View the PDF - Blue Diamond Growers

bluediamond.com
  • No tags were found...

View the PDF - Blue Diamond Growers

TWICE THECONCENTRATION.HALF THE HASSLE.Experience the effi ciencies ofABBA Ultra ® and its breakthrough ECformulation. At twice the concentrationof 0.15EC abamectins, rate conversionis easy. Plus you get the added benefi tsof less storage and disposal – alongwith reduced PPE – all while simplifyingmite control. Equip your operationwith easier-to-handle ABBA Ultra.Contact your PCA or retailer today.©2013 MANA Crop Protection. 3120 Highwoods Blvd. #100, Raleigh, NC 27604. ABBA Ultra is a Restricted UsePesticide. Always read and follow label directions. ABBA Ultra ® is a registered trademark of a Makhteshim AganGroup Company. 19859-AFM


TOGETHERWE GROWTrust is a commodity that’s earned over time. As part of the FarmCredit System we’ve been here since 1916, lending money to farmers,ranchers, growers and cooperatives — all aspects of agribusiness.And we’re still growing strong, offering financial services that makesense for you and customer service that is second to none.Visit www.FarmCreditAlliance.com to learn more.800.909.5050 800.542.8072800.800.4865


Farming in Afghanistan: A BlueDiamond Grower’s ExperienceBy Gary Soiseth, Director of Economic Growth and Agriculture DevelopmentIn July of 2009, I was sitting at the headquarters of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA),a large federal building in Washington, DC that overlooks the Washington National Monument. It wasin this office that, at 24, I volunteered to be the youngest member of a “civilian surge” of Americangovernment and agriculture advisors into Afghanistan.What I volunteered to do—to teach farmers good agricultural practices,to mentor government officials on bureaucratic processes, and toadvise military commanders on good economic strategies—seemed toinitially allow me a small role in my country’s foreign policy. What itbecame, though, was a life-changing experience that not only alteredmy perspective as a farmer, but allowed me to empathize with youngAmerican soldiers and old Afghan farmers alike, and realize that thegoals and challenges farmers face are universal.After a year working in Eastern Afghanistan, I was considered a “seasonedadvisor” and was asked to move to the district of Arghandab in Kandahar,one of Afghanistan’s deadliest districts in the second deadliest province ofthe country. It was the strategy of military leaders to flood hostile areas withdevelopment initiatives, to stabilize the district with reconstruction projects afterlethal operations, and to engage with Kandahar’s farming community; theyneeded an agricultural advisor to make their plans a reality, so I volunteered.For a year, I lived in the Arghandab District Center, sleeping on a cot justoutside the government building during the weekdays so that I could mentorthe local agriculture extension agents. On the weekends, I would jump intoan armored Mine Resistant Ambush Protection vehicle and head out intothe countryside, moving on foot from village to village with small platoonsof soldiers to deliver agricultural advice directly to the district’s farmers.My post in Arghandab became the single greatest challenge of myprofessional career: I was mentoring government officials three times my ageon budgetary processes and bureaucratic procedures; working with farmersthat ranged in age from eight to eighty on a host of pest management,irrigation, and marketing issues; and advising American military leaders thathad storied careers that started before I was even born.The biggest challenges, however, proved to be personal. I met withvillage elders on development initiatives, only to have some of themexecuted for working with me. I challenged my governmentextension agents to conduct training workshops, onlyto have them hand me a “Night Letter” frominsurgents that threatened theirfamilies. And I worked withmy military counterparts wholived side-by-side with me,ate every meal with me,and protected me—only to have some ofthem hurt and killed along the way.I had no intention of staying inAfghanistan for longer than one tour,but after investing in the fate of theAfghan people and realizing the positiveimpact of my work on the Americanand international effort, it was hard toleave. After two and a half years, though,I finally ended my time with USDA,returned home to plant an orchard, andstarted my life as an almond farmer onceagain. This reprieve from Afghanistanwould be short-lived.Just a month after I left Afghanistan, Ireceived a call from the 82 nd AirborneUnit that I worked with in Kandahar: theDeputy Commanding General of Support,a man in charge of all military aide for thereconstruction of Southern Afghanistan,asked me to come back to manage theagriculture and economic developmentportfolio as his Director of EconomicGrowth. A few weeks later, I boarded aC-17 cargo plane bound for Kandahar.Since the beginning of 2012, I have beenadvising the leadership of the U.S. Army’s82 nd Airborne and, now, the Third InfantryDivision on agriculture and economicdevelopment policy for 2.2 million Afghancitizens. From small-scale projects thatinclude beekeeping training for womenand orchard pruning demonstrationsfor pomegranate farmers, to industrialpark expansion and dam refurbishmentprojects, I have spent the last year makingsure American tax dollars were spent on12 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


projects and programs that positively impact farmers, create stability forAmerican soldiers, and are sustainable in the long-term.Surprisingly, some of my greatest accomplishments are not the projectsthat I implemented, but the proposals that I have cut: from agricultureteams that cost an average of $40 million to operate annually, to anairport expansion that was over $15 million, to programs that hand outsaplings, seed, and fertilizer at a cost of over $5 million. I cut almost$50 million worth of agriculture proposals that I deemed irresponsibleuses of American dollars.The Afghanistan Almond MarketOne of my most rewarding jobs is working with Afghanistan’s almondgrowers. Southern Afghanistan leads the country’s production ofalmonds, annually producing over 44,800 metric tons of almonds withan estimated value of $149 million. As it stands, most almonds are soldin-shell and within a small radius of where they are grown. The goal isto get these almonds into other local and regional markets.With a marginal addition of value to the almond—by removing themeat from the shell, cleaning the almond, and sorting the meats intobasic cellophane packaging before transportation—profit marginsincreased exponentially in the higher-end markets of Afghanistan’surban centers. This is the first step to making almonds a moreprofitable crop for Afghans and, as an added benefit to the UnitedStates’ stabilization efforts, will bring about a safer and more securecountry. As a Blue Diamond cooperative member, I even use myown experiences to demonstrate to Afghan farmers the benefits ofcooperation, aggressive marketing, product development, and properpackaging of agriculture products.Farming in Southern Afghanistan: Success,Setback, and SacrificeAnother initiative of my team was to create a market for low-grade,damaged pomegranates in Kandahar. In 2011, I worked to subsidize thepilot shipments from Kandahar’s orchards to a juice facility in Kabul.In the pilot year, 450 metric tons were shipped to the juice facility inKabul; the following year, the amount shipped climbed to over 2,500metric tons without outside assistance or a subsidy. By arranging theconnections between the growers, traders, transporters, and juice facilityowners, my team of Americans and Afghans demonstrated that this newmarket opportunity was viable and could increase the profit margin ofpomegranate farmers.Unfortunately, at the end of last year, a suicide bomber targetedthis juice facility. The bomb killed three workers, leveled the facility,and virtually ended this new market opportunity. While the facilityhas been partially rebuilt, the strategy of the insurgency wasunfortunately effective and the explosion was a major setback forKandahar’s farming community.continued on next page »Soiseth (left) speaks through an interpreter toa farmer in the District of Arghandab, Kandaharabout the advantages of selling third-gradepomegranates to a juice plant in the country’scapital of Kabul. In the past, Arghandab’s farmersused their split pomegranates for animal feed.Through the efforts of Soiseth and the local freshfruit cooperative, Arghandab’s farmers were ableto increase their profit margin by leveraging thisnew market opportunity.»Soiseth (right) discusses the quality ofArghandab’s pomegranates at the Omaid BaharJuice Facility in Kabul, Afghanistan with ownerMustaffah Sadiq (left). In 2011, Arghandabfarmers sold 450 metric tones of third-gradepomegranates to the facility in a pilot programdesigned by Soiseth; in 2012, Arghandab’s farmerstransported over 2,500 metric tones independentof U.S. assistance. This successful endeavor wasshort-lived: a suicide bomber targeted the facilityin December 2012, killing three Afghan workersand destroying the facility.»Soiseth (left) instructs farmers at the NerkhDistrict Center (Wardak) on new methodsof integrated pest management (IPM) for thearea’s apple orchards. In addition to mentoringgovernment officials on extension services duringthe week, Soiseth holds workshops in unstabledistricts to create IPM programs, explain efficientirrigation methods, and demonstrate basicprinciples of orchard care.»MAY | JUNE 2013 Almond Facts 13


Soiseth (left) works with Haji Baridad(right), a local village elder (malik) fromthe District of Arghandab, Kandahar.Haji Baridad was eventually targetedby Taliban insurgents and executed onthe side of a road near his village for hiscooperation with Soiseth. Maliks regularlyrisk their lives to work with Americanagriculture advisors, hoping to better theirvillage’s crop yields.»Soiseth (right) surveys flood damage toa road in the District of Jalrez (Wardak)with Daniel Johnston (left) of the U.S. ArmyCorps of Engineers. Due to deforestation,weak infrastructure, and the geographiclocation in Central Asia’s Hindu Kushmountain range, the monsoon downpourseach spring result in massive flooding andmudslides throughout Afghanistan thatdevastate local farming communities.»At home in Turlock, California, Soisethgrows almonds on the same land that hisgrandparents, George and Viola Brown,first purchased after his grandfather’sreturn from World War II. After his tour iscomplete, Soiseth, a third-generation BlueDiamond almond farmer, will resumefarming alongside his family on theirfarms in Stanislaus and Merced County.»I have been hardened by other setbacks in Afghanistan as well. Throughout my time living in district centers, walking fieldsand orchards, and sleeping in military checkpoints throughout Afghanistan, I have been fortunate: when my convoy wasattacked, it was the vehicle in front of me that was disabled; when a helicopter went down, I was in the air on a differentroute; when the government buildings I worked in were leveled by suicide bombers, I was in the fields working with farmers.Save the DateBlue Diamond’s 2013 Annual MeetingNovember 20, 2013, Modesto Centre PlazaFeaturing Turlock Plant Tours, Seminars, Product tastings and more!SPONSORS:Thank you to our outstanding business partners!EXHIBITORS:14 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


As a civilian working in Afghanistan, Itrust the military to protect me and tocreate a security bubble to work within—and they have done a great job. But theycannot insulate me from every rocketattack, roadside bomb, or small arms fire;and even worse, they cannot shield mefrom the loss of colleagues and friends.I have been left staring at the empty spoton the floor in the District Center wherea village elder sat before his executionon the side of a road. I have been leftsleeping next to an empty cot of a soldierthat left with me on a patrol, but didnot return. And I have been left walkingpast an empty desk of a friend who wasblown up while delivering books to aschoolhouse. In all, over 2,077 Americansoldiers have been killed, and over 18,500American soldiers have been severelywounded in Afghanistan. As a farmer,I never thought I would have to visit afriend in Walter Reed Army MedicalCenter or stand at attention on an airstrip as dozens of silver, flag-drapedcoffins are loaded onto C-17 cargo planesfor their final trip home.While some continue to question thedecisions of American leaders, the realityis that my country committed itself to astrategy of rebuilding Afghanistan; in 2009, Ifelt I had a moral obligation to help Americaexecute this strategy to the best of its ability,and I still feel that same calling today.I hope to eventually digest this entireexperience in Afghanistan and use itto shape future American interventionabroad. In August, though, I will simplyhead home: I will go back to harvestingmy almonds on the same land that mygrandfather farmed when he returnedfrom World War II; I will go back tofamily dinners, mowing lawns, anddriving my truck; and I will go back to myhometown of Turlock, using my energy tomake my own community stronger.Gary Soiseth, 28, is a third-generation BlueDiamond almond farmer from Turlock,California. Currently the Director of EconomicGrowth for the International Security Assistance Force in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Gary hasspent his last three and a half years living in the conflict zone’s rural villages, district centers,provincial capitals, and military headquarters as an agricultural and economic advisor.For his work, Gary has been awarded the U.S. Army’s 2013 Superior Honor Award forCivilian Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s 2011 Tom Stefani SuperiorHonor Award, the highest honor given to an agricultural advisor in Afghanistan.A graduate of Georgetown University and the University of California at Berkeley, Garyholds an advanced degree in Agriculture and Water Resources Policy and is a 2007 graduateof the Blue Diamond Young Leader program. In addition to farming, Gary will join thefaculty of the California State University at Stanislaus as an adjunct professor of global andcomparative politics.Northwest TillersOrchard Floor ManagementProven to save time and money!Clean up post harvest trashEnrich soil for tree healthRelease soil compaction to conserve waterHeaviest machine on the marketYou decide....Let us do a in your orchardLocal parts and salesCome See us at these upcoming shows!Colusa Farm ShowFebruary 4-6, 2014Colusa, CA800.204.3122 | nwtiller.comA division of MARQ Enterprises.World Ag ExpoFebruary 11-13, 2014Tulare, CAMAY | JUNE 2013 Almond Facts 15


BLUE DIAMOND RECEIVESREBATE FOR NEARLY$500,000 IN ENERGY COSTSSMUD executives present Blue Diamond with a check representingthe nearly $500,000 in savings from energy incentives. From left,Frankie McDermott, SMUD Director of Customer Services; Bruce Lish,Blue Diamond General Manager of Industrial Operations; Geoff Pyka,Blue Diamond Environmental Project Engineer; and Mark Jansen,President and CEO of Blue Diamond.»Through a partnership with theSacramento Municipal Utility District(SMUD), Blue Diamond implementedenergy efficiency initiatives that havesaved the cooperative nearly $500,000in energy costs. The project, which isprojected to save up to $1.1 millionover 5 years, involved replacing1,072 metal halide lighting fixturesthroughout several warehouses anddistribution centers with SmartWattEnergy LED lighting systems. TheSmartWatt systems combine the mosttechnologically advanced lighting andlighting control systems available toachieve the greatest possible energysavings, showing an immediatereduction of 84 percent in lightingenergy use.“The savings that Blue Diamond received goes back into helping us toinvest and continue to grow here in Sacramento, creating new jobs,”said Mark Jansen, Blue Diamond President and CEO. “It also goesback into the almond-producing communities in the Central Valleyof California, helping to spur economic growth in those areas aswell.”SMUD presented a giant check representing the actual cost-savingsof $474,000 to Blue Diamond President and CEO Mark Jansen inan event hosted in the Blue Diamond Theater on the Sacramentocampus. SMUD executives, Blue Diamond employees and membersof the Sacramento media heard about the energy savings fromSMUD board member Michael Picker, who represents Ward5 – a service area that includes Blue Diamond as well as midtown,downtown, North Sacramento, and several outlying neighborhoodsof Sacramento.“Energy efficiency incentives are provided for projects such as BlueDiamond’s because they’re cost-effective and more than pay off in thelong run,” Picker said. “We work closely with our business customersto make them more profitable and help the local economy thrive.”Geoff Pyka, Blue Diamond’s environmental project engineer, oversawthe implementation of the energy saving initiatives. “Blue Diamond»SMUD Director Michael Picker16 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


is committed to sustainability and continuous improvement throughout our operations,” he said. “These lighting projectspresented a great opportunity to utilize new, energy-saving technologies and further our efforts to protect the environmentand the local communities that support us.”In fact, according to Environmental Protection Agency calculations the reduction in greenhouse gas and carbon dioxideemissions from the project is the equivalent of removing 1,200 cars from the road or planting more than 386 acres of trees,a feat that Jansen attributed to the dedication of Blue Diamond’s employees that are committed to seeing the project through.Built into the lighting system is a network control system that gives plant managers the ability to create flexible lightingschedules for each light or circuit via the internet.“We couldn’t have had a better partnerin SMUD working with us to comeup with the technology to retrofit thethree affected warehouses,” said BruceLish, Blue Diamond’s general manager ofindustrial operations.The effect of the new lighting is quitedramatic. Whereas the older light fixtureswould remain on at all times, projectinga yellow hue throughout the warehouse,the new LED lights project a cleaner, truerlight in the space. They are also motiondetecting,meaning that when employeesleave the workspace for their breaks, thelights automatically turn off after a fewminutes of no motion. Then once thecrews return to work, the lights come onas needed, as determined by where thepeople are working at a given time.“These projects will reduce our energyconsumption by a just under $250,000annually and in fact with the benefit ofbeing able to control the programmingof the lighting, we think we’re going toexceed that by a significant amount,”Lish explained.Another aspect of the savings project wasthe upgrade of the distribution centerchiller. This incentive replaced the oldchiller with a more efficient system,resulting in energy and cost savings,maintenance cost savings and voluntaryelimination of r22 refrigerant for thatsystem, a refrigerant that producesgreenhouse gas and is being phased outover the coming years.RESERVE yourAlmondsNOW for 2014 & 2015 deliveries!Excellent Rootstocks✔ Bright’s Hybrid® 5 ✔ Hansen 536✔ Krymsk® 86 ✔ Lovell✔ Marianna 2624 ✔ NemaguardTop Producing Varieties✔ Aldrich ✔ Butte ✔ Carmel Bro✔ Durango ✔ Fritz ✔ Mission✔ Monterey ✔ Nonpareil ✔ Peerless✔ Price ✔ Sonora✔ Winters ✔ Wood Colony(800) 675-6075www.fowlernurseries.comNewcastle, Californiaalmonds • apricots • asian pearscherries • pears • nectarines• peachesTheEARLY BirdGets the Worm!*Patent Information AvailableBTLDesigns.comFowlerNurseries Almond RootstocksHalfPage 4c AlmondFacts MayJune2013.indd 1MAY | JUNE 2013 Almond Facts 175/7/2013 2:01:27 PM


Huller/Sheller Golf TournamentProvides Great EntertainmentNEWS IN A NUTSHELL1 st 2 nd»The first place team, with membersfrom left: Tyler Thalman, Drew Nielsen,Scott Mayfield and Victor Yamamoto.Not pictured, Ryan Christy.Bayer Crop ScienceBank of America – MerrillLynchCoBankAmerican Ag CreditInternational PaperButton Transportation, IncValley Farm TransportMazon TruckingOakdale Trading CompanyKevko, IncOrchard Machinery Corp.Pacific Nut ProducerGarton TractorInterstate Truck CenterThe Hat SourceYosemite Farm CreditV-V EnterprisesWinton Ireland Strom & GreenInsurance Agency»The second place team, with members from left:Rod Flory, Jason Flory, Aaron Hall, Brad Craven,Danny Miller and Tim Fitzgerald.Blue Diamond board members, staff, growers and business partners such as huller/shellers and bankers enjoyed a pleasantday at the Turlock Golf and Country Club for the 18 th Annual Huller/Sheller Golf Tournament.Thank you to all of our sponsors and donors!SponsorsDonorsFleisig ConsultingR.L. Wells & AssociatesSalida Hulling andShellingPan American InsuranceMinturn Huller Co-opClendenin Bros, IncBeeler Industries, Inc.Gery Johnson CropInsuranceCalifornia IndustrialRubber Co.Wells Fargo InsuranceFlory IndustriesJackrabbit18 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


Honey DijonTakes GrandPrizeBlue Diamond’s Honey Dijon BOLD almondswon the grand prize for innovation at theSIAL China, Asia’s leading food show.Also recognized was Artisan Nut Thins asa runner-up top 40 award. Blue Diamondis a regular exhibitor at SIAL’s tradeshows around the world, showcasing themany applications of almonds to globalcustomers and consumers.Lt. GovernorNamesAlmonds“State Nut”“When the cat’s away, the mice will play.”Perhaps that’s the motto LieutenantGovernor Gavin Newsom had in mindduring Governor Jerry Brown’s recenttrip to China? While Newsom was incharge, he named four official state foodsthat will reign for the duration of 2013.Almonds were named the officialstate nut of California! The otherofficial foods are avocados as the statefruit, artichokes as the state vegetable andrice as the state grain.WHAT NAVELORANGEWORMSDO TO YOUR CROPISN’T PRETTY.An application of Proclaim ®insecticide at hull split canstop these destructivepests before they damageyour crop. Its unique modeof action provides bothovi-larvicidal and larvicidalactivity, and Proclaim is easyon beneficials. To learn more,talk to your PCA or Syngentarepresentative today or visitProclaim-insecticide.com.© 2013 Syngenta. Important: Always read and follow label instructions. Somecrop protection products may not be registered for sale or use in all states orcounties. Please check with your state or local extension service to ensureregistration status. Proclaim is a Restricted Use Pesticide. Proclaim is highly toxicto bees exposed to direct treatment on blooming crops and weeds. Do not apply thisproduct or allow it to drift onto blooming plants while bees are foraging adjacent tothe treatment area. Proclaim ® , the Alliance Frame, the Purpose Icon and the Syngentalogo are trademarks of a Syngenta Group Company. Syngenta Customer Center:1-866-SYNGENT(A) (796-4368). www.FarmAssist.com MW 14SC3010-VB4 5/13MAY | JUNE 2013 Almond Facts 19


20 Robots de exterioresLienhart, R., Maydt., J. 2002. An extended set of haar like features for rapidobject detection. In IEEE ICIP 2002, volume 1, pp. 900­903.Marocco, D., Floreano, D. 2002. Active vision and feature selection inevolutionary behavioral systems. In Proc. of Int. Conf. on Simulation ofAdaptive Behavior (SAB­7), pp. 247­255.Marr, D., “Vision, A Computational Investigation into the Human Representation& Processing of Visual Information”, in Freeman, San Francisco,CA., 1982.Pylyshyn, Z., “Visual Indexes, preconceptual object and situated vision”,in Cognition 80, pp. 127­158, 2001.Tinbergen, N., “The study of instinct”, in Clarendon University Press, OxfordUK, 1951.Tsotsos, J.K., et.al., “Modeling visual attention via selective tuning”, inArtifical Intelligence 78, pp. 507­545, 1995.Viola, P., Jones., M., “Rapid object detection using a boosted cascade ofsimple features”, 2001.Yang, M.­H., Kriegman, D. J., Ahuja. N. 2002. Detecting faces in images:A survey. IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence,24(1), pp. 34­58.Yoshikawa, Y. et. al. 2006. Responsive robot gaze to interaction partner.Intelligent Robotics and Communication Laboratories. Advanced TelecommunicationResearch Institute International. Keihanna Science City,Kyoto, 619­0288 Japan.Zaharescu, A., Rothenstein, A.L., Tsotsos, J.K. 2005. Towards a biologicallyplausible active visual search model. In Proc. of Int. Workshop onAttention and Performance in Computational Vision, WAPCV­2004,Springer LNCS 3368, pp. 133­147.


Fast, Gentle, Clean....1The WEDGE 10 High Speed Reservoir Cart’s unique bin design and dual chainsystem unloads product faster with less nut damage and plugging then other reservoircarts. The dual chain system removes more dirt and prolongs chain life. Side panelshelp eliminate spillage and increases load capacity without tree limb interference.3JackRabbit • 471 Industrial Ave. Ripon CA 95366


....Nut Harvesting SystemsJACKRunner...simple as 1, 2, 3 !The JACKRunner High Speed Shuttle is faster from the reservoir cart to the elevator (up to 30 mphin both directions) then other shuttle systems. Fast entry, faster exit, never crossing berms or irriga-tion lines. More cab visibility for forward and reverse travel then all other systems. The orginal,proven, JackRabbit RUNNER!230/36 High Speed Elevator w/ Woodchuck DestickerThe 30/36 dual belt elevator (30” horizontal belt/36” incline belt) allows the operator to control thebelt speed for faster unloading, less plugging and minimal spilling. The Woodchuck Desticker removesmore sticks at the elevator for cleaner loads then any other type of desticking method.Phone: 209-599-6118 • www.jackrabbit.bz


Blake Sanden, irrigation and agronomy UC Cooperative Extension farmadvisor, said that growers should evaluate their orchards and know theirirrigation equipment and its effectiveness. “Any one with a micro-irrigationsystem should really take an auger out in the field and get down to six feet tounderstand the amount of water their trees are getting at the root zone level,”he explained. “Growers will not understand what their trees are missing unlessthey see how dry it is for themselves.”He recommends that for growers who find they are dry at three to four feetdeep on micro-irrigation, a 48-hour irrigation set will help to recharge somemoisture deep into the soil. The longer duration irrigation, the deeper thewater is pushed and less is lost to evaporation.Sanden’s recommendation is for growers who can manage it, to “irrigate treesat 100 percent until the beginning of June, then pull back to a 15 percentdeficit during hull split and then move into the harvest interval. A postharvest/Septemberirrigation of at least four to eight inches will recharge theroot zone and help the health of the trees for the following year.”Also important is keeping your equipment as clean as possible to keep itrunning most effectively. “Flush your system regularly, especially if youincrease frequency and duration of irrigations,” he said. “If you haven’tchlorinated in a while, it is best to clean it and then check subunit pressuresto make sure you’re operating at uniform pressure. If you have access to anirrigation mobile lab, have them do an evaluation for you.”“Going through your system with a fine-toothed comb” will help growers toknow where their weak spots are in their orchards and to adjust their irrigationplan accordingly to ensure a strong crop, even with less available water.More information about Sanden’s research can be found at his website:http://cekern.ucanr.edu/Irrigation_Management/. He can be reached by email atblsanden@ucdavis.edu.Balancing Tree Stress with Reduced Deficit IrrigationWhen water availability is limited, irrigating should be timed to when treesare most sensitive to stress and measures should be taken to minimize waterlosses that occur during irrigation events. According to the University ofCalifornia’s Drought Management guide for almonds, understanding theaffects of withholding water during different times of the growing season cansignificantly affect the quality of the crop at harvest.Water stress early in the growing season, from leaf out through the periodof early spur development can adversely affect tree and crop development.However, water use during this time is low, reducing any potential watersavings from an early-season deficit irrigation strategy.Almonds are sensitive to water deficits during nut growth and developmentand stresses during this time are not advised. Research by Ken Shakel ofUC Davis has determined that almonds can handle drought stress fairly wellduring the two months leading up to harvest after the kernels have solidified,and moderate stress during this period has little influence on kernel weight.However, severe water stress in the months leading up to hull split will reducekernel weight and significantly reduce hull splitting.


According to the University of California DroughtManagement Website, “the effect of water deficits duringthe postharvest period are substantially affected by 1) preharvest water deficits and 2) the quantity of water use over theremainder of the season.” Bud differentiation can continuethrough mid-September. Moderate stress during this periodwill have little effect on subsequent year’s nut numbers, butsevere stress during bud differentiation has been found todramatically reduce fruit set the following spring. In earlyharvest (early August) districts, particularly with early varieties,more of the high water use season remains after harvest. Thisincreases the necessity for postharvest irrigation. Later harvest(north state) districts and later varieties have a slightly shorterpostharvest period, which occurs at a time of lower cropwater demand. These factors reduce the chance of moderatewater deficits causing bud differentiation problems.Keep Birds Out ofYour AlmondswithGUARANTEED!“We had a thousand crows in one orchard eating the crop at adamaging rate. In desperation we installed a single Bird Gard SuperPro Amp thinking it might help a little.Immediately upon installation the crows totally vanished. There wasnot one crow to be found in the orchard all the way through harvest.I could not believe it. We are installing 30 more units this season.”Dr. G. Barton HeulerCo-owner, A & P RanchTulare, CAThe decision to invest in new ideas is never easy, but neither iswatching birds turn your nuts into expensive feed.We’ve been keeping birds out of crops for more than 25 yearsand we’ll make your decision to invest in Bird Gard real easy:Try Bird Gard for an entire year.If you are not completely satisfied with the results simplyreturn it for a full refund of your purchase price.According to the UC guide for a moderate stress strategy,“There are various approaches growers can take tomanage limited water supplies depending on what typesof irrigations scheduling tools interest or are available tothem. A simple method is to reduce irrigation run time orlengthen irrigation intervals to obtain the desired percentageof irrigation reduction in applied water…Another approachis to schedule irrigations using periodic pressure chamberreadings and irrigate when midday stem water potentialreaches a pre-determined threshold stress level. This methodeffectively extends the irrigation interval, but the interval isdetermined by tree water status rather than the calendar.Irrigations should be in the volume of a normal set asperformed with a full irrigation regime.”More information regarding UC’s Drought Management Guide can befound at their website: www.ucmanagedrought.ucdavis.edu/almonds.cfm.The World Leader inElectronic Bird Controlwww.BirdGard.com888-332-232826 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


ONE SMALL STEP FOR MAN,ONE GIANT LEAP FOR ALMOND-KINDOur new state-of-the-art plant in Turlock opens in May, 2013Slicing, dicing, roasting, toasting... It’ll all be happening in record time when our new Turlock plantcomes online. Fitted with the most advanced equipment available, the facility will help satisfy theworld’s growing appetite for almonds. And thanks to the totally controlled environment,our products will meet the highest food safety standards.Cutting-edge technology, global marketing and high returns are just a few of the valueadded services we provide growers. So partner with us now, and let’s take this giant leapinto the future together.Partner with the world’s leading grower-owned cooperative! Call 209-545-6225www.bluediamond.com


As a Blue Diamond grower and daughter of Blue Diamondboard member Steve Van Duyn, Lucchesi has grown up inthe cooperative and considers herself a brand ambassador.“Blue Diamond is special to me and I like to make it known.I was very proud to be wearing our Blue Diamond gearduring the race,” she said. “Every time the race marshalspoke about Blue Diamond, I couldn’t help but cheer. Thisrace definitely ‘got my good going!’”Fleet Feet and Blue Diamond are doing their part topromote healthy lifestyles in Sacramento, the sixth fittestmetro city in the country, according to the AmericanFitness Index.In addition to the physical race sponsorships, BlueDiamond’s Fleet Feet program includes 33 training groupsthat work together to build up endurance and mileage toachieve race distances and help participants improve ontheir running technique. More than 3,000 athletes havetrained with the program, logging their workouts in a“Get Your Good Going” training logbook and refuelingon Blue Diamond Almonds.The sponsorship package also includes a partnershipwith Fleet Feet’s Project Fit. Project Fit engages locallow-income elementary schools to provide children withdaily physical activity. One key element in the programis a focus on teaching healthy eating. As the “officialhealthy snack of Project Fit,” Blue Diamond fuels theafternoon activities of more than 1,500 children at morethan 15 campuses.Blue Diamond’s partnership with Fleet Feet is spreading thecooperative’s “good” message throughout the Sacramentocommunity, fueling hometown pride in the neighborhoodssurrounding Blue Diamond’s headquarters.MAY | JUNE 2013 Almond Facts 29


Chairman Emeritus Fred MontgomeryRemembered for Longtime Service to Co-opFred Montgomery, Chico-area almond grower and former Blue Diamond chairman, passed away onApril 11 at the age of 93. Blue Diamond growers and employees, both past and present, will rememberMontgomery’s dedication to the cooperative, a partnership that led him to serve 28 years on the board ofdirectors representing District 1 and eventually transitioning to vice chairman and chairman, a post heheld for 19 years.“I am glad to have known Fred for the intelligent and unique person he was,and I personally always looked forward to meeting with him,” said Dave Baker,director of member services. “His remarkable pioneering drive and spirit liveson in the continued vibrancy he was part of creating. His dedicated and wiseservice on the board of directors for Blue Diamond Growers will not be forgotten.”A native of the Durham area, Montgomery graduated from the Universityof California, Berkeley, with a degree in electrical engineering. After servingin the Signal Corps and Army Security Agency in World War II, he took overmanagement of his father’s almond operation.Before his time on the co-op’s board, Montgomery put his engineeringbackground to use in the field. In the 1950s, growers were finding new waysto more efficiently harvest their crop. According to Blue Diamond’s historybook, “The Almond People,” upfront time and labor preparing the orchardfor mechanical harvest required pruning low limbs, leveling the orchard floorand clearing rocks, debris and dirt clods. “Not one to cover the same groundtwice, Montgomery designed a way to avoid that when preparing orchards formechanical harvest. He attached a nine-foot, water-filler roller to a Lindemanland plane so he could level the ground and roll it in a single operation.”Another of Montgomery’s inventions included an almond meat washer. Awater pipe with small nozzles ran the length of a screen cylinder and sprayedthe meats as they moved down the rotating barrel, flushing away soil particles.Moisture absorption was very low, allowing the meats to easily dry.“Fred was always very innovative, even in those days. He was always lookingfor a better way to do things,” said former Blue Diamond field supervisor DarylBrun, who worked on Montgomery’s orchards as a teenager. “He was alwaysvery progressive with his cultural practices and very much aware of theimportance of quality of the crop.”Montgomery was elected to the Blue Diamond (then known as the CaliforniaAlmond Growers Exchange) board of directors in 1960, when the Californiaalmond crop was just 85 million pounds. During his tenure, the Exchangeopened foreign markets one after another, including Japan, India, Korea,Singapore and Hong Kong. Almonds took to the skies aboard AmericanAirlines, new ingredient and retail product offerings mushroomed, and the BlueDiamond brand was redesigned to the classic chevron that still adorns the outsideof the Sacramento Plant. Additionally, new office and plant buildings went up inSacramento and the Salida plant was christened and brought up to speed.“Of all the years I’ve known Fred, he was a co-op man through and through,”said Howard Isom, former board chairman who replaced Montgomery asFred Montgomery (right) with formerBlue Diamond chairman Howard Isom.»the board member from District 1.“He was proud of the work he did tocontinue to grow Blue Diamond and helpCalifornia almond growers that wereBlue Diamond members. He was knownas ‘Mr. Almond’ in our area and alwaysenjoyed going out in the orchard tocheck on the crop.”“I said, at the time that FredMontgomery was the best co-opchairman in California,” wrote formerBlue Diamond President and CEO RogerBaccigaluppi. “With the benefit ofhindsight it is clear now that he wasthe best agricultural co-op chair in thecountry. No doubt about it.”Dan Cummings, the current boardrepresentative from District 1, grew uphearing about Montgomery and his“exemplary farming practices” fromhis father, who owned a neighboringorchard. “It was my great pleasureand good fortune to get to know Fredover the years as my involvement inthe almond industry progressed. Hewas always happy to talk aboutalmond farming, the market and life32 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


The Bee BoxCHRISTI HEINTZ& MEG RIBOTTOTHE BEE BOX“Healthy honey bee colonies are critical for meetingthe demands of food production in the United States”summarized Dr. Jeff Pettis, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MDand Dr. Dennis vanEngelsdorp, University of Marylandas the US Department of Food and Ag released itsreport on May 2, 2013, the National StakeholdersConference on Honey Bee Health.Project Apis m. was invited to provide opening remarks at theOctober 15 – 17, 2012 conference held in Alexandria, VA.Christi Heintz, Executive Director, was one of six stakeholdergroups to deliver opening comments. Understanding thecontinuing and increasing losses associated with ColonyCollapse Disorder (CCD) was the primary goal of theconference with the CCD Steering Committee receivinginput from stakeholders as they participated in discussionsaddressing future actions to promote and mitigate risks tomanaged bees in the U.S.Improving the health of honey bee colonies has fourcomponents; 1) better nutrition through habitat enhancement,2) judicious and targeted pesticide use, 3) improving on BMP’s,and 4) improving on disease and pest resistant stocks of bees.As an almond grower, you are a stakeholder. You can have adirect impact on the health of individual pollinators and overallcolony longevity. Team up with Project Apis. We are in theplanning and preparing stages for fall 2013 forage plantings.PAm has received grant funding from the CA Dept of Foodand Ag to ‘Build CA Bees for CA Specialty Crops.’PAm hasalso received funding from corporate sponsors. With moneyto purchase seeds, we now need almond growers to dedicateacreage to diversify the agricultural landscape by plantingforage resources for honey bees.Consider areas where trees are being taken out of production,in between young, non-bearing trees, as a cover crop betweenrows, orchard margins, along access roads, waterways or fallow,unused land. PAm is looking for participants. Now through July31 st we will take your honeybee forage seed order. Shipmentswill start in August. In order to provide early winter bloomfor honeybees, prior to almond bloom, plan on sowing seedsbeginning September 20 to take advantage of the first rains.“It is imperative that we increase honeybee survival both tomake beekeeping profitable but more importantly to meet thedemands of US agriculture for pollination and thus ensure foodsecurity,” Pettis and vanEngelsdorp emphasized.»Honey bee on Crimson CloverPhoto by Meg Ribotto‘Bee’ part of the solution. To enroll in thepollinator forage project, contact us today atProjectApis@gmail.com. The following articleby Christine Souza was originally published inAgAlert, the weekly newspaper from the CaliforniaFarm Bureau, on April 17.Thinking Outside The Box ToGrow Honeybee ForageHoneybee health is often cited as a factor forbee losses each year, yet experts say with propernutrition from a diverse variety of flowers andplants, bees can fend off many of the problemsthat lead to their demise. To improve the healthof the honeybee, Project Apis m.—a groupestablished by growers and beekeepers to fundhoneybee research— is enlisting growers and otherlandowners to plant floral seed mixes to increaseforage for honeybees.“Natural bee forage has a profoundly beneficialimpact on the health of honeybees, and whatPAm is doing to promote bee pasture holds greatpromise,” said Hamilton City almond growerDan Cummings, who also operates an apiarybusiness and sits on the Blue Diamond board ofdirectors. “We don’t know what causes (colonycollapse disorder), but we know that CCD is highly34 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


correlated with cumulative stress, and that can come from varroamite, nosema, viruses and pesticides. The stronger, more robust beescan withstand these pressures better, and what you notice aboutstrong colonies is they’ve had good access to natural forage.”Cummings, who is participating in an 80-acre forage demonstrationplot for the Seeds for Bees project by Project Apis m. and theCalifornia State Beekeepers Association, said mustard, vetch,crimson clover and other wildflowers are now in bloom. Flowersin the seed mixes will bloom at different times to provide bees withsomething to eat throughout the year.With forage plots in Glenn, Colusa, Stanislaus and Kern counties,Project Apis m. is working with growers and others and hasestablished acreage, seed mixes, seed suppliers and planting regimesfor the study, funded by the California Department of Food andAgriculture Specialty Crop Block Grant program.Cummings planted a variety of PAm seed mixes last December, andresearchers are now collecting pollen samples and comparing thenutritional profiles of each.Christi Heintz, Project Apis m. executive director, noted that it isimportant to maintain floral diversity prior to and after the almondbloom for the 1.6 million colonies that pollinate the state’s almondcrop. When forage is limited, such as in years of drought, beekeepersprovide bees with supplemental feed and pollen substitutes that donot provide the complete nutrition that the bees need, she said.“When we try to remake Mother Nature by feeding pollen substitutes,we’re definitely missing the boat,” Heintz said. “The bees arelacking essential amino acids and many nutritionalcomponents of their diet.”Eric Mussen, extension apiculturist with theUniversity of California, Davis, Department ofEntomology, said that years ago, California’sdiverse mix of plants and flowers helpedbeekeepers build up bee populations, yet many ofthese plants are disappearing.“What the beekeepers used to rely upon as food fortheir bees during the year, not much of it is thereanymore,” Mussen said.During the summer months, when the colonies areproducing a lot of brood, they need about an acreequivalent of bloom per colony, Mussen added.“If we could take the times of the year when beesreally need some food (before and after bloom),we could help them with their nutrition,” Mussensaid. “If we could take the nutrition and beef upthe bees, then perhaps they could better deal withtheir parasites, predators, diseases and exposure totoxicants.”Heintz said almond growers who take care of800,000 acres of almonds in California areencouraged to participate in the project by plantingPAm seed mixes along roadways and perimetersaround their orchards.continued on next page »»Honey Bee Forage Field Day, Capay Ranch,April 26, 2013. Photo by Christi Heintz»Dan Cummings in mustard bee foragePhoto by Christi HeintzMAY | JUNE 2013 Almond Facts 35


THE BEE BOX“This project creates value byimproving honeybee nutrition, and thebenefit to the grower would be strongerbees, healthier bees and contributing toalmond production and yield—and ourcrops, of course,” Heintz said.In three years, Project Apis m. wouldlike 10 percent of all almond growersin California, or 600 growers, to beinvolved in the Seeds for Bees project.“We want to change this barrenlandscape. When bees come, there’sbasically nothing for them to feed onexcept almond pollen,” Heintz said.Bob Curtis, Almond Board ofCalifornia associate director ofagricultural affairs, said, “TheAlmond Board is working inconcert with Project Apis m. andencouraging growers to plant thesupplemental forage before and afteralmond bloom so that bees havesomething to forage on, as well asfunding research that looks at thenutritional benefits of forage.”Enhancing bee forage comes at a criticaltime for the bees, Cummings said.“I remind growers of how importantbees are to their operation. Almost twothirdsof all of the bees in the U.S. arenow required for almond pollination,and there’s more almonds beingplanted,” Cummings said. “The beesare struggling. Growers need to take anactive interest in one of their absolutelycritical inputs. Without honeybees, youdon’t have a crop.”Newcastle beekeeper John Miller,CSBA president, said, “Bee numbersare falling at unsustainable rates. Overhalf of all beehives will be replacedin 2013. It is critically important forbeekeepers to engage landownersto plant nutritious forage for bees,especially farmers dependent onpollination services.”STRONG BEE COLONIESFOR 2014 ALMOND POLLINATION* * * * * * *Colony strength guaranteedby our independent pre-bloominspection programLIMITED SUPPLYServing California almondgrowers since 1979* * * * * * *Contact: Joe TraynorScientific Ag Co.P.O. Box 2144Bakersfield, CA 93303(661)327-2631 (Office)(661)809-5551 (Cell)joetraynor@gmail.com36 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


DIAL BACK THE SMELLNOT THE PERFORMANCEWe put a powerful insecticide through some big changes. The result:Vulcan’s new chlorpyrifos formulation delivers the high-speed knockdownand performance you need while reducing the odor you don’t. Whenyou’re ready to see – and smell – the difference an enhanced formulationmakes, ask your PCA or retailer for Vulcan .INSECTICIDE©2013 MANA Crop Protection. 3120 Highwoods Blvd. #100, Raleigh, NC 27604. Vulcan is a Restricted UsePesticide. Always read and follow label directions. Vulcan is a trademark of a Makhteshim Agan GroupCompany. 19910-AFM


Time To ConsiderROB KISS, Field Supervisor»Nonpariel andPTB LarvaeNOW & PTBThis 2013 crop is shaping up to be very productive. Growers are quitesatisfied with crop load throughout the state’s almond producing areas.Nuts are distributed throughout the tree with significant numbers ofclusters in numerous varieties. Normal rule-of-thumb: when the cropgoes up – Navel Orangeworm & Peach Twig Borer damage go down.Some say it’s just a function of more nuts spread between the pestpopulation (and that can be part of it), but others indicate it’s a greaterfunction of smaller nuts with tighter shell seal. Whichever, the goal is tohave a minimum amount of damage. The real rational is good mummysanitation and accurate, well-timed sprays.TIME TO CONSIDERTiming: Many advisors attribute higher reject levelslast year to poorly timed spray applications. For the lastseveral years, harvest and hull split were “late.” Last year,hull split may have snuck up on many of us. The nutsstarted splitting a little earlier, particularly at the topsof the trees. That, coupled with a fairly heavy load ofmummy nuts, spelled higher numbers of rejects for manygrowers. Sound familiar? This year may be shaping up tobe like last year so, “Heads-up!”This year, early temperatures immediately followingbloom seemed to accelerate nut development, thuspotentially creating a condition where hull split maybe early. Consequently, if the hull split is early, weshould be geared up for an early hull split spray. Oneknowledgeable researcher put it this way: “when you seethe start of blanks opening, you’d better get the sprayrig ready, because in about five to six days, real hull splitwill begin.” And as is the case with most agriculturaloperations: better late than never is a poor excusefor good farming. Also, check the tops of the trees.Sometimes significant hull split may take place on muchof the tree on top, and most of us just check hull split athead-high. This can be misleading.Some growers have made the mistake of using the wrongtrap counts to target the N.O.W. spray. The question toask is: what trap count? Sometimes the P.T.B. trap countis reported. Make sure you use the right criteria whendetermining your spray timing. P.T.B. traps should beused to determine P.T.B. flight; do not assume P.T.B.flights will automatically correspond with N.O.W. flights.Coverage is still king. Obviously, it is not fun to sit on thetractor with a conventional rig making applications at theappropriate speed, seeming to just crawl along. However,with the cost of materials, you cannot afford to just slapthem up against the tree canopy and hope the wormswill find them. This is critical if you are using some ofthe “softer” insecticides. Most are stomach poisons andmust be injested by the pest. In other words, the materialmust be eaten. And if they are applied too late with poorcoverage, don’t blame the material.Peach Twig Borer is another insect that in certain partsof the state can become as serious a problem as theN.O.W. Again, application timing must be targeted forthis specific pest. These worms, too, know when the nutsstart to crack. They lay their eggs just when the suture isstarting to enlarge, but not to the point when the shell isvisible. Fortunately, sometimes the P.T.B. will stay outsideof the meat if the shell seal is good, but you can’t counton this for control.Leaf AnalysisAccording to early observations, we have a large crop.Growers are scrambling to evaluate their nutritionalprogram and squeeze it into their fertilizer budget.Getting the maximum bang-for-your-buck against veryhigh fertilizer prices is a real balancing act.For years, it’s been preached to attain the best croppotential, it was imperative to ensure that the nutrientlevels were in the optimum range. Currently, growers aresimply making adjustments in their fertilizer programsthat must reflect adequate maintenance levels. And, with38 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


the nitrate issue looming in the not too distant future, we will haveto continue to establish nitrogen baselines for future applications.Frankly, the only way to secure this fine line of productionrequirements is to make sure you get a good leaf analysis. It is stillthe only objective function of the nutritional status of the tree.While absolute values may vary for lab to lab, their elemental valuesstill provide the only true measure of tree nutritional balance.Recently, the UC has initiated a program of analysis wherebysamples were taken in early April and those findings were correlatedto standards usually applied at July leaf analysis. This procedureallows us to read levels and assess nutrient needs earlier in thegrowing season. While this makes sense, there were growers andadvisors who were not able follow this early sampling protocol. Notto worry: the old standard still works.Remember, leaf analysis is only a guide. It is not an absolute andresults can vary from year to year depending on crop load, soilfertility, variety differences, and a whole host of variables that affectuptake and utilization of micro and macro elements.MitesWith the record-breaking heat we had earlier this spring, thereseems no reason to doubt that mite pressure could be significantthis year. It’s simple: Stress + Heat + Dust = Mites! When it getshot, these guys can complete a generation every week (or less), andas many as eight to 15 generations per year! Fortunately, we havea fairly strong arsenal of miticides to control them before theydecimate and defoliate the orchard. However, don’t assume youwon’t get them just because populations have been minimal over thelast couple of years.The following check list is a fairly basic primeron mites:• Stress and heat is a sure-fire formula for mites• Use of insecticides unfriendly to beneficial mites (pyrethroids, etc.)• Past history – had mites?• Insufficient predator mite population• Hot-spots• The weather – plan ahead. If it’s definitely going to get hot –recognize the potential• Determine economic thresholds early – it’s easier to controla smaller, more juvenile population than an established fullblowninfestation• Your miticide’s mode of action should match the problem;each miticide has certain strengths under certain conditions.• Water: Limited irrigation —> increased stress —> increasedmite threat.continued on next page »»IMPROVE FLAVOR AND TASTETested by Monarch LaboratoryField tested for over 20 yearsby Blue Diamond Grower:Jim Tanioka (209) 769-5627Mite webbingWithin a given species of plant, the cropwith the higher refractive index of cropjuices; will have a higher Sugar, Mineraland Protein content, a greater specificgravity or density; this adds up to asweeter tasting, a more Mineralnutritious food, a lower nitrate and watercontent and a longer shelf life: Cropswith a higher Sugar content have moreresistance to insects and worms.SINCE 1970: Shur-Crop; tested & approved as aspecialty fertilizer by the State of CaliforniaShur-Crop Is manufactured in Californiafrom: Certified Organic Icelandic KelpBY LEE KENDER, INC.P O BOX 472, ORVILLE CA 95965MAY | JUNE 2013 Almond Facts 39


40 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013TIME TO CONSIDERAntsTo most of us, it’s still spring. Irrigating, weeds, fertilizing, etc. are generally first on our list; ants, not so much.However, if you have had ant pressure in the past, there is no reason to believe they would have just pulled upstakes and left. And with the increasing use of drip/micro-irrigation, the beneficial habitat for ant proliferation hasdramatically increased. Lucky us.However, we have some very effective tools for ant control. Most work very well when applied properly.One issue that may be surfacing, is that if you have heavy pressure and/or an environment for ants with other plentifulfood sources that they feed on, e.g., weed seeds etc, consider initial treatments at higher rate levels for best control.Some growers have also found it necessary to retreat later when pressure necessitates with perhaps rotating materials.With the favorable price of almonds, this may be cheap insurance.»Almond Ant Nut DamageAnother issue occurs when orchards arereplaced or newly planted with drip.Generally, most of us do not considerants to be a problem on young orchards,but they can appear and cause seriousdamage. Make sure you monitor your 3 rdor 4 th leaf orchards also.Make sure you have identified the rightant. Many growers complain that theyhave ants, and they probably do, butthere are several species of ants foundin almond orchards throughout thestate. Many growers confuse Pyramid,Carpenter, and common Gray ant withFire ant. Be sure you key them out beforeyou treat.Potato Chip Test:Researchers have for some time usedhot dogs to attract ants for trapping andidentification, and, they work great.However, since most of the bad guys(ants) are protein eaters, they are alsoextremely fond of potato chips, whichare a little easier to handle. If you findan ant mound, simply scatter a few chips.If they disappear, you probably havealmond eating ants.ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!PREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!ALWAYS PAY$$ OFF!PREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONPREP-ARATIONConditionerTo see our complete line of products, please visitwww.exactcorp.comBuilt by farmers for farmers…we understand!TheTheThe NewTheTake control of the “waiting game” with the EXACT E-250 E-Z Prep Conditioner.Don’t just stand by and hope for the best. Use the E-250 to turn your product,removing sticks, grass, and leaves and evenly metering the cleanedproduct into the middle of the row.• Reduce drying time• Increase your product turnouts• Minimize crop exposureTo learn how conditioning can improveyour operation, visit the following link:www.exactcorp.com/conditioning


*EXTINGUISH ANTS IN YOUR ORCHARDStop problem ant infestations from taking a bite out of your profits by using Extinguish ®Professional Fire Ant Bait. Its grower friendly label solves the problems that make antcontrol difficult and inconvenient because it can be used everywhere ants colonize.Extinguish ®Professional Fire Ant Bait features:• Controls Southern (California) fire ants,Pavement ants and Red Imported fire ants• Approved for ALL CROPS• A usage rate of 1 – 1.5 lbs per acre• Available in economical 25 lb bagsTo learn more about Extinguish ®Professional Fire Ant Baitand to find a list of regional sales representatives near youvisit extinguishfireants.com or call 800.347.8272.*See label for ants controlled by Extinguish ® Professional Fire Ant Bait.LOOK! Receive a Spyker ® spreader with every 1,000 lb order through June 30, 2013.Contact your Ag distributor or call 1-888-334-1588 for more information.MAY | JUNE 2013 Almond Facts 41Always read and follow label directions. Extinguish is a registered trademark of Wellmark International. © 2013 Wellmark International. Spyker is a registered trademark of Brinly-Hardy Company.


WANTED:Conveyor/ reservoir cart for almondsCall Doug (530) 891-0878 or (530) 570-7252WANTED:‘94,’95 or ‘96 F-150 pick up truck, long bed, XLT or XL,single cab. Call Arby at: cell (209) 505-0555 or home (209)634-6125.WANTED:Gasoline Memorabilia: Old Gas Pumps, Gas Signs, Oil Signsand Car Signs Call 559-485-9496WANTED:Running or not I need a White 2-60 Field Boss or Oliver 1365for parts. Trying to keep mine operational.Contact Dean at (530) 867-5207 or dff101@frontiernet.net.FOR SALE:Compton Shaker, mono-boom, 1996, 4,000 hours. Very Goodcondition. $18,000 (559) 706-8089.FOR SALE:Johnson sweeper. Runs great. New battery. $400. (209) 634-0690, Delhi area.FOR SALE:Flory Sweeper Series 30, 6 ½ ft head, low hours, $45,000.00.Call (209) 599-4944.FOR SALE:Yardney Water Management Systems Ultra 116 AutomaticController (microprocessor) at 50% retail price.Contact email orocafe@msn.com tel (530) 763-7893.FOR SALE:(1) Johnson 6ft sweeper 2 cylinder , Deutz Engine, updatedtransmission. $5,300 (2) Johnson’s pickup machines, $5,500each Call (559) 485-9496FOR SALE:20,000 used 2”x 2”x 5’ tree stakes, $.60 each.Call (209) 969-0526CLASSIFIED ADS42 Almond Facts MAY | JUNE 2013


BLUE DIAMOND GROWERS1802 C STREETSacramento, CA 95811PRESORTSTANDARDU.S. POSTAGEPAIDSACRAMENTO, CAPERMIT NO. 694

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines