Untitled - bei der Greenlight Media GmbH

greenlightmedia.com

Untitled - bei der Greenlight Media GmbH

Earth © BBC Worldwide / Greenlight Media / Planet Earth from space


G R E E N L I G H T M E D I A A N D B B C W O R L D W I D E P R E S E N T AU N I Q U E F I L M A B O U T O U R H O M E , E A RT H – A C E L E B R AT I O N O FT H E B E A U T Y O F O U R P L A N E T W H I L S T R E M I N D I N G U S O F T H ED E L I C AT E F R A G I L I T Y O F W H E R E W E L I V E


© AFLO / naturepl.com / The sun – a major character in Earth movieLengthFormatSound99 mins35 mm and HDDolby SRD & SR


EARTHDirectorsProductionProducerExecutive ProducerAlastair Fothergill and Mark LinfieldGreenlight Media AG and BBC WorldwideSophokles Tasioulis and Alix TidmarshAndré Sikojev, Nikolaus Weil, Stefan Beiten,Mike Phillips, Martyn FreemanPress ContactGreenlight Media AG • Michael HenrichsGormannstr. 22 • 10119 BerlinTel: +49 30/72 62 00-441 • Fax: +49 30/72 62 00-444Email: press@greenlightmedia.comwww.greenlightmedia.comProductionGreenlight Media AG • Sophokles TasioulisTel: +49 30/72 62 00-0 • Fax: +49 30/72 62 00-444Email: tasioulis@greenlightmedia.comWorld Sales ContactGreenlight Media AGsales@greenlightmedia.comwww.loveearth.com


© Jonny Keeling / Filming walrus at close quarters, Norway


INDEX6678111212161617192024272727272828292930303232333333333434343639TEAMFACTSCASTFILMING FIRSTSSUMMARYKEY INFORMATIONOUTLINEPRODUCTION STORIES• Filming the white beasts of the Arctic –a lesson in keeping warm• A rapid descent amongst mighty peaks –filming in the Himalayas• Filming the desert elephants –the joy of the spring rains• Getting close to giants of the ocean –the art of filming humpback whales• Capturing predation in slow motion –the joy of digitalPRODUCTION TEAM• Alastair Fothergill – Director• Mark Linfield – Director• Sophokles Tasioulis – Producer• Alix Tidmarsh – Producer• André Sikojev – Executive Producer• Stefan Beiten – Executive Producer• Nikolaus Weil – Executive Producer• George Fenton – Composer• Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra – Film scorePRODUCTION HOUSES• Greenlight Media AG• BBC Worldwide• The BBC Natural History UnitSTATEMENTS• Alastair Fothergill• Mark Linfield• Sophokles Tasioulis• Alix TidmarshFROM THE PRESSBERLIN ATLANTIC GROUP


TEAMDirectorsProducersExecutive ProducersScriptTextOriginal MusicAssociate ProducersCo-Associate ProducersProduction ManagersCinematographyEditorSound EditorsRe-recording MixersAlastair Fothergill, Mark LinfieldAlix Tidmarsh, Sophokles TasioulisAndré Sikojev, Nikolaus Weil, Stefan Beiten,Mike Phillips, Martyn FreemanAlastair Fothergill und Mark LinfieldLeslie Megahey, Alastair Fothergill, Mark LinfieldGeorge Fenton, Berlin Philharmonic OrchestraMelissa Caron, Amanda HillMichael HenrichsAmanda Hutchinson, Mandy KnightAndrew Anderson, Doug Anderson, Doug Allan,Paul Atkins, Barrie Britton, Richard Burton, SimonCarroll, Rod Clarke, Martyn Colbeck, Justin Evans,Wade Fairley,Ted Giffords, Mike Holding, MichaelKelem, Simon King,Toshihiro Muta, Justin Maguire,Didier Noiret, Andrew Penniket, Rick Rosenthal,Adam Ravetch,Tim Shepherd, Andrew Shillabeer,Peter Scoones,Warwick Sloss, Paul Stewart, GavinThurston, Jeff Turner, Nick Turner, John WatersMartin ElsburyKate Hopkins,Tim OwensAndrew Wilson, Matthew GoughFACTSLengthStart of principal photographyCompletion of principal photographyYear of copyrightCountries of originSupported byProduced byA Film byDistributed by99 minsNovember 2004June 20062007Germany and UKFederal Film Board of Germany (FFA)Greenlight Media AG and BBC WorldwideBBC Natural History Unit (NHU)Greenlight Media AG6


CASTLeading ActorsPolar bearAfrican elephantHumpback whale(Ursus maritimus), Kong Karls Land, Norway(Loxodonta africana),Skeleton Coast, Namibia; Kalahari Basin, South Africa(Megaptera novaeangliae),Tonga, Antarctic Peninsula© BBC Worldwide / Greenlight Media AGSupporting ActorsAfrican wild dogAmur leopardAntarctic KrillOlive baboonMandarin duckBlue Bird of ParadiseDolphinSailfishCheetahEmperor penguinCaribouSuperb Bird of ParadiseSalmonLionNile crocodileDemoiselle CraneCape Fur SealMagnificent RiflebirdRaggiana Bird of ParadiseChimpanzeeSnow gooseSnow leopardGoat antelopeGolden eagleBlue WildebeestWalrusGreat White SharkWolf(Lycaon pictus), Okavango Delta, Botswana(Panthera pardus orientalis), Sibiria, Russia(Euphausia superba), Antarctic Peninsula(Papio hamadryas anubis), Okavango Delta, Botswana(Anas formosa), Incheon, South Korea(Paradisaea rudolphi),Western Highlands,Papua New Guinea(Tursiops truncatus), Pacific Coast, California, USA(Istiophorus platypterus), Indian Ocean, Dubai(Acinonyx jubatus), Masai Mara, Kenya(Aptenodytes forsteri), Antarctic(Rangifer tarandus), Northwest Territories, Canada(Lophorina superba),Western Highlands, Papua New Guinea(Salmo salar), British Columbia, Canada(Panthera leo), Savute, Botswana(Crocodylus niloticus), Grumeti River,Tanzania(Anthropoides virgo), Kali Gandaki Valley, Nepal(Arctocephalus pusillus), Cape of Good Hope,South Africa(Ptiloris magnificus),Western Highlands, Papua New Guinea(Paradisaea raggiana),Western Highlands, Papua New Guinea(Pan troglodytes), Kibale Forest, Uganda(Anser caerulescens), Delaware, USA(Uncia uncia), Northwest Province, Pakistan(Capra falconeri), Northwest Province, Pakistan(Aquila chryseatos), Northwest Province, Pakistan;Kali Gandaki Valley, Nepal(Connochaetes taurinus), Serengeti,Tanzania(Odobenus rosmarus), Manning Island, Canada(Carcharodon carcharias), Cape of Good Hope,South Africa(Canis lupus), Northwest Territories, Canada7


F I V E Y E A R S I N P R O D U C T I O NF I L M E D I N 2 0 0 L O C AT I O N S2 6 C O U N T R I E S F E AT U R E D I N F I N A L M O V I E4 0 S P E C I A L I S T C R E W S1 0 0 0 S O F H O U R S O F F O O TA G E2 5 0 D AY S O F A E R I A L P H O T O G R A P H Y


“ E A RT H I S A N E S C A P E E M O V I E I N A S E N S E : I WA N T T O TA K EP E O P L E T O E X P E R I E N C E T H E N AT U R A L S P E C TA C L E S O F O U RP L A N E T T H AT F E W O F T H E M W O U L D B E A B L E T O E X P E R I E N C EF O R T H E M S E LV E S .”A L A S TA I RF O T H E R G I L L


SUMMARYHow well do we know planet earth? Using the most advanced film-making methodsever developed, EARTH takes us on a tour of our home as we’ve never seen it before.Five billion years ago, a massive asteroid crashed into the young earth.The impact wasso great that it tilted the entire planet at an angle of twenty-three and a half degrees.But far from being a catastrophe, this cosmic accident was crucial to creating life andthe world as we know it today.Without the earth’s tilt, we wouldn’t have such a spectacularvariety of landscapes, or such extremes of hot and cold.We wouldn’t have thechanging seasons. And most importantly, we wouldn’t have the perfect conditions forlife.Using the sun as a guide, we set out on a truly global journey. On the way, we meetthree mothers struggling to bring up their young. In the Arctic, a polar bear familyawakens to the first sunlight of spring.Will they find food before the ice on which theylive melts?Half a world away, in the heat of the Kalahari, an elephant mother and her calf findwater after a danger-filled trek across the desert. But they must share the pool with apride of lions.Will their uneasy truce last?For the final leg of the journey, we follow a humpback whale mother. She must keepher calf safe on their 3,700 miles migration from the equator to Antarctica.And so life on earth goes on. A story played out billions of times a day, 365 days a year,as the earth moves through the seasons, every living creature bending to the power ofthe sun. No film has ever captured the epic scope of the drama of an entire planet, yettold it with heart-breaking and heart-warming intimacy of real animal characters.Until now …© Peter Scoones /Underwater view of Africanelephants celebrating their arrival inflooded Okavango Delta, Botswana11


KEY INFORMATIONIn a time when the world-wide awareness of the fragility and endangerment of our ownhome planet is increasing more and more, this film is very up-to-date and fascinates theaudience in a gentle way.In France, EARTH is the most successful documentary of the year in France after onlyfour weeks with over one million enthusiastic viewers. In Spain, it was just the same,where EARTH had developed into the most successful nature cinema documentaryafter only ten days. EARTH has become the most successful natural history release eversince its opening across Europe and Japan.Director Alastair Fothergill (DEEP BLUE), one of the pioneers in the modern genre ofnature filming, and Director Mark Linfield show aerial shots and close-up views withoutprecedent, which were taken with the newest exposure techniques specifically developedfor this film.The spectator has the opportunity to observe fascinating landscapes andanimals in the wild – from a perspective which people could largely not see with theirown eyes – and from a perspective that moves you deeply.Earth © BBC Worldwide Ltd. 2007 /Lions wait for dark to fallbefore attempting to hunt elephants,OUTLINEKalahari Desert, BotswanaFive billion years ago a massive asteroid crashed into the young earth.The impact wasso great that it tilted the entire planet at an angle of twenty-three and a half degrees.But far from being a catastrophe, this cosmic accident was crucial to creating life andthe world as we know today.Without the earth’s tilt, we wouldn’t have such a spectacular variety of landscapes, orsuch extremes of hot and cold.We wouldn’t have the changing seasons and, most importantly,we wouldn’t have the perfect conditions for life.When the team behind EARTH set out to tell the story of our planet, they chose thesun as their guide.The journey begins close to the North Pole, where there are24 hours of darkness during winter. Only in March does the sun rise over the horizonfor the first time.Here we meet the first star of the film – a mother polar bear who has spent the winterunder the snow. Advanced film-making techniques capture the moment her cubs venture12


into the daylight for the very first time. All the cubs want to do is play – but the motherhas other things on her mind. All too soon, finding food will be a matter of life and death.Early in our journey we learn that the sun can be both a blessing and a curse.Whileits warmth is welcome, it also starts to melt the landscape in which the polar bearshave made their home.We see the male bear struggling as the ice melts beneathhis paws ...Leaving the icy Arctic Wasteland, we travel south, stopping to take in the sight of threemillion caribou in Canada.Their 2,000 mile search for fresh pasture is the longest overlandmigration on earth. But the vast herds do not travel alone. Hungry wolves shadowthem, all along the way.We watch from the air as the wolves co-operate to separate acalf from its mother. How will the pursuit finally end?To reach the first trees on our planet we need to travel further south still. 1,200 milesfrom the North Pole, stunted shrubs mark the ‘tree line’ of our planet – the northernmostpoint where trees can grow.This is the start of the Taiga – the greatest coniferousforest in the world.This lonely woodland stretches unbroken around the northernhemisphere and contains a third of all the trees on earth. In spring, after the icy thaw,the oxygen around the whole world is increased because of these trees. For much ofthe year it is a snow-covered wonderland, rarely marked by footprints.Those animalsthat do live there, like the lonely lynx, are true spirits of the wilderness.1,500 miles south of the North Pole, there is enough sunlight to support broad-leafedwoodlands of bluebells, nightingales, foxes and deer.We watch in spring as mandarinduck chicks take their first brave leaps from their nest hole high in the treetops. Andin winter – when the deciduous trees have dropped their leaves – we glimpse the rarestcat in the world. An Amur leopard and her cub scrape a living in the harsh cold.13


“ W O R K I N G O N E A RT H D I D C H A N G E H O W I V I E W O U RP L A N E T A N D I H O P E I T W I L L H AV E T H AT E F F E C T O N T H EA U D I E N C E T O O.”M A R KL I N F I E L D


We continue our journey south to the equator. Here the sun shines for 12 hours everyday.Where there is enough rainfall, there is life in abundance.Tropical rain forests coverjust three percent of our planet, but they are home to more than half of all its plantsand animals. In Papua New Guinea alone, there are 42 different species of birds of paradise,with an extraordinary variety of amusing mating displays.However, not everywhere around the equator is as hospitable. In the Kalahari, the sunbeats down on barren desert. Here we meet an elephant mother with her tiny newborncalf, travelling with her family group, aiming for paradise in the Okavango Delta.After daysof trekking in search of food and water, the elephants find a small waterhole.But they must share the precious water with a pride of lions.Will their uneasy truce last?The sun also fuels life in the oceans. It is here that we enter the final stage of our journey.In the tropical waters near the equator we meet a humpback whale mother and hernewborn baby.When the calf is five months old, the family of two set out on the longestmigration of any marine mammal: over 3,700 miles from the tropics to the southernextreme of our planet.We follow the whales as they encounter some of the oceans’most awe-inspiring spectacles, and watch violent storms form over the tropical seas.EARTH showcases some of the most breath-taking landscapes on this planet, from thegreatest mountain ranges to the highest waterfalls and the harshest deserts. And it alsoportrays some of the most incredible animals, whose lives are in a delicate balance.As the rhythm of the seasons starts to change, their struggle for survival becomes evenharder. And so life on earth goes on. A story played out billions of times a day, 365 daysa year, as the earth moves through the seasons, every living creature bending to thepower of the sun. No film has ever captured the epic scope of the drama of an entireplanet, yet told it with heartbreaking and heart warming intimacy of real animalcharacters. Until now …© Ben Osborne /Aerial view of seasonal floodedplain landscape, OkavangoDelta, Botswana15


PRODUCTION STORIES“I’ve worked on some pretty massive projects in my time but they’re completely dwarfedby the scale of earth. Over the past 5 years‚ we have filmed at over 200 locations worldwide;we have spent a record 4‚500 days in the field and employed over 40 cameramen‚all of whom are complete experts in their own field.”“Every shoot presented massive logistical challenges. Gaining access to the locations tookyears of negotiations. But because of our experience‚ logistical knowledge and reputation‚we were able to get in and bring back such wonderful images – it’s something that youcouldn’t simply buy.”Alastair Fothergill, DirectorFILMING THE WHITE BEASTS OF THE ARCTIC –A LESSON IN KEEPING WARM“The camera we used in the field for the polar bear shoot was an HD Varicam camerawith a 800 mm zoom lens. As HD is a fairly new technology, this was the first timewe had taken it to temperatures below -30 C. So our crew was experimenting to somedegree.© Staffan Widstrand /naturepl.comPolar bear jumpingacross melting icebergsThe camera needed to be kept warm and constantly on standby. Nature filming is reactiveand in the freezing cold the camera took too long to warm up from being turned off.Letting it get too cold affected the availability of the colour channels, especially blue. By thetime we were up and running, the moment could be lost.Keeping the camera on meant lots of battery power – and to complicate matters further,batteries die faster in low temperatures. So, we used exploration lithium long life batteriesand we had to keep them warm along with the camera.To keep the kit warm, we developed a special jacket we call a ‘polar bear jacket’. It’s madeof quilted down with a heating circuit in it.We would also bury the kit in the snow as it’sthe wind that drives the temperature down in the Arctic.Another measure we took was to ‘winterise’ the tripods.That means changing the greasewe use to lubricate it. Ordinary lubricant would freeze and the tripod freezes and lockssolid.16


However, keeping the crew warm was just as important.The biggest problem they faceis frostbite.You have to keep moving to keep warm but camera people are very focusedand when they are filming they will keep still with their eye glued to the eyepiece.Theireye socket can get stuck to the eye-piece and can also lead to frost bite around theeye – something very dangerous.And to prepare our crew? Doug Allan and Jason Roberts spend most of the year ateither one of the poles and seem to be as perfectly acclimatised as the local fauna!”Jason Roberts, Polar Logistics ExpertA RAPID DESCENT AMONGST MIGHTY PEAKS –FILMING IN THE HIMALAYAS“4 am in a Nepalese Air Force Base in Kathmandu. Cameraman Michael Kelem and Ifound ourselves watching soldiers emptying bombs from an ex British spy plane. In justone hour we would be taking off in this same plane to film high altitude aerials of MountEverest, and to get shots form the Demoiselle Crane migration scene. It was an unconventionalstart to a shoot, to say the least.It was a perfect morning for filming.The massive barrier of the Himalayas appeared tostretch into infinity before us.Within minutes we were heading towards China to positionourselves on the eastern side of Everest, ready for sunrise.We were cruising at an altitudeof 28,000 feet, within a couple of miles of the summit.As the first rays of sun hit thepeak I gave the instruction for filming to commence. At that moment, Michael pointed atthe monitor – the image was cloudy, the front lens had frosted over.With the sun aboutto rise we didn’t have long to sort this out.Without hesitating Michael crawled forward17


“ W H E N I S AW T H E F O O TA G E C O M I N G B A C K F R O M T H EU S E O F T H E C I N E F L E X C A M E R A A N D H O U S I N G I K N E W :T H I S I S G O I N G T O B E D I F F E R E N T.”A L I X T I D M A R S H


and quickly unscrewed and cleaned the front of the camera.This was quite a feat,working next to an open door at -20 C whilst breathing through an oxygen mask is notto be underestimated.He signalled that we were now ready to go.With one shot in the can, we decided topush our luck and try for another. I wanted to fly even closer to the summit. Just as Icalled ‘Action’, I caught sight of the engineer’s fingers which were twitching erratically.This is a classic symptom of hypoxia, or altitude sickness. I looked up at his eyes and sawthat they were rolling backwards in his head. I shouted to the co-pilot who immediatelyjumped out of the cockpit and began to share his oxygen. But nothing was happening –it appeared that the co-pilot’s oxygen mask was also jammed.There was only one thingto do, and the pilot made the split decision to descend to a safe altitude, dropping 3,000metres in 15 seconds.The engineer came around almost immediately and was soonjoking with the pilots as if nothing had happened. Michael had been in blissful ignorance,focussing throughout on his filming. In fact, he came up to the cockpit to find out whywe’d dive-bombed halfway through, ruining his shot!The instant we landed, the soldiers arrived to reload the bombs as our pilots had beenredeployed for a bombing mission. I was still in a state of shock after our recent crisisbut the air crew seemed un-phased. It was quite sobering to think that for these men,such danger is a grim reality if their daily lives.We all take risks filming wildlife, but I amgrateful that such near death experiences are thankfully a rare occurrence.”Vanessa Berlowitz, Field DirectorFILMING THE DESERT ELEPHANTS – THE JOY OF THE SPRING RAINS© Jeff Wilson /Cameraman filming inHimalayas“We had gone to the Skeleton Coast to film the desert lions when we came upon afamily of elephants.We were not expecting to find them at all.We didn’t realise theycame that far west. It was an incredible juxtaposition – the world’s largest land mammalin such an austere landscape. No one has filmed these elephants where we filmed them.So we followed them in our vehicles. And trying to keep up with them presented agreat challenge. Desert animals move considerable distances in search of food.Thirtyone miles for an elephant in a day and a night is typical.The only way to makeprogress is along the dried up river beds, and they are difficult to navigate.You can’ttravel outside those parts.There are too many rocks and the desert soils are fragile.Tyre tracks can last 50 years. None of us would want to destroy the look of the desert.19


We avoided the Cineflex and only brought it in for a couple of days at the end of theshoot to do the aerials, where we could film from a long way off.These elephants hatethe sound of helicopters and can pick up the infrasound – the low frequency sound –from some distance. In the Eighties, they were heavily poached from the air. Filming fromthe ground was fine.The elephants allowed us to get quite close to them and wetreasured the experience of such a beautiful landscape.The sandstorms were the onlydrawback.The desert is always very windy. Sometimes the wind was so strong it bouncedthe vehicles around. I came home with my lenses full of sand!The highlight of the shoot was when the river flooded. Nobody expected it. It was afantastic opportunity.The Hoanib hadn’t flooded in October in living memory.Theflip-side was that we were stuck there for a week.The flood lasts for a day but the soilis like blotting paper and soaks up the water. It was too boggy even for a 4 x4.This was a very special shoot.We lived with the elephants for nearly two months observingthem as they travelled across near barren desert, surviving on such a meagrediet.They are remarkably tough animals and incongruous in such an extraordinary setting!”Chadden Hunter, Field AssistantGETTING CLOSE TO THE GIANTS OF THE OCEAN –THE ART OF FILMING HUMPBACK WHALES“We filmed the humpbacks in the seas around Tonga. Humpbacks don’t live in pods andthe individuals are quite scattered.There’s 7,000 sq miles of sea around the archipelagoand the whales can be quite hard to find.You need to wait for the right conditions tospot them – clear, calm weather.You look out for their blows when they come up to thesurface to breath. In rougher conditions, the chop conceals them and their blow iswhipped away by the wind.What you also want are good sea conditions – clear waterand plenty of sunshine.What it takes to film these whales is patience and good preparation.Good conditions don’t last very long; so we were ever at the ready.© Ben Osborne /Aerial view of African elephantherd feeding in flooded plainsof Okavango Delta, BotswanaWhen we found them, they were not always very cooperative.We came across onegroup of males in hot pursuit of a female.There were four or five 36 tonne whalesdoing 10 – 15 knots; we certainly didn’t want to get in their way.They are very powerfulanimals. But all the time you’re out there you learn about the animals and learn how tointeract with them.This was so important for filming the mother and calf.20


“ I T ’ S L I K E A D R E A M C O M E T R U E . B E I N G PA RT O F A T E A M W I T HA P R O J E C T O F T H I S S C A L E – E V E RY W H E R E O N T H E P L A N E TA N D E V E RYO N E B E L I E V I N G I N T H E S A M E V I S I O N – T H AT ’ S AV E RY U N I Q U E M O M E N T.”S O P H O K L E S TA S I O U L I S


Naturally, the mother was very protective of the newborn but she got more confidentover time. Her calf was very boisterous and loved bashing its tale on the surface. Itwasn’t aggression, just playfulness, but we had to be careful not to excite it. It could doa lot of damage.Before getting into the water with them, we got to know their character, to learn howwe should behave in their company.The right behaviour starts with sensitive handlingof the boat – not approaching too fast, keeping the revs down and steady.Once in the water, I had to let them get accustomed to me.That also involved sensitivebehaviour – keeping splashing down to a minimum, being gentle.There’s a knack tobehaving around animals.That’s what will let you close to the animal while it carries ondoing its natural behaviour.Filming underwater means getting up close, which is why it’s so special.When you areon the land, you quite often rely on being a long way away and you’ll be hidden in ablind or in a vehicle. In the water, you have to work much closer to the subject. It willbe aware of you, so its confidence is essential. It’s a very satisfying challenge when youovercome it. My goal is always for the animal to accept me.I filmed within a couple of metres of the humpback mother.That was when it was intenselyexciting but also deeply satisfying.To be that close and have the animal acceptme and watch me. I could see her eyeball and I could see her looking at me. I feltprivileged. I had managed to gain her trust.That was what was so enjoyable workingwith humpbacks, because they think – they’re sentient with feelings and intelligence.© Sue Flood & Doug Allan /Doug Allan underwater filmingHumpback whale and calf, TongaWhen I got close and she was still relaxed, I felt that I had created a relationship betweenus. It’s the same satisfaction you get when you bond with a child. It’s trust. But that relationshipwon’t last for very long because you inhabit different worlds, so it’s very precious.The whale is 36 tonnes and 45ft long but it’s weightless and so are you. Filming her, Icould work in 3D, moving the way she does. On land, I’d need a crane to do the samekind of shots. It was a totally encompassing experience.I’m not surprised when people say having a whale encounter changes their lives andI had a far more intimate, personal experience with a whale than most people.Thereis no equivalent experience with a live animal.You can make friends with an elephantbut whales are so much bigger and in the weightless medium of water, they have thisintangible mystery about them.”Doug Allen, Cinematographer23


CAPTURING PREDATION IN SLOW MOTION – THE JOY OF DIGITAL“The camera we use for our super slow motion shots is a digital camera that recordsstraight on to a hard drive.There’s no film or tape. It creates digital files that are storedstraight onto a laptop computer. It can film at 2,000 frames per second, at full1024 x1024 pixel resolution.This means that we can slow an event down by up to40 times but maintain the clarity and detail of the image.Since the camera is digital, it can fire its shutter at extremely high speeds. On a typicalfilm camera, this process is mechanical. A second important feature is that the cameraoperates on a continuous 4 second loop.This means that it is recording constantly over4 seconds, then recording again over the top of the previous 4 seconds.This enablesus to trigger at any point during a specific action and you can be certain of gettingthe whole event.On a normal camera, you have to begin recording before an event happens, but withthis camera you can trigger half way through an event and know that the camera hasalready recorded the previous 2 seconds, and will record the next 2 seconds as well.You can even set it to record on an end trigger, meaning when you hit the trigger, thecamera will have already recorded the previous 4 seconds.This ensures that you willcapture a split second action from start to finish.The camera was originally developed for crash testing on cars, which is a very controlledenvironment.We needed it to work in the adverse conditions of wildlife filming, sowe had it specially adapted.The camera needs to stay hooked up to a processor andcomputer, from which it is controlled, and a regular power source. Out in the field there24


isn’t any, so a series of 12 volt car batteries were rigged in the back of the land roverto provide power. It takes 10 minutes to warm up and after that it’s never turned off.Originally the camera had no view finder, so the team had to adapt it so that the cameramancould see what he was doing.We use this camera to give a unique perspective on wildlife events that happen in avery short period of time. It enables an audience to see in detail what is happening in aspectacular event like a Nile crocodile shooting out of the water – an event that is overin one second of real time. A human eye and brain cannot process this quickly enough,so we miss out the detail of what is actually happening. Only by filming this way can wetruly appreciate the beauty and mastery of such magnificent creatures as the cheetah orevoke the poignancy of the life and death struggle between prey and predator.Shooting at its highest speed, this camera would take an event that occurs over 4 secondsand make it into a shot that takes over 5 minutes to lay out!Of course, technology is not what makes a fantastic shot. It just enhances what hasbeen filmed.The skill is the cameraman’s – in being at the right place at the right timeand knowing what the animal is going to do. It takes a real expert to second guess ahungry cheetah.This technique was also used to film the Great White Shark!”Simon King, CinematographerEarth © BBC Worldwide Ltd. 2007 /A Great White sharkbreaches as it hunts capefure seals, Seal Island, South Africa25


“ E A RT H I S A C T U A L LY T H E P E R F E C T F I L M F O R F A M I L I E S :PA R E N T S A R E I N S P I R E D, K I D S A R E N O T O N LY T H R I L L E DB U T A L S O E N T E RTA I N E D A N D I N F O R M E D AT T H E S A M E T I M E .”S T E F A NB E I T E N


PRODUCTION TEAMALASTAIR FOTHERGILL, DIRECTORAlastair Fothergill was educated at the Universities of St Andrew’s and Durham. Hejoined the BBC Natural History Unit (NHU) in 1983. He has worked on a wide rangeof the department’s programmes, including the BAFTA award-winning THE REALLYWILD SHOW, WILDLIFE ON ONE and the innovative REEFWATCH, where he wasone of the team that developed live broadcasting from beneath the sea.He went on to work on the BBC ONE series,THE TRIALS OF LIFE, with Sir David Attenborough.In 1993 he directed LIFE IN THE FREEZER, a six-part series for BBC ONEcelebrating the wildlife of the Antarctic.While still working on the series, he wasappointed Head of the NHU in November 1992.In June 1998, he stepped down from his role as Head of the NHU to concentrate ondirecting DEEP BLUE, the ground-breaking feature-length film on the earth’s oceans,which achieved both critical and box office success for it’s outstanding cinematography.DEEP BLUE went on to rejuvenate worldwide interest in the documentary film genre.MARK LINFIELD, DIRECTORMark Linfield started his career in 1990 working on a BBC documentary in WestAfrica. After several years he joined Green Umbrella Ltd, where he produced anddirected many award winning films, including THE TRIUMPH OF LIFE,THE BATTLESOF BRAVEHEART, ORANGUTANS:THE HIGH SOCIETY, and THE TEMPLE TROOP.© Photolibrary /In 2000 Mark Linfield returned to the BBC full time to produce and direct on theBAFTA nominated LIFE MAMMALS with Sir David Attenborough. In the last four yearshe has produced the award winning CAPUCHINS:THE MONKEY PUZZLE and twoepisodes of PLANET EARTH, including the opening show of POLE TO POLE.Polar bear mother and two cubsset off across sea ice at sunsetSOPHOKLES TASIOULIS, PRODUCERSophokles Tasioulis has been involved in diverse film and TV productions since 1998.He was the co-founder and part-owner of THESA Film, an independent productioncompany in Berlin. In 1998, as the Managing Director and Manager of the documentarydepartment, he built up the Hope&Glory film production company. During his career,in addition to selected motion pictures for an international audience, he has producedmore than 100 programme hours. From among his productions the documentaryseries CHEERLEADER STORIES and SHOES FROM AMERICA were shown at majorfestivals.27


As the Manager of Production at Greenlight Media AG, he is responsible for thedevelopment, financing and executive production. In addition, he advises in questionsof content and oversees the cooperation with a number of international co-producers,broadcasting companies and distribution companies.Sophokles Tasioulis is producer of the German-Spanish co-production THE GREATMATCH, as well as the world success DEEP BLUE. Currently, he is busy preparing afurther large documentary production SIBERIA, as well as the finishing of a cinemaanimation film QUEST FOR A HEART.ALIX TIDMARSH, PRODUCEROn her previous feature film project, DEEP BLUE, Alix Tidmarsh spearheaded the visionwith the Director of creating a feature film on the oceans.Working with co-producersGreenlight Media, DEEP BLUE was launched in 2004, grossing $30 million at the boxoffice and has sold to date over one million DVD’s. She is currently producing a numberof other feature films as well as providing consultancy services through her mediaconsultancy called B8 Media. B8 Media supports the development, funding and marketingprocesses in film and television.Alix Tidmarsh previously was at BBC Worldwide for 7 years, as Director of Marketingwhere she headed an integrated, full service marketing operation that included strategicmarket planning and the creative execution of campaigns.ANDRÉ SIKOJEV, EXECUTIVE PRODUCERSince 1981 André Sikojev has worked as a freelance journalist (among other publicationsfor DER SPIEGEL) and as a literary translator of European epics. In additionto this, he works as an author (THE NARTS – CHILDREN OF THE SUN) and as apublisher and issued a number of books and texts in the areas of church history, art,literature and art history.28


André Sikojev is one of the co-founders of Greenlight Media AG and since 2006chairman of the supervisory board. Furthermore, he is the author of the successfulanimated series SIMSALAGRIMM and together with Stefan Beiten and Nikolaus Weilthe producer of the series. As the co-producer and producer, he has developed andimplemented further animation films, including FUNKY COPS, QUEST FOR A HEARTand SIMSALAGRIMM II, the TV-documentaries SANDSTONES, GIORGIO ARMANI –A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS and ICELAND – THE REALM OF THE GODS, as wellas the motion picture THE GREAT MATCH. He is also Executive Producer of DEEPBLUE and EARTH.STEFAN BEITEN, EXECUTIVE PRODUCEREarth © BBC Worldwide Ltd. 2007 /Elephants on the annual migrationthrough the desert in search ofwater, Kalahari Desert, BotswanaStefan Beiten began his international career in 1993 in the film and media lawfirm Chrystie & Berle in Los Angeles. He continued his career as a lawyer for BeitenBurkhardt in Berlin and as an Investment Banker for film and media finance with ABNAMRO in London.In 1998 Stefan Beiten co-founded Greenlight Media AG and became chairman of theboard of the media company. He is co-creator and producer of the successful animatedseries SIMSALAGRIMM and Executive Producer of the productions GIORGIOARMANI – A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS, ICELAND – REALM OF THE GODS andSANDSTONES, FUNKY COPS, DEEP BLUE,THE GREAT MATCH, EARTH andQUEST FOR A HEART.At Greenlight Media, he is responsible for company strategy, co-production, financesand distribution. Stefan Beiten is furthermore a co-founder and Managing Partner ofthe Berlin Atlantic Group, with offices in Berlin, Atlanta and Zug to which GreenlightMedia belongs.NIKOLAUS WEIL, EXECUTIVE PRODUCERNikolaus Weil studied law in Freiburg, Munich and New York. As an attorney hespecialized in film financing, entertainment and publishing law. He represented numerousclients from the film and music industry. He was also involved in numerous structuredfinance as well as M&A transactions in the media area.In 1998 he co-founded Greeenlight Media AG and was appointed Chief OperatingOfficer of Greenlight Media, responsible for international co-productions, projectfinancing and business affairs. He is Executive Producer of the internationally successfulanimated series SIMSALAGRIMM, HAPPILY N’EVER AFTER, FUNKYCOPS, QUESTFOR A HEART as well as GIORGIO ARMANI – A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS, ICE-LAND – REALM OF THE GODS, SANDSTONES, DEEP BLUE, EARTH, and THEGREAT MATCH.29


Nikolaus Weil is also a co-founder and Managing Partner of the Berlin Atlantic Group,an international investment group specialized in alternative assets, to which GreenlightMedia also belongs.GEORGE FENTON, COMPOSERGeorge Fenton was nominated five times for the Oscar and is one of the best knownnames in film music. He wrote the scores for numerous award-winning motion picturesand television productions, for example for GANDHI, CRY FREEDOM, DANGEROUSLIASONS, MEMPHIS BELLE,THE FISHER KING, SHADOWLANDS,THE MADNESSOF KING GEORGE and ANNA AND THE KING, SWEET HOME ALABAMA andSWEET SIXTEEN.© Marguerite Smits Van Oyen /Simon King filming Great whiteshark at surface, South AfricaIn May 2003, Fenton conducted the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra for DEEP BLUE,their first recording for a cinema film and in 2007 again for EARTH. For the PLANETEARTH soundtrack he was awarded “Soundtrack Composer of the Year” at theClassical Brit Awards.BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA, FILM SCOREFor the first time in their history, the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by thecomposer George Fenton, played the soundtrack for the Greenlight Media/BBC Worldwideproduction, DEEP BLUE.This cooperation was also successfully continued withEARTH.Since it was founded in 1882, the orchestra has been conducted by different distinguishedconductors, ranging from Hans von Bülow, Felix Weingartner, and Richard Strauss, viaGustav Mahler, Johannes Brahms and Edvard Grieg, who all played an important role inmaking the orchestra world-famous.From1955 until shortly before he died in 1989, Herbert von Karajan directed the BerlinPhilharmonic Orchestra. During this time they played for an overwhelming number ofrecordings and were often on world-tour.Sir Simon Rattle made it a condition of his signing with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestrathat it be turned into a self-governing public foundation, with the power to make its ownartistic and financial decisions.This required a change to state law, which was approvedin 2001, allowing him to join the organization in 2002.The current Director of the orchestrais the American Pamela Rosenberg.30


“ W E H AV E A LWAY S D R E A M E D O F M A K I N G F I L M S F O R AW O R L D W I D E A U D I E N C E ; A N D T H I S D R E A M H A S C O M E T R U EA G A I N . “A N D R ÉS I KO J E V


PRODUCTION HOUSESGREENLIGHT MEDIAGreenlight Media AG, headquartered in Berlin, is a film production and distributioncompany which operates worldwide. From its base in Germany, Greenlight Media providesdevelopment, financing, production and distribution for international, high-qualitytheatrical and television films – primarily animation, event documentaries and features.It is committed to delivering strong entertainment brands to audiences all around theworld.Founded in 1993, Greenlight Media took off with the launch of the extremly successfulanimated TV series SIMSALAGRIMM, which has since been distributed to over 120 territoriesworldwide, making it Germany’s number one exported TV series of all time.DEEP BLUE, Greenlight Media’s 2003 BBC Worldwide co-production and EventDocumentary, was the worlds most successful German film in 2004.The motion picturefeature film,THE GREAT MATCH, was selected for the Berlinale Special Section of Berlin’sInternational Film Festival in 2006.In 2002 Greenlight Media and BBC Worldwide closed a 5-picture deal to produceinternational cinema films, for which Greenlight Media is coordinating the development,the production and the worldwide sales for mutual projects such as EARTH.32


BBC WORLDWIDEBBC Worldwide Limited is the main commercial arm and a wholly owned subsidiary ofthe British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).The company exists to maximise the valueof the BBC’s assets for the benefit of the licence payer and invest in public service programmingin return for rights.The company has six core businesses: Global Channels,Global TV Sales, Magazines, Content & Production, Home Entertainment, and DigitalMedia. In 2006/07 BBC Worldwide generated profits of £111 million on sales of £810million.THE BBC NATURAL HISTORY UNITEarth © BBC Worldwide Ltd. 2007 /Spring in the deciduous woodlandsis a time of plenty for all animals,including songbirds, UKThe BBC’s NHU celebrated its 50th anniversary last year. Based in Bristol, UK, the NHUhas been enthralling listeners and viewers around the world with its pioneering techniquesto document the flora and fauna of the globe. Its programme makers specialise in capturingthe living wonders of the world and continue to find new marvels on the planet.Theunit is the world’s largest wildlife television and radio production house and holds theworld’s largest archive of natural history film and sound recordings. It produces around100 hours of television and 50 hours of radio a year, using a variety of formats includingmajor landmark series, classical wildlife, animal and people documentaries and live broadcastsand presenter-led shows for adults and children.STATEMENTSALASTAIR FOTHERGILL, DIRECTOR“The sheer scale of EARTH is frankly breathtaking. Nobody in the history of cinema hasever had so much time, resources and talent brought together for one documentaryfeature.”“Sometimes when you find yourself in a small, dark cutting room everything getssmaller and smaller as you edit the piece.What’s so wonderful is that as soon as yousee the muted pictures on the big screen, add the sound effects and the music of theBerlin Philharmonic Orchestra and George Fenton, then suddenly the picture and theexperience gets bigger and bigger again. I hope that if nothing else, those sitting in thecinema will have that big experience that I originally had out in the wild.”33


“You can go into a rainforest and turn over a rock and going on in that tiny space areintimate, powerful, extraordinary stories that I believe are enormously engrossing.That’swhy the natural world fascinates me: it’s wonderful on the big scale, but fantastic on themicro scale as well.”MARK LINFIELD, DIRECTOR“Five years is a long time. Over the course of that period I think all the team at timesthought,‘can we pull this off? It’s so difficult in a production of this length: you have upsand downs; some shoots fail, some shoots are successful.You have to constantly rethinkthe story. But after 5 years, looking back at it I think it worked out really well.”“We’re hoping that EARTH is for absolutely everybody.We’re hoping that everyone willfall in love with their planet once they have seen it, not matter how old they are.”“If this film does even a small amount to make people fall in love with their planet anddo something, to change its future, than I will feel very proud indeed having worked onEARTH.”SOPHOKLES TASIOULIS, PRODUCER“I see EARTH as a history film rather than a natural history film, and in the years tocome some of what we see in EARTH will not be there anymore. By that alone, thisfilm will become more and more important.”ALIX TIDMARSH, PRODUCER“What’s wonderful about our home is that millions and millions of lives and stories areplayed out everyday of the year and all are delicately intertwined because we are allinfluenced by the sun and its effect of creating the seasons. Each wildlife story is uniqueand you can’t help but will the heroes in that story to succeed, and when they do, youcan’t help but feel inspired and give a little cheer.”Earth © BBC Worldwide Ltd. 2007 /A Raggiana Bird of Paradise in fulldisplay, Kiunga, Papua New Guinea34


“ E A RT H I S T H E U LT I M AT E P O RT R A I T A N D E X P E R I E N C E O F O U RP L A N E T, O U R H A B I TAT A N D O U R E N V I R O N M E N T, I F YO U D I D N ’ TH AV E A N O P I N I O N T I L L N O W, YO U C E RTA I N LY W I L L H AV E W H E NYO U ’ V E S E E N T H I S M O V I E . “N I KO L A U S W E I L


FROM THE PRESS“Probably the most ambitious nature documentary ever produced (…)One day, EARTH may be looked on as a repertoire of fabulous, semi-legendary creaturesand landscapes: for now, though, it's a stirring celebration of what we still have.”Screen Daily“Five years in the making, 4,500 days in the field at 200 locations, 250 days of aerialphotography:The statistics are more than impressive.”Variety“One of the highlights in San Sebastian has been the world premier of EARTH (…)Thunderous applause followed Saturday's screening to a packed-house (…).”Hollywood Reporter© Huw Cordey /Looking across Namibian desert“Earth has proven itself to be perfect example of what a documentary should standfor; a realistic gateway into situations that happen away from what we see or arefamiliar with, and educate us on how and why these events occur.This documentaryshows us how unique, important, and above all, amazing this planet is, and you cannothelp but fall in love with it.”Obsessed with Filmdune landscape“A spectacle for the whole family, magnificent, moving … and convincing.Do you believe that you have already seen everything as far as nature documentariesare concerned? EARTH, the German-British documentary (…) beats everything whichwas to be seen on the small or large screen up until now – with beauty and emotion.“Le Parisien“EARTH, the result of five years work, is a hymn to our planet, a plea for the protectionof animals, carried by pictures that take away your breath.“Figaro et vous36


“EARTH, a spectacular documentary by Alastair Fothergill and Mark Linfield, which (…)is on the big screen with pictures that have never been seen before. (…) a story withan epic dimension.“El Pais“EARTH is the most time – and money-intensive nature documentary of all time, anepic expedition to the last paradises of the planet.The spectacular pictures speak for themselves: zoology as a true cinema miracle.“Der Spiegel“Be amazed how the power of pictures of this successful experiment can unfold its ultimatefascination on the big screen.“Blickpunkt Film“The largest and most spectacular nature documentary, that ever existed (…) unique.“EARTH sets a benchmark which many films will follow.“Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung“Our planet has never been so beautiful. It’s better than all the Al Gores and LeonardoDiCaprio’s combined.“The Press37


BERLIN ATLANTIC GROUPGreenlight Media is part of the Berlin Atlantic Group: an international investment housewith 120 employees, which develops, markets and manages alternative investments. Itsportfolio of business consists of media, US life insurance policies and infrastructureprojects.“Films primarily represent a finance business with a long value chain. In additionto production and distribution expertise, the Berlin Atlantic Group brings entrepreneurialthinking into the film industry – in a manner which is unusual in Germany,“ saysStefan Beiten, Managing Partner of the Berlin Atlantic Group.“With theatrical documentaries it has been possible to create a whole new businessopportunity for the world market leader in documentaries, the BBC.”BUSINESS PIONEERSStefan Beiten and Nikolaus Weil co-founded Greenlight Media AG and the BerlinAtlantic Group.They have been pursuing a common entrepreneurial path since 1993.Both are passionate about film, but are predominantly result-oriented entrepreneursand businessmen.They have continuously developed and grown the company over thepast few years to its current position. From financing animation films initially to a presentbroad portfolio of investments ranging from film financing, US based telecommunicationsinfrastructure, land development to structured life insurance products.These investmentshave typically been reserved for the institutional world and are now being made availableto private investors as well.© Andrew Parkinson; naturepl.com /Nikolaus Weil, also Managing Partner of the Berlin Atlantic Group, describes the company’sphilosophy:“Our investment portfolio is very diverse, but with one aspect incommon. Unlike passive investors we manage all of our asset classes actively throughoperational subsidiaries and joint venture entities.”African elephant mother and calf,Botswana39


“ I F W E W E R E TO M A K E T H I S F I L M I N T E N – O R C E RTA I N LYT W E N T Y – Y E A R S’ T I M E, W E W O U L D N OT B E A B L E TO B R I N G T H EE X T R A O R D I N A RY I M A G E S W E A R E B R I N G I N G TO T H E B I G S C R E E N.S O T H E R E’S A S U B T L E, Y E T P O W E R F U L M E S S A G E B E H I N D T H E F I L M,W H I C H A I M S TO E N C O U R A G E T H O S E W H O S E E E A RT H TO F E E LC O M P E L L E D TO D O S O M E T H I N G TO P R E S E RV E O U R B E A U T I F U LB U T F R A G I L E P L A N E T.”A L A S TA I RF O T H E R G I L L© Photolibrary / Humpback whale dives down at sunset

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines