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Seminar Program - National School Public Relations Association

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60 Years of Learningthe Best, Latest,and Most EffectivePractices In <strong>School</strong>CommunicationsSan Diego, CaliforniaJuly 7-10, 2013The 60th Annual <strong>Seminar</strong> of the<strong>National</strong> <strong>School</strong><strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong> <strong>Association</strong>


Leadership Communicationin Changing TimesNSPRA SHOWCASETUESDAY, JULY 9, 20134:15 PM - 5:15 PMLanette Hart, APR, CPRCVP, Global Marketing & Corporate AffairsBank of America CorporationLanette Hart, APR, CPRC is an award winning and recognizedspeaker with more than 20 years’ experience helping organizationslarge and small deliver results by developing and executingon comprehensive communication plans. A recipient of the LifetimeAchievement Award from the Florida <strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong> <strong>Association</strong>,where she served as president, Mrs. Hart delivers big picturethinking combined with actionable tips you can use rightaway to make a difference in your district.


Welcome to the 2013 NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong>!Must Be Present to WinWe all know that the best way towin, learn, communicate, andcollaborate is in person, faceto face. You are already a winner, becauseyou have made the investment to attendthe 60th Annual NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong>!So, welcome – to the greatest in-person professionaldevelopment experience offered in school communications!You will find dozens of “can’t miss” learning experiencesand a spirited atmosphere like no other in celebration ofthe work we do. We encourage you to take advantage of theinsights that come from talking with fellow professionalswho understand what you’re going through before you saya word. Share your wins and your dilemmas. You neverknow who might offer the one thing you need to enhanceyour program and your professional development.By learning and collaborating together as professionals,we are moving school communications forward to benefitthose we serve: the students, families and staff in ourschools, as well as our communities. As communicators,we are the catalysts for positive change in education.While “present” this week, reach out to others and buildyour network. And, let your Board and staff know how wecan continue to make this the best “in person” professionalexperience ever for you. Have a great <strong>Seminar</strong>!Joe Krumm, APRNSPRA President2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 1


<strong>Seminar</strong> AppYour new favorite app –the NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong>!NSPRA is excited to announce it has an officialapp, available for immediate download on Androidand Apple devices. This app will provide you withquick access to valuable <strong>Seminar</strong> and NSPRA info.NSPRA App Features• Sessions• Information• Marketplace• <strong>Seminar</strong> Hotel• Feedback• Presenters• <strong>Seminar</strong> Buzz• NSPRA Directory• Notifications• News• Book Store• Community Education• Facebook• Twitter• Join Us• SettingsDownload:The app is powered byParentLink, an NSPRAsponsor and school districtapp developer. For moreinformation about ParentLink,visit www.parentlink.net.2 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Meeting RoomsAll <strong>Seminar</strong> administrative activities, General Sessions,Skill Sessions, and Action Labs/Special Sessions take placeon the 2nd and 3rd floors of the Manchester GrandHyatt San Diego Hotel (see diagram on pages 4-6).NSPRA Registration ................ Manchester Foyer – 2nd FloorCalSPRA Hospitality ............... Manchester Foyer – 2nd FloorNSPRA Office ..........................................Annie A – 3rd FloorNSPRA Book Store ................. Manchester Foyer – 2nd FloorExchange Center ...............................George Bush – 3rd FloorGeneral Sessions ...................... Manchester GHI – 2nd FloorNSPRA MarketplaceThe NSPRA Marketplace, featuring businessesserving school communication needs, is located inthe Manchester Foyer across from the ManchesterBallroom on the 2nd Floor. Hours are:Monday, July 8 ......................................8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Tuesday, July 9 .......................................8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Check Out the Savings at the<strong>Seminar</strong> Book Store!Save time and money by purchasing NSPRA’s practical,ready-to-use publications and products at the <strong>Seminar</strong>.• Instant delivery• No shipping/handling charges• NSPRA members receive 10% discountLocation:Open:Manchester Foyer – 2nd FloorSunday……….10:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Monday………. 9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Tuesday………..8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Wednesday…….8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 3


Hotel Floor Plans4 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Hotel Floor Plans2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 5


Hotel Floor Plans6 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


<strong>Seminar</strong> RegistrationNSPRA Registration is located in the ManchesterFoyer on the 2nd Floor. Hours are:<strong>Seminar</strong> RegistrationSaturday, July 6 ..................................... 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.Sunday, July 7 ....................................... 7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.Monday, July 8 ..................................... 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.Tuesday, July 9 ...................................... 7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Wednesday, July 10 .............................. 7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.<strong>Seminar</strong> Bulletin BoardsChanges in the <strong>Seminar</strong> program and room locations,as well as messages, will be posted on bulletinboards near the NSPRA Registration Desk.NSPRA Book StorePlan to stop by the NSPRA Book Store to previewour latest offerings and find the best schoolcommunication products available anywhere. Membersautomatically save 10% on all purchases. Avoidshipping/handling charges by purchasing on site.Location: Manchester Foyer – 2nd FloorOpen: Sunday ...................................10:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Monday ...................................9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Tuesday ....................................8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Wednesday ..............................8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Audio CDs and MP3sDigital Conference Providers (DCP) is audio recordingmost sessions (per presenter permission). Order orpurchase and receive on site CDs or MP3s of yourfavorite sessions, or those you missed, at the DCP boothin the Manchester Foyer on the 2nd Floor. Sessions notbeing recorded are noted throughout this program book.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 7


Information2013 <strong>Public</strong>ation Award Winners/BusinessExchange CenterVisit this year’s <strong>Public</strong>ation Award Winners/Business ExchangeCenter in the George Bush room on the 3rd Floor. TheExchange Center opens on Sunday, and the hours are thesame as registration except on Wednesday, when it closesat 1:00 p.m. Review this year’s winning publications andpick up samples to add to your idea file. Find information inthe Business Exchange about products and services providedby businesses serving school communication leaders.Open Counselors on Call SessionIf you would like to take advantage of free counseling fromveteran school PR/communication experts on your mostvexing challenges or issues, a special Open Counselingsession will be offered on Wednesday from 3:15 – 4:15p.m. in Manchester G. Counselors will be available tomeet with participants individually or in a roundtableformat to discuss ideas and solutions for your problems.Get Graduate Semester Extension CreditNSPRA 2013 attendees can receive two graduatesemester extension credits through the University ofSan Diego. The fee is $130 ($65 per credit). Registeronline up to 10 days following the first day of the<strong>Seminar</strong>. For directions and to register, go to www.nspra.org/graduate-semester-extension-credit.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactNSPRA celebrated the <strong>Association</strong>’sGolden Jubilee in Vail, Colo., at the 1985<strong>Seminar</strong> Banquet.8 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


2013 Gold Medallion Winners2013 Gold Medallion Award WinnersThe Gold Medallion Award is NSPRA’smost prestigious program award,recognizing superior educationalpublic relations/communicationprograms and projects. The 2013Gold Medallion winning entriesare posted on the NSPRA websiteat www.nspra.org/gold_medallionfor review. This year’s winners are:• Bentonville <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>sBentonville, Ark.Special Communication Project/Campaign:“Trail Time”• Capital Region BOCES, Albany, N.Y &Questar III BOCES, Castleton, N.YSpecial Communication Project/Campaign:“Your <strong>School</strong>s in Fiscal Peril: RunningOut of Time and Options”• Queensbury Union Free <strong>School</strong> DistrictQueensbury, N.Y.Special Communication Project/Campaign:“Many Voices, One Purpose: Advocacy Campaign”<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThe first Gold Medallion Awards werepresented at the 1981 Phoenix <strong>Seminar</strong>.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 9


NSPRA Executive BoardOfficers 2012-2013PresidentJoe Krumm, APR, director, community/government relations, North Clackamas<strong>School</strong> District, Milwaukie, Ore.President-electNora Carr, APR, chief of staff, GuilfordCounty <strong>School</strong>s, Greensboro, N.C.Vice President at Large for SuperintendentsSteven L. Walts, Ed.D., superintendent,Prince William County <strong>Public</strong><strong>School</strong>s, Manassas, Va.Vice President at Large for CivicEngagement & Deliberative DemocracyMatt Leighninger, executive director,Deliberative Democracy Consortium(Washington, D.C.), Hamilton, Ontario, Can.Vice President of Diversity EngagementStan Alleyne, chief communications officer,Minneapolis (Minn.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>sSouthwest Region Vice PresidentKelly Avants, APR, director,communications, Clovis (Calif.)Unified <strong>School</strong> District10 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


NSPRA Executive BoardOfficers 2012-2013Mideast Region Vice PresidentPatti Koslo, director, EducationalPartnership Institute, LLC, Powell, OhioNortheast Region Vice PresidentNancy Dzija Vaughan, APR, schoolcommunity relations coordinator,Waterbury (Conn.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>sNorth Central Region Vice PresidentBrett Clark, executive director,communications/strategic planning,Glenview (Ill.) <strong>School</strong> District #34South Central Region Vice PresidentJulie Zwahr, director, communications/partnerships, Little Elm (Texas) ISDSoutheast Region Vice PresidentElise Shelton, chief communicationsofficer, Clarksville-Montgomery County<strong>School</strong> System, Clarksville, Tenn.Northwest Region Vice PresidentCarol Fenstermacher, APR,consultant, Camas, Wash.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 11


NSPRA <strong>National</strong> Office StaffRich Bagin, APR, executive directorKaren H. Kleinz, APR, associate directorElaine Willis, manager, seminar,partnerships and programsTommy Jones, manager, business servicesKatie Hood, e-communications specialistCynthia Frazier, customerservice/operations assistant12 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


InformationNSPRA Executive Board ElectionsThere are no contested offices this year, so candidatesfor the open offices on the NSPRA Executive Board willbe affirmed by acclamation of the Board at the AnnualMeeting on Sunday at 1:00 p.m. The candidate forPresident-elect will be given five minutes to speak at theAnnual Meeting. Candidates for Northeast, Mideast andSouthwest Region Vice President will be given five minutesto speak at their regional meetings on Sunday at 4:00 p.m.The approved slate of candidates forthe NSPRA Executive Board is:President-elect Jim Cummings, APR (Ariz.)Northeast RegionVice President Vicki Presser (N.Y.)Mideast RegionVice President Barbara Hunter, APR (Va.)Southwest RegionVice President Terry Locke (Ariz.)Candidates will take office on October 1, 2013.The Flag of Learningand LibertyGold flamesBlue flamesRed flamesRed stripeBlue stripeWhite fieldLearning & LibertyHigh expectations, effective teachingResponsible families,involved communitiesStrength & vitality of ourdemocratic way of lifeStability & opportunity made possibleby a strong education systemVirtue & aspirations of a nation2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 13


InformationSuperintendent ScholarshipsProvidedParentLink awarded a generous grant to NSPRA toprovide complimentary registration scholarships forsuperintendents to attend the 2013 San Diego <strong>Seminar</strong>.ParentLink is a leading mobile app provider for schooldistricts. NSPRA has made outreach to superintendentsa priority in order to raise awareness of the importance ofeffective communication as a management function andhow a strategic communication program demonstratesaccountability and builds support for schools. Weappreciate ParentLink’s support of this outreach effort.Thank you, CalSPRA!A very special thank you goes out to ourenergetic California Chapter Host Committee:Judy Leitz, chair; Maddie Boucher; TrinetteMarquis-Hobbs, APR; Stephen Nichols;Jacqueline Ratto; and Daniel Thigpen.Thanks for helping us “Catch the Wave”to an exciting <strong>Seminar</strong> in San Diego!14 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Saturday at a Glance7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Registration — ManchesterFoyer (2nd Floor)8:30 – 9:00 a.m. Coffee Service for Pre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.* Pre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops(all workshops requireseparate registration)*Lunch is on your ownAll workshop session rooms are locatedon the 2nd and 3rd Floors.• Rise of the Mobile App: Mobile AppStrategy in <strong>School</strong> CommunicationsManchester A (2nd Floor)• Crisis Management: Plan, Prepareand PracticeManchester C (2nd Floor)• New Professionals <strong>Program</strong> – Part IFord AB (3rd Floor)• APR Prep: Get Ready for UniversalAccreditation – Part IMohsen AB (3rd Floor)2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 15


Saturday, July 6Pre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.RegistrationManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorPre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops*7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.* Coffee service for participants from 8:30-9:00 a.m.* Participants will be given time for lunch on their own.Rise of the Mobile App:Mobile App Strategy in<strong>School</strong> Communications 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Manchester A – 2nd FloorPresenter: Cody Cunningham,assistant to the superintendent forcommunications, McKinney (Texas) ISDCrisis Management:Plan, Prepare and Practice 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Manchester C – 2nd FloorPresenter: Rick Kaufman, APR,executive director, communityrelations/emergency management,Bloomington (Minn.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s16 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Pre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Saturday, July 6New Professionals <strong>Program</strong> –Part I9:00 – 4:00 p.m.Ford AB – 3rd FloorPresenters: Chris Tennill,APR, chief communicationsofficer, <strong>School</strong> District ofClayton (Mo.); and BobNoyed, APR, executivedirector, communication/community relations, EdenPrairie (Minn.) <strong>School</strong>sAPR Prep: Get Ready forUniversal Accreditation –Part IMohsen AB – 3rd Floor9:00 – 4:00 p.m.Presenters: JanetSwiecichowski, APR,executive director,communications,Minnetonka (Minn.)<strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s; and TimHensley, APR, assistant tothe superintendent, FloydCounty <strong>School</strong>s, Rome, Ga.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThe New Professionals <strong>Program</strong> andthe APR Prep Pre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshopswere first offered at the 2001 <strong>Seminar</strong> inMinneapolis.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 17


Would like to say “Thank you”to all the sponsors of the60th Annual <strong>Seminar</strong>www.blackboard.comwww.eschoolview.comwww.mindmixer.comwww.peachjar.comwww.parentlink.comwww.pearsonfoundation.orgwww.schoolmessenger.comwww.schoolwires.com18 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


California Chapter Special Event“Catch the Wave”7:30 – Midnight (event is free but tickets are required)If you did not go online to pre-register for thisspecial Tuesday post-dinner event, be sure to checkat <strong>School</strong>Messenger’s exhibit booth in the NSPRAMarketplace as soon as possible to join in the fun.Beginning at 7:30 p.m., CalSPRA, along with sponsor<strong>School</strong>Messenger, will host a “Catch the Wave”evening event at one of San Diego’s hottest nightclubs,FLUXX. Meet your CalSPRA guides in the lobby of theManchester Grand Hyatt at 7:00 p.m. to walk over asa group. The venue is approximately a half mile fromthe hotel (about a 15-minute walk). Pedi cabs will alsobe available to assist with transportation to and fromFLUXX at no cost to you – look for the Pedi cabs witha <strong>School</strong>Messenger banner! Or, you can take a cab orfind your own way at your leisure. Directions and mapsare available at the CalSPRA Hospitality Booth.Get ready for a radical evening of live music,refreshments and fun at this special event!Please note: You must be 21 to attend.Very special thanks to <strong>School</strong>Messenger forsponsoring this evening out at no cost to <strong>Seminar</strong>participants and to our bodacious CaliforniaChapter for coordinating this event!Sponsored by <strong>School</strong>Messengerwww.<strong>School</strong>Messenger.com2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 19


Sunday at a Glance7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Registration —Manchester Foyer (2nd Floor)7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Exchange Center —George Bush (3rd Floor)8:30 – 9:00 a.m. Coffee Service forPre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops10:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. NSPRA Book Store —Manchester Foyer (2nd Floor)9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.* Pre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops(all workshops requireseparate registration)*Lunch is on your ownAll workshop session rooms are locatedon the 2nd and 3rd Floors.• New Professionals <strong>Program</strong> – Part II(1/2-day AM session)Ford AB (3rd Floor)• Video Boot CampManchester D (2nd Floor)• APR Prep: Get Ready forUniversal Accreditation – Part IIMohsen AB (3rd Floor)20 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Sunday at a Glance1:00 – 3:45 p.m. Annual Meeting/Celebrationof Achievement and Leaders’MeetingManchester AB (2nd Floor)• Mark of Distinction Chapter Awards• Member Recognitions• Candidates for Office• Chapter Leaders – The Year Ahead2:30 – 3:45 p.m. How to Make the Most of YourFirst NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong>Manchester C (2nd Floor)4:00 – 5:30 p.m. Regional Colleague Connections• Southwest Region Madeline AB (3rd Floor)• Northwest Region Ford C (3rd Floor)• South Central RegionManchester GH (2nd Floor)• North Central Region Manchester I (2nd Floor)• Mideast Region Madeline CD (3rd Floor)• Southeast Region Emma AB (3rd Floor)• Northeast Region Emma C (3rd Floor)6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Opening Reception —Manchester Ballroom (2nd Floor)• Followed by CalSPRA hosted Sign-UpDinners or Evening on Your Own2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 21


Sunday, July 7Pre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.RegistrationManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorExchange CenterGeorge Bush – 3rd Floor7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.NSPRA Book Store10:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Manchester Foyer – 2nd FloorqPre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops* 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.* Coffee service for participants from 8:30-9:00 a.m.* Participants will be given time for lunch on their own.New Professionals<strong>Program</strong>: Part IIFord AB – 3rd Floor9:00 a.m. – NoonPresenters: Chris Tennill,APR, chief communicationsofficer, <strong>School</strong> District ofClayton (Mo.); and BobNoyed, APR, executivedirector, communication/community relations, EdenPrairie (Minn.) <strong>School</strong>s<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactNSPRA’s Accreditation in <strong>School</strong> <strong>Public</strong><strong>Relations</strong> (ASPR) credential programwas introduced at the 1976 Philadelphia<strong>Seminar</strong>. Nineteen NSPRA memberspassed the first ASPR exam, includingnotables Rich Bagin, Bill Banach, GaryMarx and Joe Rowson.22 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Pre-<strong>Seminar</strong> Workshops: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Sunday, July 7Video Boot Camp9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Manchester D – 2nd FloorPresenter: Jake Sturgis,communications coordinator,Minnetonka (Minn.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>sAPR Prep: Get Ready forUniversal Accreditation –Part IIMohsen AB – 3rd Floor9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.Presenters: JanetSwiecichowski, APR,executive director,communications,Minnetonka (Minn.)<strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s; and TimHensley, APR, assistant tothe superintendent, FloydCounty <strong>School</strong>s, Rome, Ga.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 23


Sunday, July 7Annual Meeting/Leaders’ Meeting: 1:00 – 3:45 p.m.Annual Meeting/Celebrationof Achievement and Leaders’Meeting1:00 – 3:45 p.m.Manchester AB – 2nd FloorThe Annual Meeting of the <strong>Association</strong> and the annualLeaders’ Meeting for chapter officers and Project Team/Committee members have been combined into a singlemeeting this year. Everyone is welcome to attend.Presiding – Annual Meeting:Joe Krumm, APR, NSPRA presidentThe NSPRA Annual Meeting/Celebration ofAchievement provides an update on the statusof the <strong>Association</strong>, highlights achievementsand initiatives of the past year, and recognizesthe accomplishments of members. Thisportion of the meeting includes:• Audit Committee Report• Mark of Distinction Chapter Awards• 2012-13 Accredited Members Pin Presentation• NSPRA Front-Runners• Member RecognitionsCampaign Speech: Candidate for NSPRAPresident-elect, Jim Cummings, APR, director,communications/parental & community engagement,Glendale (Ariz.) Elementary <strong>School</strong> DistrictPresiding – Leaders’ Meeting:Nora Carr, APR, NSPRA president-electThe NSPRA Leaders’ Meeting sets thedirection for chapters and Project Teams/Committees for the coming year andprovides <strong>Association</strong> leaders with anopportunity to interact, network, gatherideas and identify ways to connect chapter activities withNSPRA projects and initiatives. Chapter officers will receiveimportant planning information and review key deadlines,tasks and responsibilities for the year. Officers will alsomeet in groups with their Regional Vice Presidents.24 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Sunday, July 7How to Make the Most ofYour First NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong> 2:30 – 3:45 p.m.Manchester C – 2nd FloorPresenters: Nicole Kirby, APR, director, communicationservices, Park Hill <strong>School</strong> District, Kansas City,Mo.; and Trinette Marquis-Hobbs, APR, partner,Syntric Communications, Sacramento, Calif.Never been to an NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong> before? This session willhelp you maximize your opportunities and get the most out ofyour first time. Learn how the program is set up, what specialofferings to take advantage of, what after-hour activities areavailable, and what not to miss while you are in San Diego.Plus, you’ll get a chance to meet other first-timers and begin anew professional network before the <strong>Seminar</strong> gets under way!2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 25


Sunday, July 7Regional Colleague Connections: 4:00 – 5:30 p.m.Regional Colleague Connections4:00 – 5:30 p.m.Don’t miss this special opportunity to meet your NSPRARegion Vice President and network with other membersfrom your region of the country. Come join your colleaguesto share common concerns and issues affecting yourschools, identify emerging trends, trade “best practice”ideas, and connect with neighboring NSPRA chapters.Southwest RegionMadeline AB – 3rd FloorLeader: Kelly Avants, APR, Southwest Regionvice presidentRegion: Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii,Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and WyomingCampaign Speech: Candidate for Region Vice PresidentNorthwest RegionFord C – 3rd FloorLeader: Carol Fenstermacher, APR,Northwest Region vice presidentRegion: Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington,Alberta, British Columbia, NorthwestTerritories, Saskatchewan and YukonSouth Central RegionManchester GH – 2nd FloorLeader: Julie Zwahr, South Central Regionvice presidentRegion: Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri,Oklahoma, and Texas26 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Regional Colleague Connections: 4:00 – 5:30 p.m.Sunday, July 7North Central RegionManchester I – 2nd FloorLeader: Brett Clark, North Central Regionvice presidentRegion: Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska,North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin,Manitoba, and Northwestern OntarioMideast RegionMadeline CD – 3rd FloorLeader: Patti Koslo, Mideast Region vice presidentRegion: District of Columbia, Indiana, Kentucky,Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Virginia,and West VirginiaCampaign Speech: Candidate for Region Vice PresidentSoutheast RegionEmma AB – 3rd FloorLeader: Elise Shelton, Southeast Region vice presidentRegion: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee,Puerto Rico, and Virgin IslandsNortheast RegionEmma C – 3rd FloorLeader: Nancy Dzija Vaughan, APR,Northeast Region vice presidentRegion: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts,New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York,Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont,New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia,Eastern Ontario, Prince Edward Island,and QuebecCampaign Speech: Candidate for Region Vice President2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 27


Sunday, July 7Opening ReceptionEveryone Welcome!Co-Sponsored by NSPRA and <strong>School</strong>Messengerwww.nspra.orgwww.<strong>School</strong>Messenger.comManchester Ballroom6:00 – 7:30 p.m.2nd FloorWe invite you and your family to join us as we kick off the60 th Annual NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong> at the Opening Receptionco-sponsored by NSPRA and <strong>School</strong>Messenger. Connectwith colleagues old and new, meet your NSPRA ExecutiveBoard, learn what our California Chapter has planned forafter-hours socializing, and get a jump on one of the mostimportant parts of your <strong>Seminar</strong> experience – the chanceto network!Reception is followed by CalSPRA hosted Sign-Up Dinners oran evening on your own.Substitute SpeakerThis year’s designated substitute speaker isSteve Knagg, a motivational speaker for hisown company, Pinetop Presentations, anda well-known and respected presenter atNSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong>s and chapter conferences.Knagg is a past president of NSPRA andrecipient of the NSPRA Presidents Award. Hewas formerly the director of communications for the Garland(Texas) ISD and currently serves on the Garland ISD Boardof Trustees. In the event a keynote speaker is unable to presentbecause of an emergency, he will be the substitute speaker.28 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


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InformationSession FormatsChoose from different session formats to meetyour professional development needs:Skill Session – Traditional one-hour breakout with oneor more presenters. May be a lecture, panel or interactiveformat that includes tips, tactics and “how to” stepsapplicable to the experience level of the target audience.Special Session – This extended-time session allows for amore in-depth presentation by an expert in the topic area.Action Labs – Action Labs go in-depth on a topic in a twohourmini-workshop format. Action Labs are interactive,include a “hands-on” component, and provide tactics andstrategies adaptable for immediate use by participants.Corporate Showcase – These sessions provide an opportunityto learn about resources, products and services offered bymajor <strong>Seminar</strong> sponsors in an informational format.Session Focus AreasThe special icons below denote the general focus of each skillsession. The designations are based on information submittedby the presenters and sessions may present a broad perspective.They are:T PR/Communication Tactics – These are “howto” sessions that focus on specific tips, steps and tactics forimplementing, coordinating or developing a plan, program,campaign or event.M PR/Communication Management & StrategicPlanning – These sessions cover strategic planning andevaluation of the PR/communications program from amanagement perspective, i.e., effectiveness, reputationmanagement, accountability, positioning, relationshipbuilding,etc.L PR/Communication Leadership – These sessionspresent topics from a personal professional developmentperspective, or provide opportunities to think “outside the box”with professional colleagues.30 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


InformationB Marketing/Branding – These sessions offer tips andstrategies to effectively market schools and create a “brand”image for your district.E Engagement – These sessions address strategies andprocesses for effectively engaging parents, students, staffand the public in the schools and in decision-making abouteducation.F Family/Community <strong>Relations</strong> – These sessions shareprograms, strategies and activities for increasing active familyand community involvement that creates a strong volunteercore and ambassadors for the schools.C Corporate Showcase and Products/Services Preview– These sessions introduce new products or services beingoffered to members and will highlight how to use them in yourschool district. Some products may also be offered for sale atindividual sessions.Session Target AudiencesThe special icons below denote the general experience level asession is designed to target. Unmarked sessions mean contentis not experience-level specific. The designations are basedon information submitted by the presenters and sessions maypresent a broad perspective. They are:N New PR professional (1-3 years) – Session focuses onPR basics.A Advancing professional (4-7 years) – Session focuseson strategic planning tactics and applications.M-C Mid-career professional (7-15 years) – Sessionaddresses advanced skills, applications and counseling.Note: All session designations are intended as a guide only.Many sessions may fit dual categories and experiencelevels, or may not clearly fit any of the categories orexperience levels. Designations have been made basedon descriptions provided by the presenters. We hope thishelps make your <strong>Seminar</strong> experience more satisfying.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 31


Information<strong>School</strong> System ClassificationsDistrict type/enrollment information (as applicable)is included in the skill session descriptions, i.e.,Urban/75,000+, Suburban/2,000-4,999, etc.APR Learning OpportunityMany school PR professionals havepersonal and professional goals ofbecoming Accredited in <strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong>(APR) sometime during their careers. Tomake it easier to identify sessions which help you to learn moreabout the core areas of our profession, we have included theAPR seal beside the session description. The sessions markedwith the seal are NOT Accreditation Readiness Review orExamination preparatory classes. However, professionalsconsidering pursuing Accreditation may wish to attend thesesessions, as they cover knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs)tested during the APR Examination.Repeat Sessions – Why There Aren’t AnyThe answer to why we don’t repeat sessions is twofold – first,the majority of our presenters are also members who are payingto attend the <strong>Seminar</strong> and, like you, they want to attend asmany sessions as possible. Second, we have tried it in the pastand found that second sessions were poorly attended.Tip:Team up with colleagues and share notes fromdifferent sessions, or purchase a session CD orMP3 from Digital Conference Providers (DCP).<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThe NSPRA Marketplace of exhibitors wasadded at the 2001 Minneapolis <strong>Seminar</strong>.32 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


<strong>Seminar</strong> Evaluation Available Online NowInformationComplete your <strong>Seminar</strong> evaluation online while you arein San Diego! Your input is important to us as we plan forfuture <strong>Seminar</strong>s and we hope this offers a quick and easyway to share your feedback. You can evaluate sessions viathe <strong>Seminar</strong> App, or, access the online evaluation survey atwww.surveymonkey.com/s/NSPRA<strong>Seminar</strong>13. We will sendyou a reminder and a link immediately after the <strong>Seminar</strong>if you prefer to complete it after you get home. We hopethis will help make your <strong>Seminar</strong> experience even better!Online Access to Session HandoutsSession handouts are available online. Thesematerials are a benefit of attending the <strong>Seminar</strong>,so the page is password protected.• To access the materials go towww.nspra.org/seminar_handouts thenenter the password sandiego2013.• Handout availability is based on individualpresenters submitting handouts to NSPRA asrequested. E-mail addresses for presenters will belisted for those whose handouts are not available.• Session materials will remain availablethrough September 6, 2013. After that date,the page will no longer be accessible.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactSan Diego has hosted the NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong>three times – 1993, 2002 and 2013.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 33


MarketplaceNSPRA Marketplace Company ProfilesMeet exhibitors offering communication products and servicesthat save your district and schools time and money. Learnabout their products/services, and get your questions answeredfirst-hand. Don’t miss this year’s exciting Marketplace:Alboum & Associates is the translation agency for the “goodguys” – providing translation and interpretation services tonon-profits and mission-driven organizations. We’re proudto serve schools, school districts and associations who worktirelessly to make a difference. We value our clients’ work,time, and frequently-limited resources, which is why we nevercharge minimums or rush fees. Visit www.Alboum.com.Blackboard K-12 an education technology leader, expandseducational opportunities, creates collaborative learningcommunities and increases engagement for students, teachers,parents and administrators. With our online learning, mobile,mass communication, web conferencing and website solutions,educators are closing the gap between the way students liveand the way they learn. Visit www.blackboard.com/k12.Educational Measures provides districts and schools withcustom mobile apps that allow for 24/7 communicationwith parents, students, teachers, and communitymembers. Our system is custom built to include yourcurrent technology applications and provide easy access toadditional information you want available to stakeholders.From emergency notifications and weather alerts, to lunchmenus, all are controlled by you with an easy backendsystem at no-cost! Visit www.educationalmeasures.com.e<strong>School</strong>View offers easy-to-use content management system(CMS) websites and software. Our CMS allows you to engageyour community, inform parents and increase students’school pride. We have invested time and resources to createtop-notch products and customer service for the success ofmore than 350 educational organizations. Check out ourInstant Connect, Facilities Management, Parent Portal, PRConsulting Services and more! Visit www.e<strong>School</strong>View.com.34 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


MarketplaceNews For My <strong>School</strong> generates revenue for your districtby utilizing the communication tools you’ve alreadyestablished to raise funds for your students and programs.Our new program, <strong>School</strong>-Pons, provides access tocoupons from local businesses while generating revenuefor your district’s students and programs – it’s couponsfor your district! Visit www.newsformyschool.com.MindMixer works to engage communities: good ideas areout there, but so many of those ideas don’t make it to thesurface or are drowned out by the volume of usual voices.That’s where MindMixer comes in. Our platform allows youto gather ideas, review and respond to feedback, and findreal solutions all in one place. Visit www.MindMixer.com.ParentLink is the leading mobile app provider for schooldistricts. The multi-lingual app, branded with district logoand colors, provides parents and community memberswith instant access to their choice of school and studentinformation without accessing each school website. Thedistrict native app, with ease of use advantages over web apps,enhances user experience supporting educational communitiesand student achievement. Visit www.parentlink.net.Peachjar provides the most highly effective school-tohomeelectronic communication system for school flyers.We post school-approved visual e-flyers online and deliverthem to parents’ smartphones and computers. Peachjarmakes it easy for parents to find, view, and share schoolflyers. Finally! An effective electronic flyer communicationsystem that parents and staff will love. No budget? Noproblem! Peachjar is FREE! Visit www.peachjar.com.Relatrix assists districts and schools to address the growingpriority of developing synergy between communicationsand community engagement. Relatrix’ products andservices combine targeted notification by email, voice, andtext with Web and social media posting and subscriptionbasedeNews. We also assist you to: engage communitypartners with your schools; simplify volunteer recruitmentand tracking; and share news with these importantstakeholders. Learn more about Relatrix Online ContactCenter solutions. Visit www.relatrix.com/nspra2013.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 35


MarketplaceSBSI Software, Inc. provides state-of-the-art softwaresolutions for Online Class Registration, FacilitiesManagement and <strong>School</strong> Age Child Care registrationand management. We have been working with schools,community education, libraries, hospitals and severalother types of organizations that offer classes, camps andother activities for over 25 years. Let us put our experienceto work for your program! Visit www.sbsiinc.com.<strong>School</strong>Messenger is the leading provider of communicationsolutions for education. Since 1999, thousands of schooldistricts, public schools, colleges, universities, privateschools and other educational facilities in all 50 states havedepended on the company’s innovative solutions, includingthe <strong>School</strong>Messenger notification service, the Talk About It ®anonymous communication solution, and the new CustomMobile Apps service. Visit www.schoolmessenger.com.<strong>School</strong>wires provides integrated website and contentmanagement systems, a safe social learning and networkingsystem and an enterprise technology platform to K-12 districtsand schools in the United States. Our technologies aredesigned to foster student, teacher and parent engagement.Our solutions are designed to connect K-12 communitieswith the information, services and people they needto achieve their goals. Visit www.schoolwires.com.<strong>School</strong> Connect Services is a free mobile and web-basedapplication that facilitates effective communications to connectyou with your school community. Developed by an educatorand school administrator who understands and has experiencedfirst-hand the communication needs and challenges withinthe school house, <strong>School</strong> Connect is a safe, effective, onewaycommunication portal that comes without the risksof open forums. Visit www.schoolconnectservices.com.36 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Marketplace<strong>School</strong> Maps Online provides your district with an interactivemap where users can easily see schools of attendance,color-coded boundaries, feeder schools, directions, andmuch more – all on one page. We make it easy to relay thisinformation to parents and effectively communicate yourmessage. Save time and money while giving your communitywhat they need. Visit www.schoolmapsonline.com.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 37


Monday at a Glance7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration — ManchesterFoyer (2nd Floor)7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Exchange Center — GeorgeBush (3rd Floor)7:30 – 9:00 a.m. Coffee — Manchester Foyer(2nd Floor)8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. NSPRA Marketplace —Manchester Foyer (2nd Floor)9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. NSPRA Book Store —Manchester Foyer (2nd Floor)q8:00 – 10:00 a.m. First General Session,Leadership ThroughCommunication Award andPresidents Award Presentations— Manchester GHI (2nd Floor)10:00 – 10:15 a.m. Break10:15 – 11:15 a.m. Skill Sessions• 100% Graduation Is Your Community’sBusiness (Manchester A – 2nd Floor)• Education Is Everyone’s Business – Keys to Private-Sector Support (Manchester B – 2nd Floor)• Marketing <strong>School</strong> Choices: Connecting Resources,People, and Options (Manchester C – 2nd Floor)• Common Core State Standards Update(Manchester D – 2nd Floor)• Superintendent Shares: Putting the “<strong>Public</strong>” Back in<strong>School</strong> <strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong> (Manchester E – 2nd Floor)• Beyond Twitter Basics: Developing anEffective Strategy for Twitter Success(Manchester F – 2nd Floor)• New Age of Communicating in aCrisis (Elizabeth G – 2nd Floor)38 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Monday at a Glance• Framing Education Conversations forPositive Impact (Ford C – 3rd Floor)• How to Win a Bond Election in 80Days (Del Mar AB – 3rd Floor)• Strategic Focus on Communications Leads toDistrict Success (Mohsen AB – 3rd Floor)11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Skill Sessions• Engaging and Communicating with DiverseAudiences (Manchester A – 2nd Floor)• New Models for Effective <strong>Public</strong> InputMeetings (Manchester B – 2nd Floor)• Policy Recommendations to Guide SocialMedia Interactions for <strong>Public</strong> Educators(Manchester C – 2nd Floor)• Parent Partnership Summit: Connecting Districtsand Stakeholders (Manchester D – 2nd Floor)• Building <strong>Public</strong> Confidence in <strong>School</strong>Budgets (Manchester F – 2nd Floor)• Strategic <strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong> (Elizabeth G – 2nd Floor)• Pass/Fail: The Dos and Don’ts of AffectingCommunity Decisions (Del Mar AB – 3rd Floor)• Customer Service Can Make or Break Your District:Explore the DOVE Project – A Customer Service<strong>Program</strong> That Works (Mohsen AB – 3rd Floor)• Keep Calm and Carry On in Response toa Crisis – How to Meet Student, Staff andParent Needs (Manchester E – 2nd Floor)• Evaluate Your Effectiveness with <strong>School</strong>Communications Rubrics and Measures:NSPRA’s <strong>School</strong> Communications BenchmarkingProject Presents Initial Benchmarking Toolsfor the Profession (Ford C – 3rd Floor)12:30 – 3:00 p.m. Superintendents’ LuncheonPresentation and Peer Dialogue(Superintendents Only –Tickets Required) —Elizabeth F (2nd Floor)2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 39


Monday at a Glance12:30 – 2:00 p.m. Lunch on Your Own1:30 – 3:30 p.m. Beverage Service — ManchesterFoyer (2nd Floor)2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Skill Sessions• Community Academies Create CredibleCustomers (Manchester A – 2nd Floor)• Online Lunch – Strategically Engagingthe Community in the 21st Century(Manchester B – 2nd Floor)• Social Media for <strong>School</strong>s: Diving Beyond “ShouldWe?” Discussions (Manchester C – 2nd Floor)• Are We All “ADD” or Is It the Job?(Manchester D – 2nd Floor)• Writing and Editing: What to Leave In, Whatto Leave Out (Manchester E – 2nd Floor)• Involving Students in PR (Manchester F – 2nd Floor)• Q: <strong>School</strong> of Choice? A: Then MarketYour Brand (Elizabeth G – 2nd Floor)• APR: Advancing Your ProfessionalCredibility (Ford C – 3rd Floor)• Setting Up an Advertising <strong>Program</strong> in YourDistrict (Del Mar AB – 3rd Floor)• The “Dynamic Dozen” Strategic Tools Usedby the Best and Most Effective <strong>School</strong> PRPractitioners (Mohsen AB – 3rd Floor)3:15 – 5:15 p.m. Action Labs/Special Sessions• 10,000 Hours: Gaining Mastery as a <strong>School</strong>Communicator (Manchester AB – 2nd Floor)• Learn How to “Think Like a Patron”(Manchester DE – 2nd Floor)• Community Engagement – Lasting Change Builton “Partnership” (Elizabeth FG – 2nd Floor)5:15 p.m. Evening on Your Own40 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


First General Session: 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.RegistrationManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorExchange CenterGeorge Bush – 3rd FloorCoffeeManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorNSPRA MarketplaceManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorMonday, July 87:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.7:30 – 9:00 a.m.8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.NSPRA Book Store9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Manchester Foyer – 2nd FloorqFirst General Session8:00 – 10:00 a.m.Manchester GHI – 2nd FloorPresiding: Joe Krumm, APRNSPRA PresidentWelcome: Rich Bagin, APRNSPRA Executive DirectorqCoffee ServiceSponsored by PeachjarManchester Foyer – 2nd Floor2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 41


Monday, July 8First General Session: 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.KeynoteNow and Next: Trends among Parents,Teachers, Students, and CommunitiesRebecca Ryanx — NoTape AvailableIf you knew the future of education,what would you do? In this dynamicsession, futurist Rebecca Ryan willlead us on a journey to discover thekey trends among next-gen parents,teachers, students, and communities.This “big thinking” session will providecontext for the <strong>Seminar</strong> and a renewed urgency of theimportance of our role as communication professionals.Rebecca Ryan is often referred to as a “humanspark plug.” A former professional basketball player,Entrepreneur of the Year, and Communicator of theYear, the team she leads at Next Generation Consultinghas been called, “One of the most reliable sources forleaders who want to attract and retain the next generationof creative workers.” Her firm specializes in helpingpublic- and private-sector companies develop strategiesto recruit and retain young, future leaders and theyhave helped some of America’s best workplaces achieverankings in the Fortune 100 Best Places to Work. Rebecca’snew book, ReGeneration: A Manifesto for America’sLeaders, is scheduled to hit the shelves this summer.Introduction: Kelly Avants, APR, NSPRASouthwest Region vice president42 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


First General Session: 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.Monday, July 82013 Leadership Through Communication AwardSponsored by Blackboard Connect,AASA and NSPRAThe Leadership Through CommunicationAward recognizes the leadership ofoutstanding superintendents and publicrelations/communications professionalswho, along with their teams, improve communicationwithin their school systems and communities.This year’s recipients are:Barton Goering, Ph.D.,superintendent; andChristine Splichal, director,communications, SpringHill (Kan.) <strong>School</strong> DistrictIntroduction: Rich Bagin, APR, NSPRA executive directorPresentation: Mario Joy, senior vice president, client care;and Stephanie Kuhnel, vice president, global sales, BlackboardConnect; and Joe Krumm, APR, NSPRA president2013 NSPRA Presidents AwardThe Presidents Award is the highest, most prestigiousrecognition given by NSPRA. This award honorsNSPRA leaders for outstanding contributions to thefield of school public relations and to the <strong>Association</strong>.This year’s recipient is:Tom DeLapp, president, CommunicationResources for <strong>School</strong>s, Rocklin, Calif.Presentation: Joe Krumm, APR, NSPRA presidentBreak10:00 – 10:15 a.m.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 43


Monday, July 8Skill SessionsSkill Sessions: 10:15 – 11:15 a.m.10:15 – 11:15 a.m.100% Graduation Is YourCommunity’s Business! EManchester A – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenters: Elise Shelton, chief communications officer andNSPRA Southeast Region vice president; andB.J. Worthington, Ed.D., director of schools,Clarksville-Montgomery County <strong>School</strong> System,Clarksville, Tenn., and 2013 Bob GrossmanLeadership in <strong>School</strong> Communications Awardrecipient (Suburban/25,000-75,000)Learn how to replicate a community-involved initiativeto improve high school graduation rates by building prideand ownership through a shared vision and purpose.You’ll hear how one district raised graduation ratesfrom 76% to 95.2% and is closing in on 100%. Videotestimonials from community members and students offera compelling story of what can be accomplished and you’llleave with materials you can replicate in your district.Education Is Everyone’s Business –Keys to Private-Sector Support BManchester B – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenters: Keith Imon, associate superintendent,communications/technology services;Philip Kavits, director, communications;Sharon Henry, supervisor, community/business engagement; and Steven Walts,Ed.D., superintendent, Prince WilliamCounty <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s, Manassas, Va.,and NSPRA vice president at-large –superintendents (Suburban/75,000+)Business support can boost school success despite economicchallenges. Whether your district is large or small, youcan build bigger, more valuable business alliances. In thissession you’ll learn the elements of a successful businessengagement strategy from a team that has raised millions inpartnership revenue. Submit your questions and concernsat the door to ensure they’re covered. Set the course towardpartnerships that make education everyone’s business!44 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 10:15 – 11:15 a.m.Monday, July 8Marketing <strong>School</strong> Choices: ConnectingResources, People, and Options BManchester C – 2nd Floor (Seating for 192)Presenters: Alison Vai, marketing coordinator; andOlivia Brown, director, communications,Office of Innovation, Metropolitan Nashville(Tenn.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s (Urban/75,000+)With the adoption of an improved yet intricate school choiceprocess, the district’s communications team focused oncreating a clear understanding of an optional schools process,school offerings and how families should choose a school.Numerous communication strategies were implemented thatencompassed internal and external audiences as well as specificmessages for each. Strategies and examples will be sharedand you’ll leave with an understanding of how collaborationis key to creating successful marketing campaigns.Common Core State StandardsUpdate MManchester D – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenters: Jim Dunn, APR, president, JimDunn and Associates, Liberty, Mo.;and Katie Hood, e-communicationsspecialist, NSPRA, Rockville, Md.This session will bring you up-to-date on NSPRA’s effortsto become the “go to” resource for school administratorsand communications professionals seeking support forcommunicating the complexities related to implementationof the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Find outabout the communication tools and strategies developedby NSPRA that are designed to aid those charged withannouncing, educating, promoting and defending theCCSS. Learn how to implement a CCSS communicationplan for your district, debunk some common myths, andprepare for the range of opportunities and challenges theCCSS presents. A Q&A segment will be included.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 45


Monday, July 8Skill Sessions: 10:15 – 11:15 a.m.Superintendent Shares: Putting the “<strong>Public</strong>” Backin <strong>School</strong> <strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong> EManchester E – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenters: Ashley Simmons, chief public informationofficer; and Anthony Jackson, Ed.D.,superintendent, Nash-Rocky Mount <strong>Public</strong><strong>School</strong>s, Nashville, N.C. (Rural/10,000-24,999)Positive outcomes result when stakeholder groupsare well connected and engaged in the educationalprocess and effective community engagement andtwo-way communication structures are key to success.Discover how your superintendent can become achampion for public relations, and how you can usetraditional and new strategies to foster better two-waycommunication with your various stakeholder groups.Beyond Twitter Basics: Developing an EffectiveStrategy for Twitter Success MManchester F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 160)Presenter: Erika Daggett, chief information officer,Sycamore Community <strong>School</strong>s, Cincinnati,Ohio (Suburban/5,000-9,999)By providing a strategic plan and empowering districtadministrators with tools and the freedom to become “citizenjournalists” through the use of the powerful Twitter medium,school districts can create niche communication channelsthat “show and tell” the story of student achievementand staff commitment in real time. Gain an advancedunderstanding of Twitter platforms, using hashtags effectively,and measuring success, along with learning the steps forcreating a realistic and effective Twitter strategic plan.46 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 10:15 – 11:15 a.m.Monday, July 8New Age of Communicatingin a Crisis TElizabeth G – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenter: Rick J. Kaufman, APR, executivedirector, community relations/emergencymanagement, Bloomington (Minn.) <strong>Public</strong><strong>School</strong>s (Exurban/10,000-24,999)Social media is playing an important role in shaping newsstories and crisis situations. While social media makes it easyto track an emerging crisis, it makes it difficult to effectivelymanage the crisis. This nuts-and-bolts session explores theimportance, value and trends in crisis communication fromone of the foremost authorities on school crisis communicationand response, and author of the revised third edition ofNSPRA’s Complete Crisis Communication Management Manual.Framing Education Conversationsfor Positive Impact LFord C – 3rd Floor (Seating for 48)Presenter: Cheryl Scott Williams, executive director,Learning First Alliance, Alexandria, Va.This session will introduce an aggressive nationalmessaging campaign launched by the Learning FirstAlliance to reframe the context for discussions aroundpublic school improvement. Data gleaned from nationalpolling and approaches for local implementation will beshared. An overview of the initiative will be provided andparticipants will be asked to share feedback on customizinga national campaign for local impact and effectiveness.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThe first NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong> was held onJune 28, 1954, at the Hotel Statler inNew York City following the <strong>National</strong>Education <strong>Association</strong> convention.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 47


Monday, July 8Skill Sessions: 10:15 – 11:15 a.m.How to Win a Bond Election in 80 Days MDel Mar AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 96)Presenter: Benjamin Horsley, director, communications/community outreach, Granite <strong>School</strong> District,Salt Lake City, Utah (Urban/25,000-75,000)Recently lose a bond proposal? Concerned about communitysupport? Never ran a campaign before? Learn the skillsnecessary for successfully engaging your community tobuild support for school construction. This session willfocus on successful political campaign strategies and howthey translate into bond elections. Community engagementstrategies will be employed with key examples and experiencesshared, and you’ll have a chance to work in small groupson scenarios designed to teach you the skills you’ll need.Strategic Focus on CommunicationsLeads to District Success MMohsen AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 96)Presenters: Bart Goering, Ph.D., superintendent; andChristine Splichal, director, communications,Spring Hill (Kan.) <strong>School</strong> District(Suburban/2,000-4,999) and 2013 LeadershipThrough Communication Award recipientsFive years ago, Spring Hill <strong>School</strong> District had no formalcommunications program in place; today the district isrecognized as the 2013 Leadership Through CommunicationAward recipient. Through a purposeful effort to enhancecommunications, the district now has a strategic, multi-facetedprogram that has passed a bond issue, enhanced internalrelations, increased goodwill with families and community, andpositioned itself to support rapid growth and development.Learn how to define, implement and fine-tune a formalizedcommunications program that leads to success at all levels.Break11:15 – 11:30 a.m.48 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Skill SessionsMonday, July 811:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Engaging and Communicatingwith Diverse Audiences EManchester A – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenter: Stan Alleyne, chief communications officerand NSPRA vice president of diversityengagement, Minneapolis (Minn.) <strong>Public</strong><strong>School</strong>s (Urban/25,000-75,000)A growing number of today’s students come from diversefamilies – families of color, families who rely on free/reduced lunch and parents who are learning Englishalongside their children. Discover strategies for reachingthese families that include translation best practices,soliciting support from leadership, experimenting withdifferent media, and using creative methods to bridge thetechnology gap. You’ll also learn the importance of buildingrelationships – not just blocks of text – to truly customizecommunication to fit the needs of each community.New Models for Effective<strong>Public</strong> Input Meetings EManchester B – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenters: Michele Kelley, public information specialist;Deborah Bush-Suflita, senior program manager,communications service; and Jessica Scheckton,communications program manager, CapitalRegion BOCES, Albany N.Y. (Other/75,000+)Learn practical tips for planning public meetings andconstructively engaging polarized constituent groups. Whetheryou’re soliciting input to inform difficult budget choices orinviting public involvement in decisions around school closingsor consolidation initiatives, the payoff can be enormous interms of building long-term credibility with a public that isincreasingly divided on key issues. Come away with practicalideas and concrete tips for planning successful meetingsalong with some pros and cons of various meeting formats.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 49


Monday, July 8Skill Sessions: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Policy Recommendations to Guide Social MediaInteractions for <strong>Public</strong> Educators LManchester C – 2nd Floor (Seating for 192)Presenter: Stephanie Smith, Ed.D., director, humanresources/leadership development; andVirginia Conover, Ed.D., teacher, Seaford(Del.) <strong>School</strong> District (Rural/2,000-4,999)A lack of regulation for use of social media by educators hasresulted in court challenges brought by individual teachers,teachers’ unions, and the ACLU. Learn the ramifications ofsocial networking for schools, and the need for clear policiesgoverning the use of social media for all personnel within thepublic school system. This session will offer recommendationsand guidelines for policy development and implementationof appropriate social networking strategies that are basedon relevant court cases and rulings, as well as current socialnetworking policies in place in a variety of school districts.Parent Partnership Summit: Connecting Districtsand Stakeholders FManchester D – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenters: Ken Blackstone, APR, executive director,communications/strategic partnerships;and Fred McDaniel, Ph.D., chief planningofficer, Richland <strong>School</strong> District Two,Columbia, S.C. (Suburban/25,000-75,000)Studies show student achievement and test results are higher,community attitudes toward schools are better, and academicprograms are more effective when parents and communitymembers are involved in education. This session offerskey tactics for communicating with and further involvingstakeholders in the education process through a ParentPartnership Summit. Learn how to plan the event from soupto nuts, conduct an evaluation, and plan for follow-up events.50 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Monday, July 8Building <strong>Public</strong> Confidence in <strong>School</strong> BudgetsE AManchester F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 160)Presenter: DeeAnn Konrad, APR, community relationssupervisor, Sioux Falls (S.D.) <strong>School</strong> District(Urban/ 10,000-24,999)<strong>School</strong> budgets are complex beasts! Tame the “wild”misconceptions of school funding by getting your communitymore engaged in the conversation. Avoid scare tacticsand shock value statements. Instead, walk away from thissession with practical tips that will help the communitysee your district’s funding needs and understand theROI of their education dollars. Learn how to engageparents, young professionals, senior citizens and businessowners in difficult education funding conversations.Strategic <strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong> M AElizabeth G – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenter: Nora K. Carr, APR, chief of staff, GuilfordCounty <strong>School</strong>s, Greensboro, N.C., and NSPRApresident-elect (Other/25,000-75,000)In this practical, results-oriented session, discover thedifference between strategic public relations and more reactive,tactically focused efforts. The session outlines the four basicRACE components of strategic planning for public relations,marketing and communications: Research and Assessment,Analysis and Planning (Action Planning), Communication andEvaluation. Learn the importance of aligning each componentand all steps to match the message, experience, and programwith what research says about publics, timing, and values.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThe July 1966 issue of the NSPRAnewsletter, Trends, reported, “The wordat NSPRA’s 13th Annual <strong>National</strong> <strong>Seminar</strong>(in Hollywood, Fla.) was that the school PRjob becomes more demanding day by day.”2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 51


Monday, July 8Skill Sessions: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Pass/Fail: The Dos and Don’ts of AffectingCommunity Decisions TDel Mar AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 96)Presenter: Emily Grobe, public information officer,Hutto (Texas) ISD (Suburban/5,000-9,999)As financial landscapes become increasingly uncertain,more and more districts will be considering various typesof tax and budget elections in coming years. This sessionwill share how one Texas district held a successful taxratification election in 2012 that passed with 67%, afterthe same election failed in 2011. You’ll learn: what workedand what didn’t; tips for how and when to plan meetingsand voting locations; how to develop talking points;and other strategies that led to a successful election.Customer Service Can Make or BreakYour District: Explore the DOVE Project –A Customer Service <strong>Program</strong> TMohsen AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 96)Presenter: Ann Stephens-Cherry, executive director,public relations/marketing, Hampton (Va.)City <strong>School</strong>s (Urban/10,000-24,999)<strong>School</strong> districts should all be in the business of providingexcellent customer service to parents, students, colleagues,and business partners because “everyone” is our customer. Anatmosphere of excellent customer service impacts everythingfrom funding to your reputation in the community. Learnhow the DOVE (Dedication of Our Valued Employees)program has made a difference and leave armed witha process for establishing and promoting a successfulcustomer service program that works for your district.52 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Monday, July 8Keep Calm and Carry On in Responseto a Crisis – How to Meet Student,Staff and Parent Needs MManchester E – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenters: Peg Mannion, APR, communityrelations coordinator, Glenbard TownshipHigh <strong>School</strong> District 87, Glen Ellyn,Ill. (suburban/5,000-9,999); and JaneThorsen, Ed.D., principal, GlenbardWest High <strong>School</strong>, Glen Ellyn, Ill.Crisis management: how would you respond if a fire brokeout at your school? Learn the tactics to use in the minutes,hours and days following a crisis from a team that’s beenthrough it. Learn to: effectively manage media inquiries; keepthe school board, staff, students and parents informed; workeffectively with emergency responders and service providers;and prepare a contingency plan in the event of an emergency.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 53


Monday, July 8Skill Sessions: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Evaluate Your Effectiveness with <strong>School</strong>Communications Rubrics and Measures: NSPRA’s<strong>School</strong> Communications Benchmarking ProjectPresents Initial Benchmarking Tools for theProfession MFord C – 3rd Floor (Seating for 48)Presenters: Sandra Cokeley, APR, consultant, CokeleyCommunications, Pearl River, N.Y., and NSPRABenchmarking Project Team manager; andBarbara Hunter, APR, assistant superintendent,communications/community outreach, FairfaxCounty <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s, Falls Church, Va. andNSPRA Benchmarking Project Team chairNow in its second year, NSPRA’s <strong>School</strong> CommunicationsBenchmarking Project Team has developed rubrics ofpractice and associated performance measures in three criticalfunction areas of our profession: Comprehensive ProfessionalCommunications <strong>Program</strong>, Internal Communications, andParent/Family Communications. Designed for PR practitionersand others responsible for school communications, thesetools support evaluation and identification of opportunitiesto refine and improve your program so that it contributes tostudent achievement. Project Team leaders will review theoverall scope of the project, present the rubrics and measuresalong with applications for their use, and outline future plansand next steps for the benchmarking project. Learn how touse these new tools to measure your communication efforts.Lunch on Your Own12:30 – 2:00 p.m.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThe last ASPRs were presented at the1999 Baltimore <strong>Seminar</strong>, prior to theadvent of Universal Accreditation in <strong>Public</strong><strong>Relations</strong> (APR) now administered by theUniversal Accreditation Board.54 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


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Monday, July 8Superintendent’s Luncheon 12:30 – 3:00 p.m.Superintendents’ Luncheon Presentation and PeerDialogue12:30 – 3:00 p.m.Superintendents Only – Ticket RequiredElizabeth F – 2nd FloorWelcome:Joe Krumm, APR, NSPRA president andRich Bagin, APR, NSPRA executive directorIntroduction:Steven L. Walts, Ed.D., NSPRA vicepresident at-large – superintendentsPresenter sponsored by Pearson FoundationThe Pearson Foundation is an independent 501(c)(3)non-profit organization that aims to make a differenceby promoting literacy, learning, and great teaching. ThePearson Foundation collaborates with leading businesses,nonprofits, and education experts to share good practice,foster innovation, and find workable solutions to theeducational disadvantages facing young people andadults across the globe. More information on the PearsonFoundation can be found at www.pearsonfoundation.org.56 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Superintendent’s Luncheon 12:30 – 3:00 p.m.Monday, July 8Special PresentationTurning Negative Heat into Positive Energy!John Draper, Ed.D.x — NoTape AvailableChange is hard – but organizations thatdon’t change are doomed to obsolescence.The challenge is for school leaders todesign change so that staff membersembrace and support it. There are threefundamental change elements to startright or get back on track quickly. In thisspecial session, designed specifically for superintendents,Dr. John Draper will share a simple but powerful templatefor leading effective change without losing your job!The luncheon presentation will be followed by apeer-to-peer discussion around the challenges thatrestrain progress, solutions for overcoming resistanceto change, and how to be a change agent whileproviding a sense of stability across the school system.John Draper, Ed.D., is president of CambridgeStrategic Services, an organization that guides schoolleaders in building proactive plans for the futurethat create extraordinary learning communities. Aformer teacher and principal, he served as executivedirector of the Council for Leaders in Alabama<strong>School</strong>s for nine years before becoming CEO of theEducational Research Service in Washington, D.C.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 57


Monday, July 8Beverage ServiceBeverage Service 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.1:30 – 3:30 p.m.Sponsored by e<strong>School</strong>ViewManchester Foyer – 2nd Floorwww.eschoolview.com58 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.Skill SessionsMonday, July 82:00 – 3:00 p.m.Community Academies CreateCredible Customers EManchester A – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenters: Donna Petraits, communications coordinator,Brownsburg (Ind.) Community <strong>School</strong>Corporation (Suburban/5,000-9,999);and Tricia Reynolds, communityrelations coordinator, Carmel (Ind.) Clay<strong>School</strong>s (Suburban/10,000-24,999)This session will give you the tools and the foundation tobuild a successful program that develops informed, credibleadvocates for your school district and encourages strong,two-way communication with stakeholders. “CommunityAcademies” bring stakeholders behind the scenes to meet thepeople responsible for programs and services, while seeingfirst-hand how and why schools function as they do.Online Lunch – Strategically Engaging theCommunity in the 21st Century EManchester B – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenter: Amanda Morris, school/communityrelations coordinator, Hilliard (Ohio) City<strong>School</strong>s (Suburban/10,000-24,999)Community engagement is important, but who has time toattend evening meetings anymore? Move your communityforum online and engage your community at a whole newlevel. Discover how to increase community engagementefforts from a handful of the same people to hundreds ofresidents and parents who are all sharing the district’s strategicmessage. You’ll leave with a better understanding of how toengage stakeholders at a time and space that works for them.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 59


Monday, July 8Skill Sessions: 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.Social Media for <strong>School</strong>s: Diving Beyond “ShouldWe?” Discussions E M-CManchester C – 2nd Floor (Seating for 192)Presenter: Dustin Senger, digital communicationsspecialist, Falcon <strong>School</strong> District 49, Peyton,Colo. (Suburban/10,000-24,999)Do you use social media? Your school district’s onlinecommunity wants to get informed and inform others, createand contribute, share and recommend. This session focuseson participatory media best practices. Learn how to engagepatrons as partners in collaboration and content production,while exploring innovative examples of districts on Facebook,Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube and CNN iReport. Explorethe differences between “newsworthy” and “shareworthy,”and leave feeling empowered to leverage social media asan active component of your communications strategy.Are We All “ADD” or Is It the Job? MManchester D – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenter: Louise Henry, APR, director, ClientDevelopment Services, Harris CountyDepartment of Education, Houston, TexasWith so much on your plate, do you sometimes feelyou have the attention span of a gnat? Enjoy a sessionof management tips, counseling, bonding, copingmechanisms and laughter – all designed to help you in yourjob, where creativity, multitasking and priority jugglingare required. Learn about the effect of a crisis or mediafeeding frenzy on the brain and learn some techniquesto be more effective in your Average Daily Duties.60 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.Monday, July 8Writing and Editing: What to Leave In, What toLeave Out TManchester E – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenter: Leigh Ann McKelway, community relationsofficer, Chesterfield County (Va.) <strong>Public</strong><strong>School</strong>s (Suburban/25,000-75,000)Are you still running against the wind of jargon and edu-speak?This session will help professionals of all experience levels craftmessages that are easy to understand by deleting extra wordsand using the right words. In this session you’ll have a chanceto condemn examples of atrocious communication, “ooh” and“aah” over outstanding writing, and give your writing/editingmuscles a workout on publications, letters, websites, etc.Involving Students in PR T AManchester F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 160)Presenters: Jill Filer, director, communications/community relations, Harrisonville (Mo.)<strong>School</strong>s (Rural/2,000-4,999); Michelle Cronk,communications coordinator, North KansasCity (Mo.) <strong>School</strong>s (Suburban/10,000-24,999);and Tina Zubeck, school/community relationscoordinator, Platte Country R-3 <strong>School</strong> District,Platte City, Mo. (Suburban/2,000-4,999)Who better to help fulfill the NSPRA mission of “buildingsupport and trust for education through responsiblepublic relations that leads to success for all students”than students themselves? Students can provide valuableassistance with communication efforts whether youare a one-person office or a multi-layered department.Learn strategies that involve students in achieving PRgoals and provide them with hands-on experiences.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 61


Monday, July 8Skill Sessions: 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.Q: <strong>School</strong> of Choice?A: Then Market Your BrandB AElizabeth G – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenter: Ken Koch, APR, director, marketing/communications, Francis TuttleTechnology Center, Oklahoma City,Okla. (Suburban/2,000-4,999)<strong>School</strong>s of choice must compete with for-profit trainingschools, extra-curricular activities, and the ever-shiftingfocus of prospective students. Learn how a leading careertraining center presents a brand image to its community aspart of marketing, recruitment, and community outreachactivities. Examples of print, broadcast, and social mediawill be shared, while discussing how they support abrand marketing strategy. Gain a better understandingof how brand marketing can attract students andcommunicate your schools’ value to the community.APR: Advancing Your ProfessionalCredibility L AFord C – 3rd Floor (Seating for 48)Presenter: Janet Swiecichowski, APR, executivedirector, communications, Minnetonka(Minn.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>sAre you ready to take the next step in your professionaldevelopment? Accreditation in <strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong> (APR)is the hallmark of professionalism in our field. It is akinto a CPA in accounting, national boards in nursing, andadministrative certification in education. APR representsproficiency in the skills and body of knowledge required tobe effective and ethical in public relations practice. Begincharting your professional development path to APR today.Note: This is not a study course, but an overview of the process.62 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.Monday, July 8Setting Up an Advertising <strong>Program</strong>In Your District BDel Mar AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 96)Presenters: Zac Rantz, director, communication, Nixa(Mo.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s (Suburban/5,000-9,999);and Lana Snodgras, communications/community relations director, West Plains(Mo.) <strong>School</strong>s (Rural/ 2,000-4,999)So, you want to sell advertising in your district? How doyou get started? What legal issues do you need to know nowbefore you get too far in? Should you even do this? Comelearn the answers to all your questions so you can start andimplement a successful advertising program in your districtand gain access to un-tapped resources in your community.The “Dynamic Dozen” Strategic ToolsUsed by the Best and Most Effective<strong>School</strong> PR Practitioners M AMohsen AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 96)Presenter: Larry Litwin, APR, associate professor,Rowan University, Glassboro, N.J.This fast-paced session covers 12 communication modelsdesigned to propel strategic communicators to the highestlevel. Many were used by President Obama in his re-electioncampaign. From electronic releases, hyper-targeting, conflictanalysis, and audience fragmentation, to crisis communication,media relations, key communicators and summary models,you’ll learn strategies, tactics, tools and techniques for doinga more effective job in these challenging times. The sessionwill include Q&A time to address your specific issues.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThe city that has hosted the NSPRA<strong>Seminar</strong> most often is Washington, D.C.,five times (1959, 1969, 1980, 1990, and2008).2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 63


Monday, July 8Action Labs / Special Session: 3:15 – 5:15 p.m.Action Labs/Special Sessions10,000 Hours: GainingMastery as a <strong>School</strong>Communicator M M-C 3:15 – 5:15 p.m.Manchester AB – 2nd Floor (Seating for 240)Presenter: Tom DeLapp,president, Communication Resourcesfor <strong>School</strong>s, Rocklin, Calif., and2013 Presidents Award recipientIntroduction: Brett Clark, NSPRANorth Central Region Vice PresidentIt takes 10,000 hours of skill-building, experience, and practiceto truly master something. After 10 years in school PR, you’veput in about 30,000 hours. Have you spent them wisely or onchores that cause repetitive stress and “carpal tunnel vision” inyour career? Whether you’re just starting out or hitting yourcareer stride, this invigorating session offers techniques toachieve mastery as a school communicator while juggling thedemands of systemic, situational and strategic communication.This Action Lab is aimed at professionals wanting tosuccessfully get over the mid-career hump. It also helps newprofessionals create a career development plan and pathwayto job mastery. In breakout work, you’ll audit your areas ofexpertise and match them to your time allocations. Success ishabit forming; are your career habits helping you succeed?<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactAction Labs were part of the <strong>Seminar</strong>program in the 1970s and early 80s beforebeing retired and reintroduced at the 2010Charlotte <strong>Seminar</strong>. An Action Lab topic atthe 1980 Washington, D.C., <strong>Seminar</strong> was“AVs – More than the Printed Word,” whichfocused on ideas for overhead projectors,displays, sign-making, tape/slide, andtelevision.64 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Action Labs / Special Session: 3:15 – 5:15 p.m. Monday, July 8Learn How To“Think Like a Patron” M 3:15 – 5:15 p.m.Manchester DE – 2nd Floor (Seating for 180)Presenter: Ken DeSieghardt,CEO/partner, Patron Insight,Inc., Stilwell, Kan.Introduction: Patti Koslo, NSPRAMideast Region vice presidentIf you’ve ever found yourself wondering what your schooldistrict patrons are really thinking – and why – this SpecialSession is for you. Real-life examples drawn from research withpatrons of school districts of all shapes and sizes will provideyou with a road map to more effective communication. Youwill learn what 20 years of patron research tells us about thetopics that school districts should be talking about with theirpatrons if they want to build great district/patron relationships.Three communication categories will be addressed – Essential,Important, and As Needed – and you’ll receive specific,research-based recommendations you can put to use rightaway. Discover how to align topics with your patrons’interests so their eyes don’t glaze over and build great district/patron relationships as a result. Your presenter is the authorof Think Like a Patron (Without Losing Your Mind) and aco-founder of Americans for <strong>Public</strong> Education, a non-profitorganization that champions what’s right about public schools.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactNASA official Robert W. Brown returnedthe Flag of Learning and Liberty carriedaboard the Challenger by teacherastronautChrista McAuliffe to NSPRAPresident Lew Armistead, APR, in aspecial ceremony at the 1987 San Antonio<strong>Seminar</strong>.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 65


Monday, July 8Action Labs / Special Session: 3:15 – 5:15 p.m.Community Engagement – Lasting Change Built on“Partnership” E 3:15 – 5:15 p.m.Elizabeth FG – 2nd Floor (Seating for 300)Presenters: C.J. Huff, Ed.D., superintendent;and Kim Vann, director, community development,Joplin (Mo.) <strong>School</strong>s (Urban/5,000-9,999); TonyRosetti, Ed.D., superintendent, Webb City (Mo.)R-VII <strong>School</strong> District (Suburban/2,000-4,999); andJill Filer, director, communications, Harrisonville(Mo.) <strong>School</strong> District (Rural/2,000-4,999)Introduction: Julie Zwahr, NSPRA SouthCentral Region vice presidentSuccessful community engagement is built on getting theright people to the table and engaging them in creatingsupport structures around kids and school staff, even in themidst of deep budget cuts. This Action Lab will explainhow the framework of Joplin <strong>School</strong>s’ successful BrightFutures program was developed and how other districts andcommunities implementing their model have experiencedprofound change. You’ll discover how to bring business,social/human services, and faith-based sectors of thecommunity together to create a culture where kids can learnand education is valued. You’ll learn how to: evaluate yourneeds and resources; get key people on board to carry themessage; gain buy-in and educate the public to real needs; anddetermine ROI, reevaluate and refine your program. You’llhave an opportunity to interact and discuss best practicesand marketing, and receive a sample implementation plan/timeline to help you start a successful program in your district.Evening on Your Own5:15 p.m.66 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


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Tuesday at a Glance7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Registration — ManchesterFoyer (2nd Floor)7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Exchange Center — GeorgeBush (3rd Floor)7:30 – 9:00 a.m. Coffee — Manchester Foyer(2nd Floor)8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. NSPRA Marketplace —Manchester Foyer (2nd Floor)8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. NSPRA Book Store —Manchester Foyer (2nd Floor)q8:00 – 10:00 a.m. Second General Session, BobGrossman Leadership in<strong>School</strong> Communications Awardand Barry Gaskins MentorLegacy Award Presentations —Manchester GHI (2nd Floor)10:00 – 10:15 a.m. Break10:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Action Labs/Special Sessions• Effectively Communicating <strong>School</strong> Securityand Crisis Safety Issues in a World on DigitalMedia Steroids (Elizabeth FG – 2nd Floor)• Making <strong>Public</strong> Education – and PersonalLeadership – Matter in a Kim KardashianWorld (Manchester C – 2nd Floor)• <strong>Public</strong> Participation: Theory, Practice and a Modelfor Capacity Building (Manchester AB – 2nd Floor)• Rookie Round-Up: Sharing Lessonsand Getting Started on the Right Foot(Manchester DE – 2nd Floor)12:15 – 1:30 p.m. Lunch on Your Own1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Beverage Service — ManchesterFoyer (2nd Floor)68 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Skill SessionsTuesday at a Glance• Building a Culture of Storytelling to Gain Supportfor Your <strong>School</strong>s (Manchester A – 2nd Floor)• What Gets Measured Gets Done (andValued!) (Manchester B – 2nd Floor)• Maintaining Your Momentum:Communicate, Communicate, Communicate!(Manchester C – 2nd Floor)• The Power of Partnerships(Manchester D – 2nd Floor)• Reaching Out to the Hispanic Community: EffectiveMedia Strategies (Manchester E – 2nd Floor)• Dynamic, Digital, Mobile <strong>School</strong> Communication:There’s an App for That! (Manchester F – 2nd Floor)• BFFs – Connect, Learn and Share with Legendsand Leaders (Elizabeth H – 2nd Floor)• Surviving Social Media Scorn: What to Do WhenNegative News Goes Viral (Elizabeth F – 2nd Floor)• <strong>Public</strong>izing Common Core to All Audiences(Elizabeth G – 2nd Floor)• Make Friends Before You Need Them! How toSucceed with Education Foundations WithoutReally Trying (Ford AB – 3rd Floor)3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Skill Sessions• Media Madness, Mayhem and Marketingwith the New Allen Eagle Stadium(Manchester A – 2nd Floor)• On Strike: Keeping Communications Cool WhenTempers Are Hot (Manchester B – 2nd Floor)• Beyond the Basics: Making GREAT SocialMedia Content (Manchester C – 2nd Floor)• Pioneering the Way to the Top: What <strong>School</strong>sShould Look Like (Manchester D – 2nd Floor)• P.A.V.E. (People Actively Volunteering in Education):A Volunteer <strong>Program</strong> Paving the Way to BeSuccessfully Involved (Manchester E – 2nd Floor)2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 69


Tuesday at a Glance• Inside the Horse Shoe: FromCommunications Director to BoardMember (Manchester F – 2nd Floor)• How to Channel Misdirected Passion to MeaningfulCommunity Engagement (Elizabeth F – 2nd Floor)• Handling the Crisis from the Eye of the Storm:A Tabletop Exercise (Elizabeth G – 2nd Floor)• 10 Steps to Success: Strategic Marketingthat Works (Ford AB – 3rd Floor)• Engage Stakeholders to Impact Learning ThroughSummit Series (Mohsen AB – 3rd Floor)4:00 – 4:15 p.m. Break4:15 – 5:15 p.m. Corporate Showcase• See It. Text It. An NSPRA-Exclusive Unveilingof Blackboard’s Brand New Anti-BullySolution (Manchester A – 2nd Floor)• Mobile Apps for <strong>School</strong> Districts(Manchester B – 2nd Floor)• Leadership Communication in Changing Times(Manchester D – 2nd Floor)• Why K-12 Districts Need a PR Strategy and Howto Build One (Manchester E – 2nd Floor)7:30 p.m. CalSPRA Special Event:“Catch the Wave”Evening at FLUXX70 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Second General Session: 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.RegistrationManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorExchange CenterGeorge Bush – 3rd FloorCoffeeManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorNSPRA MarketplaceManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorTuesday, July 97:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.7:30 – 9:00 a.m.8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.NSPRA Book Store8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.Manchester Foyer – 2nd FloorqSecond General SessionManchester GHI – 2nd FloorPresiding: Joe Krumm, APRNSPRA President8:00 – 10:00 a.m.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactAt the 2007 Phoenix <strong>Seminar</strong>, a specialceremony was held to “burn the mortgage”on NSPRA’s headquarter offices inRockville, Md., marking a notable financialachievement for the <strong>Association</strong> andcelebrating members’ contributions to thebuilding fund initiated in 1997.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 71


Tuesday, July 9Second General Session: 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.KeynoteWe Really Can’t Do It AloneJean JohnsonJean Johnson is a Senior Fellow and Special Adviser for<strong>Public</strong> Agenda, the well-respected non-profit dealing withengagement solutions and research on key societal issues.Recently her work has focused on school reform and herfindings have been published in You Can’t Do It Alone: ACommunications and Engagement Manual for <strong>School</strong> LeadersCommitted to Reform, which provides a crisp summary ofopinion research conducted by <strong>Public</strong> Agenda, EducationSector and other respected analysts. Jean will offerguidance on what leaders can do to more successfullyengage teachers, parents and the public in reformingteacher evaluation, turning around low-performingschools, and building support for world-class standards.She will also share some practical “rules of the road” forpromoting the kind of dialogue that leads to consensusand action, and touch upon a theory of change and publiclearning developed by social scientist Daniel Yankelovich.Jean Johnson has authored and co-authored studieson education, families, religion, race relations, thefederal budget, retirement, welfare, and health care,and was the lead author of the <strong>Public</strong> Agenda/KetteringFoundation report Don’t Count Us Out: How anOverreliance on Accountability Could Undermine the<strong>Public</strong>’s Confidence in <strong>School</strong>s, Business, Government,and More. She has also served as Executive VicePresident and head of <strong>Public</strong> Agenda’s EducationalInsights division, which works to enhance publicand community engagement in public education.Introduction: Patti Koslo, NSPRAMideast Region vice president72 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Second General Session: 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.Tuesday, July 92013 Bob Grossman Leadership in <strong>School</strong>Communications AwardSponsored by <strong>School</strong>Messengerwww.schoolmessenger.comThe Bob Grossman Leadership in <strong>School</strong> CommunicationsAward recognizes a superintendent who demonstratesoutstanding leadership in school public relations andcommunications.This year’s recipient is:B.J. Worthington, Ed.D., director of schools,Clarksville-Montgomery County <strong>School</strong>System, Clarksville, Tenn.Presentation: Nate Brogen, vice president,marketing/customer engagement, <strong>School</strong>Messenger, and JoeKrumm, APR, NSPRA president2013 Barry Gaskins Mentor Legacy AwardThe Barry Gaskins Mentor Legacy Award recognizes aschool PR professional for outstandingefforts mentoring colleagues and assistingthem in their professional development.This year’s recipient is:Bonnie Reidy, chief communications officer,Gaston County <strong>School</strong>s, Gastonia, NCPresentation: Joe Krumm, APR, NSPRA presidentBreak10:00 – 10:15 a.m.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 73


Tuesday, July 9Action Labs/Special Sessions: 10:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.Action Labs/Special Sessions10:15 – 12:15 p.m.Effectively Communicating <strong>School</strong>Security and Crisis Safety Issuesin a World on Digital Media SteroidsElizabeth FG – 2nd Floor (Seating for 300)x – No Tape AvailableMPresenter: Kenneth Trump, M.P.A.,president, <strong>National</strong> <strong>School</strong> Safety andSecurity Services, Cleveland, OhioIntroduction: Elise Shelton, NSPRASoutheast Region vice presidentDo your school administrators duck and cover when theysee a reporter coming? What would you do with dozens orhundreds of reporters, cameras, and TV news trucks in frontof one of your schools? Facebook threats, bomb threats sentthrough international proxy servers, rampant text messages ofa rumored school shooting, parental safety anxiety followinghigh-profile school shootings, and the politicizing of schoolsafety are creating major communications challenges foradministrators and communication leaders. This Action Labwill help you prepare by providing practical messaging andmanagement insights. Gain an understanding of what parentswant to hear and what reporters are thinking when theycome to your schools for answers. Find out how to managethe messages as well as the politics of school safety. Learnfrom a leading school security expert who provided on-sitelive analysis and commentary for numerous network newsshows and media outlets during recent high-profile schoolshootings, including at Sandy Hook Elementary <strong>School</strong>.74 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Action Labs/Special Sessions: 10:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.Tuesday, July 9Making <strong>Public</strong> Education – andPersonal Leadership – Matter ina Kim Kardashian World LManchester C – 2nd Floor (Seating for 192)Presenter: Brian Woodland, APR, director,communications & community relations,Peel District <strong>School</strong> Board, Mississauga,Ontario, Can. (Suburban/75,000+)Introduction: Stan Alleyne, NSPRAvice president of diversity engagementIn this provocative Special Session, you’ll discover how tobe an education leader who makes a genuine, authenticimpact in a world dominated by the false and insincere.From the power of the story, to the art of humility, youwill learn how to become the “anti-Kardashian.” RealityTV clips will provide examples and you’ll learn about keystrategies for breaking through the clutter and delivering keymessages, both internally and externally. Gain an awarenessof new vs. old techniques and tools, understand the roleof social media as integral to PR, and find out what willmake an impact on a hard-to-reach public. Group work andreflection tools will get you involved. You won’t garner hugeTV ratings, but you will be able to deliver the message ofpublic education – and have it heard and remembered!<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactIn 1994, our Canadian members proudlyhosted the NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong> in Toronto,Ontario2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 75


Tuesday, July 9Action Labs/Special Sessions: 10:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.<strong>Public</strong> Participation: Theory, Practiceand a Model for Capacity Building EManchester AB – 2nd Floor (Seating for 240)Presenters: John Poynton, Ph.D., executive director,organizational development & communications, andDon Haddad, Ed.D., superintendent, St. Vrain Valley<strong>School</strong>s, Longmont, Colo. (Suburban/ 25,000-75,000);Laura McDonald, parent and president, GrassrootsSt. Vrain, Niwot, Colo.; and Martín Carcasson,Ph.D., director, Center for <strong>Public</strong> Deliberation,Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo.Introduction: Carol Fenstermacher, APR,NSPRA Northwest Region vice president<strong>School</strong> administrators typically use experts to addresscomplex problems, leaving “non-expert” citizens outof the process, which breeds disengagement, distrust,questionable solutions, and negative media. This Action Labfocuses on the theory of public deliberation and presentsa new model for systematically raising the capacity forparent engagement, building public trust, and preparingcitizens to advocate for their school district. The lab willinclude: an interactive software demonstration and handsonexperience with a participant survey; active researchdata; small group discussion; and a Q&A panel with thepresentation team. You’ll leave with a solid overview andunderstanding of public deliberation theory and a modelfor building public participation capacity in your district.76 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Action Labs/Special Sessions: 10:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.Tuesday, July 9Rookie Round-Up: Sharing Lessons and GettingStarted on the Right Foot T NManchester DE – 2nd Floor (Seating for 180)Presenters: Zac Rantz, director, communication, Nixa (Mo.)<strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s (Suburban/5,000-9,999); Lana Snodgras,communications/community relations director, West Plains(Mo.) <strong>School</strong>s (Rural/ 2,000-4,999); and Dan Sherman,coordinator, communications, Questar III BOCES, Castleton,N.Y. (Educational Service Agency/25,000-75,000)Introduction: Joe Krumm, APR, NSPRA presidentNow that you’ve landed the job you wanted in school PRand communications, are you feeling a bit overwhelmedwith the scope of work you face? Getting started in the worldof school PR can seem like a monumental task at first, andafter seeing what your colleagues in other districts are doing,it’s easy to feel inadequate and overwhelmed. Not to worry!We’ve all been there, and if you’re in need of a little helpand encouragement, this is the session for you! This SpecialSession is designed to help you lay a solid foundation andget off to positive start. You’ll learn from and interact withNSPRA colleagues who were in your shoes not too longago and are here to help you by sharing lessons learned asschool PR rookies. The session will focus on 10-12 mainareas and strategies that you can use to get your programup and running fast. There will be lots of discussion andQ&A time to address your most pressing challenges andneeds. This is peer-learning at its best and you’ll leave feelingconfident that you have the skills to shine on the job!2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 77


Tuesday, July 9Lunch on Your Own12:15 – 1:30 p.m.Beverage ServiceSponsored by e<strong>School</strong>ViewManchester Foyer – 2nd Floor1:00 – 3:00 p.m.www.eschoolview.com 78 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.Skill SessionsTuesday, July 91:30 – 2:30 p.m.Building a Culture of Storytelling toGain Support for Your <strong>School</strong>s TManchester A – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenter: Steve Edwards, coordinator, policy/recordsmanagement/communications, FrederickCounty <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s, Winchester,Va. (Suburban/10,000-24,999)What better source of wonderful stories is there than ourschools? By developing a culture of storytelling, you canbuild community support and staff morale and also generatepositive media coverage. Gain an understanding of thevalue of sharing stories internally and externally. Learnhow to tell stories that are compelling, memorable andpowerful, and leave with practical tips to start building aculture of storytelling in your school district along with anew excitement for your role as a school PR professional.What Gets Measured Gets Done (and Valued!)M AManchester B – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenter: Trinette Marquis-Hobbs, APR, partner,Syntric Communications, Sacramento, Calif.In times of diminishing resources, it’s importantto demonstrate the value of your work to decisionmakers,community leaders, internal staff, and otherinfluencers. Learn easy ways to conduct research, createsolid communication plans, and report on your efforts.You’ll leave this session with a variety of tips and toolsto keep you organized, effective, and valued.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 79


Tuesday, July 9Skill Sessions: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.Maintaining Your Momentum:Communicate, Communicate,Communicate! M M-CManchester C – 2nd Floor (Seating for 192)Presenter: Irene Payne, chief communications/communityengagement officer, Washoe County <strong>School</strong>District, Reno, Nev. (Urban/25,000-75,000)Communicating major issues related to your district’sstrategic plan, vision, mission, and core beliefs is essential,but how do you ensure your audiences don’t get “fatigued”and ignore your news? In this session you’ll discoverinnovative strategies for capturing your stakeholders’attention throughout the entire year. You’ll learn howto engage and inform stakeholders around regular events,campaigns, and media relations, and how to developa plan that will not only interest your stakeholders byproviding the mix of news they want, but will give themthe information they need to know about your district.The Power of Partnerships FManchester D – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenter: Salvatore Menzo, Ed.D., superintendent,Wallingford (Conn.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>District (Suburban/5,000-9,999)Learn how to power up your partnerships with easy ways toengage parents, students, staff, businesses, and communityleaders in the mission of your school district. Gather tipsfor identifying constituent groups and engagement ideasfor each, and brainstorm and share ideas with others.Participants will leave with a plan for engaging at leastone new facet of the school and/or district community,and have an opportunity to take part in a Twittercommunity for continuing discussions on this topic.80 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.Tuesday, July 9Reaching Out to the Hispanic Community:Effective Media Strategies T AManchester E – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenter: Denisse Cantu, senior media relations specialist,Houston (Texas) ISD (Urban/75,000+)Has the Hispanic population in your district increased andbecome the majority? If so, it’s important to understandthe dynamics of this population and learn what mediatactics work best. Learn from the largest school district inTexas how to establish effective media strategies and createpartnerships with Spanish media that will help you bettercommunicate with your community. You’ll come away feelingmore confident and knowledgeable about connecting toHispanic communities and leave with the ability to identifystories and topics relevant to this important audience.Dynamic, Digital, Mobile <strong>School</strong> Communication:There’s an App for That! TManchester F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 160)Presenters: Mary Todoric, director, communications;and Mick Torres, director, technology,Community High <strong>School</strong> District 128,Vernon Hills, Ill. (Suburban/2,000-4,999)As society becomes more mobile, so must communicationtechniques. Learn how one district made the shift and nowreaches its school community via D128 Mobile. Learn thebenefits and challenges they experienced stepping more deeplyinto the digital, mobile world. This session will provide tips forestablishing online information management systems to pavethe way for a meaningful app experience, gaining the supportof your board and administration, selecting and workingwith an app developer, and successfully launching your app.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 81


Tuesday, July 9Skill Sessions: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.“BFFs” – Connect, Learn and Sharewith Legends and Leaders T NElizabeth H – 2nd FloorFacilitator: Julie Zwahr, director, communications/partnerships, Little Elm (Texas) ISD(Suburban/5,000-9,999) and NSPRASouth Central Region vice presidentMake professional “BFFs” (Best Friends Fast!) in this fastpaced,interactive session. If you have fewer than three years ofexperience in school communications, this session is for you!We will connect you with some of our most seasoned NSPRAlegends and leaders through a “speed learning” format thatallows you to tap into their wisdom. Want to know how to dealwith a politically charged school board? Need advice for workingwith your new superintendent on a communication plan?Curious about how to boost your credibility and gain a covetedspot on the cabinet? Dealing with a sensitive personnel issuethat must be communicated? You will have a few minutes ofone-on-one time to ask that “burning” question of our veterans,and make personal connections that lead to a core group ofBFFs you can rely on in the future. Bring your business cards!Surviving Social Media Scorn: What toDo When Negative News Goes Viral TElizabeth F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenters: Laurel Heiden, community relationsmanager, Greece Central <strong>School</strong> District,Rochester, N.Y. (Suburban/10,000-24,999);and David Richardson, principal, AthenaMiddle <strong>School</strong>, Rochester, N.Y.How would you respond if an unfavorable YouTube postcatapulted your district into the national spotlight? Think fast– in the world of social media, you only have minutes to planyour initial response. Learn from the people who experiencedand navigated the June 2011 bus monitor bullying incidentthat went viral, and discover how to prepare for the unexpectedand rebuild your district’s reputation following high-profilenegative publicity. This session will include media clips, groupwork, Q&A, and best-practice sharing, and will focus on theimportance of messaging, relationships, and honest dialogue.82 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.Tuesday, July 9<strong>Public</strong>izing Common Coreto All Audiences T AElizabeth G – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenters: Margaret Van Duch, communicationscoordinator; Jill Gildea, Ed.D., superintendent;and Elizabeth Freeman, Ed.D., curriculumdirector, Fremont <strong>School</strong> District 79,Mundelein, Ill. (Suburban/2,000-4,999)Learn how one district embraced the Common Core initiativeby using a communications roll-out plan. Strategies forcommunicating the Common Core State Standards willbe shared along with detailed instructions on executing acomprehensive communication plan. You’ll learn how todevelop a website and tailor Twitter, Facebook, and emailmessages to various audiences. Yow will also gain a betterunderstanding of how the Common Core brand should be tiedto a school’s brand via mission, vision, and values, and howto measure the success of your plan. Leave with resources toprovide staff with the tools they need to communicate too.Make Friends Before You Need Them!How to Succeed with Education FoundationsWithout Really Trying LFord AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 50)Presenter: Larry Goddard, Ph.D., CFRE,executive director, Tyler (Texas) ISDFoundation (Exurban/10,000-24,999)The best public relations tactic? Make friends before youneed them. This fun-filled session offers easy-to-followsteps and instructions for creating an education foundationor rejuvenating an existing one, and demonstrates howpositive community awareness can benefit your district.You’ll come away with practical advice on creating alumniassociations and managing a foundation board, as well as a“to-do” list of things to get you started when you get home.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 83


Tuesday, July 9Skill SessionsSkill Sessions: 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.3:00 – 4:00 p.m.Media Madness, Mayhem and Marketingwith the New Allen Eagle Stadium B M-CManchester A – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenter: Tim Carroll, APR, director, public information,Allen (Texas) ISD (Suburban/10,000-24,999)Allen High <strong>School</strong>’s $59 million stadium attracted nationalmedia attention for more than a year leading up to its openingin August 2012. This session will outline what worked andwhat didn’t as print and electronic media sources convergedon Allen. Learn how public perceptions of Texas and footballshaped the coverage, get tips on managing a large (noncrisis)media event, and hear about the marketing campaignthat will bring in more than $1 million to the district.On Strike: Keeping Communications CoolWhen Tempers Are Hot T AManchester B – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenters: Andrea Rosen, community relations specialist;David L. Behlow, Ph.D., superintendent;and Bruce Hyman, M.D., board president,North Shore <strong>School</strong> District 112, HighlandPark, Ill. (Suburban/2,000-4,999)What do you do when 400 teachers march outsideyour district office claiming the board’s salary andcompensation offer is unfair? Learn from this case-studyhow proactive communication efforts were instrumentalto maintaining community support and helping theboard achieve a labor negotiation settlement that allowedfor balancing the budget without drawing from reserves.You’ll learn what to expect when negotiations becomedifficult, and why ongoing community educationabout finances and radical transparency is key.84 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.Tuesday, July 9Beyond the Basics: Making GREAT SocialMedia Content TManchester C – 2nd Floor (Seating for 192)Presenter: Kitty Porterfield, consultant, Porterfield &Carnes Communications, Alexandria, Va.Do you have a nagging feeling that your social mediaefforts could be more strategic and effective? Learn howto expand your social media skill set, leverage socialmedia as one component of your communication plan,and amplify your school’s message. This session willidentify a list of practices and illustrate them with bestpractices from schools and businesses. You’ll come awaywith ideas for stronger integration of social media intotraditional communication planning, a list of practicalskills for leveraging social media, and an understandingof how to use social media to build relationships.Pioneering the Way to the Top:What <strong>School</strong>s Should Look Like B AManchester D – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenters: Jacqueline Ratto, public information officer;Shelly Reilly, public information officer;Gabriel Perez, director, alternative education;Janine Cuaresma, assistant superintendent,San Joaquin County Office of Education,Stockton, Calif. (Other/75,000+)Kids want to learn, they just need to find the “right” schoolto make the process enjoyable. Learn how a County Officeof Education listened to the wants and needs of studentsand stood up to the slings and arrows to start an innovativecharter school and open the doors within six months. Ina time of a budget crisis, community members are staringinto the abyss while SJCOE seizes the day! Learn howstrong messaging, marketing, community outreach andbusiness partnerships can create a place that fits student andcommunity needs. Leave this session prepared to tackle theneeds of your community using strategic communication.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 85


Tuesday, July 9Skill Sessions: 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.P.A.V.E. (People Actively Volunteeringin Education): A Volunteer <strong>Program</strong> Pavingthe Way to Be Successfully Involved FManchester E – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenter: Libby Brown, community servicesdirector, Caldwell County <strong>School</strong>s,Lenoir, N.C. (Rural/10,000-24,999)P.A.V.E. – People Actively Volunteering in Education – isa tried-and-true volunteer program that’s stronger thanever at its two-decade milestone. In this session you’lllearn how to build and sustain a successful district-widevolunteer program. Information about policies, procedures,applications, handbooks, training and recognition willbe shared along with tips for connecting with differentaudiences. Learn how using volunteers as site coordinatorscan fortify parent support and keep your program healthy.Inside the Horse Shoe: From CommunicationsDirector to Board Member LManchester F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 160)Presenter: Steve Knagg, school board member, Garland(Texas) ISD (Suburban/25,000-75,000)After 30 years in the Garland ISD CommunicationsDepartment, this NSPRA Past President now finds himselfon the other side of the board table after being elected tothe Board of Trustees. This new perspective has resultedin lessons that benefit both trustees and communicationprofessionals. Become a better communicator by benefitingfrom lessons learned from both sides of the governance table.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThree NSPRA products were introduced atthe 1993 San Diego <strong>Seminar</strong>. The CompleteCrisis Communication/Management Manualfor <strong>School</strong>s, Image Builders or Breakers:A Workshop Kit for Professional <strong>School</strong>Secretaries, and See for Yourself: A Campaignto Build Support for Your <strong>School</strong>s.86 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.Tuesday, July 9How to Channel Misdirected Passion intoMeaningful Community Engagement FElizabeth F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenter: Alison Benson, director, communications& community engagement, SiouxCity (Iowa) Community <strong>School</strong>District (Urban/10-000-24,999)Have you faced “passionate” parents who unfortunatelydirected their anger at the schools? After appearing in anational documentary on school bullying, the Sioux CityCommunity <strong>School</strong> District faced intense scrutiny fromangry and frustrated parents and community members whowanted to help but didn’t know where to begin. Throughthe use of authentic communication strategies, the districtharnessed their passion to form an anti-bullying coalitionthat is now educating others on how they can make adifference. Learn tips and tactics for implementing authenticcommunication strategies and best practices to channel“passion” into meaningful community engagement.Handling the Crisis from the Eye of the Storm:A Tabletop Exercise MElizabeth G – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenters: Jeff Knapp, communications coordinator,Francis Tuttle Technology Center, OklahomaCity, Okla. (Suburban/2,000-4,999); andCara Adney, marketing/media relationscoordinator, Meridian Technology Center,Stillwater, Okla. (Rural/fewer than 2,000)This interactive session will take you beyond craftingkey messages and help you identify your team andstrategically manage the media firestorm and resultingchaos that ensues in a crisis. Learn what you need todo behind the scenes in the middle of a compoundingscenario, and develop your communications strategybefore you need it. Faint of heart need not participate!2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 87


Tuesday, July 9Skill Sessions: 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.10 Steps to Success:Strategic Marketing that Works BFord AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 50)Presenter: Jaclyn Swords, marketing/communicationsmanager, Bloomington (Minn.) <strong>Public</strong><strong>School</strong>s (Suburban/10,000-24,999)With the ever-increasing rise of charter schools andthe sensationalized attacks on public education, publicschools – now more than ever – require a strategicmarketing plan. This 10-step plan outlines researchprovenstrategies that can be applied district-wide,school-focused or program-based. Learn how you cancreate a successful marketing plan for your district.Engage Stakeholders to Impact LearningThrough a Summit Series E AMohsen AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 96)Presenters: Carla Erdey, director, communications:and James E. Gay, Ed.D., superintendent,Consolidated High <strong>School</strong> District 230,Orland Park, Ill. (Suburban/5,000-9,999)Learn how to engage thousands of stakeholders to developa common purpose and then leverage that support toprepare students for the future. Learn how one districtused a series of Summits to build partnerships, shapeclassroom education, develop a speaker’s bureau, createjob shadowing and internships and connect communityresources. You’ll receive nuts-and-bolts examples and “howto”implementation tips for impacting student learning.Break4:00 – 4:15 p.m.88 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Corporate Showcase: 4:15 – 5:15 p.m.Tuesday, July 9Corporate Showcase4:15 – 5:15 p.m.Major business sponsors of the NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong> willshare information and expertise about their productsand services. Come learn more about helpful resourcesfor your department, schools and district.BlackboardSee It. Text It. An NSPRA-Exclusive Unveiling ofBlackboard’s Brand New Anti-Bully Solution CManchester A – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenter: Jennie Breister, product marketing manager,Blackboard Connect, San Diego, Calif.Don’t miss this NSPRA-exclusive event and be the veryfirst to see Blackboard’s brand new technology – andan announcement that will make you do a double-take(but that’s all we can share for now!). We even havean iPad or two for a special post-reveal drawing.ParentLinkMobile Apps for <strong>School</strong> Districts CManchester B – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenters: Peter Cano, chief sales/marketing officer,ParentLink, Provo, Utah; Pam Little-McDaniel,public information director, Florence (S.C.)<strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong> District One; Tamerah Ringo,director, communications/public relations,Coppell (Texas) ISD; Gina Ward, publicinformation officer, Rowland Unified <strong>School</strong>District, Rowland Heights, Calif.; andBob Williams, senior technology projectadministrator, Memphis (Tenn.) City <strong>School</strong>sHear from your peers at four different-size school districts,located in various regions of the U.S., as to why, what, andhow they implemented a Mobile App for their school systems.You will discover compelling reasons for developing an app,choice criteria, and deployment best practices, as well as thebenefits resulting from having a branded District Mobile App.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 89


Tuesday, July 9Corporate Showcase: 4:15 – 5:15 p.m.<strong>School</strong>MessengerLeadership Communication in Changing TimesCManchester D – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenter: Lanette Hart, APR, CPRC, vice president,global marketing/corporate affairs, Bank ofAmerica Corporation and Past President, FPRAThis session offers an opportunity to learn from an awardwinningand recognized speaker who has been helpingorganizations large and small for over 20 years to deliverresults by developing and executing on comprehensivecommunication plans. A recipient of the Lifetime AchievementAward from the Florida <strong>Public</strong> <strong>Relations</strong> <strong>Association</strong>,where she served as president, Lanette Hart delivers bigpicturethinking combined with actionable tips that youcan use right away to make a difference in your district.<strong>School</strong>wiresWhy K-12 Districts Need a PR Strategy andHow to Build One CManchester E – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenters: Stephen Nichols, public information/community relations officer, Folsom CordovaUnified <strong>School</strong> District, Rancho Cordova,Calif.; and Mychal Frost, public informationofficer, Clover (S.C.) <strong>School</strong> DistrictFrom managing a storm of hazing allegations to a potential$8 million school bond mistake, this session will look athow to navigate challenging front-line PR experiences.The efforts and resulting successes of the presenters willillustrate how critical the PR function has become in K-12districts across the country. In this presentation you’lllearn: why a communications professional is essential toyour district; first steps in building a PR function; whymastering new technologies is critical to your PR strategy;and how to manage communications in a crisis.90 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


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CalSPRA Special Event“Catch the Wave”7:30 – Midnight (event is free but tickets are required)If you did not go online to pre-register for thisspecial Tuesday post-dinner event, be sure to checkat <strong>School</strong>Messenger’s exhibit booth in the NSPRAMarketplace as soon as possible to join in the fun.Beginning at 7:30 p.m., CalSPRA, along with sponsor<strong>School</strong>Messenger, will host a “Catch the Wave”evening event at one of San Diego’s hottest nightclubs,FLUXX. Meet your CalSPRA guides in the lobby of theManchester Grand Hyatt at 7:00 p.m. to walk over asa group. The venue is approximately a half mile fromthe hotel (about a 15-minute walk). Pedi cabs will alsobe available to assist with transportation to and fromFLUXX at no cost to you – look for the Pedi cabs witha <strong>School</strong>Messenger banner! Or, you can take a cab orfind your own way at your leisure. Directions and mapsare available at the CalSPRA Hospitality Booth.Get ready for a radical evening of live music,refreshments and fun at this special event!Please note: You must be 21 to attend.Very special thanks to <strong>School</strong>Messenger forsponsoring this evening out at no cost to <strong>Seminar</strong>participants and to our bodacious CaliforniaChapter for coordinating this event!Sponsored by <strong>School</strong>Messengerwww.<strong>School</strong>Messenger.com92 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


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Wednesday at a Glance7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Registration — ManchesterFoyer (2nd Floor)7:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Exchange Center — GeorgeBush (3rd Floor)8:30 – 10:15 a.m. Coffee — Manchester GH(2nd Floor)8:30 – 1:30 p.m. NSPRA Book Store —Manchester Foyer (2nd Floor)q9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Caffeinated Connections —Manchester GH (2nd Floor)10:15 – 10:30 a.m. Break10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Skill Sessions• Parent Ambassadors: Changing the Conversationwith Parent Voices (Manchester A – 2nd Floor)• Leading Through Communication: A Crisisof Faith (Manchester C – 2nd Floor)• Improve Communication with Your DiverseCommunity with NSPRA’s DiversityCommunication Toolkit (Manchester B – 2nd Floor)• CBOs Are from Mars, PIOs Are fromVenus (Manchester D – 2nd Floor)• Selling the Mundane: Winning a Bond Issue forInvisible Infrastructure (Manchester F – 2nd Floor)• Facebook Forward – Expanding to Your<strong>School</strong>s (Elizabeth F – 2nd Floor)• Successful Partnerships Start Here!(Elizabeth G – 2nd Floor)• Rebrand, Find Donors and Reach New Levels ofCommunity Support (Ford AB – 3rd Floor)• Stealing Tips from the Business World for YoureMail Communications (Mohsen AB – 3rd Floor)94 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Wednesday at a Glance11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch on Your Own1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Action Labs/Special Sessions• The Hub of a Community: <strong>School</strong> District Roles inCommunity Tragedies (Manchester DE – 2nd Floor)• Helping <strong>School</strong> Leadership Lead in Tough Times(Manchester GH – 2nd Floor)• Gold Mine Session (Elizabeth FG – 2nd Floor)3:00 – 3:15 p.m. Break3:15 – 4:15 p.m. Open Counselors on Call —Manchester G (2nd Floor)6:00 – 6:45 p.m. Cash Bar Reception —Manchester Foyer West(2nd Floor)7:00 – 9:30 p.m. Closing Banquet —Manchester ABC (2nd Floor)2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 95


Wednesday, July 10Caffeinated Connections: 9:00 – 10:15 a.m.RegistrationManchester Foyer – 2nd FloorExchange CenterGeorge Bush – 3rd FloorCoffeeManchester GH – 2nd FloorNSPRA Book StoreManchester Foyer – 2nd Floor7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.7:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.8:30 – 10:15 a.m.8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.qCaffeinated Connections 9:00 – 10:15 a.m.Manchester GH – 2nd Floorx – No Tape AvailableWhat better way to start the day thanwith a cup of coffee, an interesting topic,and a table of friendly colleagues? Themost valuable resource for communicationprofessionals is the networking and exchange of ideas withcolleagues that can only take place face-to-face. Here’s youropportunity to connect with others informally to discusscommon issues or challenges and to process what you’velearned in sessions. Choose from a variety of topic tablesfacilitated by NSPRA leaders, convene your own table ona specific topic, or feel free to just sit and chat with friends(and make some new ones!). This session is about makingconnections – to colleagues, ideas, professional networks,resources, opportunities. Get connected to the powerfulNSPRA network during this interesting and valuable session.Break10:15 – 10:30 a.m.96 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.Skill SessionsWednesday, July 1010:30 – 11:30 a.m.Parent Ambassadors: Changing theConversation with Parent Voices FManchester A – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Presenters: Evangeline Semark, director, communications;and Alicia Hart, freshman transitioncoordinator, Evanston Township (Ill.) High<strong>School</strong> District 202 (Other/2,000-4,999)Parents are key influencers of the perceptions that existabout schools, negative or positive. Discover how oneschool district transformed parent involvement and shiftedthe conversation in the community by creating a ParentAmbassador program. Examine the role of “parent asspokesperson” and how it leads to measurable results. Learnhow ambassadors can help support new and prospectivefamilies and “change the conversation” about schools.Leading Through Communication –A Crisis of Faith L M-CManchester C – 2nd Floor (Seating for 192)Presenter: Kelly Avants, APR, chief communicationofficer, Clovis (Calif.) Unified <strong>School</strong>District, and NSPRA Southwest Regionvice president (Suburban/25,000-75,000)Leading through crisis is as much about effectivecommunication as it is about administrative skill. Buildingon real-life experiences ranging from staff misconduct tobuilding fires and bomb threats, this session will look atcritical first steps communication professionals shouldtake to guide organizational leadership in preserving andbuilding community trust in times of crisis. Small groupdiscussion and tabletop exercises will be included.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 97


Wednesday, July 10Skill Sessions: 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.Improve Communication with Your DiverseCommunity with NSPRA’s DiversityCommunication Toolkit EManchester B – 2nd Floor (Seating for 120)Panel: Stan Alleyne, chief communications officer,Minneapolis (Minn.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s andNSPRA vice president of diversity engagement;Joseph Ortiz, director of public/communityrelations, Roosevelt <strong>School</strong> District, Phoenix,Ariz.; Sylvia Link, APR, ABC, head of strategiccommunications/stakeholder management,Early Learning Division, Ontario Ministry ofEducation, Toronto, Ontario, Can.; and FrankKwan, director, communications, Los AngelesCounty Office of Education, Downey, Calif.Moderator: Joe Krumm, APR, director, community/government relations, North Clackamas <strong>School</strong>District, Milwaukie, Ore., and NSPRA presidentAs the demographic landscape continues to change acrossthe nation, school districts must increase the focus oninclusive communication by implementing strategies thatcreate a welcoming environment for every child, familyand community member, regardless of ethnic or culturalbackground, family structure, religion, differing abilities orsexual orientation. Hosting “Taco Tuesday” nights doesn’tcut it. Inclusive communication is about mastering oneof the most important aspects of closing the achievementgap – getting families fully engaged in the education oftheir children. NSPRA’s new Diversity CommunicationToolkit provides tips and best practices to help youestablish new programs and enhance those already inplace. Come learn from our Diversity Engagement ProjectTeam how you can use this important resource to moreeffectively communicate with your diverse audiences.98 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.Wednesday, July 10CBOs are from Mars,PIOs are from Venus LManchester D – 2nd Floor (Seating for 90)Presenters: Trinette Marquis-Hobbs, APR, partner,Syntric Communications, Sacramento, Calif.;Jacqueline Ratto, public information officer,San Joaquin County Office of Education,Stockton, Calif. (Other/75,000+); StephenNichols, public information/communityrelations officer, Folsom Cordova Unified<strong>School</strong> District, Rancho Cordova, Calif.(Suburban/10,000-24,999); and DanielThigpen, communication specialist, SanJuan Unified <strong>School</strong> District, Carmichael,Calif. (Suburban/25,000-75,000)Ever feel like your Chief Business Officer (CBO) is fromanother planet? Through a series of interactive discussions,on camera interviews, and group critiques, this session offersa humorous way to bridge the gap and teach your businessoffice folks about the communications world. Walk awaywith a kit you can use to provide media and communicationstraining to the “Martians” in your organization!Selling the Mundane: Winning a Bond Issue forInvisible Infrastructure T AManchester F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 160)Presenter: Karen Derby-Lovell, APR, publicinformation officer, Bay Village (Ohio) City<strong>School</strong> District (Suburban/2,000-4,999)How do you make a compelling case to raise taxes forinfrastructure investments like upgraded heating, air, electrical,and plumbing in school buildings? It can be challengingto capture the public’s interest for needs that represent along-term investment rather than an immediate benefitfor students. Learn the strategies and tactics of a successfulbond issue and how effective communication can ramp upinterest and support for even the most boring tax proposal.Leave with a solid grounding in approaching a bond issueinformation campaign through the RACE process.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 99


Wednesday, July 10Skill Sessions: 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.Facebook Forward – Expandingto Your <strong>School</strong>s T AElizabeth F – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenter: Lauri Pyatt, school community relationsspecialist, West Des Moines (Iowa) Community<strong>School</strong>s (suburban/5,000-9,999)So your district is on Facebook…now what? Learn how onedistrict expanded its Facebook presence to include all 14schools. You’ll also hear how it took over an existing Facebookpage with over 3,000 likes, managed a community group wholaunched a page against the district, and convinced principals tocommunicate where their parents already are…on Facebook!Successful Partnerships Start Here! E NElizabeth G – 2nd Floor (Seating for 150)Presenters: Catherene Martin, director, stakeholderengagement; and Julie Morris, Ed.D.,superintendent, Harlem Consolidated <strong>School</strong>s#122, Machesney Park, Ill. (other/ 5,000-9,999)Ever wonder why some community partnerships are madein heaven while others die on the vine? Discover the keysto creating successful, sustainable partnerships that impactstudent achievement. Learn about current research, bestpractice strategies and proven activities that not onlybring resources to the school system, but also engagestakeholders and provide community-learning opportunitiesfor students. Find out how you can generate a plan forstrengthening community partnerships in your community.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactThe 1993 San Diego <strong>Seminar</strong> included thefollowing familiar Skill Session topics:• Marketing Your <strong>School</strong>s as the <strong>School</strong>s ofChoice• How to Cut Your Budget Without CuttingYour Throat• Bridging the Communications Gap withMinority Communities100 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Skill Sessions: 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.Wednesday, July 10Rebrand, Find Donors and Reach New Levels ofCommunity Support B NFord AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 50)Presenter: Anisa Sullivan Jimenez, director,public relations/communications,Clarke County <strong>School</strong> District, Athens,Ga. (Urban/10,000-24,999)Does old (and negative) information about your schoolsor district seem to linger? Are you looking for ways toclear away misinformation and ancient history? Findout how by creating change around a new brand. Learntactics for raising money that create both support andfunding. From billboards to half-marathon t-shirts to webfeatures, discover practical tips for creating a new storyfor your district that the community can rally behind!Stealing Tips from the Business World for YoureMail Communications TMohsen AB – 3rd Floor (Seating for 96)Presenter: Michael Clark, communicationsspecialist, Oregon City (Ore.) <strong>School</strong>District (Suburban/5,000-9,999)How many people are opening your district or school emails,when, and what are they clicking on? Every email you sendcould be a data goldmine if you use the tools and trickscommonly used in the business world. Learn how you canupgrade your email communications with simple tools,templates and workflows. Gain insight into ways that emailcan provide valuable metrics without the use of surveys.You’ll also learn how to create great-looking emails withoutany graphic design or coding help and leave with a betterunderstanding of how to create effective email campaigns.Lunch on Your Own11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 101


Wednesday, July 10Action Labs/Special Sessions: 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.Action Labs/Special Sessions1:00 – 3:00 p.m.The Hub of a Community: <strong>School</strong> District Roles inCommunity Tragedies MManchester DE – 2nd Floor (Seating for 180)Presenters: Georgia Durán, chief communication officer,Aurora (Colo.) <strong>Public</strong> <strong>School</strong>s (Urban/25,000-75,000);Devra Kay Ashby, APR, public information officer, ColoradoSprings (Colo.) <strong>School</strong> District 11 (Urban/25,000-75,000);and Danielle Clark, director, communications, Poudre <strong>School</strong>District, Fort Collins, Colo. (Suburban/25,000-75,000)Introduction: Nancy Vaughan, APR, NSPRANortheast Region vice presidentHow will you respond to a tragedy in your community?<strong>School</strong> districts plan for school disasters, but what is yourrole in a community tragedy? Leaders from three Coloradourban and suburban districts will share experiences andlessons learned in the aftermath of devastating wildfires anda tragic theater shooting that impacted their communities.In this Action Lab, participants will work in small groupson a variety of community tragedy scenarios and assessresponses. You will learn how critical schools and districtsare when community tragedies occur, how to partner withcommunity leaders in times of crisis, how responses differfrom school-related tragedies, and mistakes to avoid whensupporting the community, students and staff. You’ll alsoreceive a sample district disaster recovery plan and incidentresponse protocol along with a checklist of questions toconsider when responding to a community tragedy.102 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Action Labs/Special Sessions: 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.Wednesday, July 10Helping <strong>School</strong> Leadership Lead in Tough TimesMManchester GH – 2nd Floor (Seating for 240)Presenter: James E. Lukaszewski,APR, ABC, president, LukaszewskiGroup Division, Risdall <strong>Public</strong><strong>Relations</strong>, New Brighton, Minn.Introduction: Nora Carr, APR,NSPRA president-electHelping leaders be leaders when facing difficult challengesis among the most important work communicators do. Astrusted strategic advisors, communicators are the ones to helpleaders deal with: angry and agitated constituencies; conflictand contention within their organizations; overzealous,competitive public officials; and organized opposition. Andthese are the easy ones! In this Special Session, you will learnthe power and importance of the seven disciplines of thetrusted, strategic advisor. Constructive, helpful strategies forguiding leaders dealing with tough issues will be discussedand illustrated by one of the foremost PR practitioners of ourtime, who advises, coaches and counsels corporate executivesworldwide. You will learn from a master how to have amore interesting, powerful, influential and successful careerworking on the toughest challenges communicators face.<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactAt the 1976 Philadelphia <strong>Seminar</strong>, TSPRAleader Rodney Davis rode a horse intothe closing banquet to preview the 1977<strong>Seminar</strong> in Houston, Texas.2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 103


Wednesday, July 10Action Labs/Special Sessions: 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.Gold Mine SessionElizabeth FG – 2nd Floor (Seating for 200)x — NoTape AvailableHere’s your last chance to “mine” for valuable ideas andnuggets to add to your PR treasure chest. Attend four minisessionsof 20 minutes each. Plus, you’ll receive a resourceCD containing tip sheets from all roundtables at the end ofthe session. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to gather amother lode of proven, practical ideas in a time-saving format.Note: A listing of topics and table leaderswill be provided at the session.Break3:00 – 3:15 p.m.Open Counselors on CallManchester G – 2nd Floor3:15 – 4:15 p.m.Do you have a tough issue or challenge you’d like adviceon? Seeking guidance on improving your professionalskills and advancing your career? Then take advantage ofthis opportunity to consult with veteran school PR prosand NSPRA leaders. Get free counsel and guidance oncommunication issues from the political to the celebratory,crisis-related to proactively strategic, and everything inbetween. No appointment is necessary. Counselors willbe available at roundtables waiting to assist you!<strong>Seminar</strong> Fun FactTwenty years later, horses were againthe theme, when NSPRA President LewArmistead, APR, rode a runaway horsearound (and around and around) the rodeoarena at the 1987 San Antonio <strong>Seminar</strong>social event BBQ.104 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Wednesday, July 10Cash Bar ReceptionManchester Foyer West – 2nd FloorClosing BanquetManchester ABC – 2nd Floor6:00 – 6:45 p.m.7:00 – 9:30 p.m.Installation of Nora Carr, APR2013-14 NSPRA PresidentPresentation of 2013 Gold Medallion AwardsPreview of NSPRA 2014 – Baltimore, MarylandFuture NSPRA <strong>Seminar</strong>Dates and LocationsNSPRA 2014July 13 – July 16Renaissance Baltimore HarborplaceBaltimore, MarylandNSPRA 2015July 12 – July 15Renaissance Nashville HotelNashville, TennesseeNSPRA 2016July 17 – July 20Chicago Marriott DowntownChicago, IllinoisSee you next year in Baltimore!2013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 105


Speakers/PresentersAdney, Cara.............................................................................................87Alleyne, Stan.........................................................................10, 49, 75, 98Ashby, Devra Kay..................................................................................102Avants, Kelly.........................................................................10, 26, 42, 97Bagin, Rich...........................................................................12, 41, 43, 56Behlow, David.........................................................................................84Benson, Alison........................................................................................87Blackstone, Ken......................................................................................50Boucher, Maddie.....................................................................................14Breister, Jennie........................................................................................89Brogan, Nate...........................................................................................73Brown, Libby..........................................................................................86Brown, Olivia..........................................................................................45Bush-Suflita, Deborah.............................................................................49Cano, Peter.............................................................................................89Cantu, Denisse........................................................................................81Carcasson, Martín...................................................................................76Carr, Nora...................................................................10, 24, 51, 103, 105Carroll, Tim............................................................................................84Clark, Brett.................................................................................11, 27, 64Clark, Danielle......................................................................................102Clark, Michael......................................................................................101Cokeley, Sandra.......................................................................................54Conover, Virginia....................................................................................50Cronk, Michelle......................................................................................61Cuaresma, Janine....................................................................................85Cummings, Jim.................................................................................13, 24Cunningham, Cody................................................................................16Daggett, Erika.........................................................................................46DeLapp, Tom....................................................................................43, 64Derby-Lovell, Karen................................................................................99DeSieghardt, Ken....................................................................................65Draper, John...........................................................................................57Dunn, Jim...............................................................................................45Durán, Georgia.....................................................................................102Edwards, Steve........................................................................................79Erdey, Carla............................................................................................88Fenstermacher, Carol...................................................................11, 26, 76Filer, Jill............................................................................................61, 66Frazier, Cynthia.......................................................................................12Freeman, Elizabeth..................................................................................83Frost, Mychal..........................................................................................90Gay, James...............................................................................................88Gildea, Jill...............................................................................................83Goddard, Larry.......................................................................................83Goering, Bart....................................................................................43, 48Grobe, Emily..........................................................................................52Haddad, Don..........................................................................................76Hart, Alicia.............................................................................................97106 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


Speakers/PresentersHart, Lanette..........................................................................................90Heiden, Laurel........................................................................................82Henry, Louise..........................................................................................60Henry, Sharon.........................................................................................44Hensley, Tim.....................................................................................17, 23Hood, Katie......................................................................................12, 45Horsley, Benjamin...................................................................................48Huff, C. J................................................................................................66Hunter, Barbara................................................................................13, 54Hyman, Bruce.........................................................................................84Imon, Keith............................................................................................44Jackson, Anthony....................................................................................46Jimenez, Anisa.......................................................................................101Johnson, Jean..........................................................................................72Jones, Tommy.........................................................................................12Joy, Mario...............................................................................................43Kaufman, Rick..................................................................................16, 47Kavits, Philip...........................................................................................44Kelley, Michele........................................................................................49Kirby, Nicole...........................................................................................25Kleinz, Karen .........................................................................................12Knagg, Steve.....................................................................................28, 86Knapp, Jeff..............................................................................................87Koch, Ken...............................................................................................62Konrad, DeeAnn.....................................................................................51Koslo, Patti............................................................................11, 27, 65, 72Krumm, Joe........................................1, 10, 24, 41, 43, 56, 71, 73, 77, 98Kuhnel, Stephanie...................................................................................43Kwan, Frank............................................................................................98Leighninger, Matt...................................................................................10Leitz, Judy...............................................................................................14Link, Sylvia.............................................................................................98Little-McDaniel, Pam.............................................................................89Litwin, Larry...........................................................................................63Locke, Terry............................................................................................13Lukaszewski, Jim...................................................................................103Mannion, Peg..........................................................................................53Marquis-Hobbs, Trinette.......................................................14, 25, 79, 99Martin, Catherene.................................................................................100McDaniel, Fred.......................................................................................50McDonald, Laura....................................................................................76McKelway, Leigh Ann.............................................................................61Menzo, Salvatore.....................................................................................80Morris, Amanda......................................................................................59Morris, Julie..........................................................................................100Nichols, Stephen.........................................................................14, 90, 99Noyed, Bob.......................................................................................17, 22Ortiz, Joseph...........................................................................................98Payne, Irene.............................................................................................802013 NSPRA SEMINAR | 107


Speakers/PresentersPerez, Gabriel..........................................................................................85Petraits, Donna.......................................................................................59Porterfield, Kitty.....................................................................................85Poynton, John.........................................................................................76Presser, Vicki...........................................................................................13Pyatt, Lauri...........................................................................................100Rantz, Zac.........................................................................................63, 77Ratto, Jacqueline.........................................................................14, 85, 99Reidy, Bonnie..........................................................................................73Reilly, Shelly............................................................................................85Reynolds, Tricia.......................................................................................59Richardson, David..................................................................................82Ringo, Tamerah.......................................................................................89Rosen, Andrea.........................................................................................84Rosetti, Tony...........................................................................................66Ryan, Rebecca.........................................................................................42Scheckton, Jessica....................................................................................49Semark, Evangeline.................................................................................97Senger, Dustin.........................................................................................60Shelton, Elise........................................................................11, 27, 44, 74Sherman, Dan.........................................................................................77Simmons, Ashley.....................................................................................46Smith, Stephanie.....................................................................................50Snodgras, Lana..................................................................................63, 77Splichal, Christine.............................................................................43, 48Stephens-Cherry, Ann.............................................................................52Sturgis, Jake............................................................................................23Swiecichowski, Janet...................................................................17, 23, 62Swords, Jaclyn.........................................................................................88Tennill, Chris....................................................................................17, 22Thigpen, Daniel................................................................................14, 99Thorsen, Jane..........................................................................................53Todoric, Mary.........................................................................................81Torres, Mick............................................................................................81Trump, Kenneth.....................................................................................74Vai, Alison...............................................................................................45Van Duch, Margaret...............................................................................83Vann, Kim..............................................................................................66Vaughan, Nancy........................................................................11, 27, 102Walts, Steven...............................................................................10, 44, 56Ward, Gina.............................................................................................89Williams, Cheryl.....................................................................................47Williams, Bob.........................................................................................89Willis, Elaine...........................................................................................12Woodland, Brian.....................................................................................75Worthington, B.J..............................................................................44, 73Zubeck, Tina...........................................................................................61Zwahr, Julie...........................................................................11, 26, 66, 82108 | 2013 NSPRA SEMINAR


NSPRA’s PR Power HourThe cost-effective way to keepthis year’s <strong>Seminar</strong> learning alivethroughout the school year!NSPRA’s resource-rich PR Power Hours, in either audioor webinar format, offer economical and convenientprofessional development in an interactive, conversationalformat with top experts in school and private-sectorcommunication.Tentative Topics for the 2013-2014 PR Power Hour Lineup:• Building Community Supportfor the Common Core• Marketing Your <strong>School</strong>s inToday’s Competitive Climate• Raising Staff Morale in aDown Economy• Emerging Trends in SocialMedia• What Gets Measured GetsDone and Valued – EasyResearch Ideas that SupportEffective PR• The Evolving Use of Video in<strong>School</strong> Communication• <strong>School</strong> District Roles inCommunity Tragedies• Visual Eye Candy: UsingVisual Communication Toolsto Increase Media Coverage• Communicating AboutLegal Issues Impacting Your<strong>School</strong>s• Improve Learning withParent/Stakeholder Summits• Leadership and CommunityAcademies: CreatingAdvocate and BuildingUnderstanding and SupportWatch your email in earlyAugust and www.nspra.org forregistration materials and specialcombinations for great savings!

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