<br />

which was completed in 1931 and furnished in 1932 as <strong>the</strong> classroom of <strong>the</strong> History Sixth. Under Graham Jones it became a<br />

sixth form classroom for <strong>the</strong> English department and <strong>the</strong> home of <strong>the</strong> English departmental library. It now houses a suite of<br />

computers for Common Room.<br />

The sketches that follow provide a few details regarding three o<strong>the</strong>rs associated with <strong>the</strong> school whose memories are - or ought<br />

to be - enshrined in <strong>Repton</strong>’s fabric.<br />

The Rt. Hon. Lord Kindersley, GBE (H1883)<br />

Robert Molesworth Kindersley (1871-1954) followed his <strong>old</strong>er bro<strong>the</strong>r, John, to <strong>the</strong> Hall in 1883. However, a decline in family<br />

fortunes meant that Robert had to be withdrawn from <strong>the</strong> school in July 1887 and whereas John went to Oxford, Robert was<br />

obliged to make his way in <strong>the</strong> world. Beginning as a clerk, Robert worked his way up to become a member of <strong>the</strong> stock<br />

exchange, a merchant banker and ultimately a major figure in <strong>the</strong> City: a fact symbolized by his directorship of <strong>the</strong> Bank of<br />

England (1914-46) and service on several of its committees.<br />

Created <strong>the</strong> first Baron Kindersley of West Hoathly in 1941 on account of his war work in stimulating national savings,<br />

Kindersley had first introduced <strong>the</strong> concept of national savings as a means of financing a very substantial part of <strong>the</strong> nation's war<br />

(27)<br />

Continued


REMEMBERED IN STONE Continued<br />

effort in <strong>the</strong> Great War. Whilst he was chairman of what came to be known as <strong>the</strong> National Savings, <strong>the</strong> number of investors in<br />

British government securities rose from 345,000 in 1914 to 17 million by 1918. Insofar as finance provides <strong>the</strong> sinews of war<br />

Kindersley thus made a major contribution to Britain’s victory in both world wars.<br />

As well as his public service Kindersley engaged in several charitable enterprises. He was a great servant and benefactor of <strong>the</strong><br />

school, for example presenting it with a valuable seventeenth-century Flemish tapestry whilst Chairman of <strong>the</strong> Governors. This<br />

used to hang in <strong>the</strong> Ti<strong>the</strong> Barn before it was s<strong>old</strong>. He was a member of <strong>the</strong> Governing Body for no less than thirty-three years,<br />

from 1918 until 1951. The Kindersley Gateway was presented by members of his family in memory of Robert Molesworth<br />

Kindersley and of his bro<strong>the</strong>r John and was formally opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on 28 M<strong>arch</strong> 1957, <strong>the</strong> gateway<br />

marking <strong>the</strong> formal entrance to <strong>the</strong> Precinct and The Queen’s Walk.<br />

Sir John Burnett-Stuart (H 1889)<br />

John Theodosius Burnett-Stuart (1875-1958), familiarly known as ‘Jock Stuart’, was <strong>the</strong> son of a s<strong>old</strong>ier and himself embarked<br />

upon a distinguished military career after <strong>Repton</strong>. From Sandhurst he was commissioned in <strong>the</strong> rifle brigade and first saw active<br />

service on <strong>the</strong> North-West frontier of India in 1897-98. Mentioned in dispatches and awarded <strong>the</strong> DSO in <strong>the</strong> Boer War (1899-<br />

1902), he graduated from <strong>the</strong> staff college in 1904 and by 1912 was instructor GSO2 at Staff College, Camberley. He ended <strong>the</strong><br />

First World War as deputy adjutant-general at GHQ and, more importantly and unusually for staff officers at that time, with an<br />

enhanced reputation as a military strategist.<br />

From <strong>the</strong> 1920s he became a leading advocate of two points of view: that Britain should develop a highly mobile, mechanized<br />

army, and that that force should not be committed to <strong>the</strong> continent in <strong>the</strong> event of ano<strong>the</strong>r war but should ra<strong>the</strong>r safeguard <strong>the</strong><br />

empire. His career ultimately stalled when he was passed over as chief of <strong>the</strong> Imperial General Staff in 1936, largely because he’d<br />

promoted <strong>the</strong>se views not only vigorously but publicly (through several letters to ‘The Times’).<br />

Basil Liddell Hart captured <strong>the</strong> essence of <strong>the</strong> man when he wrote that he had a ‘sparkling mind, lively imagination, and long if<br />

variable vision’. His ‘impish turn of mind … handicapped his career but … toge<strong>the</strong>r with his informality of manner, made him<br />

beloved by his subordinates’.<br />

The B[urnett]-S[tuart] room is situated above <strong>the</strong> Design Centre and in its time has played host to <strong>the</strong> General Knowledge<br />

Competition, Film Society, Supervised Prep and INSET for Common Room.<br />

Broken Promise<br />

History is full of ‘what ifs’ and <strong>the</strong> 1910 Speech Day provides one such example. Lionel Ford, in his swansong as Headmaster was<br />

able to record that, ‘<strong>the</strong> whole … programme [of building] with one exception had been carried out. That one exception was <strong>the</strong><br />

school museum, and that one omission was almost ready to be made good. The plans were ready and <strong>the</strong> Governors had<br />

approved <strong>the</strong>m: for a large new building to contain an art school and five or six additional class rooms, and <strong>the</strong> present art<br />

school would be <strong>the</strong> future museum. … They wanted to make that final building, on <strong>the</strong> site of <strong>the</strong> <strong>old</strong> Fives Courts, a memorial<br />

to … <strong>the</strong> late Lord Burton. (Applause) They would call it by his name by his widow’s consent …’<br />

The Rt. Hon. Lord Burton was worthy of being so honoured. He had been a great friend to <strong>the</strong> school as a member of <strong>the</strong><br />

Governing Body, 1892-1908 (having been nominated by MPs for <strong>the</strong> County), and as a benefactor. For example he pledged £50<br />

towards <strong>the</strong> cost of <strong>the</strong> proposed rifle range for <strong>the</strong> cadet corps and offered to pay a quarter of <strong>the</strong> costs of <strong>the</strong> proposed<br />

alterations and enlargements which Ford had identified at his second Speech Day and which totalled £2,000. However, no<br />

building at <strong>Repton</strong> bears his name, so if this article serves no o<strong>the</strong>r purpose it can at least belatedly seek to make amends by<br />

recording <strong>the</strong> school’s lasting gratitude to Lord Burton. His shade might take comfort from <strong>the</strong> poet’s words:<br />

… time dissolves all monuments<br />

to selfish fame that can accrue.<br />

Relentlessly <strong>the</strong> pen moves on,<br />

selecting what endures as true;<br />

and marks upon posterity<br />

<strong>the</strong> actions we cannot disown.<br />

Our passage through this world is cast<br />

More tellingly than any stone.<br />

John Plowright,<br />

Master of <strong>the</strong> Scholars<br />

(28)


Dear ORs,<br />

It is once again my pleasure to write to you, at <strong>the</strong> kind<br />

invitation of your President, to bring you up to date with <strong>the</strong><br />

current progress of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> and to give you my view of <strong>the</strong><br />

challenges that face us in <strong>the</strong> years ahead.<br />

One of <strong>the</strong> principal events of <strong>the</strong> year has been <strong>the</strong> inspection<br />

of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> by <strong>the</strong> Independent <strong>School</strong>s’ Inspectorate, an<br />

important occasion that takes place once every six years. I<br />

believe it is important to retain a sense of humour and a sense<br />

of <strong>the</strong> human during inspections. What better way to start our<br />

own Inspection, <strong>the</strong>refore, than to have <strong>the</strong> Chaplain begin our<br />

whole school service by telling everyone that he fancied Kirsty<br />

Allsop and asking everyone in <strong>the</strong> congregation to give <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

neighbour a hug. As <strong>the</strong> Lead Inspector was sandwiched<br />

between <strong>the</strong> formidable duo of my wife and Mrs Tennant his<br />

day, and indeed <strong>the</strong> whole inspection, certainly got off to a<br />

rousing start: no wonder we received an ‘outstanding’ for our<br />

‘Spiritual, Moral and Cultural Development’! Fur<strong>the</strong>r<br />

‘outstanding’ gradings were awarded in <strong>the</strong> categories of :<br />

‘Quality of Pastoral Care’, ‘Quality of Links with Parents and <strong>the</strong><br />

Community’, ‘Quality of Boarding’, ‘Quality of Governance’ and<br />

‘Quality of Leadership and Management’ and we were graded<br />

‘good’ (with ‘excellent’ or ‘outstanding’ features) in <strong>the</strong> areas<br />

of ‘Educational Experience’, ‘Pupils’ Learning and Achievement’<br />

and ‘Quality of Teaching’ (<strong>the</strong>re are no ‘very goods’ on offer!).<br />

Thus <strong>the</strong> report paid handsome tribute to <strong>the</strong> current strength<br />

of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>, and I would like to record my thanks to all<br />

members of <strong>the</strong> team – pupils, Common Room, Bursary and<br />

support staff, toge<strong>the</strong>r with parents and ORs, for <strong>the</strong> part <strong>the</strong>y<br />

have played in winning a judgment that makes for extremely<br />

favourable comparison with similar schools. Pupils and<br />

Common Room also deserve warm appreciation for <strong>the</strong>ir efforts<br />

in achieving 83% A and B grades at A level and 67% A* and<br />

A grades at GCSE in <strong>the</strong> recent examination round. But whilst<br />

thanks are important at such a time, I never want any of us at<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> to become merely self-congratulatory. The inspection<br />

contained a number of ideas for <strong>the</strong> next phase of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>’s<br />

development, not all of which I agree with, but some of which<br />

are spot on, and we will be looking hard at how to implement<br />

<strong>the</strong>se shortly.<br />

But for now I would like to concentrate on one of <strong>the</strong><br />

categories of <strong>the</strong> inspection that seems to me to be especially<br />

important, and that is <strong>the</strong> Spiritual and Moral Development of<br />

<strong>the</strong> pupils. As <strong>the</strong> Lead Inspector put it in his report ‘The<br />

personal development of <strong>the</strong> individual is at <strong>the</strong> heart of <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>School</strong>’s philosophy, and pupils show outstanding spiritual,<br />

moral and cultural awareness.’<br />

This gives me and should give us all, special encouragement,<br />

because <strong>the</strong> development of young men and women with an<br />

awareness of right and wrong, with a discriminating sense of<br />

duty to o<strong>the</strong>rs (whatever <strong>the</strong>ir position in society) and <strong>the</strong><br />

courage to act on <strong>the</strong>ir beliefs is, ultimately, what education is<br />

all about. I like that story of <strong>the</strong> great nineteenth century<br />

headmaster of Eton, Cyril Allington, who was being badgered<br />

by a particularly persistent parent because <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> was, in<br />

her view, failing to provide value for money. (Good to know<br />

LETTER FROM HEADMASTER<br />

(29)<br />

that that was on people’s minds even <strong>the</strong>n!) ‘What, after all,<br />

Headmaster’, said <strong>the</strong> mo<strong>the</strong>r, ‘is <strong>the</strong> purpose of my son’s<br />

education if he is not achieving good results?’‘The purpose of<br />

your son’s education, M’am’, replied <strong>the</strong> great man without<br />

drawing breath, ‘is to teach him how to die.’ And although I<br />

wouldn’t get away with such a response today, still less<br />

discourage any proper debate with a parent over value for<br />

money, Allington’s answer is worth thinking about, and it is<br />

worth us all considering how <strong>the</strong> right kinds of values, beliefs<br />

and qualities are developed in <strong>the</strong> young. The government<br />

would have us believe that such standards are nurtured by<br />

policies, procedures and audit. They are not. Fur<strong>the</strong>rmore I<br />

don’t believe that <strong>the</strong> confidence required to say ‘no’ to<br />

bullying, to a premature relationship or to <strong>the</strong> temptation of<br />

drugs or alcohol comes directly from expensive and often<br />

wasteful government campaigns devoted to those aims. Such<br />

gifts come from something far deeper : from intangible<br />

strengths nurtured in <strong>the</strong> everyday business of thoughtful<br />

human contact and sound example absorbed over sustained<br />

periods of time in stable structures such as <strong>the</strong> family, <strong>the</strong><br />

boarding house, and, yes, Chapel. These are <strong>the</strong> long term<br />

foundations that enable young people to build a lasting moral<br />

code that can withstand <strong>the</strong> stresses and strains of life, and by<br />

‘moral code’ I do not merely mean <strong>the</strong> ability to tolerate o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

points of view. We run <strong>the</strong> risk in society today, I believe, of<br />

overvaluing tolerance. Not that it isn’t important – it is, of<br />

course, one of <strong>the</strong> key defining marks of a civilised community,<br />

but if we lead <strong>the</strong> young into thinking that tolerance of <strong>the</strong><br />

point of view of o<strong>the</strong>rs is a moral code in itself we are deluding<br />

<strong>the</strong>m. Tolerance is something that grows out of a mature moral<br />

code – it is not, on its own, a substitute for one. And in my<br />

view it is <strong>the</strong> duty of a school to ensure that young people<br />

understand that difference. The danger today, and it is<br />

exacerbated by <strong>the</strong> role of <strong>the</strong> media’s obsessive determination<br />

to champion <strong>the</strong> underdog regardless of merit, is that you are<br />

demonised if you speak out against a single aspect of any of <strong>the</strong><br />

great contemporary liberal causes, be that anything from<br />

animal rights to social engineering to environmental concerns,<br />

when in fact, we should be teaching <strong>the</strong> young to assess which<br />

aspects of those causes are worth fighting for and to express<br />

balanced and discriminating judgements on <strong>the</strong>m without fear<br />

of reprisal. The assumption that merely with <strong>the</strong> right kind of<br />

procedures in place, <strong>the</strong> right strategies, <strong>the</strong> pre-defined<br />

targets, clear command structures and transparent<br />

accountability we can somehow manipulate teenagers to<br />

achieve <strong>the</strong> right ‘outcomes’ in <strong>the</strong>ir judgements is, in my view,<br />

a deeply flawed one. Growing up is, and always has been, more<br />

complicated than that, and young people in my view need to<br />

understand less about targets and policies and strategies, and<br />

more about <strong>the</strong> human propensity to make mistakes, even if<br />

you like, to sin, about our need for forgiveness, for redemption<br />

and <strong>the</strong> role family and friends play in teaching <strong>the</strong> lessons that<br />

put <strong>the</strong>se great gifts into meaningful practice in our daily lives.<br />

I am proud that in <strong>the</strong> wider <strong>Repton</strong> family, in all of our homes,<br />

in <strong>the</strong> boarding houses here and in our Chapel we continue to<br />

place that spiritual dimension at <strong>the</strong> heart of all we do, and<br />

through that, achieve a genuinely inclusive and vibrant<br />

community.


We saw a wonderful example of <strong>the</strong> way in which <strong>the</strong> spiritual<br />

dimension can lift a community in <strong>the</strong> splendid Service held to<br />

commemorate <strong>the</strong> 150th anniversary of Chapel on <strong>the</strong> occasion<br />

of <strong>the</strong> very successful June Gaudy in which current pupils<br />

welcomed back <strong>Repton</strong>ians from across <strong>the</strong> generations. For<br />

that very special day John Bowley had asked Alexander<br />

l’Estrange, one of <strong>the</strong> country’s most talented young<br />

composers, to write a new piece to be sung by <strong>the</strong> choir, and I<br />

do not think it is an overstatement to say that <strong>the</strong> fruit of this<br />

request is a significant new addition to <strong>the</strong> choral repertoire.<br />

The idea behind <strong>the</strong> piece, <strong>the</strong> fusion of dissonant chords into<br />

a harmonic whole, is suggested in its title, ‘Tune me, O Lord,<br />

into one Harmony’ and <strong>the</strong> choir’s magnificent first rendition<br />

of this an<strong>the</strong>m captures <strong>the</strong> way in which a <strong>School</strong> like ours, at<br />

so many levels, functions in such a way that its whole becomes<br />

greater than <strong>the</strong> sum of its parts. There is a deeply spiritual<br />

dimension to this sense of toge<strong>the</strong>rness, and whe<strong>the</strong>r young<br />

people articulate it or not doesn’t really matter - what counts<br />

is that in a very real way, far removed from <strong>the</strong> world of policy<br />

agenda, <strong>the</strong>y are being given <strong>the</strong> chance to develop an<br />

appreciation of <strong>the</strong> confidence, sense of achievement and sheer<br />

fun and joy that teamwork can bring. I am constantly revived by<br />

<strong>the</strong> many ways in which being part of <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong> team<br />

translates itself into <strong>the</strong> highest standards of initiative and<br />

adventure in and out of <strong>the</strong> classroom. How many schools can<br />

claim a significant role in a major piece of university rese<strong>arch</strong><br />

into adolescent well being, as we are doing via Miss Horne’s<br />

‘Sleep Soc’; a co-written novel, as in Ben Hunjan and Chris<br />

Warner’s ‘Fleeting Hope’; a team of Design Scholars, including<br />

four Arkwright Award winners, who have designed and built<br />

<strong>the</strong> playground equipment for <strong>the</strong> village primary school; <strong>the</strong><br />

establishment, under Dr Ingleston’s imaginative leadership, of<br />

a Genetics Summer <strong>School</strong> not only for <strong>Repton</strong>ians but also for<br />

talented scientists from <strong>the</strong> local state sector; a Global<br />

Perspectives Conference masterminded by Dr Pitts that will<br />

bring toge<strong>the</strong>r, in a most imaginative way, <strong>Repton</strong> and our sister<br />

school <strong>Repton</strong> Dubai, about which more can be read elsewhere<br />

in this edition of <strong>the</strong> Arch; national championship winning<br />

teams in girls hockey, football and boys cricket indeed an entire<br />

body of pupils who did a spontaneous Mexican wave on <strong>the</strong><br />

occasion of <strong>the</strong> school photograph and still had <strong>the</strong><br />

photographer saying that this was <strong>the</strong> most polite and relaxed<br />

group of school children he had had <strong>the</strong> pleasure to work with?<br />

Certainly, I hope that all of <strong>the</strong>se examples, and <strong>the</strong>y are<br />

illustrative highlights ra<strong>the</strong>r than a comprehensive picture,<br />

point to a determined, ambitious and interesting team at work,<br />

though I must admit I did pause and give <strong>the</strong> photographer’s<br />

second adjective a moment’s thought whilst considering if we<br />

could take it as a compliment. In <strong>the</strong> end I came to <strong>the</strong><br />

conclusion that we could, and an important one at that. If, after<br />

all, we can achieve <strong>the</strong> standards to which we aspire and do so<br />

without over pressurising our pupils, we are doing <strong>the</strong>m an<br />

important service, and it is interesting to note how frequently<br />

visiting parents do remark on <strong>the</strong> relaxed nature of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>,<br />

and in particular, <strong>the</strong> informal yet respectful relations that exist<br />

between pupils and staff. One of <strong>the</strong> reasons for this is that we<br />

are blessed with a Common Room that likes children. Sounds<br />

obvious, doesn’t it, but we all remember our own school days<br />

LETTER FROM HEADMASTER Continued<br />

(30)<br />

and I for one can distinctly recall a Latin teacher whose chief<br />

motivating force seemed to be an antipathy towards <strong>the</strong> young.<br />

There was more than a touch of <strong>the</strong> WC Fields about him, ‘Do<br />

you like children?’ ‘Yes, especially when <strong>the</strong>y are properly<br />

cooked.’ Teachers must like young people, and <strong>the</strong> success of<br />

our retiring staff this year can in large measure be put down to<br />

<strong>the</strong> fact that <strong>the</strong>y have been round pegs in round holes, what<br />

I call ‘natural’ teachers. None more so than Roger Thompson,<br />

our outstanding Director of Sport appointed to <strong>the</strong> staff by my<br />

wise predecessor John Gamell some thirty four years ago.<br />

Roger may now be <strong>the</strong> only member of staff who still types his<br />

letters to me, and in a strange kind of way I will miss that, but<br />

he is above all someone who likes young people and translates<br />

that affection into real ambition for <strong>the</strong>m and <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>.<br />

Nowhere has that ambition been more readily visible in Roger’s<br />

determination to make <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>the</strong> country’s leading tennis<br />

<strong>School</strong>, and <strong>the</strong> 15 Youll Cup wins and 11 Glanvill Cup victories<br />

achieved during Roger’s career, as well as, equally importantly,<br />

<strong>the</strong> time he has invested in each individual pupil, whatever <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

level of ability, are ample testimony to <strong>the</strong> success that he has<br />

achieved. How pleasing for Roger and his team that that<br />

achievement was recognised by <strong>Repton</strong> being crowned Daily<br />

Telegraph Independent <strong>School</strong> of <strong>the</strong> Year for Sport in his final<br />

lap with us. Roger will be joined in retirement by his wife<br />

Rosemary, who is a Senior Mistress of rare wisdom and kindness<br />

who epitomises <strong>the</strong> civilising influence I identified earlier as<br />

being definitive in <strong>the</strong> development of our sons and daughters.<br />

David Newman, our Head of Classics, enjoys, perhaps unfairly,<br />

<strong>the</strong> reputation of being <strong>the</strong> teller of <strong>the</strong> worst jokes in Common<br />

Room, but he sets an indisputably fine example to his charges<br />

in his dedication and fearless integrity and fully deserves his<br />

preferment to <strong>the</strong> Deputyship of St Olave’s York. O<strong>the</strong>r<br />

members of Common Room to move on this year include Fred<br />

Rule, whose patient sympathy for his pupils has benefited many<br />

<strong>Repton</strong>ians, David Exley, an OR whose intellect and games<br />

playing ability certainly mark him out as one of Timeform’s<br />

Horses to Follow for next season, and Neus Reyner, Eve Sacker<br />

and Christine Walker whose cheerfulness and consistency<br />

provide fur<strong>the</strong>r hard evidence of my point that teachers need to<br />

like children to succeed. We wish all our departing staff <strong>the</strong> very<br />

best for <strong>the</strong> next stage, wherever that may lead <strong>the</strong>m. And it is<br />

also right at this point that I pay tribute to Frank Watson, who<br />

is, thankfully, remaining with us as Housemaster of <strong>School</strong><br />

House, but who hands over <strong>the</strong> post of Master in Charge of<br />

Cricket to our Director of Sport Elect, Ian Pollock, at <strong>the</strong> end of<br />

this season. Those of you with a good memory will recall that<br />

I paid tribute a year ago to Mike and Melody Kettle, <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

half of <strong>the</strong> Watson/ Kettle partnership, but now is an<br />

appropriate time to record my thanks to Frank for <strong>the</strong><br />

leadership he has shown in helping <strong>Repton</strong>, along with o<strong>the</strong>rs,<br />

to regain its reputation as one of <strong>the</strong> very strongest cricket<br />

schools in <strong>the</strong> land. It is easy, in this particular role at <strong>Repton</strong>,<br />

to be dominated by <strong>the</strong> great names of <strong>the</strong> past, but Frank and<br />

his team of coaches have produced a new generation of players<br />

who are playing attacking, competitive cricket and who are<br />

hungry to get even better. It was splendid to see <strong>the</strong> new<br />

generation forming <strong>the</strong> backbone of this year’s Pilgrim’s XI that<br />

reached <strong>the</strong> Cricketer Cup Final for <strong>the</strong> first time in sixteen


years, and under <strong>the</strong> inspired captaincy of Chris Paget and<br />

expert off <strong>the</strong> field leadership of Messrs Hutton, Ross and<br />

Russell, we now have a squad well equipped to do well in years<br />

to come. And who could disagree, despite <strong>the</strong> continued<br />

importance of <strong>the</strong> traditional format, that <strong>the</strong> Twenty:20<br />

matches held in recent seasons on <strong>the</strong> Square in front of vital,<br />

appreciative and large mixed sex crowds have not also shown<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> at its very best? Last year’s national championship title<br />

was a fitting tribute to Frank’s leadership and he has given Ian<br />

a fine legacy on which to build.<br />

Good teachers are <strong>the</strong> bedrock of a <strong>School</strong> such as ours, but<br />

facilities are important too, because <strong>the</strong>y inspire and set<br />

standards that influence <strong>the</strong> young for <strong>the</strong> rest of <strong>the</strong>ir lives.<br />

Yet <strong>the</strong> need to reinvest in facilities has, of course, to be<br />

balanced against <strong>the</strong> demands of <strong>the</strong> prevailing economic<br />

climate. Last financial year saw us complete <strong>the</strong> Digital Learning<br />

Centre for Modern Languages, <strong>the</strong> refurbishment of <strong>the</strong><br />

Grubber, <strong>the</strong> redevelopment of <strong>the</strong> Music <strong>School</strong> (please do go<br />

and visit <strong>the</strong> new Recording Studio and newly modelled Beldam<br />

Hall if you haven’t already done so) and, thanks to <strong>the</strong><br />

generosity of an anonymous Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian, <strong>the</strong> restoration of<br />

<strong>the</strong> magnificent Harrison and Harrison organ to its former glory.<br />

This financial year we have tightened our belts in terms of<br />

capital expenditure in order to streng<strong>the</strong>n our hand for 2010<br />

and have restricted ourselves, <strong>the</strong>refore, to <strong>the</strong> refurbishment<br />

of <strong>School</strong> House, which will, of course, be completed to <strong>the</strong><br />

usual high standard insisted upon by <strong>the</strong> Bursar, Carl Bilson,<br />

eagle eyed Estates Bursar, Mike Critchlow, and <strong>the</strong>ir respective<br />

teams. One of <strong>the</strong> key features about <strong>the</strong> capital spend of<br />

recent years is that it has been completed, unlike many<br />

initiatives of our current government, on <strong>the</strong> basis of nil<br />

borrowing. That, and <strong>the</strong> fact that <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> is full, gives us <strong>the</strong><br />

confidence to continue to be ambitious, and in Spring 2010,<br />

subject of course to Governors’ final approval and finances<br />

remaining strong, we will begin <strong>the</strong> greatly needed<br />

refurbishment of <strong>the</strong> 400 Hall, retaining <strong>the</strong> much loved 1957<br />

Marshall Sissons façade but incorporating a completely<br />

remodelled auditorium inside designed by London <strong>arch</strong>itect<br />

Bryan Avery of RADA and Royal Court fame and a new, greatly<br />

expanded foyer so that <strong>the</strong> performers will have a setting fit for<br />

<strong>the</strong> standard of shows that are Mr Levesley’s hallmark and <strong>the</strong><br />

audience will be able to ga<strong>the</strong>r without being squashed in <strong>the</strong><br />

current cramped entrance space.<br />

Thereafter we will, finances permitting, proceed to <strong>the</strong><br />

development of <strong>the</strong> Science Priory, a centre that will not only<br />

offer <strong>the</strong> highest standard of facility for <strong>Repton</strong>ians, but put us<br />

on <strong>the</strong> map as <strong>the</strong> leading provider of training for teachers both<br />

in <strong>the</strong> maintained as well as independent sectors. I will, if I may,<br />

write to you separately in more detail with our plans in this area<br />

in due course.<br />

So despite <strong>the</strong> note of caution that <strong>the</strong> credit crunch must<br />

inevitably sound I remain optimistic and ambitious for <strong>the</strong><br />

future of <strong>Repton</strong> and for independent schools in general –<br />

certainly those that are well managed and don’t shy from<br />

taking difficult decisions when <strong>the</strong>y need to be taken.<br />

LETTER FROM HEADMASTER Continued<br />

(31)<br />

The <strong>School</strong> is full, parental and alumni confidence in <strong>Repton</strong> is<br />

high, and that is something for which I and <strong>the</strong> Governors<br />

remain very grateful. But most of all I am optimistic because<br />

every day I wake up knowing that whatever problems or pitfalls<br />

<strong>the</strong> next few hours may bring I will also witness example upon<br />

example of <strong>Repton</strong>ians radiating both <strong>the</strong> talent and <strong>the</strong><br />

spiritual warmth that <strong>Repton</strong> stands for. To be Headmaster of<br />

this <strong>School</strong> is a pleasure and a privilege.<br />

Yours sincerely,<br />

Robert Holroyd<br />

Post Script:<br />

And so to Ypres…….<br />

I write this on a balmy August day, with <strong>the</strong> bustle of <strong>the</strong> term<br />

time now having receded, and somehow I am transported back<br />

to that hot and still summer of 1914, <strong>the</strong> calm before <strong>the</strong> storm<br />

when <strong>the</strong> idyll of England’s manicured lawns was shattered for<br />

ever and so many lives were taken, and countless more thrown<br />

into turmoil.<br />

It is important that <strong>the</strong> young of today reflect upon <strong>the</strong>se events<br />

and I am glad that we have now confirmed that in October<br />

(weekend of 24th/25th) a party of musicians from <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong><br />

will be going to St George’s Chapel, Ypres, to take part in a<br />

special Service to dedicate a memorial plaque to <strong>the</strong> 355 Old<br />

<strong>Repton</strong>ians who died in The First World War. News of this event<br />

came out too late to be included in <strong>the</strong> last ‘Arch’, but it has<br />

been well publicised on <strong>the</strong> website and elsewhere in recent<br />

months and you will find fur<strong>the</strong>r details of <strong>the</strong> trip in this<br />

edition, as well as of course being able to look forward to a full<br />

review of <strong>the</strong> occasion in next May’s publication.<br />

We are fortunate in that we will be able to combine our visit<br />

with <strong>the</strong> unveiling of a memorial to those members of <strong>the</strong><br />

Sherwood Foresters who fell in Flanders, and <strong>the</strong> boys and girls<br />

will have <strong>the</strong> privilege of playing with a Regimental Band as<br />

well as receiving a guided tour of <strong>the</strong> battle grounds from<br />

experts in <strong>the</strong> field. I am sure this will be a weekend to live long<br />

in <strong>the</strong> memory and should any members of <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong><br />

community wish to join us at that Service, you would of course<br />

be very welcome. Mr Stevens, whom you will recall mounted a<br />

superb exhibition on <strong>the</strong> lives of <strong>the</strong> 355 <strong>Repton</strong>ians who died<br />

in <strong>the</strong> war some two years ago, will revive and amplify this<br />

display in advance of <strong>the</strong> trip, and make it available to all<br />

members of <strong>the</strong> community, in order that <strong>the</strong> Service itself may<br />

have <strong>the</strong> deepest possible resonance.<br />

Robert Holroyd


Beyond The Arch<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - CHAPEL COMMEMORATION SERVICE<br />

The <strong>School</strong> celebrated <strong>the</strong> 150th Anniversary of <strong>the</strong> Commemoration of<br />

<strong>the</strong> Chapel on 6 June 2009. The Choir sang an an<strong>the</strong>m especially<br />

commissioned for <strong>the</strong> occasion by Alexander L'Estrange entitled 'Tune Me<br />

O Lord'. The Bishop of Derby presided over <strong>the</strong> occasion and preached a<br />

memorable sermon in which he reminded us that <strong>the</strong> building of <strong>the</strong><br />

chapel coincided with <strong>the</strong> publication of Darwin's 'Origin of Species'. In a<br />

humorous reflection on how Darwin decided to marry Emma Wedgewood<br />

by compiling a list of pluses and minuses-<strong>the</strong> Bishop thought it significant<br />

that even in a world of hard scientific reductionism Darwin could never<br />

contemplate himself being able to live without love. The service was<br />

attended by ORs and current Sixth Form alike.<br />

Rev Adam Watkinson<br />

Over <strong>the</strong> past few years <strong>the</strong> Careers Department has seen many changes in<br />

<strong>the</strong> way it has been guiding <strong>Repton</strong> pupils to think about higher education<br />

and <strong>the</strong> world of work beyond school and university. We continue to believe<br />

strongly in <strong>the</strong> value of inviting experienced professional people into school to<br />

talk about <strong>the</strong>ir work, tapping <strong>the</strong>ir expertise and detailed hands-on<br />

knowledge of individual career paths to guide and inform current <strong>Repton</strong>ians<br />

as <strong>the</strong>y consider <strong>the</strong>ir future employment options.<br />

The Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian body has been an invaluable source of support in one of<br />

our key career activities, <strong>the</strong> Careers Forum held annually in June. Experts<br />

from a wide range of fields address small groups of interested sixth formers,<br />

outlining <strong>the</strong> nature of <strong>the</strong>ir work and answering questions from <strong>the</strong> pupils.<br />

This year eighteen delegates contributed to <strong>the</strong> forum, generously volunteering <strong>the</strong>ir free time to give<br />

our pupils insight into popular areas of employment including law, <strong>arch</strong>itecture, <strong>the</strong> Armed Forces,<br />

medicine, financial management, investment banking and journalism, among o<strong>the</strong>rs. OR participation<br />

in this year’s forum was again significant, and much appreciated.<br />

Old <strong>Repton</strong>ians and parents have also helped by offering work experience placements to a number of<br />

our pupils. Many university courses expect to see evidence of relevant work experience to support<br />

applications for particular courses, and this has now become an important part of a pupil’s education.<br />

A database of ORs and parents willing to help in this area is<br />

proving a very valuable resource to current pupils.<br />

If you would be interested in taking part in next year’s<br />

Careers Forum or are willing to offer careers advice or work<br />

experience in this way, please contact <strong>the</strong> Careers<br />

Department. We would be delighted to hear from you.<br />

Melissa Blain<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - CAREERS DEPARTMENT<br />

(32)


Tristram Fane-Saunders (O), Sam<br />

Kingston-Jones (S) Sarah Cotterill (A)<br />

in The Proposal<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - DRAMA<br />

Once again this has been a busy year. The <strong>School</strong> Play in November was a full scale, ambitious<br />

production of Tom Stoppard’s hilarious farce, On <strong>the</strong> Razzle. John Price (S), in his last school<br />

play, was exceptional as <strong>the</strong> lead, wringing his hands in anguish at every unlucky twist and<br />

turn, rattling out jokes with a perfect sense of timing and understanding, ably supported by<br />

<strong>the</strong> likes of Blair Dunlop (S) and Joe Knight (O). As I write JMGL is busy preparing a slightly<br />

adapted version for <strong>the</strong> Edinburgh Festival Fringe under <strong>the</strong> umbrella of <strong>the</strong> Rep Theatre<br />

Company. Performances, with almost all of <strong>the</strong> original cast, take place in <strong>the</strong> last week of<br />

August at C Venues. This will be <strong>the</strong> youngest group <strong>the</strong><br />

company has taken to Edinburgh and it promises to be a<br />

very exciting enterprise.<br />

Also in <strong>the</strong> Michaelmas Term IWM produced two, short, Chekhov comedies with <strong>the</strong> Literary<br />

Society. Who else could have imagined Chekhov to be so funny? In <strong>the</strong> first piece, The<br />

Anniversary, Mark Harrison (L) and Claudia Johnson-Sabine (M) were hilariously controlled and<br />

disciplined as a bank fell apart around <strong>the</strong>m. In <strong>the</strong> second, The Proposal, all three actors, Sam<br />

Kingston-Jones (S), Sarah Cotterill (A) and Tristram Fane-Saunders (O), were excellent as a quiet<br />

afternoon turned to high farce. The four nights of The Lent Term Charity Cabaret proved to be John Price and Blair Dunlop (S)<br />

<strong>Repton</strong>’s hottest ticket once again. There was a full report on this in <strong>the</strong> last issue of The Arch, in On <strong>the</strong> Razzle<br />

but I can confirm that <strong>the</strong> ‘Child Rehabilitation Centre’ in Sri Lanka was able to benefit from a<br />

record sum of £11,330, a superb tribute to <strong>the</strong> 120 or so staff and pupils involved.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> Summer Term <strong>the</strong> A Level practical pieces went extremely well again. There were plenty<br />

of A grades and one pupil scored full marks for her acting, only <strong>the</strong> second time a <strong>Repton</strong>ian<br />

has achieved this. At <strong>the</strong> end of term <strong>the</strong> Junior <strong>School</strong> Play was an adaptation of <strong>the</strong> Capek<br />

Bro<strong>the</strong>rs’ Insect Play, involving forty pupils. There was also a short, very funny performance of<br />

Pyramus and Thisbe (<strong>the</strong> rude mechanicals’ entertainment from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer<br />

Night’s Dream) on <strong>the</strong> back of a truck in <strong>the</strong> yard on Speech Day.<br />

For next year, careful planning has taken place to ensure that <strong>the</strong> range and standards of<br />

opportunity for pupils are maintained during <strong>the</strong> radical refurbishment of <strong>the</strong> 400 Hall.<br />

Exciting times lie ahead!<br />

John Sentence<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - CCF<br />

ORs may like to know that <strong>the</strong> CCF Army section summer camp 09 was a<br />

resounding success. News of <strong>the</strong> RAF section's summer camp will follow shortly,<br />

but will, I am sure, be equally encouraging. Army camp, held at Longmoor Camp<br />

in Hampshire, immediately after <strong>the</strong> end of summer term, was a tremendously<br />

varied series of opportunities for <strong>the</strong> 44 cadets who attended (owing to limited<br />

places, less than half of <strong>the</strong> section could attend). These Army section cadets<br />

were almost all volunteers (with a few willing pressed) - <strong>the</strong> whole approach, all<br />

week, of our cadets reminded me powerfully of <strong>the</strong> enduring qualities of<br />

<strong>Repton</strong>ians, and it bodes very well for <strong>the</strong> future of <strong>the</strong> Contingent that our<br />

current A block contains some outstanding young men and women. The weekly<br />

CCF is <strong>the</strong> avenue for activities (shooting, kayak, climbing, obstacle course etc.)<br />

which broaden <strong>the</strong> experiences of pupils, and <strong>the</strong> Longmoor camp added<br />

fur<strong>the</strong>rmore: shotgun, live rifle ranges (both ETR and Barrack), orienteering, kayak,<br />

windsurfing, catamaran rafts, paintballing targetry, section attacks, ambushes, survival<br />

skills- including water purifying techniques and animal butchery - and for selected<br />

cadets <strong>the</strong> chance to represent us in M<strong>arch</strong> at Shoot and Obstacle Course<br />

competitions. My thanks in particular go to <strong>the</strong> Adjutant, Capt Wadsworth (ex 7 RHA,<br />

now <strong>Repton</strong>'s SSI), whose tireless work supported all that was achieved, and to <strong>the</strong><br />

cadets <strong>the</strong>mselves - I invite all ORs to raise a glass, at an appropriate opportunity, to<br />

<strong>the</strong> rude health of <strong>the</strong> Contingent.<br />

Gary Lawrence<br />

(33)<br />

Nathan Carr (N) and Wiebke Green (M)<br />

CCF Army Camp 09, Longmoor


SCHOOL NEWS - CRICKET<br />

The 1st XI enjoyed ano<strong>the</strong>r excellent season, winning 12 of its 17 games, losing only<br />

twice and remaining unbeaten against schools.<br />

Hamza Siddique (S) (427 at 28.46) did not enjoy <strong>the</strong> prolific run scoring that he had in<br />

2008 but grew into a most impressive captain and led a side which was most<br />

characterised by its depth in all departments.<br />

On <strong>the</strong> batting side this was amply illustrated by <strong>the</strong> fact that though only one batsman,<br />

Chris Murrall (O) (418 at 32.15), made a hundred, as many as eight passed fifty. Top of<br />

<strong>the</strong> averages was <strong>the</strong> U16, Sam Graham (S), who made only 276 runs after a late<br />

arrival into <strong>the</strong> side, but averaged 55.20. O<strong>the</strong>r major contributors were Matt<br />

Sanderson (S) (325 at 36.11), Tom Cosford (L) (340 at 34.00) and Eddie Ikin (L) (323<br />

at 26.91). The bowling was dominated, in wicket-taking terms at least, by <strong>the</strong> spinners,<br />

and in particular <strong>the</strong> off-spin pairing of <strong>the</strong> prolific Josh Moore (37 at 14.72) and Matt<br />

Sanderson (26 at 17.07). With a year left at <strong>Repton</strong> Moore has now taken over eighty<br />

1st XI wickets and Scott Chilman’s (P’99) recent record (111) looks in his sights.<br />

Seamers Luke Lacey (C’07), Ameer Ahmed (C) and Richard Lawrence (P’04) (at<br />

times) all bowled well, too, as did a third off-spinner, Tom Cosford. Behind <strong>the</strong> stumps<br />

George Hodson-Walker (S) was more than tidy and when he was unavailable Alasdair<br />

Fearns (P) proved a capable understudy. In <strong>the</strong> field, with Ikin outstanding, <strong>the</strong><br />

standards were generally high both in terms of performance and behaviour. <strong>Repton</strong><br />

teams continue to eschew <strong>the</strong> mindless noise which characterises <strong>the</strong> on-field behaviour<br />

of so many of our opponents and long may that be <strong>the</strong> case.<br />

Frank Watson (Master i/c Cricket)<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - GIRL’S FOOTBALL<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> Girls Make History<br />

In <strong>the</strong> summer term <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong> girls’ football team rounded off a very enjoyable season by becoming National Champions in <strong>the</strong><br />

ISFA Girls Cup. Having progressed to <strong>the</strong> semi-finals by <strong>the</strong> end of <strong>the</strong> Lent term, we first disposed of Cheltenham Ladies<br />

College on our home turf and <strong>the</strong>n faced ACS Cobham – an American International <strong>School</strong> – in <strong>the</strong> final, which was held at St<br />

George’s <strong>School</strong>, Ascot. After falling behind twice to our well-drilled and accomplished opponents, <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong> girls turned in a<br />

magnificent second-half performance to win <strong>the</strong> match by 6 goals to 2, including four from midfield maestro Shona McCallin<br />

(A), who richly deserved her award as player of <strong>the</strong> match. The o<strong>the</strong>r scorers were Lucy Setterington (A) and Abi Halidu (A). It<br />

was a proud moment when Abi Rodwell (A), who has been <strong>the</strong> driving force and dynamo both on and off <strong>the</strong> pitch, lifted <strong>the</strong><br />

trophy. The girls were all smiles on <strong>the</strong> long journey home after a hard-earned victory which really puts girls’ football on <strong>the</strong> map<br />

at <strong>Repton</strong>.<br />

D S Newman<br />

(34)


This year has been ano<strong>the</strong>r tremendously successful one for<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> hockey. The performances of several of <strong>the</strong> junior teams<br />

show great promise for <strong>the</strong> future too. The 1st XI, captained by<br />

Emma Fearnley (G), won a record fifth successive National Title<br />

in stylish fashion not conceding a single goal and scoring more<br />

than <strong>the</strong>ir competitors put toge<strong>the</strong>r. The boy's squad, aided<br />

by <strong>the</strong> goals of Christian Reimann (C), reached <strong>the</strong> National<br />

Indoor Finals only narrowly losing in <strong>the</strong> semi-final to <strong>the</strong><br />

eventual champions. The Under 16 Girls Lent Term squad<br />

reached <strong>the</strong> National Plate quarter-final failing to progress after<br />

a penalty shoot-out. Megan Byas (F) was <strong>the</strong> star of <strong>the</strong> Lent<br />

Term squad and also won her second National Under 18 title<br />

despite only being in A-Block.<br />

Several Old <strong>Repton</strong>ians and current pupils have been in<br />

International hockey action this summer. Susie Gilbert (F’02)<br />

represented England's Senior women's team in <strong>the</strong> recent<br />

Champions Trophy which was held in Sydney. The Champions<br />

Trophy is one of <strong>the</strong> most prestigious tournaments in hockey as<br />

it features <strong>the</strong> top six ranked teams in <strong>the</strong> world. At <strong>the</strong> time<br />

of going to press, Charlotte Craddock (A’05) and Georgie<br />

Twigg (F’03) have helped England to make a good start in <strong>the</strong><br />

FJR<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - HOCKEY<br />

Junior World Cup which is<br />

being held at Harvard<br />

University in Boston, USA.<br />

Good results against<br />

France, Chile and Korea<br />

have put <strong>the</strong> team on<br />

course for a semi-final<br />

place. Will Byas (L6S)<br />

has also represented<br />

England Under 18's this<br />

season, Shona McCallin<br />

(L6A) helped her England<br />

Under 18 team to a<br />

bronze medal at <strong>the</strong> European Championship in Belgium and<br />

Director of Coaching, Martin Jones (C’97), has played in<br />

International Test Matches against Pakistan, India and Germany<br />

in recent months.<br />

All details of fixtures and results can be found on <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>'s<br />

website from September 1st and any support down at <strong>the</strong><br />

Tanyard throughout <strong>the</strong> year will always be appreciated.<br />

Martin Jones<br />

Fred Rule came to <strong>Repton</strong> from Crossley Heath <strong>School</strong>, Halifax in 1991 to become Head of ICT; a post<br />

which he built from scratch. As well as introducing ICT as an examinable subject, he was responsible for,<br />

and <strong>the</strong> driving force behind, <strong>the</strong> introduction of computer technology throughout <strong>the</strong> school. Prior to<br />

Fred’s arrival, <strong>the</strong>re was none of <strong>the</strong> equipment which everyone now uses as part of <strong>the</strong>ir normal<br />

routine. I can’t think that anyone else has had such an influence in so many disparate areas of <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>School</strong>. Having established <strong>the</strong> initial network with a few Apple computers, he was invited to speak at a<br />

major national conference by <strong>the</strong> managing director of Apple UK. Fred was at <strong>the</strong> forefront of <strong>the</strong><br />

introduction of new technology. In <strong>the</strong> classroom he was appreciated by all for his expert knowledge,<br />

his inspiring teaching and his warm humour. In <strong>the</strong> days before every pupil had <strong>the</strong>ir own computer, he<br />

gave generously of his time. The ICT centre was open every evening and at weekends so that pupils could study. No o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

academic department <strong>the</strong>n or since has been so accessible. This speaks volumes for his dedication to his subject, and to <strong>the</strong><br />

pupils in his care. Despite this commitment, he managed to play a full part in o<strong>the</strong>r areas of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>. As a tutor in The<br />

Orchard, and more recently New House, he used his cheery good humour to good effect. It is one of Fred’s great strengths that<br />

he is able to see <strong>the</strong> funny side of life, recognise <strong>the</strong> absurdness of pomposity and laugh at himself. It is always difficult to feel<br />

down for long in his company. His innate cheerfulness endeared him to colleagues and pupils alike. In his early days, he coached<br />

football and rugby, and lately found a passion for golf. Like a true schoolmaster, he was keen to share this passion with <strong>the</strong><br />

pupils, though often it was a case of teacher being taught as, by his own admission, he is a keen player ra<strong>the</strong>r than a gifted one.<br />

In some ways he was <strong>the</strong> victim of his own success when information and communication technology became so firmly<br />

entrenched in <strong>the</strong> everyday routine that it became less popular as an academic subject. But Fred had more than one string to his<br />

bow and he taught ma<strong>the</strong>matics as well as continuing to inspire his ICT students. 2009 has been a difficult year, above all for <strong>the</strong><br />

personal tragedy for which Fred and his family have <strong>the</strong> deepest sympathy of all his friends and colleagues at <strong>Repton</strong>. This would<br />

have stopped most people in <strong>the</strong>ir tracks, but Fred paused, took time to plan his future with his soul mate and partner Andrea,<br />

and <strong>the</strong>n got on with it; looking ahead with his usual cheerful optimism. We wish him every success in whatever he does, and<br />

whenever anyone at <strong>Repton</strong> turns on <strong>the</strong>ir computer <strong>the</strong>y can give a thought to <strong>the</strong> man who brought so much to <strong>Repton</strong> and<br />

say a silent “All <strong>the</strong> best, Fred”.<br />

DM<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - FAREWELL TO STAFF<br />

(35)


DAE<br />

David Exley joined <strong>Repton</strong> in September 2006, having previously worked at Sedbergh. He was<br />

no stranger to <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>, as a former pupil of Foremarke and an <strong>old</strong> boy of The Priory.<br />

Despite only having a three year stay, David has made a huge contribution to <strong>School</strong> life.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> Economics and Business Studies Department, he has taught both subjects with real<br />

enthusiasm. He has proved to be an excellent teacher, who, I’m sure, will be much missed by<br />

his students. He has played a full role in <strong>the</strong> Department during his time here and helped to<br />

introduce many initiatives that have improved <strong>the</strong> quality of our activities.<br />

A house tutor in The Cross during his time at <strong>Repton</strong>, David served his first two years as <strong>the</strong><br />

Resident Tutor. A caring and thoughtful presence, he has always been willing to give freely of<br />

his time to support <strong>the</strong> House.<br />

His most significant contribution to <strong>the</strong> extra-curricular life of <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> has been on <strong>the</strong> sports field. An accomplished hockey<br />

player in his own right, he quickly became a valuable member of <strong>the</strong> hockey coaching set-up. His enthusiasm and expertise on<br />

<strong>the</strong> boys’ U14A team has been vital in setting <strong>the</strong> younger players along <strong>the</strong> right lines during <strong>the</strong>ir first year. His work with <strong>the</strong><br />

girls’ U15A team has also been particularly successful, and I’m sure that over <strong>the</strong> next few years <strong>the</strong>re will be plenty of 1st XI<br />

players who will have benefitted from a term of Exley coaching!<br />

As well as working on <strong>the</strong> hockey he has also found time to run <strong>the</strong> U15B cricket side in <strong>the</strong> Summer Term and even ran <strong>the</strong><br />

U14A football team in his first term at <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>.<br />

David has also been willing to give of his time during <strong>the</strong> holidays, accompanying <strong>the</strong> cricket tour to South Africa and <strong>the</strong> hockey<br />

tours to Dublin.<br />

During his time at <strong>Repton</strong>, David has developed into a first class schoolmaster, contributing impressively in a wide range of areas.<br />

I think <strong>the</strong> largest compliment I could pay him is to say how hard it will be to replace his presence in so many areas, come<br />

September. It is certainly rare that someone makes such a significant impression at <strong>Repton</strong> in such a relatively short space of<br />

time. He departs for <strong>the</strong> Grammar <strong>School</strong> at Leeds with our best wishes; our loss is certainly <strong>the</strong>ir gain.<br />

MMC<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - FAREWELL TO STAFF Continued<br />

DSN<br />

David Newman joined <strong>Repton</strong> from St. Peter’s, York in 1998 to become Head of Classics<br />

- and what an impact he has made on <strong>the</strong> school in his eleven years with us! Often seen as<br />

<strong>the</strong> preserve of <strong>the</strong> academic elite, David’s determination that Classics should be open to all<br />

has ensured that numbers in <strong>the</strong> school studying Latin, Greek and Classical Civilisation have<br />

grown significantly. At <strong>the</strong> same time, however, he has managed to retain <strong>the</strong> highest of<br />

academic standards, with over a dozen Classicists heading off to Oxford or Cambridge during<br />

his stewardship. It is an enviable record and one of which he must be very proud.<br />

Yet David is not <strong>the</strong> traditional Classics teacher that his education (Haileybury followed by<br />

Magdalen College, Oxford) would suggest. Ventures such as hosting a classically-based Jerry<br />

Springer Show for <strong>the</strong> Sixth Form, as well as Death Factor, in which Sixth Form Classicists<br />

played <strong>the</strong> role of mythical characters trying to persuade a panel of judges to allow <strong>the</strong>m into<br />

Elysium, reflect his desire to make <strong>the</strong> study of <strong>the</strong> ancient world as accessible as possible. Who could forget <strong>the</strong> Classical Society<br />

meetings held in <strong>the</strong> garden of The Mitre? On one occasion he had himself produced in a wheelbarrow as <strong>the</strong> dead Agamemnon<br />

during a reproduction of Aeschylus’ great play, and how he persuaded Deborah, dressed in nothing but a sheet, to appear from<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir bedroom window as <strong>the</strong> goddess A<strong>the</strong>ne, only Zeus knows! He leaves <strong>the</strong> Classics Department in a very strong position and<br />

his legacy will surely live on for years to come.<br />

David is a man who lives his life in a truly classical manner: he relishes early starts, often sending emails to his department timed<br />

at 5:23am, is a keen athlete, competing in a number of marathons, and was even heard once bragging that <strong>the</strong> private side<br />

living room in The Mitre had <strong>the</strong> same proportions as <strong>the</strong> Par<strong>the</strong>non! He was also never happier than when taking <strong>Repton</strong>ians on<br />

tours of <strong>the</strong> Classical Mediterranean, where he could be seen racing <strong>the</strong> pupils round sites such as <strong>the</strong> Circus Maximus in Rome,<br />

and <strong>the</strong> stadia in Delphi and Olympia. I should add that he rarely lost! His competitive spirit led him to victory in <strong>the</strong> pedalo race<br />

around <strong>the</strong> bay of Tolo, yet his sporting talent did not stop <strong>the</strong>re; he coached <strong>the</strong> 3rd XI Football side for many successful seasons<br />

and also did a great job taking girls’ tennis in <strong>the</strong> Summer Term. In recent years, he has also been instrumental in setting up <strong>the</strong><br />

girls’ football team who, under his guidance, reached <strong>the</strong> national final this year.<br />

Continued<br />

(36)


SCHOOL NEWS - FAREWELL TO STAFF Continued<br />

After many successful years as an Orchard tutor, his role in <strong>the</strong> pastoral life of <strong>the</strong> school took on greater meaning when he and<br />

Deborah entered The Mitre in 2003 in order to re-open it as a girls’ house, and <strong>the</strong>y soon proved to be a highly successful and<br />

dynamic pair. Although Deborah was <strong>the</strong> official Housemistress, David’s role in establishing The Mitre as a happy and flourishing<br />

community must never be underestimated, and <strong>the</strong> girls were just as sad to see David (or “Daddy Sugar Nuts” as he was<br />

affectionately known in reference to his initials) move out in 2008 as <strong>the</strong>y were to wave goodbye to Deborah on her<br />

appointment to Fulneck <strong>School</strong>. With his wonderful wife already settled up <strong>the</strong> M1, it was only a matter of time before David<br />

would follow, and we were all thrilled for him when his appointment as Deputy Head of St Olave’s <strong>School</strong> in York was<br />

announced. That said, it is a source of deep regret that we are losing such a terrific schoolmaster and a wonderful friend to so<br />

many. David possesses those rare qualities of intelligence, integrity, humour and whole-hearted commitment, and <strong>the</strong>se have<br />

made him such an inspiration to countless <strong>Repton</strong>ians over <strong>the</strong> past eleven years. He will be sorely missed.<br />

And so, as we say ave atque vale to one of <strong>Repton</strong>’s great characters, I can only imagine what his final words might be. To<br />

misquote Vespasian, “Alas, I think I’m becoming a Deputy” might just fit <strong>the</strong> bill!<br />

JELD<br />

RET<br />

Staff and pupil alike, we all know how it feels to join <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> as a newcomer, but, in 1994, when Rosemary (<strong>the</strong>n REH) arrived<br />

at <strong>Repton</strong> from Tettenhall College, she came not only as a new member of Common Room but as <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>’s first Senior<br />

Mistress - and indeed <strong>the</strong> first woman to sit in senior management at <strong>Repton</strong> in some 433 years of its history. Some pioneers go<br />

in all guns blazing, but that is nei<strong>the</strong>r RET’s nor <strong>Repton</strong>’s style, and <strong>the</strong> success with which she has created what now seems an<br />

indispensible role in <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> is testament to her very considerable skills of diplomacy, patience and determination.<br />

The creation of <strong>the</strong> post of Senior Mistress may have arisen from <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>’s move to full co-education a few years earlier but it<br />

was no mere tokenism and RET’s responsibilities over her fifteen years at <strong>Repton</strong> have touched upon every single member of <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>School</strong>: <strong>the</strong> creation and introduction of a PHSE programme, launching and monitoring <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>’s anti-bullying strategy, and,<br />

latterly, responsibility for Child Protection. These are undoubtedly amongst <strong>the</strong> hardest – and most important – challenges in any<br />

school, but RET’s unswerving compassion for <strong>the</strong> vulnerable and sense of justice made her <strong>the</strong> ideal choice to lead <strong>the</strong>se<br />

initiatives, and she has promoted <strong>the</strong> highest standards of pastoral care across <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> with courage, clarity of judgement and<br />

- just as important – a sense of proportion.<br />

An enthusiastic advocate of professional development, she was also <strong>the</strong> <strong>arch</strong>itect of <strong>the</strong> staff appraisal scheme and, through her<br />

management of <strong>the</strong> INSET resources and induction of newly qualified teachers, she has continued to encourage colleagues,<br />

young and <strong>old</strong>. And well beyond this formal role, <strong>the</strong>re are many of us within Common Room who have relied upon, and indeed<br />

been moulded by, her wise advice, always carefully considered and generously given.<br />

But always at <strong>the</strong> heart of Rosemary’s commitment to <strong>the</strong> <strong>Repton</strong> community has been her teaching. In <strong>the</strong> classroom, in<br />

countless tutorials and on dozens of field trips and expeditions – across deserts, over mountains and round <strong>the</strong> inevitable oxbow<br />

lakes – RET’s pupils have always known that not only would <strong>the</strong>y receive outstanding tuition during lessons, but that she would<br />

always find time outside to help with coursework or explain areas of difficulty. Her hard work is born of a genuine interest in <strong>the</strong><br />

world and its peoples – an interest which she has communicated with passion to all her classes – and I am sure that travel will<br />

feature highly on <strong>the</strong> list of retirement plans – although she may well feel that that <strong>the</strong> possibilities of Ladybower Reservoir have<br />

now been exhausted…<br />

In her fifteen years <strong>the</strong>re have, in fact, been few areas of school life which have not benefited from RET’s talents, but chief<br />

amongst <strong>the</strong>se has been her love of all things <strong>the</strong>atrical. Early on, she taught GCSE Drama alongside her Geography<br />

commitments, and for many years she was joint Wardrobe Mistress alongside (and ‘Nice Cop’ to) <strong>the</strong> somewhat forthright Miss<br />

Patricia Wilmot. Many of us can be grateful for Rosemary’s more sensitive assessment of our needs and her ability to find a<br />

costume that not only suited <strong>the</strong> part but fitted us, too.<br />

With her departure, <strong>the</strong> pupils will miss a highly committed Geography teacher, <strong>the</strong> management team one of its wisest and<br />

bravest voices, and many of us an extremely good friend: a tremendously popular member of <strong>the</strong> Common Room, <strong>the</strong>re have<br />

been few announcements received with more pleasure than when REH became RET on her marriage to Roger in 2003. It is good<br />

to know that, in Brewood, <strong>the</strong>y will not be too far away from <strong>the</strong>ir <strong>Repton</strong> family, though Thompson Tours will no doubt make it<br />

to exotic parts, too. My only advice to Rosemary would be that she, and not Roger, chooses <strong>the</strong> destination - or it might be<br />

Burton Albion’s ground ra<strong>the</strong>r than Biarritz or <strong>the</strong> Bahamas!<br />

SABT<br />

(37)


RST<br />

Londoners travelling by road might think that <strong>the</strong> North starts at <strong>the</strong> Watford Gap; railway enthusiasts might opt for Crewe<br />

Station; but when I arrived at <strong>Repton</strong>, many years ago, I realised that in truth <strong>the</strong> North starts at RST. Here was <strong>the</strong> man with <strong>the</strong><br />

uncompromising grit that fitted my preconception of what a true Nor<strong>the</strong>rner should be. Not that he thought much of me at <strong>the</strong><br />

time: I was useless at tennis. Let me explain.<br />

Roger Thompson was captain of Derbyshire tennis and Head of History at Frederick Gent <strong>School</strong> in South Normanton when he<br />

presented himself for interview at The Arch in 1975. The <strong>the</strong>n Headmaster, John Gammell, chatted away as <strong>the</strong>y strolled round<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>. At <strong>the</strong> end of <strong>the</strong> tour, just when RST thought <strong>the</strong> formal interview might begin, John Gammell said “I’ll let you<br />

know”, and that was it.<br />

RST was duly appointed, and he became Master i/c Tennis in 1976. When David Jewell became Headmaster in 1979, RST first<br />

hatched <strong>the</strong> plan of recruiting good tennis players who would train every day at <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>. The first three arrived in 1980, and<br />

success was immediate, with <strong>Repton</strong> winning <strong>the</strong> Youll Cup (boys, independent schools) in 1981 and <strong>the</strong>n 14 fur<strong>the</strong>r times<br />

under RST. The Glanvill Cup (boys, all schools) was won in 1982 and <strong>the</strong>n 10 fur<strong>the</strong>r times. The girls won <strong>the</strong> Aberdare Cup (all<br />

schools) four years running, from 1984 to 1987. <strong>Repton</strong> also produced a number of national champions, Phil Cooper becoming<br />

British U18 champion in 1991 perhaps being <strong>the</strong> highlight.<br />

These outstanding successes did not arrive on a plate. They were <strong>the</strong> fruits of RST’s phenomenal determination and leadership:<br />

he expected o<strong>the</strong>rs to work as hard as he did. Some of his colleagues in <strong>the</strong> early years disapproved of <strong>the</strong> specialisation<br />

necessary for this level of success, but this only served to streng<strong>the</strong>n RST’s resolve. The scale and longevity of his achievement,<br />

keeping <strong>Repton</strong> at <strong>the</strong> top of <strong>the</strong> school tennis scene for 30 years, is a tribute to his vision, commitment and organisation.<br />

RST preferred to label himself a teacher of History, ra<strong>the</strong>r than an Historian, and he acquired a reputation as a highly effective<br />

motivator of some of <strong>the</strong> less able pupils. His video lessons became <strong>the</strong> stuff of legend, but he has always insisted that <strong>the</strong> tape<br />

was regularly paused for question and answer sessions. One of his pupils was Jeremy Clarkson, who visited <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> recently.<br />

RST said to him: “You remember that O-level coursework you did for me on canals? It was rubbish.” Clarkson replied: “I know.<br />

My Dad wrote it!”<br />

RST continued his love of football while at <strong>Repton</strong>; in fact, he would have liked to have run <strong>the</strong> sport, had <strong>the</strong> opportunity arisen<br />

in his early years here. Many of his tennis players became star players in <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> 1st XI, and RST’s interest extended well<br />

beyond his frequent and effective refereeing. One of his hobbies is ensuring that he has watched matches at all of <strong>the</strong> grounds<br />

of <strong>the</strong> clubs in <strong>the</strong> top four football leagues: a trip to Burton Albion <strong>the</strong>refore beckons in his retirement.<br />

RST was, for many years, Master i/c Grounds, and it seemed a natural step for him to become Sports Co-ordinator, a post which<br />

later took <strong>the</strong> title of Director of Sport. He threw himself into this task with his customary vigour and thoroughness, developing a<br />

sports programme for all pupils, setting up a Sports Committee (<strong>the</strong> only one whose minutes still appear on paper), and mapping<br />

out, with <strong>the</strong> relevant staff, <strong>the</strong> routes to excellence in key sports. He can be rightly proud of his contribution to <strong>the</strong> successes<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> has had in recent years, but he has also presided over radical improvements to <strong>the</strong> provision for less able sporting<br />

pupils.<br />

RST has also been involved in o<strong>the</strong>r areas of <strong>School</strong> life. He was a House tutor in The Priory for many years, a role he reprised at<br />

<strong>School</strong> House when it first started (a time when this soft Sou<strong>the</strong>rner got to know him much better). Those of us who have heard<br />

him sing in Pedants will understand why his favourite film genre is Westerns ra<strong>the</strong>r than Musicals. His sense of humour was<br />

never more evident than in a Pedants sketch of The Full Monty, when he removed a seemingly endless supply of <strong>old</strong> vests. Those<br />

boyhood days in Chesterfield must have been c<strong>old</strong>!<br />

RST has given outstanding service to <strong>Repton</strong>, never shirking difficult decisions in his direct approach, but always able to apply <strong>the</strong><br />

human touch.<br />

AFM<br />

SCHOOL NEWS - FAREWELL TO STAFF Continued<br />

The staff and pupils of <strong>Repton</strong> wish Roger and Rosemary<br />

a long, healthy, happy – and thoroughly deserved<br />

retirement<br />

(38)


PIGEON POST<br />

Sirs,<br />

I was fascinated to read of <strong>the</strong> President’s early days at <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>, particularly reference to “personal faggin”. He had <strong>the</strong><br />

privilege one term of being in my study (a mere House Prefect, top floor turn right, last on <strong>the</strong> left overlooking <strong>the</strong> Old Trent,<br />

occupied by seven of us including Charles Fry). He was probably <strong>the</strong> “bim fag”, but unusually (some of <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>rs of that era<br />

were probably less reasonable) treated hopefully with dignity! His particular claim to fame however was in <strong>the</strong> arena of Yard<br />

Cricket - sawn off bat and one side highly polished tennis balls hurled as fast as was possible. The usual aim was to hit <strong>the</strong> ball<br />

onto <strong>the</strong> roof of <strong>the</strong> Hall or into <strong>the</strong> adjoining church yard, but he made semi reasonable shots! I do share his view of a very<br />

companionable house (my family <strong>the</strong>n lived in Kenya) and like him my affection for <strong>the</strong> school continues. I think it has always<br />

and hope continues to produce “character”. In any event, best wishes and congratulations to <strong>the</strong> President.<br />

Wilfrid Evershed (H’52)<br />

Sirs<br />

The retirement of Chris Adams (P’85) from first class cricket, perhaps too briefly reported in <strong>the</strong> last issue, gives an opportunity<br />

to see how his statistics compare with <strong>Repton</strong> cricketers of <strong>the</strong> past. Chris had a long career, making his debut for Derbyshire<br />

in 1988, and playing over a period when changes in <strong>the</strong> domestic game meant that <strong>the</strong>re were fewer opportunities for first class<br />

cricket. His career figures are as follows:<br />

Matches 336; Innings 546; Runs 19,535; Average 38.68; 100s 48; Catches 404.<br />

Only four <strong>Repton</strong>ians played more matches: D B Carr 446, B H Valentine 399. C B Fry 395 and F S G Calthorpe, but only Fry with<br />

30,886 scored more runs. Adams’ highest score (239) is bettered by L C H Palairet (292), John Carr (261*), Fry (258*) and<br />

Valentine (242). His total of 48 centuries was beaten only by Fry with 94, and his career average by Fry (50.22) and John Carr<br />

(38.90). Adams was one of <strong>the</strong> best fielders of his generation and only Donald Carr, with 499, took more catches.<br />

Figures may not tell <strong>the</strong> whole story, but Chris can certainly be proud of his record. It is a pity that his international career did<br />

not do justice to his ability, but his captaincy of Sussex (he was incidentally <strong>the</strong> third <strong>Repton</strong>ian to h<strong>old</strong> that office) was<br />

outstanding: <strong>the</strong> county won eight trophies under his leadership including three championships. In 2004 he was selected as<br />

one of Wisden’s Five Cricketers of <strong>the</strong> Year. The o<strong>the</strong>r <strong>Repton</strong>ians to have been given this award are L C H Palairet, C B Fry,<br />

J N Crawford and D B Carr.<br />

Chris has performed vey well in limited-overs cricket: he played in 369 matches, scoring 11,481 runs with a highest score of 163.<br />

His total of 21 centuries is second among current players only to Marcus Trescothik and Herscelle Gibbs.<br />

J F M Walker (H’46)<br />

Dear Editor,<br />

As a somewhat infrequent participant at Gaudies (mea culpa) I should like to add my thanks to all involved in making this year’s<br />

event so memorable. Any initial dampening of <strong>the</strong> spirits due to <strong>the</strong> rain was quickly alleviated by <strong>the</strong> Commemoration Service<br />

of <strong>the</strong> Foundation of <strong>the</strong> Chapel, with its <strong>old</strong> favourite hymn tunes, Cwm Rhondda and <strong>Repton</strong>, counterpoised by <strong>the</strong> specially<br />

commissioned an<strong>the</strong>m – Tune Me, O Lord - to words by Christina Rossetti, which <strong>the</strong> Bishop of Derby used as one of <strong>the</strong> texts<br />

for his sermon, which included Darwin’s listing of <strong>the</strong> pros and cons of marriage.<br />

Later in <strong>the</strong> day we were wined and dined in style in Pears <strong>School</strong> and eloquently addressed by <strong>the</strong> Headmaster before a tour of<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong>, conducted in our case by two girls from <strong>the</strong> Mitre, whom we led astray from <strong>the</strong> set route by insisting that we<br />

approached our <strong>old</strong> house by way of rears track. When we mentioned <strong>the</strong> site of fag calls, it was assumed that this referred to<br />

cigarettes, while stories of <strong>the</strong> effects of boiling <strong>the</strong> milk for a study h<strong>old</strong>er’s cocoa should have been withheld until after we had<br />

been treated to a cream tea, backed up with a memory test in trying to identify faces from house photos of <strong>the</strong> early 50s.<br />

Which brings me to my only problem of <strong>the</strong> day, shared I suspect by several of my generation – identifying contemporaries at a<br />

Gaudy after a gap of over 50 years. I had checked <strong>the</strong> list on <strong>the</strong> website, and noted a dozen to contact. But how to find <strong>the</strong>m<br />

among <strong>the</strong> throng in <strong>the</strong> 400 Hall? Thanks to Richard Cowdell, I joined a number of Latham ORs from 1951, but <strong>the</strong>re were<br />

several from o<strong>the</strong>r houses that I never found. Larger labels, stressing eg M51, would help, but could I also support <strong>the</strong> idea<br />

proposed by Kevin McDonnell’s letter in <strong>the</strong> May 09 Arch, that <strong>the</strong>re should be a members only area in <strong>the</strong> website, for contact<br />

details - including mugshots?<br />

Meanwhile, may I end by asking Richard whe<strong>the</strong>r we appeared toge<strong>the</strong>r in a Mitre/Latham production of The Silver Box?<br />

David Harding (M’51)<br />

(39)


PIGEON POST Continued<br />

Dear Editor<br />

I wonder how many Old <strong>Repton</strong>ians realised <strong>the</strong> coincidence of <strong>the</strong> Three Wheeler Morgan appearing on <strong>the</strong> same page as “Bill”<br />

Blaxland in <strong>the</strong> May issue of The Arch?<br />

In his earlier years at <strong>Repton</strong> Bill owned a Three-Wheeler Morgan and among o<strong>the</strong>r tales he used to relate one of how he turned<br />

it over while trying to navigate <strong>the</strong> Cross.<br />

J.E. Gant-Ives (H’40)<br />

Dear Mr Stones<br />

Like many I thoroughly enjoy receiving my copy of The Arch.<br />

I was delighted to see <strong>the</strong> article about <strong>the</strong> Morgan car association with <strong>Repton</strong>.<br />

The Morgan Club of South Africa came to our restaurant for lunch a couple of years ago, on <strong>the</strong>ir way to <strong>the</strong> Cars in <strong>the</strong> Park<br />

annual show at Pietermaritzburg. They drove 8 of <strong>the</strong>se beauties up our driveway, sounded like a World War 2 RAF base.<br />

I have included a short article which I wrote for The Quill, a local newspaper, and some photos that I took on <strong>the</strong> day - 'a king's<br />

ransom of Morgan's parked on our top lawn'.<br />

Cooking Bear Restaurant goes Moggy.<br />

Cooking Bear Restaurant on <strong>the</strong> Caversham Road hosted Morgan car owners at lunch<br />

on Saturday 19th May. The magnificent 8 were on <strong>the</strong>ir way to <strong>the</strong> Pietermaritzburg<br />

‘Cars in <strong>the</strong> Park’ classic car rally held on Sunday 20th May.<br />

Morgan drivers refer to <strong>the</strong>ir beloved cars as Mogs and a couple of <strong>the</strong>se beauties<br />

sported suitable Registration numbers including ‘MOG 1’, which is a Morgan +8 with a<br />

3.5 litre engine, and ‘MOGGY 8’. The most recent model was also present, an Aero 8<br />

which sports a 4.4 litre engine and a R1.4 million price tag.<br />

The photograph shows 5 of <strong>the</strong> 8 beauties lined up on <strong>the</strong> lawn in front of <strong>the</strong> restaurant, with <strong>the</strong> bright yellow MOG 1 second<br />

from <strong>the</strong> left and <strong>the</strong> Aero 8 second from <strong>the</strong> right.<br />

Morgan owners can be a tad quirky. The club members are <strong>the</strong> cars, not <strong>the</strong> owners. The Morgan enthusiast’s web site<br />

www.gomog.com suggests that a Morgan owner “can cry like a baby when he finds a flea-sized scratch on his paint job, but will<br />

laugh with <strong>the</strong> rest of <strong>the</strong>m when he spins out on a corner and smashes a fender.”<br />

MOG 1 arrived first and announced itself with a throaty exhaust roar as it came up <strong>the</strong> Cooking Bear drive. According to Mike,<br />

owner of MOG 1, South Africa has <strong>the</strong> <strong>old</strong>est registered Morgan in <strong>the</strong> world that is still running.<br />

The Morgan Motor Company has hand-built its aluminium chassis, wooden framed sports cars at Great Malvern in England since<br />

1909.<br />

Best regards and <strong>the</strong> best of health to all at <strong>Repton</strong>.<br />

P.S. I was at <strong>Repton</strong> when our new President was rewriting <strong>the</strong> cricket books. I remember a very lively century he scored against<br />

a visiting Bermuda (or maybe Bahamas) team. Who said Calypso cricket was <strong>the</strong> sole preserve of <strong>the</strong> Caribbean?<br />

Peter Hall (L’57)<br />

It is with regret that we announce <strong>the</strong> death of Keith Workman, former Housemaster of The Cross.<br />

A proper obituary will follow in <strong>the</strong> next issue. During <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> Chapel Service on Sunday, November 15th<br />

at 10.15am, part of <strong>the</strong> service will be dedicated to his memory.<br />

(40)


OVERSEAS LINKS<br />

We are publishing below a full list of those <strong>Repton</strong>ians who have volunteered to be ‘Overseas Links’. We are very grateful to those who have<br />

volunteered, but <strong>the</strong>re are many gaps in <strong>the</strong> list of countries for which we have Links. If you would be willing to act as an Overseas Link in a<br />

country not already covered, please contact Mike Stones/Jan Cobb at: or@repton.org.uk or jcobb@repton.org.uk<br />

Country Overseas Link House/Year Email Telephone<br />

AUSTRALIA<br />

New South Wales<br />

Queensland<br />

Perth<br />

Victoria (Melbourne)<br />

Victoria<br />

CANADA<br />

Alberta<br />

Eastern Ontario & Quebec<br />

Western<br />

CHILE<br />

CHINA<br />

CYPRUS<br />

DENMARK<br />

EAST AFRICA<br />

EAST AFRICA (Kenya)<br />

EIRE<br />

FINLAND<br />

FRANCE<br />

GERMANY (East/South)<br />

GERMANY<br />

GERMANY<br />

HONG KONG<br />

HONG KONG<br />

INDIA<br />

ITALY<br />

JAPAN<br />

NEW ZEALAND<br />

NIGERIA<br />

NORWAY<br />

PHILIPPINES<br />

SINGAPORE<br />

SOUTH AFRICA<br />

Cape Town<br />

Johannesburg<br />

Natal<br />

SPAIN<br />

Madrid<br />

Madrid<br />

Mallorca<br />

SWITZERLAND<br />

TANZANIA<br />

THAILAND<br />

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES<br />

USA<br />

Ohio<br />

Massachusetts<br />

New York<br />

North Carolina<br />

North Carolina<br />

Florida<br />

Washington<br />

Arizona<br />

Texas<br />

All<br />

All<br />

WEST INDIES<br />

All<br />

CAYMAN ISLANDS<br />

JAMAICA<br />

ZAMBIA<br />

Lloyd Berger<br />

John Reddington<br />

Frank Smith<br />

Simon Q Crabtree<br />

Vanessa Twigg<br />

Rev Martin Hattersley<br />

Tony Houghton<br />

David Laing<br />

Nicolas Ibanez Scott<br />

Jipeng Li<br />

Richard Sale<br />

Mathilde Juul<br />

Mark Dudley<br />

Philip Hechle<br />

Brian John O'Neill<br />

Roger Smith<br />

Rev James Barnett<br />

James R Chapman<br />

Martin Duncan Robinshaw<br />

Severin J B Zilg<br />

Eddie Niem<br />

David Poon<br />

Tom Goodall<br />

Julie Daniels<br />

Natsuko Ishikawa(nee Sato)<br />

Richard Hedley<br />

Ibrahim Dikko<br />

David Llewelyn<br />

Paul Bleckly<br />

Mark Verheyen<br />

Mark Smith<br />

Ryan Brews<br />

Richard Brooksbank<br />

Peter Hall<br />

Luke Allen<br />

John Wilcox<br />

Jonny Greenall<br />

Alex Proctor-Pearson<br />

Charles Adeogun-Phillips<br />

Jom Salakshana<br />

Charles Neil<br />

Douglas Balchan<br />

Andreas Graham<br />

Anthony Edgar<br />

Paul Elliott<br />

Russell Elliott<br />

Andy Hilton<br />

Christopher Huson<br />

Mike Jolley<br />

Shaheen Ladhani<br />

Jane Roy<br />

Mark Wilhelm Verheyen<br />

Edward James Hutson Elliot<br />

Charles Reid<br />

Gordon Sharp<br />

Samuel Chibale<br />

Priory ' 71<br />

Brook ' 42<br />

Orchard ' 53<br />

Orchard ' 90<br />

Abbey ' 76<br />

Orchard ' 46<br />

Latham '51<br />

Latham ' 70<br />

Latham ' 70<br />

Field ' 97<br />

Hall ' 61<br />

Abbey ' 91<br />

Priory ' 91<br />

Hall ' 50<br />

Mitre ' 49<br />

Priory ' 66<br />

Hall ' 57<br />

Hall ' 83<br />

Latham ' 78<br />

Mitre ' 01<br />

Latham ' 66<br />

Hall ' 85<br />

New ' 93<br />

Abbey ' 89<br />

Abbey ' 96<br />

Hall ' 66<br />

New ' 83<br />

Orchard ' 63<br />

Cross ' 67<br />

Cross ' 77<br />

Orchard ' 78<br />

Mitre ' 00<br />

New ‘79<br />

Latham ' 57<br />

Orchard ' 87<br />

Mitre ' 82<br />

Orchard ' 89<br />

Orchard ' 89<br />

Orchard ' 83<br />

Mitre ' 86<br />

Priory ' 65<br />

Orchard ' 71<br />

Mitre'83<br />

Orchard ' 90<br />

Mitre ' 90<br />

Mitre ' 93<br />

Brook ' 68<br />

Hall ' '72<br />

Orchard ' 46<br />

Cross ' 89<br />

Abbey ' 86<br />

Cross ' 77<br />

Mitre ' 68<br />

Hall ' 64<br />

Priory ' 54<br />

Mitre '95<br />

lloyd.berger@bgih.com.au<br />

jm_reddington@yahoo.co.uk<br />

frank@happygardener.com.au<br />

simon@afps.net.au<br />

vanessatwigg@optusnet.com.au<br />

jmartinh@shaw.ca<br />

dtbears@kingston.net<br />

dlaing@endeavourfinancial.com<br />

rsale@spidernet.com.cy<br />

miss@matty.dk<br />

markdudley@blueyonder.co.uk<br />

hechle@wananchi.com<br />

bandhoneill@eircom.net<br />

noelsmit@campus.jyu.fi<br />

james.barnett@wanadoo.fr<br />

jim@chapmans.de<br />

martin@robinshaw.de<br />

niemeyf@netvigator.com<br />

dgkpoon@gmail.com<br />

info@juliedaniels.com<br />

Violino7@hotmail.com<br />

r-s.hedley@xtra.co.nz<br />

lydikko@hotmail.com<br />

davidlle@online.no<br />

bceurasia@pacific.net.ph<br />

mverheyen@comcast.net<br />

mshsmith@btinternet.com<br />

RyanbR@mcmotor.co.za<br />

richard.brooksbank@wits.ac.za.<br />

eat@cookingbear.com<br />

luke@quova.com<br />

jdw@fidentiis.com<br />

jonnyg@propilots.net<br />

adeogun@un.org<br />

Charles.Neil@difc.ae<br />

djbalchan@aol.com<br />

andreas.graham@verizon.net<br />

ajedgar@mac.com<br />

paul_elliott0@yahoo.com<br />

Russell_Elliott@irco.com<br />

andyh@totallybrilliant.com<br />

mrhuson@mindspring.com<br />

MnJJOLLEY@aol.com<br />

shaheen@rice.edu<br />

jroy@uab.edu<br />

mverheyen@comcast.net<br />

james@ellcorentals.com<br />

bracmed@candw.ky<br />

gsharp@cwjamaica.com<br />

chibale_s@yahoo.com<br />

Note: If you require a postal address for any of <strong>the</strong> Overseas Links please contact <strong>the</strong> OR Secretary.<br />

(41)<br />

+ 61 293374081<br />

+ 61 738083249<br />

+ 61 8 9364 6875<br />

(+61) 401 069 394 / (03) 90900501<br />

+ 61 394 121 206<br />

+1 780 483 5442<br />

+1 613 547 6551<br />

+ 1 604 925 3113<br />

+ 56 2 216 8820<br />

07855 237559<br />

+ 357 2543 4165<br />

+ 45 3555 6490<br />

+ 00 353 1 285 9663/087 2956724<br />

+ 358 14260 1224<br />

+ 33 5 46 94 99 25<br />

+ 0049 541 181590<br />

+ 0049 6201 15807<br />

+ 852 2873 8118<br />

+ 852 9252 2128<br />

+ 91 22 6676 1676<br />

+ 39 0583 23675<br />

+ 81 80 3002 7170<br />

+ 0064 9 277 6577<br />

+ 234 809 944 4545<br />

+ 47 51 571930<br />

+ 63 2 753 1489<br />

+34 662143442<br />

+ 27 21 531 7206<br />

+ 27 33 234 4933<br />

+34 91 366 1378 & +34 654 328577<br />

+ 00 34 914153415<br />

+ 41 21 621 6424<br />

+ 255 27 256 5329<br />

+ 66 2 331 9053 & +661 8192717<br />

+ 9714 3622238<br />

+ 00 1 937 322 2040<br />

andreas.graham@verizon.net<br />

+ 1 212 988 2602<br />

+ 001 704 756 6981<br />

+ 1 863 7012680<br />

+ 1 206 328 6112<br />

+ 1 520 529 9562<br />

+ 1 713-348-5716<br />

+ 1 205 934 1757<br />

+ 246 256 4637 & +246 4347395<br />

+ 1 876 986 2870<br />

0978 214 362 (zain network)<br />

add international dialling codes


In <strong>the</strong> OR Office we are keen to ensure<br />

that we keep our records updated for<br />

all ORs. To this end we would be<br />

grateful if you could contact us if any<br />

of your details change, such as address,<br />

email, telephone numbers etc.<br />

Would you prefer to read The Arch<br />

on-line and not receive a paper copy?<br />

Several ORs now request this. Please<br />

advise us if this is <strong>the</strong> case.<br />

OR Ties:<br />

Silk Smooth £21.40<br />

Silk non crease £23.75<br />

Bow Tie £19.60<br />

OR House/Sports Ties:<br />

Brook House £7.10<br />

The Hall £9.05<br />

The Priory £5.40<br />

<strong>School</strong> House polyester £6.35<br />

New House £6.10<br />

Latham House £7.35<br />

The Orchard £10.50<br />

The Mitre £8.50<br />

The Cross £7.60<br />

OR Football £16.50<br />

OR Hockey £12.65<br />

OR Golf (striped) £6.10<br />

Cambridge £16.95<br />

OR OFFICE<br />

Please email <strong>the</strong> office:<br />

or@repton.org.uk<br />

Or telephone: 01283 559320<br />

Or write to us at:<br />

The Old <strong>Repton</strong>ian Society<br />

The Hall, <strong>Repton</strong> <strong>School</strong><br />

<strong>Repton</strong>, Derbyshire DE65 6FH<br />

REPTON SCHOOL SHOP - Memorabilia<br />

If you wish to order any of <strong>the</strong> following items please contact <strong>the</strong> <strong>School</strong> Shop.<br />

Tel. 01283 559323, or by email: shop@repton.org.uk.<br />

Please note that <strong>the</strong> prices shown do not include postage and packing.<br />

House scarves:<br />

The Priory £19.90<br />

<strong>School</strong> House £19.90<br />

New House £19.90<br />

Latham House £19.90<br />

The Orchard £19.90<br />

The Mitre (Girls) £19.90<br />

Cross<br />

The Abbey<br />

£19.90<br />

& Field House £19.90<br />

The Garden £20.95<br />

Blazer - made to order £146.80<br />

Banded white sweaters<br />

(Long-sleeve and sleeveless)<br />

£25.00<br />

Umbrellas:<br />

Large golf umbrella £25.95<br />

Ladies umbrella £15.95<br />

(42)<br />

We are also delighted to hear your ‘good<br />

news’ such as engagements, marriages,<br />

births, qualifications gained, new jobs etc.<br />

We will only publish such information in<br />

The Arch with your agreement. Thank You!<br />

DEADLINE FOR ARTICLES<br />

for <strong>the</strong> next Edition<br />

(May 2010) is M<strong>arch</strong> 2010<br />

Miscellaneous:<br />

Large Glass Crested Tankard £19.35<br />

Small Glass Crested Tankard £15.90<br />

Large Glass Crested Goblet £15.65<br />

Crested Red Wine Glass £14.70<br />

Glass Crested Paper Weight £19.60<br />

Crested Cuff Links £14.70<br />

Crested Key Rings £7.15<br />

Brass buttons - large £3.90<br />

Brass buttons - small £3.90<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> Prints, Framed £48.95<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> cards £0.75<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> Postcards £0.10<br />

Large teddy bear (12”) £13.85<br />

Baseball Cap £9.50<br />

Gentleman’s Weekend Socks (pair) £7.15<br />

(Sizes: medium 6½ -8½; large 9-11)<br />

Mug £4.90<br />

Coaster £2.90<br />

OR ladies brooch £44.05<br />

Porcelain Box £26.90<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> China Coin Tray £3.20<br />

<strong>Repton</strong> To The End £36.70<br />

Christmas Cards pack of 10 £1.30


LEAVERS 2009

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