Globe-2014-

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Globe-2014-

G2 • AN INFORMATION FEATURETHE GLOBE AND MAIL • TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 2014Visit globeandmail.com/globe2014DATAThe numbers behind North America’s largest internationalenvironmental business summitGLOBE 2012:9,000+Total Participants3,100Participating Organizations1,800Conference Delegates650Presidents and CEOs400Exhibiting Companies157Conference Speakers58Countries RepresentedGLOBE 2014:40%MORE SESSIONSAND WORKSHOPSTHAN GLOBE 201250MORE SPEAKERSTHAN GLOBE 2012GLOBE 2014 conference highlightsThe changingenergylandscapeTowards thecirculareconomyWho attends?1%Chairpersons8%14%Vice PresidentsPresidents&CEOsFood & watersecurity21%Managers10%DirectorsBuildingresilient cities46%OtherResponsibleresourcemanagementClean capitalism:Financingsustainableinnovation4%Association13%Education18%EnvironmentalService/TechnologyEmergingenvironmentalleaders3%Media 2%NGO20%GovernmentRealizing theAboriginaladvantage40%CorporateChina – ourshared futurePARTNERSHIPSProtecting food and water securityow can businesses,governments and citizenshelp to ensure that thecompetition for fresh water andarable land is not going to putthese essentials in peril?It’s one of the vitally importantquestions that will be explored atGLOBE 2014 by thought leaderssuch as Marco Ferroni, executivedirector of the SwitzerlandbasedSyngenta Foundation forSustainable Agriculture; DeborahHarford, executive director of theAdaptation to Climate ChangeTeam at Simon Fraser University;and Torgny Holmgren, executivedirector of the StockholmInternational Water Institute ofSweden.Access to fresh water is an essentialhuman right: each of themore than seven billion peopleon earth today requires five litresVancouver Convention Centre EastMarch 26 - 28UNITING BUSINESS & THE ENVIRONMENTExperience North America’s largest and mostcomprehensive international showcase of sustainableinnovation in Vancouver at the GLOBE 2014International Conference & Exposition on Business andthe Environment.EXPOSITION HIGHLIGHTS:• Large Scope - nearly 300 exhibitors will be showcasingtheir innovative solutions to the world’s most pressingenvironmental challenges.• Far-stretching Range – exhibits will focuson energy solutions, water & wastewater,green building, and more!• Participation - 16 exhibiting countriesare already confirmed.• Exclusive Access – to product launches,informative presentations, and specialsessions and workshops.• Investor Alert -discover30ofBC’smost exciting companies to watch atthe Powerhaus Pavilion.EXPOSITION HOURS:• Wednesday,March2610:00 AM - 6:00 PM• Thursday, March 2710:00 AM - 6:00 PM• Friday,March2810:00 AM - 5:00 PMRegister Now!globeseries.comof water for daily hydration and25 litres for minimum hygiene.But that amount representsonly 1.5 per cent of the currentfreshwater use on the planet –the balance is used primarily byagriculture, industry and in ourhomes.To sustain food production andhuman life as the world’s populationincreases and extremeweather threatens food andBy thenumbers80%of fresh wateris used byagriculture.2.5%Amount offresh water onthe earth; thebalance issalt water.20%Increase inglobal waterscarcity attributabletoclimate changethis century


G4 • AN INFORMATION FEATURETHE GLOBE AND MAIL • TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 2014Visit globeandmail.com/globe2014INNOVATIONCanada’s clean tech sector sets sights on globalopportunitiesQ&A with Vicky Sharpe,President and CEO,Sustainable DevelopmentTechnology CanadaWhat’s the current state ofclean technology innovation inCanada?Canada is brimming with cleantech innovation. Recent numbersshow that the industryis strong, with just over 700companies employing 41,000people. That is a lot of creative,innovative energy focused onproducing solutions for increasingresource or energy efficiencies,technologies related torenewable energy, alternativesfor gas-powered vehicles, andmore. Thanks to the qualityof these solutions and to theparticipation of major playersas they embrace and put to usethose technologies, the Canadianclean tech market is valuedat $11.3-billion: an impressivenumber that clearly indicates athriving clean tech industry.Sustainable Development Technology Canada president and CEO Vicky Sharpe says Canada's clean tech sector is thriving.SUPPLIEDWhy is it important for Canada tohave a strong clean tech sector?Besides the inherent qualitiesof clean technologies here athome – being resource and energyefficiency, job creation andrevenue growth, and improvedenvironmental performance –clean tech is important becausethe world is hungry for it. Theglobal market today is pegged at$1.1-trillion, and this number ispoised to grow to $2.5-trillion by2022. This represents an unbelievableopportunity for Canada,and we are well-positioned tomake the most of it. Right now,our share of the global marketis just over one per cent. If thatcontinues, the industry couldenjoy revenues as high as$65-billion by 2022, employingup to 116,600 by then. Cleantech truly is the key to Canada’seconomic and environmentalfuture.What role is SDTC playing tosupport the further developmentof clean tech?On behalf of the Government ofCanada, SDTC is investing in themost difficult development phaseof clean technologies: the stepsimmediately before commercialization.With a need for prototypeand field testing, this phase ofthe process tends to require alot of capital, and yet is a highriskphase that conventionalinvestors tend to avoid. That’swhere SDTC steps in: our supportranges from early-stage companydevelopment through our VirtualIncubator, through to funding ofprojects through various funds,and finally to programs that helpsuccessful companies find furtherfinancing or industry partnershipsthat see their technologyadopted in a real-world scenario.It is a process that works – a processthat truly builds Canadiancompanies and brings clean technologyinnovations to Canada’smajor economic sectors.How successful have Canadianclean tech companies been inexport markets?I can let the numbers speak forthemselves: Analytica Advisorsreports that 52 per cent of revenuesin 2012 came from sales outsideof Canada; 22 per cent fromnon U.S. markets. U.S. and E.U.markets were the most activelyengaged, but South America andChina are gaining greater interestas export markets. Eager tohelp companies generate evenmore export sales, SDTC worksclosely with partners like ExportDevelopment Canada to launchCanadian clean tech companiesto the world stage. Thanks to ahealthy global appetite for cleantech, the opportunity is there forthe taking, and Canadian companiesare indeed taking it.What are the major challengesfacing the continued developmentof Canada’s clean techsector and how can they beovercome?Funding. Investors seek bigreturns but don’t want to takeon the risk associated with cleantech. This occurs at the early seedstage where the predictability offuture success is low and the timeto market lengthy. This is whereSDTC acts to bridge the financinggap, and I am happy to reportthat we are on the right track.SUSTAINABILITYWheat waste straw replaces wood fibre in eco-friendly papereff Golfman has been aself-described “eco-entrepreneur”for the past25 years. His Winnipeg company,Prairie Paper Ventures Inc., hasdeveloped the technology to producea new 80 per cent tree-free,elemental chlorine-free paper,made from waste wheat straw.After 14 years of R&D, marketresearch, laboratory workand engineering, the companyrecently launched Step ForwardPaper on the retail market. InCanada it’s available at staples.ca,Staples stores, Unisource, Lyrecoand Basics. In the U.S. it’s exclusivelyavailable through staples.com and Staples Advantage.Although the product is currentlymanufactured in India,Mr. Golfman says the company’splans include the constructionof a factory on the CanadianPrairies, where there are millionsof acres of waste straw availableto make paper. Most of it is currentlyworked into the ground,dumped in landfills or burned.“We’re working with farmersusing wheat straw and otheragricultural straws, instead oftrees,” he says, pointing out thatwhile tree-based fibre is now thestandard for paper making, it’sonly been that way for about 120years.“Traditionally, over thousandsof years, the standard was agriculturalfibre. What we’re tryingto do is a back-to-the-future kindof project, and turning straw intogold. Our advantage is that whiletrees take years to grow, annualfibres, such as wheat, straw orother agricultural crops growin virtually the same field everyyear and continue to use thatsame field over and over again.It’s a much better use of the land,from an environmental and economicpoint of view,” he says.The paper quality is comparableto tree-based paper, he adds,but it’s more eco-friendly, whichnew $30-million fund tosupport the developmentand demonstration ofdownstream natural gas technologiesis accepting its first applicationsfor financial support.The SD Natural Gas Fund wasannounced last month as a jointventure by the Governmentof Canada, Sustainable DevelopmentTechnology Canada(SDTC) and the Canadian GasAssociation (CGA).The fund brings togethercontributions from the CGAmembers through their EnergyTechnology Innovation CanadaInitiative to match contributionsfrom SDTC’s SD Tech Fund up toa combined total of $30-millionover three years.Natural gas plays an importantrole in Canada’s energymix, meeting 30 per cent of thewas shown in a life-cycle studythat was done on the company’sproduct.Mr. Golfman says that asidefrom the environmental benefitsof straw-based paper, the cost oftree-based paper is rising, as aresult of increasing demand forfibre.“The supply of trees is going togo down in the future, but globaldemand will go up, and so willthe price. We have to come upwith alternate fibre sources tosupply that demand at a reasonablecost. To me, that’s the keyhere. It’s really not the positioningof wheat versus trees. It’smore like, how do we meet theglobal demand?” he says.In November 2012, Prairie Paperwas recognized by the Canadianprinting community for itsfirst product, Step Forward Paper.Print Action Canada presentedthe company with two awards:the Gold award for Most EnvironmentallyProgressive PrintingTechnology and the Bronzeaward for Most EnvironmentallyProgressive Vendor in Canada.In February last year the companyreceived the Globe Awardsfor Environmental Excellence inBest Green Consumer Productcategory. In October it receivedthe 2013 Canadian Office ProductsAssociation Eco-FriendlyProduct Award of Excellenceand in November the prestigious3M Award for EnvironmentalInnovation.For more information visitstepforwardpaper.com.The SD Natural Gas Fund will promotethe development of technologiesthat use natural gas producedat facilities like Spectra Energy’sMcMahon processing plant in Taylor,B.C. SUPPLIEDcountry’s energy needs. Morethan 6.4 million customers relyon natural gas for heat andPrairie Paper Ventures Inc.'s Jeff Golfman says wheat waste straw is a viablealternative to wood fibre for paper making. SUPPLIEDINVESTMENTFund aims to boost innovation and discovery in downstreamnatural gas technologypower in homes, apartments,buildings, businesses, hospitalsand schools.Former federal Minister ofNatural Resources Joe Oliversays the fund demonstrates thegovernment’s commitment tocreating jobs, growth and longtermprosperity.“We are proud to play a rolein developing the SD NaturalGas Fund, which will drive newclean technologies that buildour economy and protect theenvironment,” he said at thelaunch.SDTC president and CEO VickySharpe says the fund is the firstof-its-kindfunding partnershipbetween SDTC and the privatesector.“It will help support thecommercialization of innovativetechnologies for natural gasthat create high-quality jobs,drive productivity and economicgrowth, and help support aclean environment,” she says.“Investments and partnershipssuch as this demonstrate leadershipin driving a vibrant cleantechnology industry in Canada.The creation of the SD NaturalGas Fund is an exciting andimportant first step.”Representing natural gas utilitiesacross Canada, CGA presidentand CEO Timothy Egan saysthe group is excited about the opportunityto partner with SDTCand the federal government.“Natural gas is a very affordableclean energy choicefor Canadian consumers. Theinvestments through this fundwill help build even more opportunitiesto make that choice,”he says.Bringing Clean Technologies to MarketClean technologies are contributing to amore competitive Canadian economy — creating jobs,revenues and export opportunities.www.sdtc.caSDTC supports the commercialization of clean technologies by Canadian companies.

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