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THE NICHOLAS RHODESCOLLECTIONOF TIBETAN COINS21 AUGUST 2013HONG KONG


GROUP CHAIRMAN AND CEOOlivier D. StockerYOUR SPECIALISTSSTAMPSUK - Tim Hirsch Guy Croton David Parsons Nick Startup Neill GrangerPaul Mathews Dominic Savastano Tom SmithUSA - George Eveleth Arthur Poudrier Rex Bishop Richard DebneyEUROPE - Guido Craveri Fernando MartínezCHINA - Anna LeeCOINSUK - Mike Veissid Paul Dawson Richard Bishop William MacKayEleanor Charlotte Dix Tim Robson Barbara Mears John PettUSA - Stephen Goldsmith Greg Cole Normand PepinCHINA - Mark LiBANKNOTES, BONDS & SHARESUK - Barnaby Faull Mike Veissid Andrew PattisonUSA - Stephen GoldsmithCHINA - Mark LiORDERS, DECORATIONS, MEDALS & MILITARIAUK - Mark Quayle Oliver PepysBOOKSUK - Philip SkingleyAUTOGRAPHSUSA - Stephen GoldsmithWINESCHINA - Anna Lee Guillaume Willk-FabiaYOUR EUROPE TEAM (LONDON - LUGANO)Chairman’s OfficeMonica Kruber Charles BlaneDirectorsTim Hirsch Anthony SpinkAuction & Client Management TeamMiroslava Adusei-Poku Eleanor Ball Luca Borgo Rita Ariete John WinchcombeHarry Gladwin María Martínez Maurizio ScheniniFinanceAlison Bennet Marco Fiori Mina Bhagat Dennis Muriu Alison Kinnaird Billy Tumelty Dean DowdallIT & AdministrationBerdia Qamarauli Attila Gyanyi Liz Cones Curlene SpencerTom Robinson Cristina Dugoni Giacomo CanziYOUR AMERICA TEAM (NEW YORK)Chairman EmeritusJohn HerzogAuction Administration and Marketing & DesignSonia Alves Luke MitchellFinance & AdministrationSam Qureshi Ingrid QureshiAuctioneerStephen GoldsmithYOUR ASIA TEAM (HONG KONG - SINGAPORE)Vice ChairmanAnna LeeAdministrationAmy Yung Newton Tsang Raymond Tat Gary Tan


YOUR SPINK TEAM FOR THIS SALEFOR YOUR QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SALE LOTSBarbara Mearsbmears@spink.com+44 207 563 4091/4000(until 16 August 2013)+852 25 300 100Anna Leechina@spink.com+852 25 300 100AUCTION TEAM FOR YOUR BIDS, SALE RESULTS ANDCATALOGUE REQUESTSAmy Yungchina@spink.com+852 25 300 100fax +852 25 266 128Miroslava Adusei-Pokuauctionteam@spink.com+44 (0)20 7563 4020fax +44 (0)20 7563 4037(until 19 August 2013)FOR YOUR INTERNET BIDDINGNewton Tsangchina@spink.com+852 25 300 100FOR SHIPPING OF YOUR LOTSRaymond Tatchina@spink.com+852 25 300 100FOR YOUR PAYMENTchina@spink.com+852 25 300 100 fax +852 25 266 128Cataloguing by Wolfgang Bertsch,an expert in Tibetan coins and banknotes


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION -COINS OF TIBETTo include a selection of Tibetan Banknotes21 August 2013 in Hong Kong and onSALE LOCATIONSPINK CHINA9/F Malaysian Consulate Building,50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kongtel +852 25 300 100 fax +852 25 266 128SALE DETAILSWednesday 21 August at 3.00 p.m.YOUR SPINK TEAM FOR THIS SALEFOR YOUR QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SALE LOTSBarbara Mearsbmears@spink.com+44 207 563 4091/4000(until 16 August 2013)+852 25 300 100Anna Leechina@spink.com+852 25 300 100In sending commission bids or making enquiries,this sale should be referred to as TIBET - 13020VIEWING OF LOTSViewing at 69 Southampton Row, London:Thursday 1 August 2013 1.00 p.m. - 6.00 p.m.Any further viewing up to 7 August by appointment onlyViewing at 50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kong:Monday 19 August 2013 10.00 a.m.- 6.00 p.m.Tuesday 20 August 2013 10.00 a.m.- 6.00 p.m.To purchase a catalogue:email: catalogues@spink.comtel: +44 (0)20 7563 4005 fax: +44 (0)20 7563 4037For more information about Spink services, forthcomingsales and sales results visit the Spink Websitewww.spink.comUse this QR code to visit our online catalogue and leave commissionbids.You can download the QR Code Reader for iPhone, Blackberry andAndroid from App Store on your smartphoneThe Spink Environment Commitment:Paper from Sustainable Forests and Clean InkFor centuries Spink and its employees have been preserving and curating collectable items.We now wish to play a modest role in preserving our planet, as well as the heritage of collectables, so futuregenerations may enjoy both.We insist that our printers source all paper used in the production of Spink catalogues from FSC registeredsuppliers (for further information on the FSC standard please visit fsc.org) and use non hazardous inks. Wealso insist they hold the environmental standard ISO 14001.Spink recycle all ecological material used on our premises and we would encourage you to recycle yourcatalogue once you have finished with it.AUCTION TEAM FOR YOUR BIDS, SALE RESULTS ANDCATALOGUE REQUESTSAmy Yungchina@spink.com+852 25 300 100fax +852 25 266 128Miroslava Adusei-Pokuauctionteam@spink.com+44 (0)20 7563 4020fax +44 (0)20 7563 4037(until 19 August 2013)FOR YOUR INTERNET BIDDINGNewton Tsangchina@spink.com+852 25 300 100FOR SHIPPING OF YOUR LOTSFOR YOUR PAYMENTRaymond Tatchina@spink.com+852 25 300 100china@spink.com+852 25 300 100 fax +852 25 266 128Cataloguing by Wolfgang Bertsch,an expert in Tibetan coins and banknotesFront Cover Illustrations: 302 Back Cover Illustration: 476


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETWEDNESDAY 21 AUGUST 2013Commencing at 3.00 p.m.LotsThe Earliest Coins Struck by the Tibetans 1 - 4Nepalese Coins adapted for Tibet 5 - 10Sino-Tibetan Coins, issued under jointChinese and Tibetan authority 11 - 130Kong Par Tangkas 131 - 159Tangkas with Ranjana Script 160 - 174Coins adapted with Bow and Arrow 175 - 178Chinese issues for Tibet: Sichuan Rupees 179 - 231Sichuan Rupees countermarked in Eastern Tibet 232 - 248The Gaden Tangkas 249 - 292Special Tangkas (“Monk Tangka”) 293 - 296Tibetan Pattern Coins 297 - 30820th Century Sino-Tibetan Coins under Chinese Authority 309 - 320Other Coins in the name of Xuan Tong 321 - 329Break for RefreshmentsOrder of SaleCoinage of the 13th Dalai Lama 330 - 3683-Srang Silver Coins 369 - 3951½-Srang Coins 396 - 40310-Srang Coins 404 - 43010-Srang Coins, issued by the Dugö Lekhung 431 - 434Copper Coins of the 20th Century 435 - 47120-Tam Srang Gold Coins 472 - 478Coins struck by the Chinese Republic for Tibet 479 - 485Fantasy Coins 486 - 505Miscellaneous 506 - 512Tibetan Banknotes 513 - 555END OF SALEWWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGNICHOLAS RHODES (1946-2011)Nicholas Rhodes was brought up in London. He started to collect coins from an early age and as a seven year old wasfirst taken to AH Baldwin & Sons, receiving excellent guidance from the late Albert Baldwin. Nicholas was a scholar atWestminster School, where he co-authored his first numismatic publication on the Anglo-Saxon Coins in the schoolcollection. In 1962, Nicholas started collecting oriental coins, particularly the coins of Nepal, which at this timepresented the opportunity to build a meaningful collection and provided a fertile field for original research. On leavingschool, he travelled overland to Nepal where he found a numismatist’s paradise of Nepalese and Tibetan coins. Over theyears he made many return journeys to India, Nepal and Bhutan, where he had a large number of friends and contacts.After a Mathematics degree from Trinity College Cambridge, Nicholas qualified as an actuary and continued in thiscapacity for the rest of his professional life, working for an international (re)insurance company. During this time he wassuccessfully able to balance working life with his passion for the collection and study of coins, banknotes, books, stampsand postal history. His specialist interests embraced the currency of the whole Himalayan region from Kashmir toLadakh in the west, through Nepal, Tibet, Bhutan, to Assam and the Hindu states of north-east India. He also collectedChinese coins and in recent years developed an interest in the coinage of Acheh and Murshidabad.Nicholas wrote and lectured extensively on his numismatic interests, publishing in excess of 200 articles andco-authoring eight books. His book, “The Coinage of Nepal”, written in collaboration with the late Karl Gabrisch andCarlo Valdettaro, is the standard reference work for the series. In recent years he collaborated with SK Bose on a seriesof books on the coinage of the north-east Indian states. He retired at the age of 56 in order to focus on his academicinterests, dividing his time principally between London and Kolkata.John Rhodes5Page 5


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETNicholas Rhodes and his Collection of Tibetan CoinsLike most serious collectors, Nicholas started acquiring and studying coins at an early age. His lifelong passion for the coinsof the Himalayas was ignited during an overland trip to and an extensive stay in Nepal in the 1960s, where he found thatKathmandu was one of the most fascinating places for a coin collector. Nicholas was fortunate to start collecting Tibetan andNepalese coins at a time when unpublished coins or banknotes could still be found and the prices of even very rare pieceswere affordable. He was therefore able to relatively quickly build a fine collection which formed the basis for studies whichhe started publishing in the 1970s.Nicholas was always interested in studying the historical context of the coins which he acquired. Guided by this interest andencouraged by his friend and fellow collector Carlo Valdettaro, with whom he corresponded and was in close contact from1965 until Valdettaro’s death in 1988, Nicholas published articles in the field of Tibetan numismatics at a time when thisdiscipline was still in its infancy. In this context one may mention the following important publications which have stood thetest of time: “The Gaden Tangkas of Tibet”, “Tibetan Mints” and “The Development of Currency in Tibet”.Subsequently Nicholas started collecting the coins of other Himalayan states and regions, forming outstanding coincollections of Kashmir, Ladakh, Bhutan, Assam, Cooch Bihar, Tripura, Jaintiapur, Kachar and Manipur as well as variousformer Indian hill states. He published many pioneering articles and several important books on these areas and thus gainedthe reputation of being the world’s leading expert in the coinage of the Himalayas.While in the beginning of his collecting activities Nicholas could rely primarily on coin and curio dealers from Nepal andIndia, in later years he was able to enrich his collection of Tibetan coins by acquiring rare pieces in coin auctions, notably inthose auctions which included the most outstanding collections to have come to the market to date, namely those of theAmerican dentist and collector Wesley Halpert (1922-2010) (New York 2000 Spink) and the German veterinarian andcollector Karl Gabrisch (1926-1995) (Hong Kong, 2005; Baldwin, Ma Tak Wo, Gillio, Monetarium). Nicholas had writtenthe catalogue of both collections.Nicholas Rhodes was member of numerous numismatic and other societies. From 1977 until 2002 he was HonoraryTreasurer of the Royal Numismatic Society (U.K.) and acted as Secretary General of the Oriental Numismatic Society from1997 until his death. He was Founding Member, and for some time also Honorary Treasurer, of the Bhutan Society in U.K.Nicholas was also interested in Nepalese and Tibetan philately and as a member of the Nepal and Tibet Philatelic StudyCircle published various articles on the philately of Tibet, Sikkim and the Darjeeling area in the journal of the study circle“Postal Himal”.The collection of Tibetan coins of Nicholas Rhodes which is being offered in this auction surpasses the two aforementionedcollections both in terms of total size and in the number of rare and extremely rare coins being offered. I would like to pointout a few highlights of the collection:– From the first silver coins struck in Tibet, one example of a beautifully designed silver tangka, referred to as “ShriMangalam tangka”, and a rare variant of the tangka bearing Vartula script;– The Sino-Tibetan issues include a rare variant of a half sho, Qian Long 58th year, two variants of the very scarce and odd61st year of Qian Long and a silver sho, dated to the second year of Jia Qing (a very rare coin which so far has neverbeen offered in any auction), along with other rare silver sho issues of this ruler (years 4, 5 and 6);– Almost all the rare regular issues of the coinage issued between 1908 and 1954, the highlights being a 1 Srang dated15-48 and a beautiful example of the 5 sho silver coin in the name of Xuan Tong;– In addition to the regular issues, the collection is very rich in rare Tibetan pattern coins, the most spectacular among thesebeing an undated 10 Tam coin of ca. 1910, the heaviest silver coin which was ever struck in Tibet, and two furtherexperimental pieces of 10 Tam which are equally rare, one of them being perhaps the most attractive coin ever struck inTibet.In view of the fact that the supply of rare Tibetan coins coming directly from Lhasa or indirectly from Nepal or India hasalmost dried up in recent years, one may state without risking exaggeration that the collection of Tibetan coins being offeredhere presents a unique opportunity to acquire some of the rarest Tibetan coins and that it is doubtful whether such anopportunity will ever come up again during the lifetime of most of those numismatists who seriously collect Tibetan coins.Wolfgang BertschWWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGA Brief Introduction to the Coinage of TibetWolfgang Bertsch1. Historical OverviewAlthough Tibet’s main neighbours had their own coinage since time immemorial, in ancient Tibet the use of coins was veryinsignificant. Tibet had no locally struck coinage, however some coins from India, Nepal, Xinjiang and China had reachedTibet by way of trade or as donations to important monasteries. Some of these coins may have entered circulation, but didnot develop into an important instrument for transactions in daily life, since almost all domestic and foreign trade was carriedout by barter.Tibet had the highest trade volume with China, the main barter items being horses from north-eastern Tibet (Amdo) whichwere traded for Chinese tea. Tibet also exported medicinal herbs, stag antlers, musk and gold and imported silk cloth,porcelain and silver. The trade volume with Tibet’s southern neighbours, India, Nepal and Bhutan, was much smaller. TheTibetan traders mainly exchanged salt and wool for grain (including rice) with these countries. Traditionally one measure ofsalt was traded for one measure of grain at the border with Nepal and India. Other, less important export goods were yaktails, musk and live animals (goats and sheep). The export of falcons to India is also recorded during the 17th Century(Pennant, vol. I, 1798, p. 356).Gold dust, mostly tied up in small leather bags 1 , and Chinese silver ingots were used for large transactions within Tibet. Theseingots came in different shapes, the most common brand resembling horse or donkey shoes, were named rta rmig ma inTibetan. Marco Polo reports that red coral also served as currency in Tibet. For small transactions, various consumer goodswhich had about the same standard value among the majority of the Tibetans could be used. Among others, these were arecanuts, tobacco, ceremonial scarves (Khadag, Tibetan: kha btags) and tea (Gabrisch, 1990). The tea was usually traded in theform of bricks (Tibetan: ja sbag) and developed into the most important medium of exchange in the 19th Century when aregular coinage had already been introduced into Tibet (Bertsch, 2006). For very small purchases, cowries (small sea shellswhich were mainly procured in the Maldive Islands and reached Tibet and China via Bengal) and stone beads are alsorecorded as money for ancient Tibet (Xiao Huaiyuan, 1987).The first coinage extensively used in southern Tibet were silver coins supplied by the Nepalese Malla kingdoms and the firstkings of the subsequent Shah dynasty from about 1640 until 1791 (Rhodes et alii, 1989). Tibet provided the silver for thestriking of these coins and received coins at the same weight, the Nepalese reaping a handsome profit by alloying the puresilver with copper before the striking. Owing to a dispute between Nepal and Tibet regarding the fineness of the silver coinssupplied by Nepal, the export of these coins was disrupted after the mid-eighteenth Century. In order to overcome theshortage of coins in Tibet at that time, the Tibetan Government started striking its own coins modelled on Nepaleseprototypes. This occurred in 1763/64 (Martynov, 1965 and 1987; Rhodes, 1990; Bertsch & Gabrisch, 1986 and Gabrisch,1999).The Nepalese tried to carry on the very lucrative coin business during the Shah dynasty, which had been established by KingPrithvi Narayan Shah in the Kathmandu Valley in 1768. First the Nepalese supplied mohars (silver coins which weighedabout 5.4 grams) of good silver, but wanted these to circulate at the rate of one new Mohar for two of the old adulteratedsilver coins struck by the Malla kings. This would have meant a tremendous loss for the Tibetan traders, and the Tibetangovernment did not accept these terms. The second Shah King who ruled from Kathmandu, Pratap Simha, supplied alloyedsilver coins during the period 1775 until 1777. But when the Nepalese again tried to introduce coins of good silver tocirculate at a considerable premium compared with the Malla and Pratap Simha coins, the Tibetans refused, trade betweenNepal and Tibet was disrupted and Tibet again experimented with its own coinage in 1785 to mitigate the shortage of silvercoins. In order to resume the profitable coin export on their own terms, the Nepalese invaded Tibet in 1788 and again in1790/91.When the Tibetan government turned to China for help, an Imperial army was sent to Tibet and together with the Tibetanarmy drove out the Nepalese by autumn of 1792. The Chinese government took this opportunity to tighten their grip on Tibetand issued an Imperial edict which among other dispositions stipulated the introduction of a new silver coinage, struck in thename of Emperor Qian Long (Rhodes, 1990). At the same time, it was forbidden to import silver coins from Nepal. In orderto temporarily solve the shortage of coins in Tibet when the Chinese army arrived in 1791, the Chinese had allowed thestriking of the so-called Kong Par Tangkas, which were produced from alloyed silver and had a design copied from Nepaleseprototypes. These tangkas, which were first produced in the Kongpo province and later in Lhasa, were the first massproducedsilver coins of Tibet and had about the same weight as their Nepalese counterparts, i.e. about 5.2 grams (Bertsch,2008).7


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETFrom 1793, new coins were struck in Lhasa from almost pure silver. These had both Tibetan and Chinese inscriptions.Meanwhile the striking of the Kong Par Tangkas continued through 1792 and early 1793. Both types of coins were authorisedby the Chinese and struck under joint Chinese and Tibetan supervision, but they were not part of the Chinese currencysystem, as silver coinage was unknown in China during the 18th and early 19th Centuries (with the exception of Xinjiangprovince). In 1791 the Chinese authorities originally planned to cast copper cash coins in Tibet. Had this plan been carriedout, the Tibetan coinage could have become part of the Chinese currency system, however the plan was abandoned, as it wasfound to be too expensive to transport copper from China to Tibet and cast cash coinage in Lhasa (Xiao Huaiyuan, 1987).Between 1792 and 1836 the Tibetan currency was largely determined by the Chinese government in consultation withTibetan authorities and silver coins were struck to the sho (zho) standard (i.e. about 3.7 grams) in the denominations “halfsho”, “sho” and “tangka” in the 57th and 58th year of Qian Long (AD 1792 and 1793). The coins of the 57th year wereexperimental pieces inscribed only in Tibetan, the issues of the 58th and subsequent years were inscribed with Chineselegends on obverse and with Tibetan legends on reverse. Only in the 58th year of Qian Long a fourth denomination, ¾ sho(= half tangka), was struck, although such an issue was not mentioned in the above mentioned Imperial edict. During the59th year of Qian Long (1794) only very few half sho coins were struck along with one sho coins; the denominations ¾ shoand tangka were eliminated. A few silver coins of one sho were also struck in the 61st year of Qian Long (1796), who hadabdicated towards the end of his 60th year in power. By the time the news of his abdication reached Lhasa, some silver coinsof the 61st year had already been struck and released for circulation (Rhodes and Gabrisch, 1980). Further Sino-Tibetansilver coins of one sho were struck in the first six years of the Jia Qing era (1796-1801), as well as during the 8th and 9thyear (1803-04) and during the last two years of this reign, the 24th and 25th year (1819-20). During the Dao Guang era whichfollowed, silver coins were struck only in the first four years of this era (1821-24) and in the 15th and 16th year (1835-36).From 1840 until 1954, with Chinese influence weakening, the Tibetan Government decided on Tibet’s coinage systemwithout much interference by the Chinese Government; the coins of this period had only Tibetan inscriptions and designsand made no reference to China. The only incident which interrupted the production of purely Tibetan coins occurred duringthe short period of 1909 and 1910, when the Tibetan Government struck copper and silver coins dated to the first year of theXuan Tong era (1909) and in 1910 when the Chinese Amban (representative of the Imperial Chinese Government) in Lhasahad silver and copper coins struck with legends in Chinese and Tibetan; these are the only coins minted in Tibet which canbe considered as being part of the Chinese currency system of this period.The only coin types which were produced in Lhasa between 1840 and 1908 were silver coins struck to the tangka standardof the newly created “Ganden Tangka” type (Rhodes, 1983) and of the earlier “Kong Par Tangka” type. After theaforementioned interruption of the purely Tibetan coin production towards the end of the Qing dynasty (1909/10), the TibetanGovernment started producing a large selection of silver and copper coins in various denominations ranging from 2½ skarto 1 srang. Later, silver coins of higher denominations were introduced: 1½ and 3 srang (1933-1938 and 1946). From 1949until 1952 coins with the denomination “10 srang” were struck which contained only about 10% of silver; this is the highestdenomination coin released for regular circulation in Tibet.From 1918 until early 1921 gold coins of the denomination “20 tam srang” were struck in the Serkhang mint which waslocated near the summer residence of the Dalai Lamas, the Norbu Lingka. These gold coins did not circulate very much inTibet and were mainly used for storing wealth or were exported to India where a good profit could be obtained (Gabrisch,1990/1991). Silver coins of the “Gaden Tangka” design continued to be struck in the 20th Century in parallel with the variousother denominations mentioned above. The last Tibetan silver coin of this design was produced in 1953/54; this was a specialissue struck in fine silver for distribution to monks in the Lhasa area. These neatly machine struck coins were valued at fivesrang.From 1840 until 1932 Tibet’s coins were struck in different mints located in or near Lhasa by hand and later with water orman-powered locally made machines. Among the most important mints in the early 20th Century were one known by thename ´dod dpal (las khung) located in Shol, below the Potala, and one located about 12 kilometers north/northeast of Lhasain the Dode (dog bde or dog de) valley (Rhodes, 1978). Another important mint was located in Trabshi (4 kilometers northof Lhasa on the way to Sera monastery). This mint was modernised in the early 1930s, and all the machinery from the othermints was subsequently transferred to this establishment, which operated as the only Tibetan Government mint from 1932onwards. It had the official name Trabshi Lotrü Lekhung (grwa bzhi glog ´khrul las khung “Trabshi electric machinefactory”). Coins were struck by machines imported from England and from British India, first on an experimental basis in1928 and 1929 and then on a large scale from 1932 to 1938 and again from 1946 to 1954. The electric power for thesemachines was supplied by a hydro-electric power plant in the Dode valley which was set up between 1927 and 1928 withequipment imported from England in 1924.WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGDuring the years 1955 to 1959 no more coins were struck, but paper notes of 100 srang were still printed. By the middle of1959 the Chinese Government was introducing the Renminbi currency into Tibet. This was to replace the traditional Tibetanmoney and the dollars with the portrait of Yuan Shikai which the Chinese had introduced after 1951.Interior of the Tibetan mint Trabshi Lekhung. Photographed by F. Williamson, August 31st, 1933.2. Tibetan Currency UnitsTibet had a dual, and therefore complicated, system of currency units. One was imported from Nepal, its basic unit beingthe “tangka” (also called “trangka” “tam” or “tamga”; equivalent to about 5.4 to 5.6 grams of alloyed silver); the otherwas imported from China, its basic unit being the “srang” (Chinese liang, equivalent to 37.3 grams of silver). These twosystems were used in Tibet concurrently from about 1640 until 1959. The respective value was calculated as follows:1 srang = 6⅔ tangkas1 tangka = 1½ sho = 15 skar½ tangka = 7½ skar1 sho = ⅔ tangka = 10 skarThe subdivisions of the srang were as follows:1 srang = 10 sho = 100 skar1 sho = 10 skar1 srang was called srang gang1 sho was called zho gang2 sho were called zho doIn the 18th and 19th Centuries only silver coins of the following units were struck:½ sho½ tangka = ¾ sho1 sho1 tangkaThe small units of ½ sho and ½ tangka were only struck for circulation in small numbers in 1793. There exist ½ shocoins, dated Qian Long 59 which are extremely rare and most probably have to be considered as patterns.9


In the 20th Century the following units were struck:Copper:½ skar (skar che)1 skar⅛ sho¼ sho2½ skar (skar phyed gsum or kha gang)5 skar (skar lnga)7½ skar (skar phyed brgyad)1 sho (zho gang)3 sho (zho gsum)5 sho (zho lnga)Silver or billon:1 tangka1 sho2 sho5 sho1 srang (srang gang)1½ srang (srang gang zho lnga)3 srang5 srang (in limited numbers; this coin was also struck in copper)10 srangGold:20 srang (gser tam)THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET3. Dates on Tibetan CoinsThe Kong Par Tangkas and the coins which were struck during the 20th Century, excepting the Gaden Tangkas which areundated, are dated according to the Tibetan 60-year cycle which starts in 1026 when according to Tibetan tradition theKalacakra Tantra (dus kyi ‘khor lo) became known in Tibet. The first year of the first cycle is equivalent to the Western Year1027. The reckoning of years according to the 60 year cycles which goes back to Indian tradition was only established inTibet in the 13th Century (Schuh, 1973, p. 143).Except for the Sino-Tibetan coins, the early undated tangkas of the 18th Century and the undated Gaden Tangka issues, allTibetan coins are inscribed with the cycle and the year in which they were struck. Each cycle comprises of 60 years. The firstyear of the first cycle corresponds to the Western year AD 1027. In order to convert a cycle date of a Tibetan coin into awestern date one can use the following formula:Example (1 srang coin, dated 15-43): rab byung 15 lo 43 means that 14 complete cycles plus 43 years of the 15th cycle haveelapsed since the year 1026. This date can be converted as follows:(15 – 1)*60 + 43 + 1026 = AD 1909.One should be aware that the Tibetan year usually starts some time in February according to the Western calendar. Thereforethe coin of the above example cannot have been struck as early as January 1909, but may have been struck as late as Januaryor early February 1910.There exist 25 and 50 srang pattern coins which are dated according to rab lo which is short for rab byung lo. The rab losimply counts the total number of years which have passed since 1026. These coins are dated rab-lo 925. This date isconverted to the Western year on the 25 and 50 srang pattern coins, which are also inscribed with spyi lo 1951. By adding1026 to 925 one arrives at the Western year 1951. There also exist 5 srang copper coins which may be patterns as well, whichare dated rab lo 927 without indicating the equivalent Western year, which can be calculated as being 1953.WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGThe Sino-Tibetan coins are dated according to throne years of various imperial eras:Qian Long (58th, 59th, 60th and 61st year = 1793, 1794, 1795 and 1796);Jia Qing (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 24th and 25th year = 1796, 1797, 1798, 1799, 1800, 1801, 1803. 1804,1819 and 1820);Dao Guang (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 15th and 16th year = 1821, 1822, 1823, 1824, 1835 and 1836); andXuan Tong (1st year = A.D. 1909).Coin minting in the Dode Mint, located about 12 km north-east of Lhasa. From a film taken in ca.1930 bySonam Wangfel Laden La. The coin press was most probably made by the British firm Taylor & Challen andimported by the Tibetan Government in the 1920s. The Tibetans extended the arms of the press with twotubes in order to improve the leverage.Footnote:1For the last quarter of the 19th Century the use of gold dust tied up in little bags called sár-shu (gser shubs), weighing about90 grains (1 grain = 0.064799 gram) is reported for southern Tibetan areas bordering on Kumaon. Cf. Atkinson, Edwin T.:Himalayan Gazetteer, vol. 1, part 1, Reprint, New Delhi 1973, p. 277 (Originally published in Allahabad, 1882). A memberof the Younghusband expedition, which stayed in Lhasa in August 1904, reports that “little bags of gold dust” were still aform of Tibetan currency (O’Connor, 1940, p. 75). In 1813 Moorcoft describes similar bags filled with wash-gold dust asbeing imported from Hundes Desh (western Tibet) which he calls fitank and states that their weight is exactly 100 grains (i.e.6.48 grams) (British Library, 1813).11


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETWEDNESDAY 21 AUGUST 2013Commencing at 3.00 p.m.All Sales are subject to the Terms and Conditions for Buyers printed at the back of this catalogueEstimatesThe estimated selling price of each lot is printed below the lot description and does not include the Buyer’s Premium.Bidders should bear in mind that estimates are prepared well in advance of the sale and are not definitive.They are subject to revision.THE EARLIEST COINS STRUCK BY THE TIBETANS1 21 Tibet, Anonymous (1763/4 or 1785), vartula Tangka, 5.53g, the syllable “dza” invartula-script repeated eight times on both sides, with eight-spoked wheel in centre,obverse with double central circle (YZM. 252; KM. C#5.1), in PCGS holder, gradedXF45, very rarePROVENANCE:Ex. G.G.Richardson (June 1975)Only three specimens of this variety are known, including one in the “KunsthistorischesMuseum” in Vienna.On both sides the inscription represents eight times the syllable “dza” in vartula-script(equivalent to the syllable “ja” in Sanskrit). “ja” may be short for jaya (victorious).Together with the wheel with eight spokes in the centre the meaning would be“victorious wheel”, referring to the teaching of the Buddha or more specifically to thedharma cakra (Tibetan chos ‘khor), the wheel of religion which according to Buddhisttradition was set in motion by Buddha in the deer park of Sarnath, near varanasi(Benares). Chinese sources report that the first coins were struck in Tibet in 1763/4 andin 1785 and this coin has been been tentatively attributed to the years 1763/4, 1785 orto the early 19th Century (Martynov, A. S.: “O pervych chekankakh monety v Tibete”Kratkie Soobshcheniia Akademia Nauk SSSR, Institut Narodoz Azji, no. 69, Moscow,1965, p. 197-202).The attribution of this Tangka to 1763/4 (first Demo Tulku Regent) was favoured byNicholas Rhodes (see “The first coins struck in Tibet”, Tibet Journal, vol. 15, no. 4,Dharamsala 1990, p. 56-63). The present cataloguer suggested an attribution to theregency of the second Demo Tulku in the early 19th Century, since the syllable “dza” invartula-script on the coin is very similar to the one which was engraved on the uppermargin of the seal of the second Demo Tulku when he took office in AD 1811 (seeBertsch, Wolfgang: “Some Difficulties in Dating an Early Tibetan Coin,” NumismaticsInternational Bulletin (NIB), vol. 25, no. 8, Dallas, August 1990, p. 184-185 andBertsch, Wolfgang and Gabrisch, Karl: “Some varieties of Tibet’s First Struck Coins,”NIB, vol. 20, no. 6, Dallas, June 1986, p. 125-128).2 Tibet, Anonymous (1763/4 or 1785), vartula Tangka, 5.42g, the syllable “dza” invartula-script repeated eight times, with eight-spoked wheel in centre, both sides withdouble central circle (YZM. 253; KM. C#5.3), in PCGS holder, graded XF40, very rarePROVENANCE:Ex. Karl Gabrisch Collection, Baldwin’s Auctions Ltd, Ma Tak Wo Numismatic Co.Ltd, Monetarium (S) Pte Ltd and Ronald G. Gillio Auction, Hong Kong, 1 September2005, lot 134.This sale included the Nepalese and Tibetan coins of the collection of Karl Gabrisch.The only known specimen in private hands. One similar piece is in the coin cabinet of the“Kunsthistorisches Museum” in Vienna.HK$15,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)HK$15,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG33 (x2)3 Tibet, Anonymous (1763/4 or 1785), Shri Mangalam Tangka, 5.36g, quatrefoil withina square frame, with small central circle in centre and bead within each petal and betweenthe petals, this within a design of four lozenge-shaped hexagons each containing twofloral motifs made up of eight beads and one of the syllables of the legend shri mam galam, plain circle with beads around, rev. eight-petalled flower with a bead in central circleand beads between each petal, these within a circular border to which eight petals areattached, each containing one of the syllables of the reverse legend dga’ ldan phyo(gs) lasrnam par rgyal ba, short arrows between the upper part of the petals with a plain circle ofbeads around (YZM. 259 this coin; KM. C#10.1?), in PCGS holder, graded XF40,extremely rarePROVENANCE:Ex. Karl Gabrisch Collection, Baldwin, Ma Tak Wo, Monetarium & Gillio Auction,Hong Kong, 1 September 2005, lot 136.This Tangka is known as “Shri Mangalam Tangka” owing to its obverse inscription whichis “shri mam ga lam”, a Sanskrit term meaning “Good luck”. The reverse inscription:“dga’ ldan phyo(gs) las rnam par rgyal ba” (“Gaden [Palace] completely victorious in alldirections”) is a reference to the form of Tibetan Government which was established bythe 5th Dalai Lama in 1642. The central part of the reverse has a flower with eight petalswhich can also be interpreted as representing the eight spokes of the dharma cakra, theBuddhist “wheel of religion” or “wheel of law.”Most of the design elements on this coin were copied from Nepalese coins of the Mallaperiod. The obverse is a very close copy of an undated Mohar in the name ofMahipatendra Malla which was struck in about 1669 (RGV 266).This undated coin has been ascribed to the years 1763/4 or 1785.HK$30,000-40,000(US$4,000-5,000)13


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET44 Tibet, Anonymous (1763/4 or 1785), Su Cakra Vijaya Tangka, 5.0g, inscription inTibetan Seal Script su cakra vijaya within a wheel with eight diamond-shaped spokes, thediamonds not joined to the brackets either side (YZM. 255; KM. C#A10), very fine andrareThis Tangka is referred to as “Su cakra vijaya”-Tangka, according to the inscription whichappears in the centre of both obverse and reverse in Tibetan Seal Script (Tibetan: “horyig”). These Sanskrit words have the meaning “Victorious wheel”. The design of the coinrepresents the dharma cakra (Tibetan chos ‘khor, “wheel of law” or “wheel of religion”)which has eight spokes, referring to the “eightfold path” an important element of theteachings of the Buddha. This undated coin has been ascribed to the years 1763/4 or1785HK$11,000-14,000(US$1,500-2,000)NEPALESE COINS ADAPTED FOR TIBET655 Nepal for Tibet, Jaya Prakash Malla, Mohar, 5.27g, NS 856 (AD 1736), Half-Mohar,3.30g, within central circle trident and legend in four lines: shri 2 ja/ya pra/ka sha/ma lla,eight Buddhist auspicious symbols between inner and outer circle, rev. garlanded swordand legend in five lines within octagonal frame: shri2/ma hi/pa te/ndra ma lla/856,surrounded by eight lotus leaves containing legend (starting at 12 o’clock and readingclockwise): Nepales vara rajendra (RGV 327), about fine (2)Large quantities of these alloyed silver coins (ca. 66% silver) were exported to Tibet wheremany of them were cut in order to obtain small change. The Half-Mohurs circulated atthe value of 7½-Skar.6 Nepal for Tibet, Ranjit Malla cut Half-Mohar, 2.76g, NS 842 (AD 1722) legend (onlypartly visible; within cartouche): Shri, shri jaya ra na ji ta ma lla de va 842, damaru(double drum) above and pseudo-script on either side of the cartouche, rev. trident withribbon in centre, surrounded by circle; sword and garland (not visible) and pseudo-scriptbetween central circle and outer circle of beads (RGV 564 for whole coin), very fine.Huge quantities of this coin type from Bhadgaon were exported to Tibet where they werereferred to as nag tam (black Tangka), since owing to their low silver content they turnedblack with use.This half coin circulated as 7½-Skar coin and has not further been cut down. Since thisMohar does not feature eight fleurets like most other mohars exported by Nepal to Tibet,it was not very suitable for cutting into fractions and is therefore seldom found in the formof cut pieces.WWW.SPINK.COMHK$600-800(US$80-100)HK$400-500(US$50-70)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG787 Nepal for Tibet, Pratap Simha, cut fractional Mohars (2), 1.46g and 1.50g, the first inthe shape of half moon with five fleurets represents 1-Sho, the second with three fleurets,dated SE 1697 (AD 1755), represents 5-Skar or Half-Sho (YZM -; KM -), very fine (2)In these examples the first has been halved and then further trimmed around the edge andthe middle part cut out, leaving the design of the five fleurets (petals) intact.The second fraction has been cut once and then further reduced in size, by cutting offtwo corners. The silver parts which were cut off after dividing the mohars were kept bythe silver smith as payment for his work.The fractions which were the result of a simple cut and were not further trimmed mostprobably had the same value as those which had further parts cut away. What counted inorder to establish the value of a fragment was the number of fleurets. Three fleuretsindicated a piece worth 5-Skar, 4 fleurets a piece worth 7½-Skar and 5 fleurets a pieceworth one sho. The whole Mohar which was equal to one Tibetan Tangka was calledgchod tam which means “Tangka for cutting” (see next lot no. 8 for a whole Mohar).The Chinese numismatist Wang Haiyan argued that the fragments were assigned differentvalues according to how much they were trimmed after the first division of the Mohar(Wang Haiyan: “Qing dai zai xi zang liu tong de jian sui de ni bo er yin bi” (“The CutNepalese Silver Coins Circulated during the Qing Dynasty”). Wen Wu, 1985, issue 11,pp. 92-95). Nicholas Rhodes and the cataloguer have doubts about this assumption,arguing that such a complicated system would have been impractible in the markets(Bertsch, Wolfgang and Rhodes, Nicholas: “The Use of Cut Coins in Tibet”. TibetJournal, vol. 35, no. 3, autumn 2010, p. 19-40).The journalist Perceval Landon gives a vivid description of how the cut Mohars were usedin the market which the Tibetans had set up in August 1904 near the Lhasa camp of theYounghusband Mission:“I was pleased to watch Sikhs and Pathans cheerfully haggling for some coveted sugarplum, sitting down on their heels for half-an-hour to cheapen it an anna, and then, afterthey had made their bargain, looking a bewildered way at the little irregularly shapedscraps of silver which the voluble Tibetaness had given them in change. For in Lhasa a‘Tangka’ has a hole gouged in the middle, has its corners filed off, and is then cut acrossthe middle without ceasing to be legal tender” (Landon, Perceval: The Opening of Tibet.An Account of Lhasa and the Country and People of Central Tibet and of the Progress of theMission sent there by the English Government in the year 1903-04. New York, 1906, p. 370).8 Nepal for Tibet, Pratap Simha, Mohar, 5.45g, NS 1697, cut fractional Mohars (3)(3.83g, 2.72g and 1.75g), representing the value of 1-Sho (5 petals), 7½-Skar (fourpetals) and 5-Skar (3 petals) of the same ruler and same date, legend within square: Shrishri shri Pra-/tapa/si-mha/saha deva, date 1697 below, rev. legend: sri sri sriGorakhanatha (placed in the eight petals) and sri sri Guhyesh vari (within central circle)very fine (4)The fragments are cut in a straight line and are not further trimmed.HK$400-500(US$50-70)HK$750-950(US$100-120)15


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET9 109 Nepal for Tibet, Pratap Simha, cut fractional Mohars (3) (2.85g, 2.34g and 1.79g), NS16??, the larger piece with five petals (1-Sho), the second with four petals (7½-Skar), thesmaller piece with three petals (5-Skar), all cut straight across, the second with cornersalso removed, very fine (3)10 Nepal for Tibet, Pratap Simha, cut fractional Mohars (3) (2.04g, 1.10g and 0.84g), NS16??, the larger piece with five petals (1-Sho), the second with four petals (7½-Skar), thesmaller piece with three petals (5-Skar), all trimmed around the edge with central partscut out, the second with corners also removed, very fine (3)HK$500-750(US$70-100)HK$500-750(US$70-100)SINO-TIBETAN COINS,ISSUED UNDER JOINT CHINESE AND TIBETAN AUTHORITYThe Sino Tibetan coins in the name of Qian Long have the following obverse inscription (reads crosswise, up to down and rightto left): qian long bao zang (Tibet money of Qian Long). The reverse legend is a Tibetan transcription of the Chinese legend andreads crosswise: chan lung pa ’u gtsang.Apart from the inscription all the coins of the Qian Long and Dao Guang era and most of the issues of the Jia Qing era bear fourdesign elements on both sides which can be interpreted as “lion’s snout”, stylised clouds or as lingzhi mushrooms (GanodermaLucidum).Normally Sino-Tibetan coins of the Qian Long, Jia Qing and Dao Guang eras are struck in medal alignment.11 1211 Tibet, Qian Long (1735-96), Tangka, 5.60g, 58th year, large size (diameter c.29mm),32 beads, divided into four groups of eight beads on both sides, date reads clockwise,starting at 9 o’clock near the rim: nian wu shi ba (year fifty eight), rev. Tibetan date readsclockwise, starting at 12 o’clock near the rim: lnga bcu nga brgyad (fifty-eight) (YZM 71-78; KM. C#73), very fine and rare, seldom found in such a superb condition HK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,300)12 Tibet, Qian Long, Tangka, 5.61g, 58th year, small size (diameter c.27mm), 24 beads,divided into four groups of six beads on both sides (YZM 67-70; KM. C#73.1), aboutvery fine and rareHK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,300)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG13 14 1513 Tibet, Qian Long, Tangka, 5.04g, 58th year, small size (diameter c.27mm), 24 beads,divided into four groups of six beads on both sides (YZM 67-70; KM. C#73.1), fine andrare14 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.71g, 58th year, very small size (diameter c.24mm), 24 beadsdivided into four groups of 6 beads, rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of sevenbeads, reverse die struck in inverted position in relation to the obverse die (YZM -; KM.C#72.1 var; LM 638 var), very fine and very rare in this size15 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.74g, 58th year, small size (diameter c.24mm), 24 beads,divided into four groups of six beads on both sides (YZM 54-57; KM. C#72.1; LM 638),in PCGS holder, very fine and scarceHK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,300)HK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,300)HK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,300)161716 Tibet, Qian Long, ¾-Sho (Half-Tangka), 2.57g, 58th year, four groups of six beads onboth sides (YZM 52; KM. C#66.1; LM 638A), very fine and rare17 Tibet, Qian Long, ½-Sho, 1.87g, 58th year, 24 beads, rev. 20 beads (YZM -; KM. C#71var; LM 638B var), a loop has been removed, in PCGS holder, very rare with this beadcombination, good very finePROVENANCE:Ex Wesley Halpert collection Spink, New York, 11 December 2000, lot 89.HK$23,000-30,000(US$3,000-4,000)HK$38,000-42,000(US$5,000-6,000)1819 2018 Tibet, Qian Long, ½-Sho, 1.94g, 58th year, 24 beads on both sides (YZM 47-51;KM. C#71; LM 638B), very fine and rare19 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.99g, 58th year, large variety (c.26-27mm), 32 beads onboth sides, divided into four groups of eight beads (YZM 47-51; KM. C#72; LM 636),some edge weakness, very fine20 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.78g, 58th year, large variety (c.26-27mm), 32 beads onboth sides, divided into four groups of eight beads (YZM 47-51; KM. C#72; LM 636),very fineHK$23,000-30,000(US$3,000-4,000)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)17


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET2122 2321 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.22g, 58th year, large variety (c.26-27mm), 32 beads onboth sides, divided into four groups of eight beads (YZM 47-51; KM. C#72; LM 636),fine22 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.54g, 58th year, small variety (c.25mm), 32 beads on bothsides, divided into four groups of eight beads (YZM 47-51; KM. C#72; LM 636), veryfine23 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.48g, 58th year, large variety (26-27mm), 32 beads on bothsides, divided into four groups of eight beads (YZM 47-51; KM. C#72; LM 636),scratched both sides, fineHK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$3,000-4,000(US$350-550)24 25 2624 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.77g, 58th year, small variety (c.25mm), 32 beads on bothsides, divided into four groups of eight beads (YZM 47-51; KM. C#72; LM 636), fine25 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.67g, 58th year, 32 beads on both sides, divided into fourgroups of eight beads (YZM 47-51; KM. C#72; LM 636), one obverse scratch, about veryfine26 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 58th year, large variety (26-27mm), 32 beads on bothsides, divided into four groups of seven beads, rev. modern countermark punched with aTibetan iron seal, reading nor bu (“Jewel”) (YZM 47-51; KM. C#72; LM 636), very fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$1,500-2,000(US$200-250)27 28 2927 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 59th year, large variety (26-27mm), 32 beads on bothsides, date reads clockwise, starting at 9 o’ clock near the rim: nian wu shi jiu (year fiftynine), rev. Tibetan date reads clockwise, starting at 12 o’clock near the rim: lnga bcu ngadgu (fifty nine) (YZM 80-83; KM. C#72; LM 638B), very fine.28 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.33g, 59th year, large variety (26-27mm), 32 beads on bothsides (YZM 80-83; KM. C#72; LM 638B), fine29 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.33g, 59th year, large variety (26-27mm), 32 beads on bothsides (YZM 80-83; KM. C#72; LM 638B), fineHK$6,000-8,000(US$750-1,000)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG30 313230 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.74g, 59th year, small variety (c.25mm), 32 beads on bothsides (YZM 80-83; KM. C#72; LM 638B), very fine31 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.24g, 59th year, small variety (c.25mm), 28 beads on bothsides (YZM 85-88; KM. C#72; LM 638B), reverse planchet crack, with some weak areas,fine32 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 59th year, large variety (26-27mm), 28 beads on bothsides (YZM 85-88; KM. C#72; LM 638B), very fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)3334 3533 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.58g, 59th year, large variety (26-27mm), 28 beads on bothsides (YZM 85-88; KM. C#72; LM 638B), planchet crack on reverse, fine34 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 2.91g, 59th year, smallest variety for this type (c.24mm), 28beads on both sides (YZM 85-88; KM. C#72; LM 638B), fineThe coin is outside the usual weight range and size for this type, but appears to begenuine.35 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.96g, 59th year, large variety (26-27mm), 28 beads on bothsides (YZM 85-88; KM. C#72; LM 638B), very fine/extremely fineHK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,300)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)36 37 3836 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.57g, 60th year, 30 beads, divided into two groups of sevenand one group of 16 beads, date reads clockwise near the rim, starting at 9 o’clock: nianliu shi (year sixty), rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of seven beads, Tibetan datereads clockwise near the rim, starting at 12 o’clock: dgu cu tham pa (sixtieth) (YZM 92-104 var; KM. C#72 var; LM -), very fine HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)37 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.81g, 60th year, 30 beads, divided into two groups of sevenand one group of 16 beads, rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of seven beads (YZM92-104; KM. C#72; LM -), good very fine HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)38 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.95g, 60th year, 30 beads, divided into two groups of sevenand one group of 16 beads, rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of seven beads (YZM92-104; KM. C#72; LM -), with some coloured paste on obverse, about very fine HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)19


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET39404139 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.72g, 60th year, 30 beads, divided into two groups of sevenand one group of 16 beads, rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of seven beads (YZM92-104; KM. C#72; LM -), very fine HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)40 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.05g, 60th year, 30 beads, divided into two groups of sevenand one group of 16 beads, rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of seven beads (YZM92-104, KM. C#72, LM -), fine HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)41 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.62g, 60th year, 30 beads, divided into two groups of sevenand one group of 16 beads, rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of seven beads (YZM92-104; KM. C#72; LM -), about very fine HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)424342 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.56g, 60th year, 30 beads, divided into two groups of sevenand one group of 16 beads, rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of seven beads (YZM92-104; KM. C#72; LM -), reverse planchet crack, good fine HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)43 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.75g, 60th year, 30 beads, divided into two groups of sevenand one group of 16 beads, rev. 28 beads, divided into four groups of seven beads (YZM92-104; KM. C#72; LM -), very fine HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)44 45 4644 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.44g, 60th year, large variety (27mm), 24 beads, divided intotwo groups of six and one group of 12 beads, rev. 24 beads, divided into four groups ofsix beads (YZM 105-115; KM. C#72.2; LM 640), loop removed from edge, fine45 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.97g, 60th year, large variety (27mm), 24 beads, divided intotwo groups of six and one group of 12 beads, rev. 24 beads, divided into four groups ofsix beads (YZM 105-115; KM. C#72.2; LM 640), very fine46 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.69g, 60th year, large variety (27mm), 24 beads, divided intotwo groups of six and one group of 12 beads, rev. 24 beads, divided into four groups ofsix beads (YZM 105-115; KM. C#72.2; LM 640), very fineWWW.SPINK.COMHK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-650)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG484748 (x1.5)47 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.62g, 60th year, large variety (28mm), 24 beads, divided intotwo groups of six and one group of 12 beads, rev. 24 beads, divided into four groups ofsix beads (YZM 105-115; KM. C#72.2; LM 640), very fine48 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.49g, 61st year, 24 beads on both sides, date reads clockwise,starting at 9 o’clock near the rim: nian liu shi yi (year sixty-one), rev. Tibetan date readsclockwise, starting at 12 o’clock near the rim: dgu cu re gcig (sixty-one) (YZM 116; KM.C#72.2; LM 640A var), in PCGS holder, graded XF 45, very fine and very rareThe Qian Long Emperor abdicated in favour of his son at the end of the 60th year of hisreign. By the time the news about his abdication reached Lhasa, the mint had started toproduce coins with the date 61 (Rhodes, 1975).The rare Sino-Tibetan coins of Qian Long, 61st year, form the subject of the short story“Vagabond Spirit” by the Chinese author Ma Yuan (born in 1953). See Ma Yuan: Balladof the Himalaya: stories of Tibet, translated by Herbert J. Batt, MerwinAsia Publishing,Portland, Me., 2011.See also: http://merwinasia.com/Reviews/balad_of_the_himalayas_excerpts.phpHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$23,000-30,000(US$3,000-4,000)4949 (x1.5)49 Tibet, Qian Long, 1-Sho, 3.74g, 61st year, 36 beads on both sides, date reads clockwise,starting at 9 o’clock near the rim: nian liu shi yi (year sixty-one), rev. Tibetan date readsclockwise, starting at 12 o’clock near the rim: dgu cu re gcig (sixty-one) (YZM 117; KM.C#72.2; LM 640A), in PCGS holder, graded XF, very fine and very rareHK$23,000-30,000(US$3,000-4,000)21


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET50 5150 Tibet, Jia Qing (1796-1820), 1-Sho, 3.69g, 1st year, date near the rim: nian yuan (firstyear), the first character at 6 o’clock, the second at 12 o’clock), rev. Tibetan date: dangpo (first), the first character at 12 o’clock and the second at 6 o’clock (YZM 120, 121 and124-125; KM. C# 83.1; LM 641 var), very fine and scarce HK$6,000-9,000(US$800-1,000)The Sino Tibetan coins in the name of Jia Qing have the following obverse inscription(reads crosswise, up to down and right to left): jia qing bao zang (Tibet money of JiaQing). The reverse legend is a Tibetan transcription of the Chinese legend and readscrosswise: bca’ ‘chin pa ’u gtsang.51 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.71g, 1st year, legends as before (YZM 120,121 and 124-125;KM. C# 83.1; LM 641 var), small obverse flan crack at 11 o’clock, about very fine, scarceHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)5252 (x1.5)52 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.73g, 2nd year, date near the rim: nian er (second year),the first character at 9 o’clock, the second at 3 o’clock), rev. Tibetan date: gnyis pa(second), the first character at 12 o’clock and the second at 6 o’clock (YZM 126; KM.C#83.1; LM 641A; Wang Chun Li, WS0211, this coin), in PCGS holder, graded XF45,extremely rareHK$75,000-100,000(US$10,000-15,000)Out of three known specimens this is by far the finest in existence.WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG5353 (x1.5)53 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.64g, 4th year, date near the rim: nian si (fourth year), the firstcharacter at 6 o’clock, the second at 12 o’clock), rev. Tibetan date: bzhi pa (fourth), thefirst character at 12 o’clock and the second at 6 o’clock (YZM 128; KM. C#83.1; LM641B), in PCGS holder, graded XF45, very rarePROVENANCE:Ex. Wesley Halpert collection, Spink, New York, 11 December 2000, lot 95.At that time one of only four known.The coins with the rare dates 4, 5 and 6 of the Jia Qing era were first published byBertsch, Wolfgang, Gabrisch, Karl and Rhodes, Nicholas: “A Study of Sino-Tibetan Coinsof the Chia Ch’ing Era.” Journal of East Asian Numismatics, vol. 2, no. 4, Summer 1995,p. 23-34.Apart from the rare coins in the Rhodes collection a Half-Sho and a Sho of year 3 and aHalf-Sho of year 6 of the Jia Qing era exist.HK$60,000-75,000(US$8,000-10,000)5454 (x1.5)54 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.43g, 5th year, date near the rim: nian wu (fifth year), the firstcharacter at 6 o’clock, the second at 12 o’clock), rev. Tibetan date: lnga pa (fifth), thefirst character at 12 o’clock and the second at 6 o’clock (YZM 129; KM. C#83.1; LM641C), in PCGS holder, very fine and very rareHK$60,000-75,000(US$8,000-10,000)23


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET555655 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.58g, 6th year, date near the rim: nian liu (sixth year), the firstcharacter at 9 o’clock, the second at 3 o’clock), rev. Tibetan legend ca’ chin/’khri bzhugs(Jia Qing throne honorable) in three lines in the centre flanked by two columns ofManchurian script: menggun/ningun (“silver money/six”), reading the left column ofscript first, Tibetan date near the rim: gung lo drug pa (honourable year sixth), the firstcharacter at 12 o’clock, the second at 9 o’clock, the third at 3 o’clock and the last at 6o’clock (YZM 132; KM. C#85; LM 641D), in PCGS holder, graded VF30, fine and veryrarePROVENANCE:Ex. Wesley Halpert collection, Spink, New York, 11 December 2000, lot 97.This is the only Tibetan coin which has legends in three different scripts of three differentlanguages: Chinese, Tibetan and Manchurian. A free translation of the complete Tibetanlegend reads “The sixth honorable throne year of Jia Qing.”56 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.62g, 8th year, 21 beads, 10 in top section, 11 below, date nearthe rim: nian ba (eighth year), the first character at 9 o’clock, the second at 3 o’clock, rev.20 beads, 10 both sides of date, Tibetan legend reads “bca’ ” (three letters) instead of“ca’ ” (two letters), date: brgyad pa (eighth), the first character at 12 o’clock and thesecond at 6 o’clock (YZM 135 var; KM. C#83.3; LM -), about very fine, rare legendvariantPROVENANCE:Ex G.E.Chapman collection, acquired by Nicholas Rhodes in 1978 (see letter byNicholas Rhodes to Carlo Valdettaro, dated Kingston-upon Thames 24.3.1978).The coins of year 8, 9, 24 and 25 of the Jia Qing era are known struck from manydifferent dies which can easily be distinguished by counting the number of beads whichare placed near the rim on both sides of the coins.The coins of years 8 and 9 do not have the four “cloud” ornaments on the obverse thatcan be seen on all other Sino-Tibetan coins of the Qian Long, Jia Qing and Dao Guangeras.HK$45,000-60,000(US$6,000-8,000)HK$15,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)57 5857 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.70g, 8th year, 20 beads, 12 in top section, 11 below, date asbefore, rev. 25 beads, 12 to left, 13 to right of date, Tibetan legend reads “bca’ ” (threeletters) instead of “ca’ ” (two letters), date as before ( YZM 135 var; KM C#83.3;LM -), toned very fine/about very fine, rare legend variant58 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.66g, 8th year, 27 beads, 13 in top section, 14 below, date asbefore, rev. 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ” (two letters), dateas before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), flan slightly bent, about very fineand scarce, coins of the 8th and 9th year of Jia Qing era are seldom found in such a goodconditionHK$15,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)HK$9,000-11,000(US$1,000-1,200)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG59 60 6159 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.42g, 8th year, 27 beads, 13 in top section, 14 below, date asbefore, rev. 21 beads, 11 to left and 10 to right of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ” (twoletters), date as before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), good fine and scarce60 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.54g, 8th year, 27 beads, 13 in top section, 14 below, date asbefore, rev. 25 beads, 13 to left and 12 to right of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ” (twoletters), date as before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), about fine and scarce61 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 8th year, 26 beads, 12 in top section, 14 below, date asbefore, rev. 24 beads, 12 both sides of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ” (two letters), dateas before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), a little bent with some rim damage,good fine and scarceHK$6,000-7,500(US$700-900)HK$6,000-7,500(US$700-900)HK$6,000-7,500(US$700-900)62 6362 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.62g, 8th year, 27 beads, 14 in top section, 13 below, date asbefore, rev. 25 beads, 13 to left and 12 to right of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ” (twoletters), date as before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), about very fine andscarce63 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.62g, 8th year, 27 beads, 14 in top section, 13 below, date asbefore, rev. 25 beads, 13 to left and 12? to right of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ” (twoletters), date as before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), some edge weakness,about very fine and scarceHK$6,000-7,500(US$700-900)HK$6,000-7,500(US$700-900)64 65 6664 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 8th year, 27 beads, 14 in top section, 13 below, date asbefore, rev. 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ” (two letters), dateas before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), flan a little bent, about very fineand scarce65 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.53g, 8th year, 27 beads, 14 in top section, 13 below, date asbefore, rev. 29 beads, 14? on left and 15 on right side of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ”(two letters), date as before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), good fine andscarce66 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.76g, 8th year, 28 beads, 14 in both sections, date as before,rev. 27 beads, 13 to left and 14 to right of date, Tibetan legend reads “ca’ ” (two letters),date as before (YZM 136-144; KM. C#83.2; LM 642 var), fine and scarce25HK$6,000-7,500(US$700-900)HK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)HK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET6768 6967 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.66g, 9th year, 27 beads, 14 in top section, 13 below, date nearthe rim: nian jiu (ninth year), the first character at 9 o’clock, the second at 3 o’clock, rev.31 beads, 16 to left and 15 to right of date, Tibetan date: dgu pa (ninth), the firstcharacter at 12 o’clock and the second at 6 o’clock (YZM 145-154; KM. C#83.2; LM644 var), fine and scarce HK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)68 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 9th year, 27 beads, 14 in top section, 13 below, date asbefore, rev. 31 beads, 16 to left and 15 to right of date, date as before (YZM 145-154;KM. C#83.2; LM 644 var), scratch on reverse, very good, scarce69 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.85g, 9th year, 28 beads, 14 in both sections, date as before,rev. 31 beads, 16 to left and 15 to right of date, date as before (YZM 145-154; KM.C#83.2; LM 644 var), traces of coloured powder on reverse, good fine and scarceHK$3,000-4,000(US$350-550)HK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)70 7170 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.69g, 9th year, 29 beads, 14 in top section, 15 below, date asbefore, rev. 27 beads, 14 to left and 13 to right of date, date as before (YZM 145-154;KM. C#83.2; LM 644 var), good fine and scarce71 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.55g, 9th year, 29 beads, 14 in top section, 15 below, date asbefore, rev. 30 beads, 16 to left and 14 to right of date, date as before (YZM 145-154;KM. C#83.2; LM 644 var), very fine and scarceHK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)HK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)72 73 7472 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.44g, 9th year, 29 beads, 13 in top section, 16 below, date asbefore, rev. 30 beads, 15 both sides of date, date as before (YZM 145-154; KM. C#83.2;LM 644 var), holed twice at 12 o’clock, good fine and scarce73 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 9th year, 27 beads, 14 in top section, 13 below, date asbefore, rev. 31 beads, 16 to left and 15 to right of date, date as before (YZM 145-154;KM. C#83.2; LM 644 var), a few weak areas, good fine and scarce74 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.72g, 9th year, 34 beads, 17 in each section, date as before, rev.33 beads, 17 to left and 16 to right of date, date as before (YZM 145-154; KM. C#83.2;LM 644 var), good fine and scarceHK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)HK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)HK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG757675 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.48g, 24th year, 24 beads both sides, six beads in each quarter,date near the rim: nian er shi si (24th year), the first character at 9 o’clock, the second at12 o’clock, the third at 6 o’clock and the last at 3 o’clock, rev. Tibetan date nyi shu rtsabzhi (twenty-fourth), reads clockwise around the rim from 12 o’clock (YZM 155-162;KM. C#83.1; LM 645 var), about very fine and scarceProbably all coins dated to the 24th year of Jia Qing era have 24 beads on both sides,which are divided into four groups of six beads each. This is the case with the five coinsof this date from the collection of Nicholas Rhodes which are struck with four differentChinese (obverse) dies which can easily be distinguished by focusing on the different wayof writing the character “qing” (south-position).The coins of Jia Qing era year 24 and 25 have the first Tibetan syllable on reverse speltwith three letters: bca’76 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.70g, 24th year, legends as before (YZM 155-162; KM.C#83.1; LM 645 var), some weak areas, about very fine and scarceHK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)HK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)777877 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.63g, 24th year, legends as before (YZM 155-162; KM.C#83.1; LM 645 var), some scratches on reverse, good fine, scarce78 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.70g, 24th year, legends as before (YZM 161; KM. C#83.1;LM 645 var), has been folded and re-flattened, fine and scarceHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)79 8079 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.66g, 25th year, 24 beads both sides, six beads in each quarter,date near the rim: nian er shi wu (25th year), reads clockwise from 9 o’clock, rev. Tibetandate nyi shu rtsa lnga (twenty-fifth), reads clockwise around the rim from 12 o’clock(YZM 165-202; KM. C#83.1; LM 646 var), die crack, otherwise about very fineThe coins dated 25th year of Jia Qing era generally feature 24 beads near the rim on theobverse, divided into four groups of six beads each; the same goes for the reverse. Thebead in the 2 o’clock position on reverse is mostly elongated (drop shaped) which may bea secret mark. Although they are the most common Sino-Tibetan coins they are rarelyfound in good condition.80 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.66g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), very fineHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)27


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET81 8281 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.66g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), some edge damage at 11 o’clock, very fine82 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.71g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), about very fineHK$3,000-4,000(US$350-450)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)83 8483 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.72g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), very fine84 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.64g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), some scratches, about very fineHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)85 8685 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.58g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), scratch on reverse, good fine86 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), some areas of weakness, very fineHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)878887 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.69g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), some adhesion on flan, very fine and rare in this condition88 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.73g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), edge crack, good very fineHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG89 9089 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.74g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), some edge weakness, good fine90 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.74g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), good fineHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)91 92 9391 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.57g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), small scratches on reverse, good fine92 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.69g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), toned, good fine93 Tibet, Jia Qing, 1-Sho, 3.72g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202; KM.C#83.1; LM 646 var), tiny edge crack at 3 o’clock, very fineHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$3,000-4,000(US$350-450)94 9594 Tibet, Jia Qing, 25th year, 1-Sho, 3.70g, 25th year, legends as before (YZM 165-202;KM. C#83.1; LM 646 var), about very fine95 Tibet, Dao Guang (1821-50), 1-Sho, 3.77g, 1st year, 26 beads, 13 both sides of date,date near the rim: nian yuan (1st year), the first character at 6 o’clock, the second at 12o’clock, rev. 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, Tibetan date: dang po (first), the firstcharacter at 12 o’clock and the second at 6 o’clock (YZM 203-207; KM. C#93; LM 647var), about very fine and scarceThe Sino Tibetan coins in the name of Dao Guang have the following obverse inscription(reads crosswise, up to down and right to left): dao guang bao zang (Tibet money of DaoGuang). The reverse legend is a Tibetan transcription of the Chinese legend and readscrosswise: rda’o kwong pa ’u gtsang.HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)29


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET96 9796 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.66g, 1st year, 26 beads, 13 both sides of date, rev. 28beads, 14 both sides, legends as before (YZM 203-207; KM. C#93; LM 647 var), goodfine and scarce97 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.73g, 1st year, 26 beads, 13 both sides of date, rev. 28beads, 14 both sides, legends as before (YZM 203-207; KM. C#93; LM 647 var), veryfine and scarceHK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)HK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)9899 10098 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.71g, 1st year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, one beadabove the lower right stroke of the character yuan, rev. 28 beads, 14 both sides, legendsas before (YZM 203-207; KM. C#93; LM 647 var), very fine and scarce99 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.76g, 2nd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, date nearthe rim: nian er (2nd year), the first character at 6 o’clock, the second at 12 o’clock, rev.26 beads, 13 both sides, Tibetan date: gnyis pa (second), the first character at 12 o’clockand the second at 6 o’clock (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), good fineNearly all coins of this date feature an elongated dot (drop shape) on reverse at the 3o’clock position.100 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.64g, 2nd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), veryfineHK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)101 102101 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.65g, 2nd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), veryfine102 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 2nd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), veryfineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG103 104103 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.62g, 2nd year, 27 beads, 14 on left and 13 on right of date,rev. 26 beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var),holed at 12 o’clock, good fine104 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.69g, 2nd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), veryfineHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)105 106 107105 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 2nd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), fine106 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.78g, 2nd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), aboutvery fine107 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.71g, 2nd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), flan alittle bent, good fineHK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,200-5,200(US$550-750)HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)108 109108 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.57g, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26 beads, 13 bothsides, legends as before (YZM 208-225; KM. C#93; LM 648 var), fine109 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.78g, 3rd year, 30 beads, 15 both sides of date, nian san(3rd year), the first character at 6 o’clock, the second at 12 o’clock, rev. 26 beads, 13 bothsides, Tibetan date: gsum pa (third), the first character at 12 o’clock and the second at 6o’clock (YZM 226-233; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), fineMany coins of this date have an elongated dot (drop shape) in the 1 o’clock position ofthe reverse.31HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET110 111110 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.75g, 3rd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 226-233; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), goodvery fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)111 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.76g, 3rd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, small crossto the right of the character dao, rev. 26 beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM230; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), in PCGS holder, graded XF45, rare HK$15,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)Very dangerous forgeries of this rare variety have been sold on e-bay during the last twoyears.112 113112 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.73g, 3rd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, standard legends (YZM 226-233; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), somecorrosion on obverse, very fine113 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.80g, 3rd year, 30 beads, 15 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 226-233; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), aboutvery fineHK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)114 115114 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.81g, 3rd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 226-233; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), fine115 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.65g, 3rd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 226-233; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), goodfineHK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG116 117116 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.61g, 3rd year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 226-233; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), aboutvery fine117 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.62g, 3rd year, 26 beads, 13 both sides of date, on bothsides, legends as before (YZM 226-233; KM. C#93; LM 649 var), fineHK$4,000-5,000(US$450-650)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)118 119118 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.67g, 4th year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, nian si (4thyear), the first character at 6 o’clock, the second at 12 o’clock, rev. 26 beads, 13 bothsides, Tibetan date: bzhi pa (fourth), the first character at 12 o’clock and the second at 6o’clock (YZM 234-239; KM. C#93; LM 649A var), good fine and scarce119 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.64g, 4th year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 234-239; KM. C#93; LM 649A var), somedamage near the rim, good fine and scarceHK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,300)HK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)120121120 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.84g, 4th year, 28 beads, 14 both sides of date, rev. 26beads, 13 both sides, legends as before (YZM 234-239; KM. C#93; LM 649A var), withloop attached, fine, scarce121 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.12g, 15th year, 25 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 13 inlower half, date nian shi wu (15th year) reads clockwise starting at 9 o’clock near rim, rev.27 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 15 in lower half, the Tibetan syllable at 6 o’clock isspelt krong instead of kwong, Tibetan date: bco lnga pa (fifteenth), reads clockwise startingat 12 o’clock (YZM 240-242 var; KM. C#93; LM 650 var), about very fine and rareThe coins of this date have no elongated dot on the reverse.HK$3,000-4,500(US$400-600)HK$11,000-14,000(US$1,400-1,800)33


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET122 123122 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.27g, 15th year, 25 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 13 inlower half, rev. 28 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 16 in lower half, the Tibetan syllableat 6 o’clock is spelt krong instead of kwong (YZM 240-242 var; KM. C#93; LM 650 var),small part of edge missing between 3 and 4 o’clock, about very fine and rareHK$10,000-13,000(US$1,300-1,700)123 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.69g, 15th year, 27 beads, 7 and 6 beads in each uppersegment, 14 in lower half, rev. 27 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 15 in lower half, theTibetan syllable at 6 o’clock is spelt kwong as normal (YZM 240-242; KM. C#93; LM650 var), very fine and rare HK$11,000-14,000(US$1,400-1,800)124125124 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.76g, 15th year, 27 beads, 7 and 6 beads in each uppersegment, 14 in lower half, rev. 28 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 16 in lower half, theTibetan syllable at 6 o’clock is spelt kwong as normal (YZM 240-242; KM. C#93; LM650 var), edge ragged, about very fine and rare HK$9,000-11,000(US$1,100-1,400)125 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.73g, 15th year, 25 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 13 inlower half, rev. 28 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 16 in lower half, the Tibetan syllableat 6 o’clock is spelt kwong as normal (YZM 240-242; KM. C#93; LM 650 var), goodfine/fine and rareHK$9,000-11,000(US$1,100-1,400)126126 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.76g, 16th year, 22 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 10 inlower half, date nian shi liu (16th year) reads clockwise starting at 9 o’clock near rim, rev.26 beads, 5 in each upper segment, 16 in lower half, Tibetan date: bcu dgu pa (sixteenth),reads clockwise starting at 12 o’clock (YZM 243-247; KM. C#93; LM 651 var), very fineand rareThe coins of this date have no elongated dot on the reverse.HK$11,000-14,000(US$1,400-1,800)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG127127 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.74g, 16th year, 22 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 10 inlower half, rev. 27 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 15 in lower half, legends as before(YZM 243-247; KM. C#93; LM 651 var), about very fine and rareHK$9,000-11,000(US$1,100-1,400)128128 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.72g, 16th year, 26 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 14 inlower half, rev. 28 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 16 in lower half, legends as before(YZM 243-247; KM. C#93; LM 651 var), a little crimped, good fine and rareHK$9,000-11,000(US$1,100-1,400)129 130129 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.72g, 16th year, 25 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 13 inlower half, rev. 26 beads, 6 and 5 in each upper segment, 15 in lower half, legends asbefore (YZM 243-247; KM. C#93; LM 651 var), some edge weakness, very fine and rare130 Tibet, Dao Guang, 1-Sho, 3.62g, large flan, 16th year, 24 beads, 6 in each uppersegment, 12 in lower half, rev. 27 beads, 6 in each upper segment, 15 in lower half,legends as before (YZM 243-247; KM. C#93; LM 651 var) holed with loop removed fromedge, good fine, rareThis coin is struck on a large flan of 30mm, whereas other coins of this date have adiameter of about 28mm.35HK$9,000-11,000(US$1,100-1,400)HK$7,000-9,000(US$900-1,100)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETKONG PAR TANGKASThe supply of Nepalese Mohars was disrupted during the conflict between Tibet and Nepal between 1788 and 1791. Thereforethe Chinese authorities in Tibet authorised a temporary coin issue which was to be of the same weight standard and struck fromsilver of about the same fineness (about 66% silver) as the Nepalese Mohars. The first Kong Par Tangkas were struck in a mintlocated in Kongbo district east of Lhasa, hence their name “Kong Par Tangkas” which means “Tangkas struck in Kong(bo)”.Initially they were issued to members of the Chinese army who were instructed to change into Kong Par Tangkas the silver ingotswhich they carried from China as advance payment. In spring 1791 the Chinese army had entered Tibet in order to drive out theNepalese army which had invaded parts of southern Tibet and the Kong Par Tangkas issued to its members were partly spent inLhasa for buying supplies and subsequently were used as circulating coins along with the old Nepalese Mohars.The first series of Kong Par Tangkas bears the dates 13-45 (AD 1791), 13-46 (1792) and 13-47 (1793). While considerablequantities of the first two dates were struck it appears that the coins dated 13-47 were only struck in the beginning of that yearafter which the production of Kong Par Tangkas was suspended. The reason for this was that the Chinese authorities had decidedto strike coins of fine silver with the reign name “Qian Long” which were to replace both the Nepalese Mohars and the Kong ParTangkas. The Sino-Tibetan coins in the name of Qian Long, Jia Qing and Dao Guang were struck between 1792 and 1840 withperiods of various lengths of disruption.After 1840 the Chinese influence on Tibetan affairs had weakened considerably and the Tibetan government decided to resumethe striking of Tangkas in the style of the Kong-Par Tangkas to the same weight standard and in silver of the same fineness as thefirst series of Kong Par Tangkas. However, the Tibetan authorities did not inscribe the new series of Kong Par Tangkas with theactual date, but continued to use the old date 13-46 which in numismatics is referred to as “frozen date”. The second series ofKong Par Tangkas was struck around 1840 and is characterized by having a pointed “date arch” on obverse. The third series ofKong Par Tangkas was struck in about 1850, again with the frozen date 13-46. These issues can be identified by their large petalson reverse and the improved quality of striking. A substantial number of Kong Par Tangkas of the third series has survived andtherefore they are the second most common Tibetan silver coins of the 19th Century after the Ganden Tangkas which were firststruck in about 1840. A fourth series of Kong Par Tangkas was struck in 1890 and 1891; this time the coins bear a new date whichcorresponds to the actual year when they were struck, i.e. 15-24 and 15-25. They were struck at a reduced weight standard.The first Issue of Kong Par Tangkas131132131 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 4.93g, 13-47, the dateand arch above the date within a double square instead of a single square (KM -; YZM -),very good with flan crack, but extremely rareHK$1,500-2,000(US$200-250)PROVENANCE:Acquired from Alexander B. Lissanevitch.The cataloguer is aware of only one other specimen of this variety; both coins are crudelystruck but appear to be genuine.132 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 5.16g, 13-45 (YZM11; KM. C #60), very fine and scarce, exceptional condition for this issue HK$600-750(US$80-100)133 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, 13-45, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.01g &5.61g, date within central square with arch above, surmounted by moon and sun,ornaments around the square which have been interpreted as being “lotus hands,” circleof pearls within border around, rev. lotus flower in centre within double circle to whicheight petals are attached, each containing one of the eight Buddhist auspicious emblems,circle of pearls within border around, the first with fishes swimming clockwise within petalat 1 o’clock, the second with fishes anticlockwise (YZM 11 & 12; KM. C #60), about veryfine and scarce (2)133WWW.SPINK.COMHK$750-900(US$100-120)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG134134 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 4.82g, 13-45, rev.fishes swimming clockwise, double circle in centre (YZM 11; KM. C #60), traces ofverdigris both sides, about fine, scarce135 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 5.22g, 13-46, rev.fishes swimming anti-clockwise, double circle in centre (YZM 11; KM. C #60), fine,scarce135HK$300-400(US$40-50)HK$450-600(US$60-80)136136 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.86g, 5.05g, 13-46, rev. single circle in centre (YZM 14 & 15; KM. C #60.1), about fine, scarce (2) HK$750-1,000(US$100-150)137 138137 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.53g, 5.22g, 13-46, rev. single circle in centre (YZM 14 & 15; KM. C #60.1), fine, scarce (2) HK$750-1,000(US$100-150)138 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.29g, 5.11g, 13-46, rev. single circle in centre (YZM 14; KM. C #60.1), the first fine, the second very fine,both scarce (2)139 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 5.01g, 13-46, rev.single circle in centre (YZM 14; KM. C #60.1), flan a little irregular, some staining, goodfine37HK$750-1,000(US$100-150)HK$350-500(US$60-80)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET140141140 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 5.47g, 13-46, rev.single circle in centre (YZM 14; KM. C #60.1), well centred, good fine141 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (3), 13-46, rev. singlecircle in centre (YZM 14; KM. C #60.1), about fine to fine (3)HK$400-500(US$60-80)HK$900-1,200(US$120-160)142142 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (3), 13-46 (2), dateunclear, possibly 13-47 (1), rev. single circle in centre (YZM 14, 15, 16-22; KM. C#60.1), about fine to fine (3) HK$900-1,200(US$120-160)143143 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (3), 13-46, rev. singlecircle in centre (YZM 14, 15, 16-22; KM. C #60.1), about fine to fine (3)HK$900-1,200(US$120-160)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG144 145144 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 13-46, 13-47?,rev. single circle in centre (YZM 14, 16-22; KM. C #60.1), about fine and good fine (2)145 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.28g, 13-47,Kong Par Tangka, 5.04g, date unclear (YZM 16-22; KM. C #60.1), the first fine, rare,the second very good (2)HK$750-1,000(US$100-150)HK$900-1,200(US$120-160)146146 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, fractional Kong Par Tangka, 0.74g, nodate, three petals representing 5-Skar (YZM -; KM. C # -), fine, very rarePROVENANCE:Ex E.H.C. Walsh collection (illustrated in his article “The coinage of Tibet”).The cataloguer has not seen another piece which could compare to this one.HK$300-400(US$40-60)The second Issue of Kong Par TangkasThe coins of this group stand out by having a pointed date arch on the obverse. Although dated 13-46, it is believed that thesecoins were struck in about AD 1840. It is very difficult to find coins from this group which are in very fine or better condition.147148147 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.51g, 5.27g, 13-46 (YZM 24-30; KM. C #60.5), very good to fine (2) HK$700-900(US$90-120)148 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.42g, 5.54g, 13-46 (YZM 24-30; KM. C #60.5), very good to fine (2) HK$700-900(US$90-120)39


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET149149 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 5.45g, 13-46 (YZM24-30; KM. C #60.5), one weak area but generally good fine HK$400-500(US$50-70)150 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.14g, 5.31g, 13-46 (YZM 24-30; KM. C #60.5), very good to good fine (2) HK$700-900(US$90-120)150151152151 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 5.54g, 5.63g, 13-46 (YZM 24-30; KM. C #60.5), very good to fine (2) HK$700-900(US$90-120)152 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 4.88g, 5.28g, 13-46 (YZM 24-30; KM. C #60.5), the first stained, very good, the second fine (2) HK$600-900(US$80-120)153153 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 5.45g, 13-46,“pointed date arch,” rev. order of emblems reversed (YZM 31; KM -), fine, very rareThe cataloguer is only aware of two further specimens of this very rare variety: one in theBritish Museum (bequest of Carlo Valdettaro de la Rocchetta) and the one illustrated byYin Zheng Min as no. 31. In recent years modern forgeries of this variety were discoveredin Lhasa.HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGThe third Issue of Kong Par TangkasThe coins of this group have larger figures on obverse and larger auspicious symbols on reverse than the coins of the first andsecond issue of Kong Par Tangkas. Although dated 13-46, it is believed that these coins were struck in about AD 1850 at a slightlyreduced weight standard ranging from 3.73 to 5.26g among the coins from the Rhodes collection.154 155154 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous (Third series, from 1850), Kong ParTangkas (3), 13-46, larger petals on reverse design (YZM 32-38; KM 60.3), fine (3)HK$450-600(US$40-60)155 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous (Third series), Kong Par Tangkas (3), 13-46, larger petals on reverse design (YZM 32-38; KM 60.3), fine to good fine (3) HK$450-600(US$68-80)156156 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous (Third series), Kong Par Tangkas (2),5.15g, 5.26g, 13-46, larger petals on reverse design (YZM 32-38; KM 60.3), good fineand good very fine (2)HK$300-450(US$40-60)41


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETThe fourth Issue of Kong Par Tangkas158157157 Tibetan and Chinese authority, Anonymous, Kong Par Tangkas (2), 4.34g, 4.33g, 15-24 (1890), two types with large and small figures, rev. different south-west symbols (YZM369-375; KM. C#13.1), very fine (2) HK$300-450(US$40-60)158 Tibetan and Chinese authority, anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 4.00g, 15-25 (1891)(YZM 376-379; KM. C#13.1), very fine159 Tibetan and Chinese authority, anonymous, Kong Par Tangka, 4.67g, 15-25 (1891)(YZM 376-379; KM C#13.1), very fine159HK$230-360(US$30-50)HK$230-360(US$30-50)TANGKAS WITH RANJANA SCRIPTThe Tangka coins of this series are known as “Ranjana-Tangkas” (or “Rañjana-Tangkas”) referring to the type of script which isused on both sides. This type of ornamental script is also known as Lantsa-script. The legend represents an invocation of Lakshmi,the Hindu goddess of wealth and good luck. variants of the obverse legends have been noted. All the coins of this type are dated,but some of the dates do not make sense. It is believed that these coins were struck in the late 19th and early 20th Century inTibet by Nepalese merchants, and that they circulated at the same value as the Kong Par- and Gaden-Tangkas (see Bertsch,Wolfgang: “The Tibetan Tangka with Rañjana Script”. Oriental Numismatic Society, Newsletter, no. 185, autumn, 2005, pp. 18-31). The basic design of these coins is copied from the Mohars struck in Kathmandu in the name of Pratap Simha which wereexported to Tibet.160 161 162160 Tibet, Anonymous (meaningless date), Ranjana-Tangka, 4.58g, date given in Nepalesefigures can be read as 16-72 (YZM 359; KM. C#27), good very fine161 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.87g, date given in Nepalese figures can be readas 16-16 (YZM 360; KM. C#27), very fine162 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.44g, date given in Nepalese figures can be readas 16-61 (YZM 362/363; KM. C#27), very fineHK$500-650(US$70-90)HK$500-650(US$70-90)HK$500-650(US$70-90)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG163 164163 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.82g, date given in Nepalese figures can be readas 16-61 (YZM 362/363; KM. C#27), very fineHK$450-600(US$60-80)164 Tibet, Anonymous, cut Ranjana-Tangkas (2), dates only partly visible, but probably15-40 and 16-61 (YZM -; KM -), very fine (2) HK$400-500(US$50-70)Cut pieces showing five fleurets on reverse circulated at the value of 1-Sho.165 166165 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.70g, date given in Nepalese figures can be readas 16-64 or 16-67 (YZM 362/363; KM. C#27), possible edge mount, very fine166 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.64g, date given in Nepalese figures can be readas 16-72 (YZM 359; KM. C27), very fineHK$500-650(US$70-90)HK$500-650(US$70-90)167 168167 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.52g, date given in Nepalese figures can be readas 16-72 (YZM 359; KM. C#27), very fine168 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.74g, date in Nepalese figures is uncertain(YZM -; KM. C#27), very fineHK$500-650(US$70-90)HK$500-650(US$60-80)169 170 171169 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.84g, dated 15-28 (YZM 353; KM. C#27), veryfine170 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 5.33g, dated 15-30 (YZM 354; KM. C#27), veryfine171 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.36g, dated 15-40 (YZM 356; KM C#27.1), veryfineHK$500-650(US$70-90)HK$500-650(US$70-90)HK$500-650(US$70-90)43


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET172 173172 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 5.21g, dated 15-46, swastika instead of sun abovethe central square right (YZM 357; KM. C#27.2), scarce variety, very fine173 Tibet, Anonymous, cut Ranjana-Tangka, 3.17g, dated 15-40 (YZM -; KM -), somestaining, very fineThis cut piece has five fleurets on reverse and represents 1-Sho174 Tibet, Anonymous (meaningless date), cut Ranjana-Tangkas (4) (YZM -; KM -), veryfine (4)The cut pieces with three fleurets on reverse represent 5-Skar (⅓ Tangka), those with 4fleurets on reverse represents 7½-Skar (Half-Tangka)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)HK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$500-650(US$70-90)COINS ADAPTED WITH BOW AND ARROW175 Nepal, Pratap Simha (1775-77), Mohar, 5.49g, SE 1699 (1777), with bow and arrowdesign added to reverse (cf. RGV. 644), very fine and rare“These pieces and other similar Nepalese coins altered in this way (with bow and arrowdesign skilfully engraved), were used as talismans in Tibet. It was believed that the ownerof such a piece would be blessed with a boy child. They were regarded as very valuable asfew were made. Coins altered in this way were called Da-shu-ma Kem-pa by theTibetans.” (RGV, 1989, p. 210). “Da-shu-ma” (mda’ gzhu ma) means “with arrow andbow”. According to Carlo Valdettaro the bow and arrow design was carefully welded onto the coin wheras Nicholas Rhodes thought that it was engraved. We believe that bothmethods were used in order to produce this auspicious design; the outline of the designwas engraved first, then thin silver wire was welded into the groove left by the engraving.175HK$1,800-2,300(US$250-300)176 177 178176 Nepal, Ranjit Malla, Mohar, 5.22g, Bhaktapur, dated N.S. (Nepal Samvat) 842 (AD1722) ( RGV.564/565), with bow and arrow design engraved and welded to reverse(RGV T2), fine and rare177 Tibet, Anonymous, Ranjana-Tangka, 4.77g, 16-61 with bow and arrow design weldedto reverse (YZM - ; KM -), very fine and rare178 Nepal, Malla, Srinivasa Malla, Mohar, 5.45g, Patan, dated N.S. 786 (AD 1666) (cf.RGV. 382), with bow and arrow engraved and welded on reverse, fine and rareWWW.SPINK.COMHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$2,300-2,800(US$300-350)HK$2,700-3,000(US$350-400)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGCHINESE ISSUES FOR TIBET: SICHUAN RUPEESThis series of coins is known as Sichuan or Tibet Rupees. These coins were produced by the Chinese in imitation of the BritishIndian Rupees with the portrait of Queen Victoria. The portrait of the queen was replaced by one which most authorities believeto be the portrait of Emperor Guang Xu. The Sichuan Rupees were minted for exclusive use in Tibet and areas with Tibetanpopulation in western China. One can distinguish between four major varieties:1. Small head without collar (1902-1911 Chengdu mint) with reverse horizontal or vertical rosette2. Small head with collar (1912-1916 Chengdu mint)3. Small head with collar/flat nose (1930-1935 Kangding mint)4. Big head (1936-1942 Kangding mint)According to Y.K.Leung Sichuan Rupees were struck until 1944 (33rd year of the Republic). See:http://ykleungn.tripod.com/szeRupee.htmThe reverses of the Sichuan Rupees struck in Chengdu feature a Chinese character si which has two short vertical strokes withinan open square. On the reverses of the Sichuan Rupees of the Kangding mint the two strokes of the character si are curved sidwardsat their lower ends. The Sichuan Rupees can briefly be described as follows: Obverse: portrait of Emperor Guang Xu Reverse:horizontal or vertical rosette in centre. Four Chinese characters to be read crosswise up to down and from right to left; si chuansheng zao (“made in Sichuan”). Branches with cusps and/or flowers around, a feature which was copied from the British IndianRupees with the portrait of Queen Victoria which were first issued in 1840.179 180179 China, issued for Tibet (1902-1911), Sichuan Rupee, 11.45g, undated, small headwithout collar, rev. horizontal rosette (KM 3.1), good fine and scarce180 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.48g, undated, small head without collar,rev. horizontal rosette (YZM 445-447; KM 3.1), very fine/good fine and scarceHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)181 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.28g, undated, small head without collar,rev. horizontal rosette (YZM 445-447; KM 3.1), scratches on obverse and reverse, fine andscarce181HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)182 183182 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.44g, undated, small head without collar,rev. horizontal rosette (YZM 445-447; KM 3.1), good fine and scarce183 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.55g, undated, small head without collar,rev. vertical rosette, small branch with three leaves in north-east position (YZM 448-449;KM 3), very fine and scarce45HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET184 185184 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.43g, undated, small head without collar,rev. vertical rosette, small branch with three leaves in north-east position (YZM 448-449;KM 3), about very fine and scarce185 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.28g, undated, small head without collar,rev. vertical rosette, without branch with three leaves in north-east (YZM 450; KM 3 var),about very fine and scarceHK$6,000-8,000(US$700-900)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)186 187186 China, issued for Tibet (1912-16), Sichuan Rupee, 11.06g, undated, small head withcollar, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2),fine187 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.35g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, without leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), dirtysurfaces both sides, very fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)188 189188 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.19g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, with leaf in north-east position (YZM 471-472; KM 3.2), toned veryfine/good fine189 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.41g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, without leaf in north-east position (YZM 471-472; KM 3.2), toned veryfineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG190191190 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.46g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, without leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), very fine191 China, issued for Tibet, forgery of Sichuan Rupee, 9.66g, undated, small head withcollar, the string of pearls below the collar is composed of only 13 pearls, instead of theusual 14, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in north-east position (YZM - ; KM 3.2 fortype), very good/fineMost probably a contemporaneous cast forgery.HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$400-500(US$50-70)192 193192 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.44g, undated, small head with collar, thestring of pearls below the collar is composed of only 13 pearls, instead of the usual 14,rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), very fine193 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.50g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, without leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), weaklystruck, fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)194 195194 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.40g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, with leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), veryfine/extremely fine195 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.22g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, with leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)47


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET196 197196 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.41g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, without leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), weaklystruck, very fine197 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.24g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, with leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), about fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)198199198 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.19g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, with leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), good fine199 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 10.94g, undated, small head with collar, largeeye, rev. vertical rosette, with leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), aboutvery fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)200 201200 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.31g, undated, small head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 15 pearls, instead of the usual 14, rev. verticalrosette, with leaf in northeast position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)201 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.58g, undated, small head with collar, shortlower eye-line, rev. vertical rosette, with leaf in north-east position (YZM 451-472; KM3.2), fine HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG202203202 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.22g, undated, small head with collar, rev.vertical rosette, with flower in the shape of a butterfly in northeast position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), in PCGS holder, graded XF40, rare HK$15,000-20,000(US$1,800-2,200)203 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.33g, undated, small head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls, instead of the usual 14, rev. verticalrosette, with flower in the shape of a butterfly in northeast position (YZM 451-454 and457-472; KM 3.2), in PCGS holder, very fine and rare HK$15,000-20,000(US$1,800-2,200)204204 China, issued for Tibet (1930-35), Sichuan Rupee, 10.72g, undated, small head withcollar, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 15 pearls, instead of the usual 14,rev. horizontal rosette, with leaf in north-east position (YZM 455-456; KM 3.5), in PCGSholder, graded AU50, very rareHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)205206205 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.66g, undated, small head with collar, flatnose, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM 473-479; KM 3.4),fine206 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.23g, undated, small head with collar, flatnose, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 15 pearls, instead of the usual 14,rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM 473-479; KM 3.4), fineHK$750-1,000(US$100-140)HK$750-1,000(US$100-140)49


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET207208207 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 10.80g, undated, small head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 15 pearls, instead of the usual 14, rev. verticalrosette, with leaf in northeast position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), weakly struck, about veryfine208 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.43g, undated, small head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 16 pearls, instead of the usual 14, rev. verticalrosette, with leaf in northeast position (YZM 451-472; KM 3.2), about very fineHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)HK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)209209 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.48g, undated, small head with collar, flatnose, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 15 pearls, instead of the usual 14,rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM 473-479; KM 3.4), fineHK$750-1,000(US$100-140)210211210 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 10.86g, undated, large head withcollar, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls, rev. vertical rosette,without leaf in northeast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), very fine211 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.46g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), obverse scratches, fineHK$600-750(US$80-100)HK$600-750(US$80-100)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG212213212 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 10.34g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), fine213 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.02g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 14 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), damaged rim, fineHK$600-750(US$80-100)HK$600-750(US$80-100)214214 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.74g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 15 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), very fineHK$600-750(US$80-100)215 216215 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.28g, undated, small head with collar, flatnose, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 14 pearls, rev. vertical rosette,without leaf in northeast position (YZM 473-479; KM. Y #3.4), fine216 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.63g, undated, small head with collar, flatnose, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 15 pearls, rev. vertical rosette,without leaf in northeast position (YZM 473-479; KM. Y #3.4), fineHK$750-1,000(US$100-140)HK$750-1,000(US$100-140)51


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET217 218217 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.15g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 14 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), fine218 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 10.74g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 14 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), fineHK$600-750(US$80-100)HK$600-750(US$80-100)219219 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.64g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 12 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), a little dirty, fineHK$600-750(US$80-100)220 221220 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 10.47g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 12 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), rather dirty, fine221 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 10.23g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 12 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), rather dirty, good fineHK$600-750(US$80-100)HK$600-750(US$80-100)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG222 223222 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 9.51g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), fine223 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.34g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), fineHK$600-750(US$80-100)HK$600-750(US$80-100)224224 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.57g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 11 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), weakly struck, good fine and scarceHK$1,500-2,000(US$200-250)225 226225 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 12.16g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 14 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), very fine226 China, issued for Tibet, Sichuan Rupee, 11.89g, undated, large head with collar, stringof pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf innortheast position (YZM 480-484; KM. Y #3b), very fineHK$600-750(US$80-100)HK$600-750(US$80-100)53


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET227 228227 China, issued for Tibet, Half-Sichuan Rupee, 5.64g, undated (YZM 443-444; KM. Y#2), rather dirty, very fine and scarce HK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,500)According to Wang Chengzhi (“Sichuan Zang yang”, “Tibetan Silver coins of Sichuan”,China Numismatics, 1983.3, p. 12-18 and plate 54) the Half Rupee coins were struck bythe Chengdu mint in 1904, 1905, 1907 and 1912.228 China, issued for Tibet, Half-Sichuan Rupee, 5.72g, undated (YZM 443-444; KM. Y#2; LM361), in PCGS holder, graded AU53, scarce HK$11,000-15,000(US$1,500-2,000)229229 China, issued for Tibet, Half-Sichuan Rupee, 5.71g, undated (YZM 443-444; KM. Y#2), in PCGS holder, graded XF45, scarce HK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,400)230 231230 China, issued for Tibet, Quarter-Sichuan Rupee, 2.77g, undated, rev. without small leafto the left of the character “zao” (9 o’clock position) (YZM - ; KM. Y #1 var; LM 362),in PCGS holder, graded AU50, very rare reverse typeIn recent years clever forgeries of this rare variety were offered on ebay and in auctions.To the best of our knowledge the specimen from the Rhodes collection is genuine; it wasacquired a long time before modern forgeries made their appearance in the collector’smarket.According to Wang Chengzhi (“Sichuan zang yang”, “Tibetan Silver coins of Sichuan”,China Numismatics, 1983.3, p. 12-18 and plate 54) a total of only 110,000 pieces ofQuarter-Rupee coins were struck by the Chengdu mint in 1904, 1905 and 1912. The factthat most of them were converted to buttons and jewellery items explains the rarity ofthese coins nowadays.HK$15,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)231 China, issued for Tibet, Quarter-Sichuan Rupee, 2.86g, undated, rev. with small leaf tothe left of the character “zao” (9 o’clock position) (YZM 441-442 , KM Y #1 var; LM362), die crack on obverse, in PCGS holder, graded MS63, rare HK$7,500-10,000(US$1,000-1,400)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGSICHUAN RUPEES COUNTERMARKED IN EASTERN TIBETThe Sichuan Rupees which were struck in Kangding of alloyed silver are occasionally found with countermarks in Tibetan and/orChinese script and marks consisting of Western figures or the English word “one”. The meaning of most of these marks remainsuncertain, but we can presume that they were applied to the coins by local authorities, such as monasteries or dzong dpon (districtofficials) in order to enforce the circulation of the Sichuan Rupees made of low grade silver in a specific area of Tibet. In contrastto the well known Chinese chops which are found on both Western and Chinese silver coins and were applied in order to guaranteethat the chopped coin was of fine silver, the countermarks on the Sichuan Rupees do not give such a guarantee. Most of the knowncountermarks which were used in Tibet were described by Karl Gabrisch and Wolfgang Bertsch: “Chopmarks on Sichuan Rupeesand Coins from Tibet”, Numismatics International Bulletin, vol. 26, no. 3, Dallas, March 1991, pp. 57-65.232232 China, issued for Tibet (1930-35), Sichuan Rupee, 11.61g, undated, countermark “sa”in lobed depression and “li yong lam” in rectangular depression (Gabrisch and Bertsch, 1and I), on type with small head with collar, flat nose, string of pearls below the collar iscomposed of 15 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM 495-496; KM -), very fine and scarce HK$1,800-2,300(US$250-300)The countermark “li yong lam” (to be read from right to left) consists of two Chinesecharacters and one Tibetan syllable and has tentatively been attributed to the Litangmonastery in Eastern Tibet (Gabrisch and Bertsch, 1991, p. 60 based on Yue Shi: “Sichuan lu bi jia gai jun yong ping ying bi bian?” - “Is the Sichuan Rupee with thecountermark jun yong ping for military use?”, China Numismatics, no. 28, 1990.1, p.74.). Should this attribution be correct the Chinese characters could be translated asfollows “for use in Li (tang)”. The Tibetan syllable “lam”, spelt with anusvãra (smallcircle placed above the letter “la” to indicate the final “m”), normally means “way” or“road”. The complete inscription may therefore be interpreted as “for use on the road toLitang”, which could be understood as having the wider sense “for use in the Litangarea”. Gabrisch and Bertsch suggested that the legend could be interpreted as “for use bythe Lamas of Litang”. The present cataloguer now thinks that this reading is impossible,since Lama has the spelling bla ma in Tibetan and could only be abbreviated as bla andnot as lam. Many monasteries in Tibet acted also as money lending institutions. Thecountermark should guarantee to the debitor that he could pay back his credit andinterests with the Rupees bearing the monastery’s mark. However, this guarantee was notalways respected by the monastic authorities.233233 China, issued for Tibet (1930-35), Sichuan Rupee, 11.79g, undated, very clear strikingof the countermark “li yong lam” in rectangular depression (Gabrisch and Bertsch, I), ontype with small head with collar, flat nose, string of pearls below the collar is composedof 14 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM 487-488;KM -), very fine and scarceHK$2,700-3,000(US$350-400)55


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET234 235234 China, issued for Tibet (1930-35), Sichuan Rupee, 11.01g, undated, countermark “5”in rectangular depression and “one” (Gabrisch and Bertsch, E and A. Wang Chun Li:“Illustrated Catalogue of Chinese Gold & Silver Coins; 1791-1949” (Zhong guo jin yinbi mu lu), Zhong guo shang ye chu ban she (China Trade Publishing House), Beijing 2012,p. 200, no. WS0768), on type with small head with collar, flat nose, string of pearls belowthe collar is composed of 15 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position(YZM -; KM -), about fine, countermark “one” rare235 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 11.50g, undated, countermarks “5”and “li yong lam”, both in rectangular depression (Gabrisch and Bertsch, E and I), ontype with large head with collar, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls,rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM - ; KM -), fine and scarceHK$2,700-3,000(US$350-400)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)236 237236 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 11.86g, undated, countermark “sa”within lobed depression (the mark is placed upside down; Gabrisch and Bertsch, 1), ontype with large head with collar, string of pearls below the collar composed of 15 pearls,rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM 491-492; KM -), very fine237 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 10.47g, undated, countermark “5”and Chinese character, both marks in rectangular depression (Gabrisch and Bertsch, E anda), on type with large head with collar, string of pearls below the collar composed of 13pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM 494; KM -), very fineand scarceHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)238 239238 China, issued for Tibet (1930-35), Sichuan Rupee, 11.61g, undated, two types of thecountermark “5”, both in a rectangular depression (Gabrisch and Bertsch, E), on typewith small head with collar, flat nose, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 13pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM 495-496; KM -), veryfine and scarce239 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 11.06g, undated, rectangularcountermark which cannot be read, but may be a variant of the mark “li yong lam” ontype with large head with collar, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls,rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM - ; KM -), fineWWW.SPINK.COMHK$1,800-2,300(US$250-300)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG240 241240 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 10.88g, undated, countermark “5”(Gabrisch and Bertsch, E), on type with large head with collar, string of pearls below thecollar is composed of 13 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position(YZM 496; KM -), fine and scarce241 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 10.55g, undated, countermark “3”(Gabrisch and Bertsch, C), on type with large head with collar, string of pearls below thecollar is composed of 14 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position(YZM 493; KM -), some verdigris, fine, countermark rareHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$1,800-2,300(US$250-300)242 243242 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 11.14g, undated, two variants ofthe countermark “5”, both in rectangular depression (Gabrisch and Bertsch, E), on typewith large head with collar, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 13 pearls, rev.vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM - ; KM -), fine and scarce243 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 10.48g, undated, countermark“one” (Gabrisch and Bertsch, A), on type with large head with collar, string of pearlsbelow the collar is composed of 14 pearls, rev. vertical rosette, without leaf in northeastposition (YZM 485-486; KM -), about fine, countermark rareHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$2,700-3,000(US$350-400)244244 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 10.75g, undated, countermark “4,”on type with large head with collar, string of pearls below the collar has 13 pearls, rev.vertical rosette, without leaf in northeast position (YZM -, KM -), obverse beautifullystruck very fine, countermark very rareCountermark “4” is discussed in Gabrisch and Bertsch, D; Wang Chun Li: “IllustratedCatalogue of Chinese Gold & Silver Coins; 1791-1949” (Zhong guo jin yin bi mu lu),Zhong guo shang ye chu ban she (China Trade Publishing House), Beijing 2012, p. 200,no. WS0770; also Zhang Cheng Guang (responsible editor), Zhao Weng Sheng, TuHong Qiu, Zhang Ming Cong and Wang Tian Fu (authors): Sichuan Zangyang. Si kronbod dngul (Sichuan Tibet money = Sichuan Rupee), Zhong guo guo ji wen yi chu ban she(China International Art Publishing House), n.p. (Beijing?), 2011, p.157)57HK$3,000-4,000(US$400-500)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET245245 China, issued for Tibet, cut Sichuan Rupees of the early type (2), 5.93g and 4.90g (KM.Y#B5) very fine (2)The minor Indian denominations had never been popular in Tibet, and the minordenominations of the Sichuan Rupee were similarly rejected as coins, but were often usedas buttons or to produce silver jewellery. In order to obtain small change the full Rupeeswere cut into fractions, mostly into halves and less frequently into quarters, often with asword and the blow of a hammer. Surviving cut pieces nearly always are the result ofdividing the Emperor’s portrait vertically; pesumably the Tibetans did not wish to offendthe feelings of the Chinese by cutting the portrait horizontally, which would have beeninterpreted as “symbolic beheading” of the Emperor. The cataloguer has seen only veryfew examples which make exception to this rule (Bertsch, Wolfgang and Rhodes,Nicholas: “The Use of Cut Coins in Tibet”. Tibet Journal, vol. 35, no. 3, autumn 2010,p. 19-40).HK$600-750(US$80-100)246246 China, issued for Tibet, cut Sichuan Rupees of the early type (2), 5.47g and 4.54g (KM.Y#B5) very fine (2)HK$750-1,000(US$100-150)247 248247 China, issued for Tibet (1936-42), Sichuan Rupee, 10.98g, undated, roundcountermark “rnam” in Tibetan script, this a modern fabrication, probably punched inNorthern India with a Tibetan iron seal (Gabrisch and Bertsch, 5), on type with largehead with collar, string of pearls below the collar is composed of 14 pearls, rev. verticalrosette, without small leaf in northeast position (YZM -; KM -), the host coin genuine,about very fineAccording to the cataloguers own experience and to a collector from Kathmandu SichuanRupees with this countermark were never found in Lhasa.248 China, issued for Tibet (1902-11), Sichuan Rupee, 11.56g, undated, two countermarksin Tibetan which are not punched but engraved, certainly modern addition, producedwith a fairly crude chisel, that to the left of the portrait can be read as bod (“Tibet”), oncoin type with small head without collar, rev. horizontal rosette (YZM 445-447; KM 3.1for coin type without countermark), very fine and scarceThis type of early Sichuan Rupee is not known with genuine Tibetan countermarks.WWW.SPINK.COMHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGTHE GADEN TANGKASThe undated Gaden Tangkas received their name by Western collectors based on the first two syllables of the inscription on theobverse. These intriguing coins were struck from about 1840 until 1930 with different weight standards and include an almostendless number of variants. The Tibetans referred to these coins as Tangka dkar po (“white Tangka”), because after striking, thecoins were left in a solution of borax which gave them a white appearance - at least for some time - as opposed to the NepaleseMohars, most of which turned black with use and were therfore called nag tam (“black Tangka”) (Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The‘Whitening’ of Tibetan Tangkas in the Dode Mint” Journal of the Oriental Numismatic Society, no. 197, autumn 2008, p. 47).The best classification, of these silver coins was published by Nicholas Rhodes who based his findings on previous research whichwas made by the Italian collector of Tibetan coins Carlo Valdettaro de la Rocchetta who was a friend of Rhodes for many yearsand whose Tibetan coin collection is now housed in the coin department of the British Museum. Rhodes grouped the GadenTangkas taking the marks which are placed between the outer parts of the petals on both sides of the coins. He presented the eightgroups to which he assigned the letters A to H in a convincing chronological order and catalogued the variants of the coins in eachgroup by focussing on the change of design details among the eight Buddhist auspicious emblems.Since Rhodes’ classification has stood the test of time and since he arranged the coins in his collection according to his classificationthe cataloguer thought that the Gaden Tangkas presented in this auction will best be listed according to Rhodes’ system. Rhodes’article on the Gaden Tangkas is now also available on the internet: Rhodes, Nicholas: The Gaden Tangka of Tibet. OrientalNumismatic Society, Occasional Paper, no. 17, January 1983. http://gorila.netlab.cz/coins/Tibet/ONS_TangkaTibet.pdfThe Gaden Tangka can be described as follows:Obverse: Lotus in centre, surrounded by an inner circle to which eight petals are attached, each of them containing one of theeight auspicious emblems of Buddhism. In an article, entitled “Loan-Words in Tibetan” Berthold Laufer reports that the obversedesign of the Gaden Tangka was explained to him by a Lama as dpag bsam ljon shing (“wish-granting tree”). Laufer, Berthold:Sino-Tibetan Studies, vol. 2, New Delhi, 1987, p. 514.Reverse: Three comma-shaped devices in the centre represent the nor bu dga’ khyil (“the whorling jewel of joy”) The central partof the design can be understood as flower or as wheel with eight spokes which end in a circle and are seperated from each otherby straight lines. The cataloguer is in favour of interpreting the design as wheel, i.e. as dharma cakra (Tibetan chos ‘khor), sincethe central norbu dga’ kyhil often appears as the axis of this wheel in traditional Tibetan art, as can be seen above the main gatesof Tibetan monasteries, where often the chos ‘khor (“wheel of religion”) is to be found, flanked by a pair of deer.The central design is placed within a circle consisting of eight joined arches encompassed by a curved octogon. Near the rim eightseparate petals each of which contains one of the eight syllables of the legend dga`ldan pho brang phyo(gs) las rnam rgyal (“theGanden Palace victorious in all directions”) which is the standard phrase describing the Tibetan government as it was created bythe 5th Dalai Lama in 1642 while still residing in the Ganden Palace within the Drepung monastery which is located about 8 kmwest of Lhasa.Gaden Tangkas of A-group (1840-50). Dod-pal (dod dpal) MintThe coins of this group have the obverse with three beads between the outer part of the eight petals and the reverse with smallarches between the outer part of the petals. There is no water line below the lotus on obverseThe Dod-pal mint was located below the Potala (winter residence of the Dalai Lamas).249249 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1840-50), Gaden Tangka, 5.23g, undated, threestraight stalks of lotus, rev. Solid buds (what Rhodes describes as “buds” are the finalround parts of what we consider as spokes of a wheel) ( Rhodes Ai; KM. A 13.1), fineHK$500-750(US$70-100)59


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET250 251250 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (2), 5.19g, 5.39g, undated, threestalks of lotus slightly bent to the right, rev. hollow buds (Rhodes Ai; KM. A 13.1), fineand good fine (2)251 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (2), 5.21g, 5.08g, undated, thefirst with three straight stalks of lotus, the second with single stalk and north-east symbolwith fishes swimming clockwise, rev. hollow buds (Rhodes Ai; KM. A 13.1), fine (2)HK$400-600(US$60-90)HK$400-600(US$60-90)253252252 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (2), 4.69g, 5.22g, undated, lotuswith single stalk, the first coin with this bent right, north-east symbol with fishesswimming clockwise and anti-clockwise, rev. hollow buds (Rhodes Aii; KM. A 13.2), fineand good fine (2)253 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangka, 4.92g, undated, lotus with singlestalk, north-east symbol with fishes swimming anti-clockwise, rev. hollow buds (RhodesAii; KM. A 13.2), fineHK$400-600(US$60-90)HK$200-300(US$30-50)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGGaden Tangkas of B-Group (1880-94). Dod-pal MintThe coins of this group have the obverse with three beads between the outer part of petals and the reverse with wavy lines betweenthe outer part of the eight petals. There are two water lines below the lotus on obverse.254 (x 85%)254 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1880-94), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated, the thirdwith fishes swimming clockwise in north-east symbol (Rhodes Bi, Biii, Biiia, Biv; KM. B13.2, 13.3, 13.4), fine to very fine (4) HK$400-600(US$60-90)255 (x 85%)255 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (4), undated (Rhodes Bi, Biii, Biv;KM. B 13.1, 13.3, 13.4), fine to very fine (4)HK$400-600(US$60-90)257256 (x 85%)256 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (4), undated, one with conchvariety as west symbol (Rhodes Biii, Biv; KM. B 13.3, 13.4), fine to very fine (4)257 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangka, 4.96g, undated, small hook of theupper part of conch (west-symbol) pointing left (Rhodes Biva, KM. B 13.4), very fine,scarce variety61HK$400-600(US$60-90)HK$750-1,000(US$100-150)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETGaden Tangkas of C-GroupThe coins of this group have the obverse with three beads between the outer part of petals and the reverse with wavy lines betweenthe outer part of the eight petals. There is only one water line below the lotus on obverse.Most of the eight auspicious symbols have changed place when compared with coins of group A and B. They remain in this neworder for the coins of groups D through H.258 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1895-96), Gaden Tangkas (5) (Rhodes Ci, Cii,Biv; KM. C 13.1, 13.2), fine to very fine (5)HK$500-700(US$70-100)Gaden Tangkas of D-GroupThe coins of this group have both the obverse and the reverse with three beads between the outer part of the petals.259 (x 85%)259 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1896-99), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated (RhodesDi, Dii, Diii, Div; KM. D 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4), about very fine or better (4)HK$400-600(US$60-90)260 (x 85%)260 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (4), undated (Rhodes Dii, Diii;KM. D 13.2, 13.3), about very fine or better (4)HK$400-600(US$60-90)261 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1896-99), machine struck Gaden Tangka, 4.74g,undated (Rhodes Dv; KM. D 13.5), good very fine, rare261WWW.SPINK.COMHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGGaden Tangkas of E-GroupThe coins of this group have the obverse with wavy lines between the outer part of petals and the reverse with three beads betweenthe outer part of the eight petals.262 (x 85%)262 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1899-1907), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated(Rhodes Ei, Eii, Eiii, Eiv; KM. E 13.1, 13.2, 13.2a, 13.4a), fine to very fine (4)263 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (4), undated (Rhodes Ei, Eii, Eiii,Eiv; KM. E 13.1, 13.2, 13.2a, 13.4a), fine to very fine (4)264 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (5), undated (Rhodes Ei, Eiii, Evi,Evii; KM. E 13.1, 13.2a, 13.-), fine to very fine (5)HK$400-600(US$60-90)HK$400-600(US$60-90)HK$500-750(US$0-100)265 266265 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1899-1907), Gaden Tangka, 4.94g, undated, theeight auspicious emblems rotated clockwise by one position (45 degrees) in relation tothe centre (Rhodes Eiiia; KM. E 13.3), good fine, very scarce obverse variety266 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1899-1907), Gaden Tangka, 4.57g, undated, asprevious lot (Rhodes Eiiia; KM. E 13.3), good very fine, very scarce obverse varietyHK$1,000-1,500(US$150-250)HK$1,000-1,500(US$150-250)267 268267 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1899-1907), Gaden Tangka, 4.58g, undated,small circle around lotus design and of finer style than the other Tangkas of this group(Rhodes Ev; KM. E 13.4), in PCGS holder, graded XF40, very scarce obverse variety268 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1899-1907), Gaden Tangka, 4.15g, undated,small circle around lotus design and of finer style than the other Tangkas of this group(Rhodes Ev; KM. E 13.4), in PCGS holder, graded XF45, very scarce obverse varietyHK$1,500-2,000(US$200-300)HK$1,500-2,000(US$200-300)63


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET269269 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1899-1907), Gaden Tangka, 4.32g, undated,small circle around lotus design and of finer style than the other Tangkas of this group(Rhodes Ev; KM. E 13.4), in PCGS holder, good very fine, very scarce obverse variety270 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (5), undated (Rhodes Eiv, Evii;KM. E 13.4a, 13.-), fine to very fine (5)HK$1,500-2,000(US$200-300)HK$500-750(US$70-100)Gaden Tangkas of F-Group (c.1907-22, 1924-25), Dode MintThe coins of this group were struck in the Dode (dog bde) mint which was located in the valley of the same name, about 15 kmnorth-east of Lhasa. They have the obverse with one dot between the outer part of petals and the reverse with three beads betweenthe outer part of the eight petals.271 (x 70%)271 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1907-12), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated (RhodesF, Fiii, Fiv, Fvi; KM. F 13.1), fine to very fine (4) HK$400-500(US$50-70)272 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangkas (4), undated (Rhodes Fi, Fiii, Fiv,Fvi; KM. F 13.1), fine to very fine (4)HK$400-500(US$50-70)273 (x 70%) 274 (x 70%)273 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (issued 1907-18), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated(Rhodes Fi, Fiv, Fvi, Fvii; KM. F 13.1), fine to very fine (4)274 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (issued 1907-22), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated, onewith one bead each side of the lotus (Rhodes Fi, Fviii, Fx (c), Fxi; KM. F 13.1), aboutvery fine to good very fine (4)WWW.SPINK.COMHK$400-500(US$50-70)HK$400-500(US$50-70)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG275 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (issued 1907-22), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated, onewith one bead each side of the lotus (Rhodes Fi, Fviii, Fx (c), Fxi; KM. F 13.1), fine tovery fine (4)276 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (issued 1907-22), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated, onewith one bead each side of the lotus, another with no beads by lotus (Rhodes Fi, Fviii,Fxi, Fxi (a); KM. F 13.1), very fine or better (4)HK$450-600(US$60-90)HK$450-600(US$60-90)277278 279277 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1907-1912), Gaden Tangka, 5.20g, undated,north-east symbol has small circle instead of dot between the fish, rev. with solid buds(Rhodes Fii var), about very fine278 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangka, 4.87g, undated, north-east symbolhas small circle instead of dot between the fish, south symbol (conch) is different fromthat of previous coin, rev. with solid buds (Rhodes Fii var), about very fine279 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangka, 4.62g, undated, north-west symbolhas small cross instead of dot in its centre (Rhodes Fiv var), very fine, very scarce obversevarietyHK$400-500(US$50-70)HK$400-500(US$50-70)HK$500-650(US$60-90)280281283280 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangka, 4.65g, undated (Rhodes Fv), veryfine and scarce281 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Gaden Tangka, 4.84g, undated (Rhodes Fv), veryfine and scarce282 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (issued 1907-22), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated, onewith no beads by lotus, another with conch (south symbol) curled on right side (RhodesFi, Fviii, Fxi (a), Fxi (c); KM. F 13.1), about very fine to good very fine (4)283 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (issued 1912-22), Gaden Tangkas (3), undated, onewith no beads by lotus, conch (south symbol) with single bead, another with conch curledon left side (Rhodes Fviii, Fxi (b), Fxi (c)), about very fine (3)65HK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$500-750(US$70-100)HK$500-750(US$70-100)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET285284 (x 85%)284 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (issued 1912-25), Gaden Tangkas (4), undated, onewith four beads instead of three between fishes (north-east symbol), another with conch(south symbol) curled on right side (Rhodes Fviii, Fxi (c), Fxii), one of the Fviii coins witha bulging area on both sides, about very fine to good very fine (4)285 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1924-25), Gaden Tangka, 4.63g, large flan(31mm), undated (Rhodes Fxii (a)), very fine and rareHK$500-750(US$70-100)HK$450-600(US$60-80)Gaden Tangkas of G-Group. Serkhang (gser khang) MintThe Tangkas of this group are the only ones which do not have any distinguishing marks between the outer part of the eight petals.They were struck at the Serkhang mint which was located west of the Norbu Lingka (summer residence of the Dalai Lamas), andshare the peculiar shape of the combined letter “rn” in the syllable “rnam” of the obverse legend with the 20 Srang gold coinswhich were struck at the same mint. It appears that after the the striking of Tibetan gold coins had been suspended early in T.E.15-55 (AD 1921), it was decided to strike Gaden Tangkas in this mint in order to make further use of the coin presses.286 287 288286 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1921), Gaden Tangka, 4.51g, undated (RhodesG, YZM 342-343, KM. Y#G13), very fine HK$230-400(US$30-50)287 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1921), Gaden Tangka, 4.40g, undated (RhodesG, YZM 342-343, KM. Y#G13), good very fine HK$230-400(US$30-50)Gaden Tangkas of H-group (c.1929-30), Dode Mint288 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1929-30), Gaden Tangka, 4.17g, undated, rev.the syllable in northwest position is spelt “la rgya” instead of “rgyal” (Rhodes Hi var,YZM 350, KM. Y#H13.2), in PCGS holder, graded AU50, rareHK$1,500-2,000(US$200-300)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG289289 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1929-30), Gaden Tangkas (2), 4.00g, 4.35g,undated (Rhodes Hi, Hii; YZM 345, 346, 347; KM Y# H13.1), good very fine (2)HK$450-600(US$60-90)290 291290 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1912), Double-Tangka, 10.47g, undated, withtails of two fishes not joined (northeast-symbol) (YZM 366; KM. Y#15), very fine andrare291 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (c.1912), Double-Tangka, 9.35g, undated, withtails of two fishes joined (north-east symbol) (YZM 367; KM. Y#15), edge weakness, aboutvery fine and rareHK$6,000-7,500(US$750-950)HK$6,000-7,500(US$750-950)292292 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, brockage of Gaden Tangka, 4.18g, undated, rev.obverse design struck incuse and reversed (YZM -; KM -), very fine and rareHK$3,000-4,000(US$400-500)67


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETSPECIAL TANGKAS (“MONK TANGKA”) 1910This coin is known in Tibetan as Kelsang Tangka and is said to have been distributed to monks during the Mönlam Festival (GreatPrayer Festival) which took place after New Year Day which in Tibet normally is in February according to the Western calendar.Possibly the distribution ceremony took place in the bskal bzang pho brang (“Kelsang Palace”) which is located in the NorbuLingka and was constructed by order of, and named after, the 7th Dalai Lama (1708-57).The British Resident in Nepal, Manners-Smith, reported the following: “On Monday 10th Falgun (21.2.1910) charity at the rateof 20 Mohars for each monk and 4 Masas of silver for each beggar was distributed on behalf of the Potala Lama. The money thusexpended must have come to about 6 lakh Mohars” (India Office Library & Records; File L/P&S/10/138). One could deducefrom this that the impressive number of 600,000 Tangkas of this type were struck, supposing that only this coin type was used forthe distribution ceremony. Although the weight standard of these coins is below that of the Gaden Tangkas, they could circulateat the same value, since they have about the same intrinsic value, being struck of fine silver, while the Gaden Tangkas on averagecontained only two thirds of silver.Today this type of Tangka is scarce, as most of these coins must have been melted down. This is in contrast to the Gaden Tangkasof which considerable numbers have survived.The obverse design of the “Monk Tangkas” is very similar to that of the 1 Srang coins which were struck in the name of XuanTong in 1909, the design of which was largely copied from the Mohars struck in the name of Pratap Singha which widely circulatedin Tibet. However, on the obverse the designer of the Monk Tangkas replaced the reference to the Chinese emperor by thestandard phrase which describes the Tibetan Government and he omitted the eight auspicious emblems which were shifted to thereverse which is closely copied from that of the contemporary Gaden Tangkas.Numerous obverse varities of the Kelsang Tangka have been noted. These can be identified by focussing on the legend of theobverse which is placed into four trapeziums. The two syllables in each trapezium have either two beads, placed at the beginningof the first and at the end of the second syllable or they have only one bead at either of these places or they are written withoutthe addition of one or two beads. Thus the obverse varieties can be described by recording these beads, starting with the uppertrapezium and going clockwise.(Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The Silver Coin Presented by the 13th Dalai Lama to Monks in 1910 A.D.” Tibet Journal, vol. 24, no. 4,winter 1999, pp. 22-34)293293 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (1910), Kelsang Tangka, 4.06g, undated, obv. beadtype: 1/2/0/0 (YZM? ; KM Y#14), good very fine and scarceHK$500-600(US$70-90)294294 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (1910), Kelsang Tangka, 4.38g, undated, obv. beadtype: 1/2/2/1 (YZM 352; KM. Y#14), very fine and scarceHK$500-600(US$70-90)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG295295 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (1953/54), Second issue Monk Tangka, 4.28g,undated (YZM 514-515; KM. Y#31), extremely fineFormerly it was assumed that the Tangkas were distributed to monks on behalf of the14th Dalai Lama in the late 1940s. The Chinese work by Zhu Jin Zhong et. al., publishedin 2002 includes illustrations of several pairs of dies and master dies for this type ofTangka. Some dies are inscribed with a Tibetan date on the shaft (Zhu Jinzhong (chiefeditor), Wang Haiyan, Wang Jiafeng, Zhang Wuyi, Wu Hanlin, Wang Dui [dbang ´dus]and Tsering Pincuo: Zhong guo xi zang qian bi [The Money of Chinese Tibet] Xi zang zi zhiou qian bi xue hui [Tibet Autonomous Region Numismatic Society], Zhong hua shu ju,Beijing 2002, pp. 225-231).The Tibetans referred to this Tangka as Tangka dkarpo sarpa (“new white Tangka”) inorder to distinguish it from the normal Gaden Tangkas. This coin circulated for sometime at the value of 5-Srang which shows the high inflation rate which was prevailing inTibet in the 20th Century. In the 19th Century 6⅔ Tangkas were equivalent to 1-Srangwhich corresponded to slightly more than 37 grams of silver. Taking the circulating valueof this Monk Tangka as a base, 1-Srang was equal to about 33⅓ Tangkas in 1953/54.HK$300-400(US$40-50)296296 Tibetan Government, Anonymous (1912), Machine struck Gaden Tangka, 5.71g,undated (YZM 514-515; KM. Y#F 13.3), in PCGS holder, graded AU58, very rareAcquired through exchange from Wolfgang Bertsch.This coin is struck from the same or similar dies as the double Tangka KM Y#15. A smallgroup of these Tangkas were purchased by the cataloguer in Kathmandu in about 1983;thereafter this coin type was never available again. The machine struck Tangka of this typein the Halpert sale (lot 117), in the Gabrisch sale (lot 166), the one formerly in theValdettaro collection (now in the British Museum, accession number: 1989,0904.274),and this coin were all part of this small group.The only other specimen which we are aware of is in the collection of the AmericanNumismatic Society and was donated by Charles Panish (accession no. 1973.217.36).HK$4,000-5,000(US$500-600)69


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETTIBETAN PATTERN COINSThe Tibetan pattern coins of the 20th Century are among the rarest and most desirable items a collector of Tibetan coins can hopeto acquire for his collection. Some of them were struck in England, while others were struck in Tibet and are inspired by Britishprototypes and yet others are of pure Tibetan design. Most of them were described and illustrated by Nicholas Rhodes andWolfgang Bertsch and were more recently illustrated in Chinese publications, such as those edited by Zhu Jinzhong (and others,2002), Cao Gang (1999), and more recently in the catalogues by Wang Haiyan (2007), Ying Zheng Min (2004) and Wang ChunLi (2012). For more details on these publications see the bibliography in the introductory part of this catalogue. Most of theTibetan pattern coins were also listed with illustrations in the older editions of the Standard Catalog of World Coins 1901-2000of Krause Publications; however, the illustrations were omitted for no obvious reasons in more recent editions of these catalogues.The Rhodes collection includes the largest group of Tibetan pattern coins ever to be offered at a public auction.297 Tibet, Anonymous (c.1910), 10-Tam pattern, 27.4g, undated, norbu within centralsquare panel within a second square divided by diagonal lines, legend (starting in theupper trapezium and continuing clockwise) dga’ ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal (theGaden Palace, victorious in all directions), denomination near the rim at 12 o’clock and6 o clock: tam bcu (“ten Tam”) only the letter “t” of the word “tam” is visible, rev. fivesymbols within a circular panel, surrounded by the eight auspicious symbols within alotus-petal design (YZM 381; KM Pn 3), in PCGS holder, graded SP63, very fine andextremely rareHK$120,000-150,000(US$15,000-20,000)PROVENANCE:Ex. Karl Gabrisch collection. Baldwin, Ma Tak Wo, Monetarium & Gillio Auction,Hong Kong, 1 September 2005, lot 176.The weight standard of this pattern coin seems to be modelled on Chinese silver Taels,which again followed the weight standard of the South American and Mexican 8-Realessilver coins.The obverse of the coin shows the same design and inscription as the well-known MonkTangka (KM Y#14). The double arches attached to the trapeziums are copied from theNepalese Mohars struck in the name of Pratap Simha which were specially struck forexport to Tibet. The denomination tam bcu (“ten Tam”) has only the letter “t” of theword “tam” visible, as the final letter “m” is probably indicated by a small circle (inSanskrit known as anusvãra) placed above the letter “t”, off flan.The reverse design is only found on this coin. It represents the five symbolic objects whichstimulate the senses (Tibetan: ´don yon sna lnga): The mirror (me long) symbolizes thephysical forms (gzugs) that appeal to the eye. The two peaches (shing tog) on either sideof the mirror are pleasing to the taste (ro). The pair of cymbals (sil snyan) below themirror represent the sounds (sgra) which reach the ear. The pieces of cloth that areattached to the cymbals excite the sense of touch (reg bya). The conch shell (dung) belowthe cymbals is supposed to contain a fragrant liquid which stimulates the faculty of smell.No example of this pattern seems to exist in China. The illustration in the catalogue ofYZM (no. 381) has been copied (without indicating the source) from Gabrisch, Karl:Geld aus Tibet. Sammlung Dr. Karl Gabrisch, Winterthur and Rikon, 1990, plate 21, no.90. The same coin from a European collection (not the specimen from the Rhodescollection) is illustrated by Wang Chun Li: “Illustrated Catalogue of Chinese Gold & SilverCoins; 1791-1949” (Zhong guo jin yin bi mu lu), Zhong guo shang ye chu ban she (ChinaTrade Publishing House), Beijing 2012, p. 89, no. WS0275.There exists a smaller coin (29.2mm) of the same design the obverse of which is inscribednear the rim with the syllables tam lnga (five tam) and is illustrated by YZM as no. 387.WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG297297 (x2)71


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET298298 Tibet, Anonymous, Forgery 10-Tam pattern, 21.84g, undated, see previous coin (YZM380; KM -), very fine HK$3,000-4,000(US$400-500)PROVENANCE:Ex. Karl Gabrisch collection. Baldwin, Ma Tak Wo, Monetarium & Gillio Auction,Hong Kong, 1 September 2005, lot 176 (with previous lot)Probably produced in Nepal in the late 1960s.The forger engraved the eight Buddhist emblems of the reverse in reversed order andinstead of the peaches and the conch he engraved some meaningless lines. YZM whoillustrates this forgery as no. 380 does not mention that this coin is fake. In the late 1990sone of these apparently rare forgeries was offered for a very high price to the cataloguerby a dealer from Lhasa. It had been brought by a Tibetan trader from Kathmanduto Lhasa. Most probably this is the specimen which YZM illustrates in his catalogue asno. 380.299299 Tibet, Anonymous, Forgery 10-Tam pattern, 12.99g, undated, struck from the samedies as previous coin, but to a different weight standard (YZM 380; KM -), very fineHK$3,000-4,000(US$400-500)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG300300 Tibet, Anonymous, 20-Tam Srang pattern struck in brass, 7.48g, 15-57 (1923),crouching lion of European style, facing left, legend rab byung 15 (“cycle 15”) and lo 57(“year 57”) below, eight auspicious emblems of Buddhism between inner and outercircles, rev. central legend tam srang 20, around this dga’ ldan pho brang phyogs las rnamrgyal (“the Ganden Palace, victorious in all directions”). (YZM - ; KM Pn 8), in PCGSholder, graded SP63, rareExamples of this pattern were send to Tibet by the British firm Taylor & Challen who hadsold coin presses to Tibet in the 1920s.HK$15,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)301301 Tibet, Anonymous, Shokang pattern struck in brass, 4.98g, 15-57 (1923), standing lionof European style, facing left and looking backwards with sun above, the legend dga’ ldanpho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal (“the Ganden Palace, victorious in all directions”) around,rev. central legend zho gang (“one Sho”), surrounded by string of pearls, the legend: rabbyung 15 lo 57 (cycle 15 year 57”) around this, the syllables being seperated by anornament which the European die engraver copied from the regular 1-Sho copper issuesof the Tibetan Government (YZM 769; KM Pn 6), in PCGS holder, graded SP63, rarePROVENANCE:Ex. Spink, 1977. Spink had purchased this coin in the U.S.A. A letter by NicholasRhodes to Carlo Valdettaro, dated Kingston-upon-Thames 11th October 1977 refers tothis. A second letter to Carlo Valdettaro, dated 24 March 1978 concerns the twopattern Shokang coins (lot 301 and lot 307), and the 5-Sho pattern coin (lot 304) inwhich he wrote: “The two 1-Sho coins came from Spinks, who bought them inAmerica. The one dated 15-57 was almost certainly struck by Taylor & Challen inBirmingham, and was the companion piece to our brass 20 srang piece of the samedate. Ringang must have bought the coin press in England in that year, while he waspurchasing the hydro-electric machinery, and these patterns were produced as examplesof what the machine could strike. The machine could not be used in Tibet until 1928,when the hydro-electric plant was finally working and it is my opinion that the first coinstruck was the ¡ 5-Sho (Y 32), which has identical milling to my brass pattern 20-Srang. The two 1-Sho have plain edges. The 15-57 piece has a matt surface, whereasthe 16-1 piece has a proof surface. I have no idea where this latter piece was made, butthe design is very similar to the 16-4 ¡ 5-Sho pattern.”Actually Taylor & Challen must have sent as well (or only) the dies for the Shokang dated16-4 and for the 5-Sho pattern of the same date. Three of the dies must have been keptin the Tibetan mint and are illustrated by Zhu Jinzhong, Wang Hai Yan, Wang Jia Feng,Zhang Wu Yi, Wu Han Lin, Wang Dui and Tse ring Pin cuo: Zhong guo Xi zang Qian bi(Chinese Tibet’s Money). Xi zang zi zhi ou qian bi xue hui (Tibet Autonomous RegionNumismatic Society). Zhong hua Shu ju, ISBN 7-101-03360-4/Z.449, Beijing, 2002, p.199, no. 3-20 and p. 200, no. 3-21 and 3-22.HK$15,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)73


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET302302 (x2)302 Tibet, Anonymous (c.1928-30), 10-Tam Srang pattern, 12.26g, standing snow lionfacing left within a circular border, an emblem referred to in Tibet as nor bu dga’ kyil(“whorling jewel of joy”) above the lion, surrounded by four small jewels and streamers,below the lion the same device in a simpler version, the eight Buddhist auspiciousemblems between this and outer beaded circle, rev. the legend tam 10 in the centre of anornamental cartouche with four small crosses, the standard legend which refers to theTibetan Government: dga’ ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal around, the legend’ssyllables not seperated by the usual beads (Tibetan tsheg = “syllable marker”) but by smallcrosses, this surrounded by a circle composed of cloud-shaped elements connected byarches, between each pair of which there is a bead, all within a beaded circular border(YZM 499; KM Pn.11), in PCGS holder, graded SP45, extremely rareHK$75,000-100,000(US$10,000-12,000)PROVENANCE:Ex. Wesley Halpert collection, Spink, New York, 11 December 2000, lot 176.This pattern was probably among the first coins to be struck in the Dode mint between1928 and 1930 with the imported coining presses from the British firm Taylor & Challen.This pattern, along with the 5-Sho pattern of similar design (lot 304) is the most beautifulexample of the skill of Tibetan designers and die engravers. It is the only example onwhich this peculiar shape of the tsheg is present.WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG303303 (x2)303 Tibet, Anonymous (c.1928-30), 10-Tam Srang pattern, 8.26g, undated, crouchingsnow lion, facing left, looking diagonally upwards right with sun and three ornamentsabove and small mountain below, within a circular border to which eight lotus petals areattached, each containing one of the eight Buddhist auspicious emblems, with circle andbeaded border around, rev. legend tam 10 within an ornamental cartouche, standardlegend around dga’ ldan pho brang phyo(gs) las rnam rgyal each syllable being enclosedby the upper part of a petal, within a beaded circular border (YZM 500; KM Pn. 12), inPCGS holder, graded SP45, extremely rareHK$75,000-100,000(US$10,000-12,000)PROVENANCE:Ex. Wesley Halpert collection, Spink, New York, 11 December 2000, lot 177.This pattern was probably among the first coins to be struck in the Dode mint between1928 and 1930 with the imported coining presses from the British firm Taylor & Challen.75


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET304304 (x1.5)304 Tibet, Anonymous (c.1928-30), 5-Sho pattern, 6.26g, undated, similar to the 10-Tampattern (lot 302), except that lotus on obverse (5 o’clock position) has a bead and smallcircle in the centre, rev. legend in centre reads zho lnga (“five Sho”) (YZM 497; KM.PnA12), in PCGS holder, extremely fine and very rareIn older editions of KM this coin was listed as a regular issue (as Y # 32), but it is nowbelieved that it is a pattern coin struck between 1928 and 1930 in the Dode mint withthe imported coining presses from the British firm Taylor & Challen.HK$60,000-75,000(US$8,000-10,000)305305 (x1.5)305 Tibet, Anonymous (c.1928-30), 1-Tam Srang pattern, 6.04g, undated, same as previouscoin, rev. flower shaped wheel with eight spokes and norbu dga’ kyil (“whirling jewel ofjoy”) in centre, surrounded by eight arches and a circle, the legend: dga’ ldan pho brangphyogs las rnam rgyal tam srang 1 (“the Gaden Palace, victorious in all directions 1 TamSrang”) around, within a beaded circular border (YZM 498; KM Pn 10), in PCGS holder,graded SP64, extremely rareThis pattern was probably among the first coins to be struck in the Dode mint between1928 and 1930 using the imported coining presses from the British firm Taylor &Challen. The obverse appears to have been struck from the same obverse die as theprevious coin, lot 304. The reverse design is inspired by that of the 20 Tam gold coins.HK$60,000-75,000(US$8,000-10,000)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG306306 (x1.5)306 Tibet, Anonymous, 5-Sho pattern, 4.44g, 16-4 (1930), crouching snow lion, facing left,looking diagonally upwards, norbu dga’ kyil (“whirling jewel of joy”), three ornamentsabove and small mountain below, within a circular border to which eight lotus petals areattached, each containing one syllable of the standard legend dga’ ldan pho brang phyogslas rnam rgyal, rev. central legend zho lnga (“five Sho”) within circle around which runslegend: rab byung 16 lo 4 (“cycle 16 year 4”), the syllables being separated by lotus flowerswith eight petals (YZM 425; KM Pn 13), in PCGS holder, graded SP66, very rarePROVENANCE:Ex. Carlo Valdettaro collection (1987).The reverse of this coin seems to have been struck from the altered reverse die of thefollowing coin, lot 307 (Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “Two Tibetan Pattern Coins,” OrientalNumismatic Society Newsletter, no. 105, March-April 1987).HK$60,000-75,000(US$8,000-10,000)307307 Tibet, Anonymous, brass Shokang pattern, 4.34g, 16-1, crouching lion of Europeanstyle, facing left, similar to that on the 20 Tam Srang pattern coin (lot 300), otherwisesimilar to previous lot, rev. as previous lot but central legend reads zho gang (“one Sho”)with peripheral legend: rab byung 16 lo 1 (“cycle 16 year 1”), (YZM 770; KM Pn 9), inPCGS holder, graded SP64, very rarePROVENANCE:Acquired from Spink together with lot 301 in 1977. Spink had purchased this coin inthe U.S.A.Only two other specimens are known. These were offered in a fixed price list by GirijaE.Brilliant and Lawrence B. Brilliant: Himalayan Numismatics, Winter 1983, p.14, lot71. The Brilliants mention that one of their two specimens came from the collection ofH. Chang (author of The Silver Dollars and Taels of China) and the other from thecollection of proofs and patterns of the Birmingham mint.Most probably the dies used for striking these coins were sent to Tibet by the British firmTaylor & Challen of Birmingham. According to Nicholas Rhodes “the dies for thispattern 1-Sho piece were sent to Tibet, perhaps from Birmingham, and were subseqentlyground down and re-engraved by the Tibetans, and used to strike the silver 5-Sho coins”(Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “Two Tibetan Pattern Coins”. Oriental Numismatic SocietyNewsletter, no. 105, March-April 1987). The cataloguer would prefer to state thatoriginally at least two pairs of dies existed out of which one pair was only partly grounddown before being re-engraved, while the other pair was left in the original state and isillustrated by Zhu Jinzhong, Wang Hai Yan, Wang Jia Feng, Zhang Wu Yi, Wu Han Lin,Wang Dui and Tse ring Pin cuo: Zhong guo Xi zang Qian bi (Chinese Tibet’s Money). Xizang zi zhi ou qian bi xue hui (Tibet Autonomous Region Numismatic Society). Zhonghua Shu ju, ISBN 7-101-03360-4/Z.449, Beijing, 2002, p.200, no. 3-21 and 3-22. Areverse die for striking of the 5-Sho pattern, dated 16-4 is illutrated in the same work,p.199, no. 3-20. A master die for the production of the shokang pattern, dated 16-1, alsoexisted and is illustrated by Cao Gang: Zhong guo xi zang di feng huo bi (Chinese Tibet’sRegional Currency), Sichuan Minzi Chubanshe, Chengdu, 1999, p.76.HK$18,000-23,000(US$2,500-3,000)77


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET308308 Tibet, Anonymous, Æ 5-Ngul Srang pattern, 6.17g, (rab lo 927), snow lion with mountKailash (Tibetan gangs rin po che or gangs ti se) sun above, surrounded by the standardlegend: dga’ ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal, with denomination srang lnga (“fiveSrang”) below, rev. Wheel of Law (Sanskrit: dharma cakra; Tibetan chos ‘khor) in centre,surrounded by “flaming jewel”, moon and sun, ribbons and lotus flower below, twobranches on either side, this surrounded by a string of pearls with legend around: gangsljongs chos srid gnyis ldan rab lo 927 (cycle year 927 of the both religious and worldly[government] of the Snow Country) (YZM 529; KM Pn 20), very fine and scarcePROVENANCE:Purchased by Nicholas Rhodes in Nepal in 1967.This pattern is also known in silver (or billon). Some of the copper issues may haveentered circulation (see Zhu Jinzhong, Wang Hai Yan, Wang Jia Feng, Zhang Wu Yi, WuHan Lin, Wang Dui and Tse ring Pin cuo: Zhong guo Xi zang Qian bi (Chinese Tibet’sMoney). Xi zang zi zhi ou qian bi xue hui (Tibet Autonomous Region NumismaticSociety). Zhong hua Shu ju, ISBN 7-101-03360-4/Z.449, Beijing, 2002, coin no. 1-344to 1-348, p. 140).(Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “Two Tibetan Pattern Coins”. Oriental Numismatic SocietyNewsletter, no. 105, March-April 1987)HK$5,000-6,000(US$650-850)20TH CENTURY SINO-TIBETAN COINS UNDER CHINESE AUTHORITY309309 Tibet, Xuan Tong (1909-11), 2-Sho, 7.32g, undated (c.1910), lotus design in centre,Chinese inscription (to be read crosswise) Xuan Tong bao zang (Tibetan money of theXuan Tong era), rev. dragon in centre, surrounded by a string of pearls and Tibetaninscription: shon thong bod kyi rin khor khu phon zho do (Xuan Tong, precious coin of twosho, (struck) to the kuping standard) (YZM 433-437; KM. Y#6; LM 652), fine“rin khor” is most probably a phonetic spelling of “rin sgor” which means “preciouscoin”. Kuping (transcribed as khu phon in Tibetan) “treasury standard” or “treasury scale”refers to the Kuping Tael, the standard weight which was fixed at 37.3121 in the lateQing Dynasty for payment of government taxes.HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG310310 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 2-Sho, 8.13g, undated (c.1910), lotus design in centre, Chineseinscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev. as previous coin (YZM 433-437; KM. Y#6; LM652), die crack visible on reverse, very fine HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)311312311 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 2-Sho, 6.84g, undated (c.1910), lotus design in centre, Chineseinscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev. as previous coin (YZM 433-437; KM. Y#6; LM652), fine HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)312 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 2-Sho, 7.27g, undated (c.1910), lotus design in centre, Chineseinscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev. as previous coin (YZM 433-437; KM. Y#6; LM652), adjustment marks on reverse, fine HK$1,800-2,400(US$250-350)313314313 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 1-Sho, 4.07g, undated (c.1910), five-petalled lotus design in centre,surrounded by a string of pearls, Chinese inscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev. dragon incentre, surrounded by a string of pearls, Tibetan inscription: shon thong bod kyi rin khorkhu phon zho gang (Xuan Tong, precious coin of 1-Sho, (struck) to the Kuping standard)(YZM 426-432; KM. Y#5; LM 653/4), very fineObverse variety: pearls connected by string.One Tibetan Sho is equivalent to 1 ⁄10th of a Srang or Tael (Liang), hence the weightstandard intended for the 1sho coins of the Xuan Tong era is 3.73g.314 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 1-Sho, 3.81g, undated (c.1910), five-petalled lotus design in centre,surrounded by a string of pearls, Chinese inscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev. asprevious coin (YZM 426-432; KM Y#5; LM 653/4), obverse die crack, very fine,exceptionally nice condition for issueObverse variety: pearls not connected by string.HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)HK$4,000-5,000(US$500-700)79


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET315315 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 1-Sho, 3.68g, undated (c.1910), five-petalled lotus design in centre,surrounded by a string of pearls, Chinese inscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev. asprevious coin (YZM 426-432; KM. Y#5; LM 653/4), die crack on obverse, adjustmentmarks both sides, very fineObverse variety: pearls not connected by string.HK$1,700-2,200(US$250-300)316316 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 1-Sho, 4.08g, undated (c.1910), five-petalled lotus design in centre,surrounded by a string of pearls, Chinese inscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev. asprevious coin (YZM 426-432; KM Y#5; LM 653/4), very fineObverse variety: only two pearls connected by string.HK$3,000-4,000(US$350-450)317317 Tibet, Xuan Tong, Æ 1-Skar, 6.41g, undated (c.1910), four-petalled lotus design incentre, surrounded by a string of pearls, Chinese inscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev.dragon in centre, surrounded by a string of pearls, Tibetan inscription: shon thong bod kyirin ´khor Skar gang (Xuan Tong, precious coin of one Skar) (YZM 635; KM. Y#4), aboutvery fine and scarceHK$6,000-7,500(US$750-950)318318 Tibet, Xuan Tong, Æ Half-Skar, 3.44g, undated (c.1910), four-petalled lotus design incentre, surrounded by a string of pearls, Chinese inscription, Xuan Tong bao zang, rev.dragon in centre, surrounded by a string of pearls, Tibetan inscription: shon thong bod kyirin khor Skar che (Xuan Tong, precious coin of Half-Skar) (YZM 633 [under no. 634YZM describes a Half-Skar, but the illustration shows a forgery of a 1-Sho coin, struck incopper]; KM Y#A4), in PCGS holder, graded XF45, rarePROVENANCE:Ex G.E.Chapman collection, acquired by Nicholas Rhodes in 1978 (see letter byNicholas Rhodes to Carlo Valdettaro, dated Kingston-upon Thames 24.3.1978).The syllable che in Skar che means “half” and is normally spelt phyed in Tibetan as can beseen on the 2½ and 7½-Skar copper coins.WWW.SPINK.COMHK$11,000-15,000(US$1,400-1,900)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG319319 (x1.5)319 China for Tibet, Anonymous (c.1902/03), “Lukuan”(lu guan) Rupee, 11.70g,undated (YZM 438; KM. Y#A1.1; LM 655), in PCGS holder, graded XF, small scratchand two edge nicks on obverse, very rareHK$75,000-100,000(US$10,000-13,000)According to the obverse inscription this rare coin is known as Lukuan (lu guan) Rupee.It was struck in the Kangding mint in western Sichuan.This Rupee can be considered as the forerunner of the Sichuan Rupee. It is believed thatin 1902AD “Liu Ding Shu”, Sub-Prefect of Ta Chien Lu (now Kangding district) orderedthe minting of “Lu Guang” silver coins in order to eliminate the circulation of foreigncoins, particularly of British-Indian Rupees, in Szechuan Province. Liu used the silverbeing transported to Tibet for military expenses to mint the coin(http://ykleungn.tripod.com/szeRupee.htm).Nicholas Rhodes (Rhodes, Nicholas: “A Sino-Tibetan Rupee”. Spink’s NumismaticCircular, vol. 85, London, 1977, p.107-108) has attempted to read the legends asfollows:Obverse legend (to be read from right to left): “Lu guan tsu yin ?” (“Tachienlu Customsenough silver”). The syllable “lu” could be interpreted as the last syllable of Da jian lu,the former Chinese name of Kangding, from which the western version “Tachienlu” isderived.The reverse Tibetan legend: nged gsum zho dar (“three sho of Tachienlu enough silver”).The syllable dar may be understood as being the first syllable of Dar rtse mdo, thetraditional Tibetan name of present day Kangding.320320 China for Tibet, Anonymous (c.1902/03), “Lukuan”(lu guan) Rupee, 11.64g,undated, as previous coin except rev. Tibetan script around the central circle of beads isupside down and reversed when compared with the normal issue (YZM 438 var; KMY#A1.2; LM 655 var), weakly struck in places, in PCGS holder, graded AU50, very rarePROVENANCE:Ex Erving Goodman collection, Superior Galleries, 1991, lot 1802.HK$60,000-70,000(US$8,000-9,000)81


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETOTHER COINS IN THE NAME OF XUAN TONG321321 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 1-Tam Srang, 19.99g, first year (1909), shon thong (uppertrapezium)/khri (trapezium to the left)/lo 1 (trapezium to the right)/srang gang (lowertrapezium), “One Srang of the first year of Xuan Tong”, the eight auspicious Buddhistemblems (Tibetan bkra shis rtag brgyad) placed around the central square, rev. legendplaced inside eight lotus petals: dga’ ldan pho brang phyo(gs) las rnam rgyal (“the GandenPalace victorious in all directions”) (YZM 386; KM. Y#9; LM 657), in PCGS holder,graded AU58Numerous obverse variants of the 1-Srang coins dated to the first year of Xuan Tong exist.The features on the obverse which differ are the ornaments placed outside the largersquare in the north-west and south-east position and the norbu in the centre.The reverse legend is an expression referring to the Tibetan government as it was createdby the 5th Dalai Lama in 1642, while he was still residing in the Ganden Palace withinthe Drepung monastery.HK$11,000-14,000(US$1,400-1,800)322 323322 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 1-Tam Srang, 19.22g, first year (1909) (YZM 385; KM. Y#9; LM657), in PCGS holder, graded AU55 HK$11,000-14,000(US$1,400-1,800)323 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 1-Tam Srang, 18.58g, first year (1909) (YZM 385; KM. Y#9;. LM657), with some scratches, in PCGS holder, graded VF30 HK$6,000-7,500(US$750-950)324324 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 1-Tam Srang, 17.93g, first year (1909) (YZM 382; KM. Y#9; LM657), in PCGS holder, graded AU58 HK$11,000-14,000(US$1,400-1,800)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG325325 Tibet, Xuan Tong, 5-Sho, 10.41g, first year (1909), inscription similar to previous lotexcept that legend in the lower trapezium gives the denomination: zho lnga (“five zho”)(YZM 388; KM. Y#8; LM -), in PCGS holder, graded AU53, very rareHK$38,000-45,000(US$5,000-7,000)326327326 Tibet, Xuan Tong, Æ Quarter-Sho, 9.11g, first year (1909), inscription similar toprevious lot except that legend in the lower trapezium gives the denomination: zho ‘i 4 ⁄ 1(“¼ of the Sho”) (YZM 630/631; KM. Y#B7), very fineNote that in Tibetan language fractions are written with the denominator placed aboveand the numerator below which is the opposite to the Western way of writing fractions.327 Tibet, Xuan Tong, Æ Quarter-Sho, 8.58g, first year (1909), zho ‘i 4 ⁄ 1 (“¼ of the Sho”)(YZM 630/631; KM Y#B7), very fineHK$2,300-3,000(US$300-350)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)328 329328 Tibet, Xuan Tong, Æ ⅛-Sho, 4.00g, first year (1909), two syllables of the legend in theupper trapezium read shon thong (Tibetan transcription of Xuan Tong) separated with asmall vertical stroke, legend in lower trapezium reads: zho ‘i 8 ⁄ 1 (“⅛ of the Sho”) (YZM628; KM. Y#A7), fine and scarce HK$3,000-4,500(US$400-600)The two coins offered include both the two known obverse variants.This small vertical stroke found separating the legend in the upper trapezium is thesyllable divider, called tsheg in Tibetan. It is normally in the form of a dot. The correctspelling of the legend shon thong should be with tsheg as is the case with the 1-Srang,5-Sho and quarter-Sho coins of the Xuan Tong era.329 Tibet, Xuan Tong Æ ⅛-Sho, 4.36g, first year (1909), two syllables of the legend in theupper trapezium reading shon thong not separated, legend in lower trapezium reads:zho ‘i 8 ⁄ 1 (“⅛ of the Sho”) (YZM -; KM. Y#A7), fine and scarceHK$3,000-4,500(US$400-600)83


Early Coins dated 15-43 (1909)THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETCOINAGE OF THE 13TH DALAI LAMA330330 Tibet, Anonymous (1909), 1-Tam Srang, 19.13g, 15-43, snow lion looking back,ornaments above lion’s back, within circle to which eight lotus petals are attached, eachcontaining one syllable of the legend dga ldan pho brang phyo(gs) las rnam rgyal (“theGanden Palace, victorious in all directions”), rev. triratna (triple gem) in centresurrounded by circle around which the following legend is found (starting at 12 o’clockand reading clockwise): rab byung 15 lo 43 tam srang gang (“cycle 15, year 43, one tamsrang”), this surrounded by a circle to which eight lotus petals are attached, eachcontaining one of the eight Buddhist auspicious emblems (YZM 391 rev. var; KM. Y#12;LM 656), in PCGS holder, small planchet fault on reverse, very fine and scarceThe traces red puja powder found on the coin indicates that it had been used for somereligious ceremony. The figure “3” on reverse is written in a peculiar way; the lower strokebeing separate from the upper part of the figure.The triratna or “triple gem” (Tibetan; nor bu, “jewel” or dkon mchog gsum “the threerare ones”), refers to buddha, sangha and dharma, i.e. “the enlightened”, “thecommunity” and “the teaching” or “religion.”HK$30,000-40,000(US$4,000-5,000)331331 Tibet, Anonymous, 1-Tam Srang, 19.85g, 15-43, snow lion looking back, as previouscoin, rev. as before but vertical (instead of horizontal) stroke in the north symbol (YZM-; KM. Y#12 var), in PCGS holder, graded AU58, rare variant HK$30,000-40,000(US$4,000-5,000)332332 Tibet, Anonymous, 1-Tam Srang, 18.49g, 15-43, snow lion looking back, as previouscoin, rev. as before but horizontal stroke in north symbol (YZM 390; KM. Y#12), inPCGS holder, graded XF45, scarceHK$30,000-40,000(US$4,000-5,000)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG333333 (x1.5)333 Tibet, Anonymous, 1-Tam Srang, 18.25g, 15-43, snow lion looking back, as previouscoin, rev. as before (YZM 390; KM. Y#12), in PCGS holder, graded AU58, scarceHK$45,000-55,000(US$6.000-7,000)334 335334 Tibet, Anonymous (1909), Æ 7½-Skar, 9.79g, 15-43, snow lion looking back, asprevious coin, rev. as before but legend (starting at 12 o’clock and reading clockwise): rabbyung 15 lo 43 Skar phyed brgyad (“cycle 15, year 43, seven and half Skar”; literally: “cycle15, year 43, take half off eight Skar”) (YZM 626; KM. Y#11), very fine and scarce HK$4,000-4,500(US$500-600)335 Tibet, Anonymous (1909), Æ 5-Skar, 5.44g, 15-43, snow lion looking back, as previouscoin, rev. as before but legend (starting at 12 o’clock and reading clockwise): rab byung15 lo 43 Skar lnga (“cycle 15, year 43, five Skar”) (YZM 625; KM. Y#A10), very fine andscarceHK$4,500-6,000(US$550-750)336 337336 Tibet, Anonymous, (1909), Æ 2½-Skar, 4.42g, 15-43, snow lion looking back, asprevious coin, rev. as before but legend (starting at 12 o’clock and reading clockwise): rabbyung 15 lo 43 Skar phyed gsum (“cycle 15, year 43, two and half Skar”; literally: “cycle15, year 43, take half off three Skar”) (YZM 624; KM. Y#10), fine and scarce HK$3,000-4,000(US$400-500)337 Tibet, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar?, 3.28g, 15-43, snow lion looking back, as previouscoin, rev. as for Shokang (YZM -; KM -), fine and rareIt appears that a 2½-Skar coin was overstruck on reverse with a Shokang die in order torevalue the coin by the factor 4 (1 Shokang = 10 Skar).85HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETLater Coins post 1912338338 (x1.5)338 Tibet, Anonymous, 1-Tam Srang, 18.52g, 15-48 (1914), snow lion looking upwards,ornaments above back, rev. as previous Tam-Srangs (lots 330-333), but legend reads:rab byung 15 lo 48 tam srang gang (cycle 15, year 48, one Tam Srang) (YZM 397;KM. Y#A18), in PCGS holder, graded VF35, very rareHK$75,000-100,000(US$10,000-14,000)339 340339 Tibet, Anonymous, 1-Tam Srang, 19.39g, 15-52 (1918) snow lion looking upwards,ornaments above back, rev. as previous, but legend reads: rab byung 15 lo 52 tam sranggang (cycle 15, year 52, one Tam Srang) (YZM 398; KM. Y#A18.1), in PCGS holder,graded XF45, very rare340 Tibet, Anonymous, 1-Tam Srang, 19.39g, 15-53 (1919), snow lion looking upwards,ornaments above back, rev. as previous, but legend reads: rab byung 15 lo 53 tam sranggang (cycle 15, year 53, one Tam Srang) (YZM 399; KM. Y#A18.1), in PCGS holder,graded AU58, rareHK$60,000-75,000(US$8,000-10,000)HK$50,000-60,000(US$7,000-8,000)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG341342341 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.63g, Dode mint, 15-47 (1913), snowlion looking upwards with sun and three ornaments within circle to which eight lotuspetals are attached, each contains one syllable of the legend dga’ ldan pho brang phyo(gs)las rnam rgyal (The Ganden Palace, victorious in all directions), rev. triratna (triple gem)in centre surrounded by circle with legend around (starting at 12 o’clock and readingclockwise: rab byung 15 lo 47 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 47, 5-Sho), this surrounded by acircle to which eight lotus petals are attached, each containing one of the eight Buddhistauspicious emblems (YZM 400; KM. Y#18), very fine342 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.80g, Dode mint, 15-48 (1914), snowlion looking upwards, as previous lot but lion’s tail has nine strands, rev. triratna andsymbols as previous coin, but legend reads: rab byung 15 lo 48 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 48,5-Sho) (YZM 401-402; KM. Y#18), about very fineHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)343 344343 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.44g, Dode mint, 15-49 (1915), snowlion looking upwards, as previous lot but lion’s tail has ten strands, thick line above sun,rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin, but legend reads: rab byung 15 lo 49 zho lnga(cycle 15, year 49, 5-Sho) (YZM 403; KM. Y#18), very fine and scarceThe thick line above the sun is due to an engraving error, not a planchet fault, sincevarious coins with this feature are known.344 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.66g, Dode mint, 15-49 (1915), snowlion looking diagonally upwards, as previous lot but lion’s tail has nine strands, rev.triratna, symbols and legend as previous coin (YZM 403; KM. Y#18), about very fineHK$2,300-2,800(US$300-350)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)345 346345 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.35g, Dode mint, 15-50 (1916), snowlion looking upwards, tail has nine strands as previous lot, but lion fatter with large circlearound, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin but legend reads: rab byung 15 lo 50zho lnga (cycle 15, year 50, 5-Sho) (YZM 404-5; KM. Y#18), some areas of dirt, very fine346 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 7.85g, Dode mint, 15-50 (1916), snowlion looking upwards, as previous lot, rev. triratna, symbols and legend as previous coin(YZM 404-5; KM. Y#18), very fineHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)87


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET347 348347 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.48g, Dode mint, 15-50 (1916), snowlion looking upwards, as previous lot, tail has eight strands and lion ‘thin’ with small circlearound, rev. triratna, symbols and legend as previous coin (YZM 404-5; KM. Y#18), veryfine348 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 7.86g, Dode mint, 15-50 (1916), snowlion looking upwards, similar to previous lot, rev. triratna, symbols and legend asprevious coin, but with a countermark in Seal Script (Tibetan hor yig) (coin YZM 404-5;KM. Y#18), about very fineThe countermark is probably a modern addition, produced in Northern India with aTibetan iron sealHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$2,300-2,800(US$300-350)349 350349 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.43g, Dode mint, 15-59 (1925), snowlion looking upwards, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin but legend reads: rabbyung 15 lo 59 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 59, 5-Sho) (YZM -; KM. Y#18), in PCGS holder,EF45, rare350 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.95g, Dode mint, 15-60 (1926), snowlion looking upwards, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin but legend reads: rabbyung 15 lo 60 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 60, 5-Sho) (YZM -; KM. Y#18), in PCGS holder,EF45, very rareHK$7,500-9,000(US$1,000-1,200)HK$15,000-18,000(US$1,200-2,500)351 352351 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 7.41g, Dode mint, 15-60 (1926), snowlion looking backwards, flower above composed of seven beads, three beads instead ofsmall mountain below lion, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin but legend reads:rab byung 15 lo 52 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 52, 5-Sho) (YZM 406; KM. Y#18.2), very fineand rare352 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.95g, Mekyi mint, 15-49 (1915), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, but cross-shaped ornament above back (knownin Tibetan as a nor bu dga ‘kyil, “precious joyful whorl” or “whorling jewel of joy”), sunhas 11 rays, and three ornaments, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin, but legendreads: rab byung 15 lo 49 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 49, 5-Sho) (YZM 408-411; KM.Y#18.1), very fineHK$9,000-12,000(US$1,200-1,500)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG353 354353 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.75g, Mekyi mint, 15-49 (1915), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament above back, rev.triratna, symbols and legend as previous coin, but also two countermarks: one in Tibetanscript reading rgyal and one in Chinese script, reading shou, within a circle of beads (YZM408-411 var; KM. Y#18.1), obverse has a flattened area due to countermark, very fine HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)Most probably the countermarks are modern additions applied with Tibetan iron seals.354 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.62g, Mekyi mint, 15-49 (1915), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament above back, sun hasnine rays and three ornaments, rev. triratna, symbols and legend as previous coin, butwithout countermarks (YZM 408-411; KM. Y#18.1), good fineHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)355 356355 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.16g, Mekyi mint, 15-50 (1916), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament above back, sun hassix or seven rays and three ornaments, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin butlegend reads: rab byung 15 lo 50 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 50, 5-Sho) (YZM 412-415; KM.Y#18.1), about fine356 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.72g, Mekyi mint, 15-50 (1916), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, “thin” lion with cross-shaped ornament aboveback, sun has seven rays and three ornaments, rev. triratna, symbols and legend asprevious coin (YZM 412-415; KM. Y#18.1), very fineHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)357 358357 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.02g, Mekyi mint, 15-52 (1918), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament and six rays and threeornaments, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin but legend reads: rab byung 15 lo52 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 52, 5-Sho) (YZM 417-418, KM. Y#18.1), good fine HK$1,800-2,200(US$250-300)358 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.71g, Mekyi mint, 15-52 (1918), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament and seven rays andthree ornaments, rev. triratna, symbols and legend as previous coin (YZM 417-418; KM.Y#18.1), about very fine89HK$1,800-2,200(US$250-300)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET359 360359 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.53g, Mekyi mint, 15-53 (1919), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament and seven or eightrays and three ornaments, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin but legend reads: rabbyung 15 lo 53 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 53, 5-Sho) (YZM 419; KM. Y#18.1), good fineand rare360 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), Æ 5-Sho, 6.66g, Mekyi mint, 15-53 (1919),snow lion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament and sevenor eight rays and three ornaments, rev. triratna, symbols and legend as previous coin(YZM -; KM. Y#18.1), in PCGS holder, graded XF, rareOwing to silver being in short supply, the mint was experimenting with 5-Sho coins struckin copper. Some pieces are known in copper which is coated with silver (“silver-washed”).HK$7,500-9,000(US$1,000-1,200)HK$9,000-12,000(US$1,200-1,500)361 362361 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 9.10g, Mekyi mint, 15-56 (1919), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament and six rays and threeornaments, tail has nine strands, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin but legendreads: rab byung 15 lo 56 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 56, 5-Sho) (YZM 420-421; KM.Y#18.1), good fine and scarce362 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.47g, Mekyi mint, 15-56 (1919), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament and seven or eightrays and three ornaments, tail has eight strands, rev. triratna, symbols and legend asprevious coin (YZM 420-421; KM. Y#18.1), about very fine and scarceHK$6,000-9,000(US$800-1,200)HK$6,000-9,000(US$800-1,200)363 364363 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.54g, Mekyi mint, 15-59 (1925), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, with cross-shaped ornament and six rays and threeornaments, tail has nine strands, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin but legendreads: rab byung 15 lo 59 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 59, 5-Sho) (YZM 422; KM. Y#18.1),in PCGS holder, graded VF30, very rare364 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 7.63g, Mekyi mint, 15-60 (1926), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin butlegend reads: rab byung 15 lo 60 zho lnga (cycle 15, year 60, 5-Sho) (YZM 423; KM.Y#18.1), in PCGS holder, graded XF45, about fine and very rareWWW.SPINK.COMHK$9,000-11,000(US$1,200-1,500)HK$11,000-15,000(US$1,500-2,000)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG365365 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), 5-Sho, 8.12g, Mekyi mint, 16-1 (1927), snowlion looking backwards, as previous lot, rev. triratna and symbols as previous coin butlegend reads: rab byung 16 lo 1 zho lnga (cycle 16, year 1, 5-Sho) (YZM 424; KM.Y#18.1) in PCGS holder, graded XF40, about very fine and rareHK$9,000-11,000(US$1,200-1,500)366 367366 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), Æ 2½-Skar, 2.16g, 15-52 (1918), snow lionwithin central cartouche, legend rab byung 15 lo 52 (“cycle 15, year 52”) and five flowerscomposed of five beads each around, rev. norbu (triple gem) in centre with legend andornaments around: Skar/phyed gsum (“two and half Skar”; literally: “half off three Skar”)(YZM 678-679; KM. A19), very fine and scarceThe word gsum is spelled with anusvãra (small circle above the letter “s”) which indicatesthe letter “m” in final position. Obviously this type of abbreviated spelling, which doesnot occur on other coins struck in Tibet, was used in order to be able to fit the legend onthe small planchet.367 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), Æ 2½-Skar, 1.90g, 15-53 (1919), snow lionwithin central cartouche, legend rab byung 15 lo 53 (“cycle 15, year 53”) and five flowerscomposed of five beads each around, rev. norbu in centre with legend Skar/phyed gsum(YZM 680-681; KM. A19), very fine and scarceHK$2,300-2,800(US$300-350)HK$2,300-2,800(US$300-350)368368 Tibet, Anonymous (13th Dalai Lama), Æ 2½-Skar, 1.91g, 15-55 (1920), snow lionwithin central cartouche, legend rab byung 15 lo 55 (“cycle 15, year 55”) and five flowerscomposed of five beads each around, rev. norbu in centre with legend Skar/phyed gsum(YZM 682; KM. A19), very fine and rareMost of the coins of this rare date are found in very good or fine condition. The coin ofthe Rhodes collection is one of the best existing.HK$4,000-4,500(US$500-600)91


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETTHE 3-SRANG SILVER COINSThese beautiful silver coins were struck in the government mint Trabshi. This mint initially was an arsenal which was establishedin 1914 and later expanded to include a mint. The whole factory was modernised in 1931 with coin presses which had beenimported from the UK or British India. Older machinery which was recuperated from the various mints existing in and near Lhasauntil then was used in the new mint along with modern machinery. The modernised mint was officially opened in the presence ofthe 13th Dalai Lama on Nov. 11th 1931 and served as the only Tibetan Government Mint until 1959. The full Tibetan name ofthis factory was Grwa-bzhi glog-´phrul las-khungs (“Trabshi electrical machine factory”).The first issue of 3-Srang silver coins was only struck during two years (1933 and 1934) and replaced by a newly designed issue.The reason for this was that the 13th Dalai Lama had died in December 1933 and the design of the first issue of the 3-Srang coinswas being considered inauspicious.369 370The 3-Srang Silver Coins, First Issue369 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.71g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-7 (1933),snow lion facing left with norbu dga’ khyil and ornaments above and below, legend dga’ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal (“the Ganden Palace, victorious in all directions”) ineight syllables between inner circle and an outer circle of pearls arranged in groups of twosyllables, separated by Buddhist endless knot emblems, rev. denomination in two lines:srang gsum (“three Srang”), flanked by two ornaments, with small cross in the centre,legend, rab byung bcu drug lo bdun (“cycle sixteen, year seven”) starting from 12 o’clockbetween inner and outer circle of beads arranged in three groups of two syllablesseperated by Buddhist endless knots (YZM 501; KM. Y#25; LM 659), in PCGS holder,graded MS67370 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 12.35g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-7 (1933),as previous coin (YZM 501; KM. Y#25; LM 659), very fineHK$900-1,200(US$100-150)HK$600-900(US$80-120)371 372371 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.71g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-7 (1933),as previous coin (YZM 501; KM. Y#25; LM 659), very fine/extremely fine372 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 12.45g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-7 (1933),as previous coin (YZM 501; KM. Y#25; LM 659), in PCGS holder, extremely fineHK$750-1,000(US$100-140)HK$900-1,100(US$120-150)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG373 374373 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 12.69g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-7 (1933),as previous coin, rev. with dubious countermark in Tibetan seal script (YZM 501; KM.Y#25; LM 659), very fine374 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.90g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-8 (1934),as previous coin, rev. legend: rab byung bcu drug lo brgyad (“cycle sixteen, year eight”)(YZM 502; KM. Y#25; LM -), extremely fineHK$750-1,000(US$100-130)HK$900-1,100(US$120-150)The 3-Srang Silver Coins, Second IssueThe 3-Srang coins with altered design were struck in the Trabshi mint between 1935 and 1938 during the regency of RetingRinpoche and again in 1946 during the regency of Taktra Rinpoche.Among the coins dated 16-9 and 16-10 two reverse varieties exist: the scroll ornamentto the right of the vase can have a smallhook at its lower end which is missing on some coins.Several obverse varieties can be identified for most dates: the two suns can have different numbers of rays, the device placedbetween the two fishes (north-east postion) can be a small single arch or a small double arch and the number of strands attachedto the lion’s legs can vary.Many of these varieties are represented in the Rhodes collection.375 376375 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 12.07g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-9 (1935),snow lion facing left in centre with Himalayan range behind with two suns above andornament below, legend dga’ ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal in eight syllablesbetween inner circle and an outer circle of pearls arranged in groups of two syllables,separated by Buddhist emblems: pair of fish, conch, endless knot and parasol, rev. vasecontaining foliage with scroll ornaments either side and below, legend: rab byung bcudrug lo dgu srang gsum (“cycle sixteen, year nine, three Srang”) reading clockwise from12 o’clock, separated by four of the auspicious symbols: the banner of victory (north),lotus (east and west) and wheel (south) (YZM -; KM. Y#26; LM -), very fineScarce reverse variety without hook at the lower end of the ornament to the right of thevase.376 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.98g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-9 (1935),as previous lot, but normal reverse (YZM 503; KM. Y#26; LM -), very fineHK$900-1,100(US$120-150)HK$450-600(US$60-90)93


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET377 378377 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.24g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-9 (1935),as previous lot (YZM 503; KM. Y#26; LM -), about extremely fine378 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.98g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-9 (1935),as previous lot (YZM 503; KM. Y#26; LM -), good very fineHK$450-600(US$60-90)HK$450-600(US$60-90)379 380379 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.65g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot, rev. legend: rab byung bcu drug lo bcu srang gsum (“cycle sixteen, year ten,three Srang”), without hook at the lower end of the ornament to the right of the vase(YZM -; KM. Y#26; LM -), very fine, scarce reverse type380 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 12.82g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot, but normal reverse type (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), very fineHK$600-800(US$80-110)HK$450-600(US$60-90)381 382381 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.57g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), good very fine382 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.57g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), good very fineHK$450-600(US$60-90)HK$450-600(US$60-90)383 384383 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.96g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), very fine384 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.53g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), about extremely fineHK$450-600(US$60-90)HK$450-600(US$60-90)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG385 386385 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.85g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), good very fine386 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 12.57g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), good very fineHK$450-600(US$60-90)HK$450-600(US$60-90)387 388387 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.27g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), very fine388 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.06g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 504; KM. Y#26; LM 658), good very fineHK$450-600(US$60-90)HK$450-600(US$60-90)389 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.18g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-11 (1937),as previous lot, rev. legend: rab byung bcu drug lo bcuig srang gsum (“cycle sixteen, yeareleven, three Srang”) (YZM 505; KM. Y#26; LM -), extremely fine389HK$450-600(US$60-90)390390 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.63g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-11 (1937),as previous lot (YZM 505; KM. Y#26; LM -), very fine391 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.59g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-12 (1938),as previous lot, rev. legend: rab byung bcu drug lo bcuis srang gsum (“cycle sixteen, yeartwelve, three srang”) (YZM 506; KM. Y#26; LM -), minor edge fault, about extremely fine391HK$450-600(US$60-90)HK$450-600(US$60-90)95


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET392 393392 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.07g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-12 (1938),as previous lot, rev. legend reads srang gsam instead of srang gsum (the u-sign below theletter “s” (north-west position) is missing) (YZM 506; KM. Y#26; LM -), about very fine393 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 12.06g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-20 (1946),as previous lot, rev. legend rab byung bcu drug lo nyi shu srang gsum (“cycle sixteen, yeartwenty, three Srang”), dot after syllable “shu” of the word nyi-shu (south-west position)(YZM 507; KM. Y#26; LM -), in PCGS holder, graded MS63, rare dateHK$1,100-1,400(US$150-200)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)394 395394 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.57g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-20 (1946),as previous lot, rev. without dot after syllable “shu” of the word nyi-shu (YZM 507; KM.Y#26; LM 658A), in PCGS holder, graded MS63, very fine, rare date395 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 3-Srang, 11.93g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-20 (1946),as previous lot, rev. without dot after syllable “shu” of the word nyi-shu (YZM 507; KM.Y#26; LM 658A), in PCGS holder, graded MS62, rare dateHK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)The 1½ Srang Silver CoinsThese coins were struck with the same design as the second issue of the 3-Srang silver coins. Since 1 1 ⁄2-Srang is equivalent to 10-Tam (Tangka), the Tibetans also referred to these coins as bcu sgor which means “coin of ten.”396396 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 1½-Srang, 5.72g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),snow lion facing left in centre with Himalayan range behind with two suns above andornament below, legend dga’ ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal in eight syllablesbetween inner circle and an outer circle of pearls arranged in groups of two syllables,separated by Buddhist emblems, pair of fish, conch, endless knot and parasol, rev. vasecontaining foliage with scroll ornaments either side and below, legend: rab byung bcudrug lo bcu srang 1/5 (“cycle sixteen, year ten, 1½ srang”) reading clockwise from 12o’clock, separated by four of the auspicious symbols: the banner of victory (north), lotus(east and west) and wheel (south) (YZM 509; KM. Y#24; L&M -), very fineThe expression indicating the denomination srang 1/5 (1 over 5) has to be understood asmeaning srang-gang zho lnga (“one Srang and five Sho”).WWW.SPINK.COMHK$450-600(US$60-80)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG397397 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 1½-Srang, 5.55g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-10 (1936),as previous lot (YZM 509; KM Y#24; L&M -), very fineHK$450-600(US$60-80)398 399398 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 1½-Srang, 5.89g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-11 (1937),as previous lot, rev. legend: rab byung bcu drug lo bcuig srang 1/5 (“cycle sixteen, yeareleven, 1½ Srang”) (YZM 510; KM. Y#24; L&M -), very fineHK$450-600(US$60-80)399 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 1½-Srang, 5.92g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-11 (1937),as previous lot (YZM 510; KM. Y#24; L&M -), good fineHK$450-600(US$60-80)400 401400 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 1½-Srang, 5.81g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-11 (1937),as previous lot (YZM 510; KM. Y#24; L&M -), very fine401 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 1½-Srang, 5.79g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-12 (1938),as previous lot, rev. legend: rab byung bcu drug lo bcuis srang 1/5 (“cycle sixteen, yeartwelve, 1½-Srang”) (YZM 511; KM. Y#24; LM 660), good fine402 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 1½-Srang, 5.75g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-12 (1938),as previous lot (YZM 511; KM. Y#24; LM 660), about very fine403 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 1½-Srang, 6.01g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-20 (1946),as previous lot, rev. legend: rab byung bcu drug lo nyi shu srang 1/5 (“cycle sixteen, yeartwenty, 1½-Srang”) (YZM 512; KM. Y#24; LM 660A), in PCGS holder, graded AU58,rare dateHK$450-600(US$60-80)HK$450-600(US$60-80)HK$450-600(US$60-80)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)97


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETThe 10-Srang Coins (Trabshi mint)404404 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.61g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-22(1948), snow lion facing left in centre with mount Kailash behind with two suns above,ornaments and two tufts of grass below, surrounded by a circle to which eight lotus-petalpanels are attached, each containing one syllable of the legend dga’ ldan pho brangphyo(gs) las rnam rgyal (“the Ganden Palace, victorious in all directions”), rev. a pair ofMongoose facing a banner of victory over disharmony, the year and denomination abovein two lines: lo 22/srang 10 (year 22, 10-Srang”), this surrounded by a circle to whicheight lotus petals panels are attached, each containing one syllable of the legend (startingat 12 o’clock): chos srid gnyis ldan rab byung bcu drug (“the religious and politicalgovernment, cycle sixteen”) (YZM 516; KM. Y#29 [wrong illustration]; LM 663),extremely fine/uncirculatedThe reverse design has been described by the 14th Dalai Lama or by one of his advisorsas follows:“The design depicts a pair of Mongoose facing a banner of victory over disharmony. Thepair of Mongoose represents prosperity, with each vomiting precious stones into a tray.The banner consists of three animals - one animal represents the offspring of the Sea Shelland the Crocodile, another the offspring of the Fish and the Otter, and the third, theoffspring of the Garuda and the Snow Lion. Each offspring symbolizes the perpetuationof harmony and unity over the forces of discord, represented by each of the three pairs ofanimals, which are natural enemies.”(Barrie Newman: “The Australian story behind two Tibetan facsimile ‘re-strikes’: 1950ten srang and 1957 five sho”, Journal of the Numismatic Association of Australia (JNAA),vol. 20 ([2009] 2010), p. 82-89http://naa-online.com/pdfjournal/Vol20/Article207.pdfThe combined animals, i.e. the mythical chu srin (Sanskrit makara, a creature which isnormally represented as being composed of fish and crocodile and having an elephanttrunk) issuing from a sea shell, otter with fish-head and snow lion with garuda-head areseen on the coin going from the lower end of the banner upwards.HK$900-1,200(US$120-150)405 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.34g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-22(1948), as previous lot (YZM 516; KM. Y#29 [wrong illustration]; LM 663), in PCGSholder, graded MS64405WWW.SPINK.COMHK$900-1,200(US$120-150)406 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.84g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-22(1948), as previous lot (YZM 516; KM. Y#29 [wrong illustration]; LM 663), very fine HK$300-450(US$40-60)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG407 408407 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.69g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-22(1948), as previous lot (YZM 516; KM. Y#29 [wrong illustration]; LM 663), about veryfineHK$300-450(US$40-60)408 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 17.31g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-22(1948), as previous lot (YZM 516; KM. Y#29 [wrong illustration]; LM 663), very fine HK$300-450(US$40-60)409 410409 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.46g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-22(1948), as previous lot (YZM 516; KM. Y#29 [wrong illustration]; LM 663), about veryfine410 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.98g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-23(1949), as previous lot, rev. legend: lo 23/srang bcu (denomination in words instead offigures) (YZM 517; KM. Y#29.1; LM 662), in PCGS holder, extremely fine411 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.74g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-23(1949), as previous lot, rev. denomination in words (YZM 517; KM. Y#29.1; LM 662),very fineHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$900-1,200(US$120-150)HK$750-1,000(US$100-130)412 413412 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.75g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-23(1949), as previous lot, rev. denomination in words (YZM 517; KM. Y#29.1; LM 662),very fine413 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.21g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-23(1949), as previous lot, rev. denomination in words (YZM 517; KM. Y#29.1; LM 662),very fineHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$300-450(US$40-60)99


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET414 415414 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.26g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-23(1949), as previous lot, rev. denomination in words (YZM 517; KM. Y#29.1; LM 662),good fine415 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.05g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-23(1949), as previous lot, rev. denomination in words (YZM 517; KM. Y#29.1; LM 662),about extremely fineHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$750-900(US$40-60)416 417416 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.28g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-23(1949), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. denomination in words (YZM 519;KM. Y#29a; LM 662 for type), good fine and rareOut of the series of 10-Srang coins this is the rarest variety which is missing in mostcollections. Apparently during most of the year 16-23 (AD 1949) only the variety withtwo suns on obverse was struck and the new variety with moon and sun on obverse wasonly introduced towards the end of that year, perhaps as late as January 1950.417 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 17.38g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-24(1950), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. legend: lo 24/srang bcu, no dotafter bcu (end of second line), the figure “4” of the date overstruck on another figure(YZM -; KM. Y#29a; LM 662), about very fineHK$1,800-2,200(US$250-300)HK$450-600(US$60-80)418 419418 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.63g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-24(1950), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. as previous, no dot after bcu, the figure“4” of the date overstruck (YZM -; KM. Y#29a; LM 662 for type), good fine HK$450-600(US$60-80)419 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.34g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-24(1950), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. dot after bcu (YZM 521; KM. Y#29a;LM 662 for type), a little dirty, good fineWWW.SPINK.COMHK$300-450(US$40-60)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG420 421420 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.21g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-24(1950), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. no dot after bcu, the figure “4” of thedate overstruck (YZM -; KM. Y#29a; LM 662 for type), good fine421 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.62g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-24(1950), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. dot after bcu (YZM 521; KM. Y#29a;LM 662 for type), very fineHK$450-600(US$60-80)HK$300-450(US$40-60)422 423422 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.37g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-24(1950), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. dot after bcu (YZM 521; KM. Y#29a;LM 662 for type), very fine423 Tibet, Government in Exile, Cu.Ni. Proof 10-Srang, 13.10g, Valcambi mint, T.E.16-24 (1950), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. no dot after bcu, the figure “4” ofthe date overstruck (YZM -; Bruce X #4), uncirculatedThis is a modern restrike produced in the Valcambi mint (Switzerland) after having beenauthorised by the 14th Dalai Lama. Restrikes of this coin type in silver and gold also exist(for more details see Barrie Newman: “The Australian story behind two Tibetan facsimile‘re-strikes’: 1950 ten srang and 1957 five sho”, Journal of the Numismatic Association ofAustralia (JNAA), vol. 20 ([2009] 2010), p. 82-89.http://naa-online.com/pdfjournal/Vol20/Article207.pdfHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$600-900(US$80-120)424 425424 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 15.44g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-25(1951), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. legend: lo 25/srang bcu, no dot afterbcu (YZM 522; KM. Y#29a; LM 662 for type), in PCGS holder, graded MS63425 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 15.82g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-25(1951), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. dot after bcu (YZM 522; KM. Y#29a;LM 662 for type), very fineHK$750-900(US$100-120)HK$300-450(US$40-60)101


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET426 427426 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.91g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-26(1952), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. legend: lo 26/srang bcu, no dot afterbcu (YZM 524; KM. Y#29a; LM 662 for type), very fine427 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.85g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-26(1952), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. no dot after bcu (YZM 524; KM.Y#29a; LM 662 for type), about very fineHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$300-450(US$40-60)428429428 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.77g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-26(1952), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. dot after bcu (YZM 525; KM. Y#29a;LM 662 for type), about very fine429 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 17.84g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-26(1952), with moon and sun above mountain, rev. no dot after bcu (YZM 524; KM.Y#29a; LM 662 for type), very fineHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$300-450(US$40-60)430430 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang (2), 17.53g, Trabshi mint, T.E.16-26(1952), rev. dot after bcu, 16.20g, Dugö Lekhung T.E.16-25 (1951), (YZM 525, 527;KM. Y#29a, 30; LM 661 var, 662), the first about very fine, the second very fine withmount removed from obverse (2)WWW.SPINK.COMHK$500-750(US$70-100)


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGThe 10-Srang Coins, issued by the Dugö Lekhung (‘du- ‘god las-khungs)Originally these 10-Srang coins were struck by the ‘du- ‘god las-khungs to pay Tibetan army members. This office was locatedwithin the compound of the Tibetan army at Trabshi to the west of the Government factory and mint. The syllables ‘du- ‘god havethe meaning “affairs” or “dealings” and the expression ‘du- ‘god las-khungs refers to an office which was dealing with the salariesof soldiers. This type of 10-Srang coins was struck only during two years and must have circulated along with the regulargovernment issues.431 432431 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 15.97g, Dugö Lekhung, T.E.16-24(1950), snow lion facing left in centre with mount Kailash behind with two suns above,ornaments and two tufts of grass below, surrounded by a circle to which eight lotus petalpanels are attached, each containing one syllable of the legend dga’ ldan pho brangphyo(gs) las rnam rgyal (“the Ganden Palace, victorious in all directions”), rev. date anddenomination in the centre in three lines: rab byung bcu/drug lo nyer bzhi/dngul srang bcu(“cycle sixteen, year twenty-four, ten silver Srang”), without a dot after bzhi (four) at theend of the second line, this surrounded by a circle to which eight lotus petal panels areattached, each containing one syllable of the legend: ‘du ‘dgod bde skyid ‘dod rgu ‘khyil ba(affairs, happiness, objects of desire, turning around) (YZM 527; KM. Y#30; LM 661),in PCGS slab, extremely fineAccording to D.W.Shakabpa (Shakabpa, W.D.: “Tibetan Currency” Tibet HouseBulletin, vol. 7, no. 1, Spring 1992, pp. 2-3) the meaning of the reverse legend is“finance, happiness, wealth and prosperity”. The cataloguer thinks that this legendrepresents the complete name of the office which issued these coins, suggesting that it isdealing with (turning around) the worldly necessities (objects of desire) and the welfare(happiness) [of army members].432 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.60g, Dugö Lekhung, T.E.16-24(1950), as previous lot, rev. date and denomination as before, a dot after bzhi at the endof the second line (YZM 527; KM. Y#30; LM 661 var), in PCGS holder, graded MS64HK$500-700(US$70-90)HK$450-600(US$60-80)433 434433 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 14.87g, Dugö Lekhung, T.E.16-24(1950), as previous lot, rev. date and denomination as before, no dot after bzhi (YZM527; KM. Y#30; LM 661 var), very fine HK$300-450(US$40-60)434 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, 10-Srang, 16.80g, Dugö Lekhung, T.E.16-25(1951), as previous lot, rev. legend: rab byung bcu/drug lo nyer lnga/dngul srang bcu(“cycle sixteen, year twenty-five, ten silver Srang”), (YZM 527; KM. Y#30; LM 661 var),very fine103HK$300-450(US$40-60)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETCOPPER COINS OF THE 20TH CENTURY435 436435 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar, 3.17g, Dode mint, T.E.15-48 (1914),standing lion facing left and looking back, sun and three ornaments above and smallmountain below, surrounded by a circle to which eight lotus petal panels are attached,each containing one syllable of the legend dga’ ldan pho brang phyo(gs) las rnam rgyal(“the Ganden Palace, victorious in all directions”), rev. three concentric circlesrepresenting the axis of a wheel, with bead in centre and eight beads in other circles, thissurrounded by a string of pearls (the number of which can vary between 28 and 36 forthis series), between this and the outermost circle legend: rab byung 15 lo 48 Skar phyedgsum (“cycle 15, year 48, two and half Skar”) (YZM 640-542; KM. Y#16.2), fine436 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar, 3.60g, Dode mint, T.E.15-48 (1914),crouching lion looking back, otherwise as previous lot (YZM 639; KM. Y#16.3), fineHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$300-450(US$40-60)437 438437 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar, 4.75g, Dode mint, T.E.15-47 (1913),crouching lion looking diagonally upwards, rev. legend: rab byung 15 lo 47 Skar phyedgsum (“cycle 15, year 47, two and half Skar”), otherwise as previous lot (YZM 639; KM.Y#16.1(wrong illustration)), fine438 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar, 3.97g, Dode mint, T.E.15-48 (1914),crouching lion looking diagonally upwards, rev. legend: rab byung 15 lo 48 Skar phyedgsum (“cycle 15, year 48, two and half Skar”), otherwise as previous lot (YZM 638; KM.Y#16.1(wrong illustration)), fineHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$300-450(US$40-60)439440439 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar, 5.47g, Dode mint, T.E.15-49 (1915),crouching lion looking diagonally upwards, rev. legend: rab byung 15 lo 49 Skar phyedgsum (“cycle 15, year 49, two and half Skar”), otherwise as previous lot (YZM 643; KM.Y#16.1(wrong illustration)), reverse struck slightly off-centre, fine440 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar, 4.63g, Dode mint, T.E.15-50 (1916),crouching lion looking diagonally upwards, rev. legend: rab byung 15 lo 50 Skar phyedgsum (“cycle 15, year 50, two and half Skar”), otherwise as previous lot (YZM 644-45;KM. Y#16.1(wrong illustration)), fineHK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$300-450(US$40-60)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG441442441 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar, 4.34g, Dode mint, T.E.15-51?(1917), crouching lion looking diagonally upwards, rev. legend: rab byung 15 lo 51 Skarphyed gsum (“cycle 15, year 51, two and half Skar”), otherwise as previous lot (YZM 646;KM. Y#16.1(wrong illustration)), the last digit of date very faint and only partially visible,fine and rareThe coin with the date 15-51 is the rarest in this series. The date on this specimen is veryfaint, buyers are recommended to view this coin in person before bidding.442 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 2½-Skar, 5.53g, Dode mint, T.E.15-52 (1918),crouching lion looking diagonally upwards, rev. legend: rab byung 15 lo 52 Skar phyedgsum (“cycle 15, year 52, two and half Skar”), otherwise as previous lot (YZM 647-49;KM. Y#16.1(wrong illustration)), very fineHK$900-1,200(US$120-170)HK$400-500(US$50-70)The 5-Skar coins443 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 5-Skar (9), Dode mint, T.E.15-48 to 15-52(1914 - 1918), a complete date set of the 5-Skar coins with the snow lion lookingbackwards, including five major variants dated 15-48 (style of lion and design in thecentre of the reverse vary considerably) (YZM 653-660, 663-667, 669-670, 673,676;KM. Y#17.1, Y 17.3), selected coins, far better than normal for this issue, fine to very fine(9) HK$900-1,200(US$120-150)444 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 5-Skar (6), Dode mint, T.E.15-47 to 15-52(1913 - 1918), a complete date set of the 5-Skar coins with the lion looking upwards(YZM 650-651, 661-662, 668, 671-672 & 674-675; KM. Y#17), selected coins, far betterthan normal for this issue, fine to very fine (6)445 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 5-Skar (8), Dode mint, T.E.15-52 to 15-56(1918 - 1922), a complete date set of the 5-Skar coins of type Y # 19 (21mm), includingtwo variants of 15-54 date and two variants of the rare coin, 15-56 date (engraver’s error,reverse legend written retrograde) (YZM 683-686, 688-689 & 691-692; KM. Y#19),very fine or better (8)HK$600-750(US$80-100)HK$1,100-1,400(US$150-200)446446 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 5-Skar (2), Dode mint, T.E.15-55, 15-56(1921, 1922), rev. with extra bead above denomination Skar lnga (YZM 687, 690; KM.Y#19.1), very fine to extremely fine, both scarce types (2)According to Kempf (Kempf, Fred: A Primary Report on Native Tibetan Coins, Seattle,Washington 1961) the Dode mint consisted of two parts, the upper part and the lowerpart, located within the same compound. “In 1921 and 1922 the upper Dokde mint puta dot on it’s 5 Kar coins to distinguish them from those of the lower mint.” Kempfgleaned this information from exiled Tibetans, primarily from the former Governmentofficial Wangchen Surkhang.105HK$750-900(US$100-120)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETThe 7½-Skar coins447 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 7½-Skar (9), Dode mint, T.E.15-52 to 15-56 &15-60 (1918 - 1922 & 1926), a complete date set of the 7½-Skar coins struck on a eightlobedflan, rev. several varieties, including those with central three comma-shapes (norbudga’ kyil) running anti-clockwise (YZM 693-720; KM. Y#20), including the key date 15-60, fine or very fine (9) HK$1,100-1,400(US$150-200)The copper Shokang issues448 449 450448 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho, large flan (25mm), 3.94g, Dode mint,T.E.15-52 (1918), lion looking diagonally upwards (YZM 723-724; KM. Y # 21), aboutvery fine and scarce449 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho, large flan (25mm), 4.26g, Dode mint,T.E.15-52 (1918), lion looking backwards (YZM 721-722; KM. Y # 21b), some greendiscolouration, very fine and very scarce450 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (24mm), 6.01g, Dode mint, T.E.15-56?(1922), lion looking upwards, rev. bead in arabesques (YZM -; KM. Y # 21.2 for type),double struck on both sides on a heavy and unusually large flan, about very fine and rare451 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (14), Mekyi mint, T.E.15-52 to T.E.16-2 (1918-1928), complete date set of obverse type “lion looking backwards,” includingvariants of date 15-55 (2) and 15-57 (3), rev. without bead in arabesques (YZM 725-735;KM. Y #21.1a), fine to very fine (14)452 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (11), Dode mint, T.E.15-54 to T.E.16-2(1920-1928), complete date set of obverse type “lion looking upwards,” includingvariants of date 16-1 (2), one with numeral “1” counterstamped over “60,” rev. bead inarabesques (YZM 736-742, 752, &755-764; KM. Y#21.2), fine to very fine (11)HK$400-500(US$50-70)HK$500-600(US$70-90)HK$600-900(US$80-120)HK$500-750(US$70-100)HK$500-750(US$70-100)453453 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (2), Dode mint, T.E.15-54 (1920), thiswith error date 54-54, the second with uncertain date, both lion looking upwards,rev. bead in arabesque (YZM 751), the first very fine and very scarce, the second struck over2 1 ⁄2-Skar coin of the type Y #16, fine (2) HK$600-750(US$80-100)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG456454455454 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (2), Dode mint, T.E.15-54 (1920), thefirst with error date 51-54, the second with rev. legend rab byung lo 15 (plus weakly struckfigure 54) instead of usual date, both lion looking upwards, rev. bead in arabesques (YZM746-748), fine and very scarce (2) HK$750-1,000(US$100-130)455 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (2), Dode mint, T.E.15-54 (1920), thefirst with rev. legend rab byung lo 15-54, instead of rab byung 15 lo 54, the second withrev. error legend and unusual “filled” letters zho gang in centre, both lion lookingupwards, rev. bead in arabesques (YZM 743-744), fine and very scarce (2)456 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho, 4.41g, Dode mint, uncertain date,obverse brockage of 1-Sho coin of the obverse variety “lion looking upwards” (YZM -;KM. Y#21.2 for type), very fine and rareHK$750-1,000(US$100-130)HK$1,000-1,500(US$150-200)457458457 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho, 4.87g, Dode mint, T.E.16-2 (1928),mule with mismatched dies, obv. “lion looking backwards,” rev. “bead in arabesques”(YZM -; obv. KM. Y # 21a, rev. KM. Y # 21.1b), fine and rare458 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho, 5.85g, Dode mint, T.E.16-1 (1927),reverse brockage of 1-Sho coin of the variety “bead in arabesques” (YZM -; KM. -), aboutvery fine and rare459 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (2), Dode mint, uncertain date, the firstmis-struck, the second of type “lion looking upwards”, rev. bead in arabesques, rab byung15 lo 4, the figure “5” of the date apparently missing (YZM -; KM. Y# 21a & KM. Y#21.2for types), fine and scarce (2)460 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (7), Dode mint, T.E. 15-54, 15-55, 15-57 and 15-58, all of the type “lion looking upwards”, the 3 coins dated 15-54 are possiblycontemporaneous forgeries showing the figure 54 in different styles, one coin showing aretooled figure 15 may be struck over another coin, the two coins dated 15-55 are twomajor variants, the coin dated 15-57 appears to be missing the figure “5” in “57” (KM Y21.2 for type), a group of coins which deserves further study by a specialist collector, fine tovery fine (7)HK$600-750(US$80-100)HK$1,000-1,500(US$150-200)HK$400-500(US$50-70)HK$450-600(US$60-80)107


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET461 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (12), Dode mint, T.E.15-56 to T.E.16-2(1922-1928), complete date set “lion looking upwards” type, rev. legend zho gangarranged vertically in centre, including variants of dates 15-56, 15-57 & 15-60 (YZM771-781, 785-787, 789-790 &792; KM. Y #21a), one of the 15-57 coins with clashedreverse die (part of the obverse legend is visible on reverse), fine to very fine (12)HK$450-600(US$60-80)462 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (15), Trabshi mint, T.E.16-6 to T.E.16-12 (1932- 1938), date run including all dates, except 16-16, and most varieties (secretmarks placed in the middle of reverse ornament, above the inscription zho gang in thecentre) (YZM 793-817; KM. Y # 23), very fine to about uncirculated, the scarce early dates16-6 & 16-8 about uncirculated and rare thus (15) HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)463463 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 1-Sho (3), Dode Mint, “lion looking up,”punched with figure 10, rev. bead in arabesques; Trabshi mint, 16-11, also punched withfigure 10 on reverse, Trabshi mint, 16-12, with small arrow as secret mark on reverse (thefirst KM. Y # 21.2; the last YZM 816-817), fine to very fine, the last scarce (3)The two coins punched with figure 10 were probably converted into tokens after 1959.HK$500-600(US$70-90)The 3-Sho coins464 465464 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 3-Sho, 9.40g, Trabshi Mint, T.E.16-20 (1946),double cloud line on obverse (YZM 819-820; KM. Y# 27.2), very fineHK$450-600(US$60-80)465 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 3-Sho, 7.29g, Trabshi Mint, T.E.16-20 (1946),cloud line behind the mountains ends in a small cloud placed far right (YZM 835; KM.Y# 27.1), very fine, scarce obverse type HK$400-500(US$50-70)466 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 3-Sho (4), Trabshi Mint, T.E.16-20 (1946), rev.including conch (northwest symbol) types with one or four dots and two dashes and onedot (YZM 829, 830; KM. Y# 27.1), fine to very fine (4)HK$900-1,200(US$120-150)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG467467 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 3-Sho, 8.65g, Trabshi Mint, T.E.16-20 (1946),rev. conch (north-west symbol) with four beads above (YZM 821-828; KM Y# 27.1),about uncirculated and nicely toned, rare thusHK$600-900(US$80-120)The 5-Sho Copper coins468468 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 5-Sho, 8.54g, Trabshi Mint, T.E.16-21 (1947),two mountains on obverse (YZM 836; KM. Y# 28), about uncirculated with lustreHK$300-450(US$40-60)469469 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 5-Sho, 8.88g, Trabshi Mint, T.E.16-22 (1948),cloud is missing from, or merged with, middle summit (YZM 839; KM. Y# 28.2), veryfine109HK$500-600(US$70-90)470 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 5-Sho (20), Trabshi Mint, T.E.16-21 to 16-24(1947-1950), a complete date set of this type with two suns above the mountains,including date 16-21 (2), rev. date over-strikes: 16-23 with “3” cut into figure below, 16-24 with “4” cut into figure below, all varieties between 16-22 and 16-24 with or withoutdot after “16” (at start of second line of script) are represented (YZM 838, 840-845; KMY# 28.1), very fine to extremely fine (20) HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)Obverse varieties of this type can be discovered by focussing on the number of rays of eachsun and the position of the norbu dga’ khyil below the lion’s right front paw.471 Tibetan Government, Anonymous, Æ 5-Sho (19), Trabshi Mint, T.E.16-23 to 16-27(1949-1953), a complete date set of this type with moon and sun above the mountainsincluding two obverse varieties with moon cut over sun and cloud merged with middlesummit, reverse overdates 16-24, 16-25 & 16-27, also a brass 5-Sho, 16-24 (YZM 846-857; KM, Y# 28a), fine to very fine (19) HK$900-1,200(US$120-160)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET20-TAM SRANG GOLD COINSMost if not all Tibetan gold coins of 20 Tam Srang were struck between 1918 and 1921 in the gser khang mint, which was locatedin the western part of Lhasa near the summer residence of the Dalai Lama, the Norbu Lingka. The meaning of gser khang is “goldhouse”.In his unpublished diary Charles Bell noted the folowing:“27.8.20 Tsarong Shape makes a large profit out of his work at the gold mint. The gold coin ser-trang ranks as equal to 20 ngusangs,but actually equals 16 only. Thus on every Ser-trang the Tibetan Government makes a profit of 4 ngu-sang (= Rs. 6). Peoplesay that 10,000 ser-trangs are being coined daily at this mint. I doubt personally whether the number is so large; possibly only1000 are coined daily. Tsarong is allowed to bring some of the gold that he buys himself and pass it into the currency, and take asimilar profit on it for himself. I would think HK that for every thousand coins coined from the Government gold he is allowedto coin one hundred or so from his own gold and take the profit on these 4 ngu-sangs per ser-trang.”There exist gold coins of the dates 15-52 and 15-54 which feature a small bead in the centre of the reverse and others which arewithout this bead. It is possible that this mark served to distinguish the issues which were struck by Tsarong Shape from thosewhich were struck by the Tibetan Government.By the time the last gold coins with the date 15-55 (AD 1921) were struck, the intrinsic value exceeded the face value which isthe reason why the issue of gold coins was suspended after a very small number of coins with the date 15-55 had been produced.472472 (x1.5)472 Tibet, Anonymous, 20-Tam Srang, 10.83g, 15-52, snow lion facing left, the words rabbyung 15 (“cycle 15”) above and lo 52 (“year 52”) below, this surrounded by a circlearound which the eight Buddhist auspicious emblems are arranged in the following order(starting at 12 o’clock and going clockwise): parasol, pair of golden fishes, treasure vase,lotus flower, conch, endless knot, banner of victory, wheel of dharma, rev. without dot incentre of central circle, stylised wheel with eight spokes in centre, surrounded by circle,outer circle contains the following legend (starting at 12 o’clock and reading clockwise):dga’ ldan pho brang phyo(gs) las rnam rgyal/tam srang 20 (“the Ganden palace, victoriousin all directions/20 Tam Srang”) (YZM 1 , KM Y22, LM 1064), in PCGS holder, gradedMS65, scarceHK$30,000-40,000(US$4,000-5,000)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG473473 (x1.5)473 Tibet, Anonymous, 20-Tam Srang, 11.28g, 15-52, snow lion facing left, the words rabbyung 15 (“cycle 15”) above and lo 52 (“year 52”) below, rev. as previous coin but withdot in centre of central circle (YZM 5; KM. Y22), in PCGS holder, graded cleaned AU,scarcePROVENANCE:Ex. Collection of Margaret (Peggy) D. Williamson.Author of “Memoirs of a Political Officer’s wife in Tibet, Sikim and Bhutan” (incollaboration with John Snelling), Wisdom Publications, London, 1987. In the early1930s her husband Frederick (Derrick) Williamson was political officer in Sikkim for theBritish Indian Government. In 1935, during a third visit to Tibet, her husband died inLhasa. She accompanied her husband on all official visits to Tibet and Bhutan.In matters regarding the minting of Tibetan coins Nicholas Rhodes helped Mrs.Williamson with the parts in her book which deal with this subject. Undoubtedly the goldcoin, dated 15-52 was presented to the Williamsons during one of their three visits toLhasa.HK$30,000-40,000(US$4,000-5,000)474474 (x1.5)474 Tibet, Anonymous, 20-Tam Srang, 10.82g, 15-53, snow lion facing left, the words rabbyung 15 (“cycle 15”) above and lo 53 (“year 53”) below, rev. as previous coin butwithout dot in centre of central circle (YZM - ; KM. Y22; LM -), in PCGS holder, gradededge repaired UNC, scarceHK$30,000-40,000(US$4,000-5,000)475475 (x1.5)475 Tibet, Anonymous, 20-Tam Srang, 10.94g, 15-54, snow lion facing left, the words rabbyung 15 (“cycle 15”) above and lo 54 (“year 54”) below, rev. as previous coin, withoutdot in centre of central circle (YZM 8; KM. Y22; LM 1063), in PCGS holder, gradedMS63, very fine and scarceHK$30,000-40,000(US$4,000-5,000)111


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET476476 (x2)476 Tibet, Anonymous, 20-Tam Srang, 11.15g, 15-55, snow lion facing left, the words rabbyung 15 (“cycle 15”) above and lo 55 (“year 55”) below, rev. as previous coin, withoutdot in centre of central circle (YZM 9; KM. Y22), in PCGS holder, graded UNC cleaning,extremely rareHK$90,000-110,000(US$12,000-15,000)PROVENANCE:Ex. Carlo Valdettaro collectionOnly one other specimen of this date was ever offered at a public auction. This was lot200 of the Gabrisch collection (Baldwin’s Auctions Ltd, Ma Tak Wo Numismatic Co.Ltd, Monetarium (S) Pte Ltd and Ronals G. Gillio Auction, Hong Kong, 1 September2005)477 478477 Tibet, Anonymous, forgery of a 20-Tam Srang, struck in silver, 7.34g, 15-54 (YZM - ;KM -), about extremely fine and scarceForgery made in China (Rhodes, Nicholas G. “A Tibetan Forgery, Spink, NumismaticCircular, Vol. 86, London 1978, pp. 364-365).The coin still has the ink marks applied by Nicholas Rhodes in order to point out the areaswhich identify it as forgery.478 Tibet, Anonymous, forgery of 20-Tam Srang, struck in copper, 6.10g, 15-54 (YZM - ;KM -), toned good extremely fine and scarceApparently struck from the same pair of dies as the previous coin.HK$6,000-7,500(US$800-1,000)HK$5,000-6,000(US$700-900)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGCHINESE REPUBLIC FOR TIBET479480479 China for Tibet, Anonymous (c.1908), 1-Tael, 36.21g, undated, inscription (to be readfrom right to left) xi zang yuan Liang (Tibet, one Liang) (Kann 441), about extremely fineand rareHK$6,000-7,500(US$800-1,000)480 Sichuan Province, Anonymous, (1911), 5 cash, 4.79g, 1st year of the republic (KM. Y# 441), very fine and scarce HK$3,000-4,500(US$400-600)According to S. Semans this coin was “said to commemorate an expedition to Tibet ledby Hsiung K’e-wu” (Semans, Scot: The Daniel K. Ching Sale, Seattle, Washington, June2, 1991, lot 865)481 482481 Chinese Republic for Tibet (c.early 1950s), Yuan Shikai Dollar, 26.46g, dated 3rd yearof the Republic, rev. closed “triangle” in the upper part of the character for yuan (KM329 var), fine HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)According to N.Rhodes (Rhodes, Nicholas: “A Communist Chinese Restrike”. Spink’sNumismatic Circular, vol. 83, 1975, p. 239-240) this variety with a closed “triangle” inthe upper part of the character for yuan on reverse was struck in China for use in Tibet inthe early 1950s.This variety of the Yuan Shikai Dollar is said to have been struck in the Chengdu mintfrom silver which was obtained from objects made of precious metal that were collectedin Eastern Tibet and Western Sichuan (former Xikang province). It was used by theChinese to buy the goodwill of influential Tibetans and pay Tibetan workers involved inroad construction. During the Mönlam Festival (“Great Prayer Festival”) in 1952 theChinese distributed a considerable amount of these coins to the monks of importantmonasteries in and near Lhasa. Owing to their high silver content these coins becamequite popular in Tibet where they were called dayan. They were also used by Tibetantraders to pay for imports from India.For further discussions regarding this variety see the following webpage:http://www.zeno.ru/showphoto.php?photo=16199482 Chinese Republic for Tibet (c.early 1950s), Yuan Shikai Dollar, 26.32g, dated 3rd yearof the Republic, rev. closed “triangle” in the upper part of the character for yuan (KM329 var), very fine HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)113


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET483483 Chinese Republic for Tibet (c.early 1950s), Yuan Shikai Dollar, 27.00g, dated 3rd yearof the Republic, rev. closed “triangle” in the upper part of the character for yuan (KM329 var), very fine HK$1,800-2,200(US$250-300)484485484 Chinese Republic for Tibet (c.early 1950s), Yuan Shikai Dollar, 26.74g, dated 3rd yearof the Republic, rev. closed “triangle” in the upper part of the character for yuan (KM329 var), some black spots on obverse, very fine HK$1,200-1,500(US$150-200)485 Chinese Republic for Tibet (c.early 1950s), Yuan Shikai Dollar, 26.63g, dated 3rd yearof the Republic, rev. closed “triangle” in the upper part of the character for yuan (KM329 var), some discolouration on both sides, fine HK$1,200-1,500(US$150-200)FANTASY COINS486 487486 Tibet, Qian Long, forgery of Half-Sho, 1.50g, 58th year (YZM -; KM -; LM -), very fine,scarceThis coin has already been identified as forgery by Edward Kann (Kann, F 1460). It wasprobably produced in China for the collector’s market. In some editions of KM it servedas plate specimen for the genuine Half-Sho issue of this ruler. Meanwhile this error hasbeen corrected.487 Tibet, Jia Qing, fantasy of 1-Sho, 3.50g, (6th year?) (YZM -; KM -; LM -), very fine, notcommonThis fantasy was first found in Nepal in the 1960s. A genuine coin of year 6 of the JiaQing era in this style does not exist, therefore we refer to this coin as fantasy, rather thanforgery.HK$4,500-6,000(US$600-800)HK$750-900(US$100-120)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG488488 Tibet, Qian Long, forgery of 1-Sho, 3.15g, 59th year (YZM -; KM -; LM -);Tibet, Jia Qing, forgery of 1-Sho, 2.94g, 1st year (YZM -; KM -; L M -; Kann F1464)While the Chinese inscription is of good style, the Tibetan inscription is faulty. Thisindicates that this forgery most probably was produced in China for the collector’smarket, both very fine, the second scarce (2)The first was found in Nepal in the 1970s, but it is not known where it was made. Thefact that it was struck in a collar and has a weight which is below the standard weight givesit away as forgery.HK$4,500-6,000(US$600-800)489 490489 Tibet, Jia Qing, dubious issue of Half-Sho, 1.83g, 8th year, (YZM -; KM -; LM -; DongWenchao, no. 1279, very fine and very rarePROVENANCE:Ex. Wesley Halpert collection, Spink, New York, 11 December 2000, lot 109.Ex The Money Company, Public Auction, Hong Kong, September 1986, lot 897This coin was bought by the American collector Gilbert Richardson who sold it toWesley Halpert.It was discussed by Nicholas Rhodes in the following publication: Rhodes, Nicholas:“Some Sino-Tibetan Forgeries,”Numismatics International Bulletin, vol. 20, no. 11,1975, p. 254-257.Note that the letter “rgya” in the Tibetan word for eight (brgyad) is written reversed.490 Tibet, Dao Guang, forgery of 1-Sho, 3.22g, 1st year, (YZM 243-247; KM -; LM -), veryfineThe fact that this coin was struck in a collar and has a weight which is below the standardweight gives it away as forgery.HK$6,000-9,000(US$800-1,200)HK$750-1,000(US$100-150)115


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET491 493492491 Tibet, Dao Guang, dubious issue of ½-Sho, 1.94g, 1st year (YZM -; KM -; LM -), veryfine and very rarePROVENANCE:Ex. Wesley Halpert collection, Spink, New York, 11 December 2000, lot 110Ex The Money Company, Public Auction, Hong Kong, September 1986, lot 896.This coin was bought by the American collector Gilbert Richardson who sold it toWesley Halpert.It was discussed by Nicholas Rhodes in the following publication: Rhodes, Nicholas:“Some Sino-Tibetan Forgeries”. Numismatics International Bulletin, vol. 20, no. 11,1975, p. 254-257.492 Tibet, Xian Feng, forgery of 1-Sho, 3.23g, 3rd year (YZM 243-247; KM -; LM -; KannB78), very fineHK$7,000-10,000(US$900-1,200)HK$900-1,400(US$120-180)The fact that this coin was struck in a collar and has a weight which is below the standardweight gives it away as forgery.A similar coin is illustrated as WS0232 in the following catalogue: Wang Chun Li:Illustrated Catalogue of Chinese Gold & Silver Coins 1791-1949. Zhong Guo Shang YeChu Ban She, Beijing, 2012, p. 79. However, the coin illustrated by Wang Chun Liappears to be struck on a wavy flan without the use of a collar, similar to those foundamong genuine Sino-Tibetan coins. Yet the dies which were used to strike this piece seemto be the same as those used to strike the fake coin included in the present lot.493 Tibet, Xian Feng, dubious issue of ½-Sho, 1.79g, 3rd year (YZM 243-247; KM -; LM-), very fine and very rare HK$7,000-9,000(US$900-1,200)PROVENANCE:Ex. Wesley Halpert collection, Spink, New York, 11 December 2000, lot 111Ex. The Money Company, Public Auction, Hong Kong, September 1986, lot 895.This coin was bought by the American collector Gilbert Richardson who sold it toWesley Halpert.This coin was discussed by Nicholas Rhodes in the following publication: Rhodes,Nicholas: “Some Sino-Tibetan Forgeries”. Numismatics International Bulletin, vol. 20,no. 11, 1975, p. 254-257. Although Nicholas Rhodes is inclined to consider the Half-Sho coins of Xian Feng, 3rd year, of Dao Guang, 1st year (lots 490, 491) and of Jia Qing,8th year (lot 489) as forgeries, he mentions the following “theory” in his article: “Anotherpossible theory is that these pieces were made in China for presentation to the Emperor,as examples of the coins that were being issued (in theory, but not in practice) in variousparts of the Empire. A number of fine brass cash of this nature are known, but if this werethe case, surely these silver pieces for Tibet would have been recorded in Chinese sources,along with the similar brass cash? Indeed a number of silver Sino-Tibetan coins, reputedlypresented to the Emperor, were in the Peking Old Palace Museum, but none of the coinsdescribed above were there.”WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG494495494 Qian Long, ¡ fantasy Coin, 7.07g, undated, Pagoda with inscription around (readingthe right column of script first) Qian Long bao zang, rev. design copied from the TibetanGaden Tangka (Kann B74; Bruce XM420), very fine and scarce495 Qian Long, fantasy Dollar, 18.17g, undated, facing bust of Panchen Lama, Chinesescript to left: Hou Tsang (Eastern Tibet), to right: Pan Ch’an (Panchan Lama), rev.viśvavajra (double vajra) with eight-spoked wheel in centre, legend: Qian Long in Tibetanand Chinese scrip (Kann B76; Dong Wenchao, 1277), very fine and scarceThis fantasy is often referred to as “Lama Dollar” and according to some authorities theobverse features a portrait of the Panchen Lama.H.F. Bowker (Bowker, H.F.: “Notes on Asian Numismatics. The Lama Dollar of Tibet”.The Numismatic Scrapbook Magazine, vol. 22, 1956, p. 2134-2136) suggested that thispiece may have been an official issue struck by the Chengdu Mint. Nowadays all expertsagree that this piece is a fantasy.HK$1,500-2,300(US$200-300)HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)496496 China, Anonymous, fantasy Sichuan Rupee, 22.71g, large size, bust of Guang Xu (BruceXM 442; Dong Wenchao, 1323), very fine and scarceThe cataloguer cannot rule out the possibility that this coin is a modern copy of an oldfantasy.HK$2,300-3,000(US$300-400)497 China, Anonymous, fantasy Sichuan Rupee, 13.13g, undated, facing portrait of theDowager Empress Cixi (1835-1908), rev. design based on the Sichuan Rupee (Kann B27), very fine and scarce HK$1,800-2,300(US$250-350)498 Guang Xu, ¡ fantasy Coin, 4.59g, undated, four Chinese characters, rev. Chineseinscription framed by a dragon, fine497117HK$400-500(US$50-70)


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBET499 500499 China for Tibet, anonymous (c.1875-1908), fantasy 1- Tael, 23.86g, undated, Chineselegend: xi zang yuan Liang (“Tibet, one Liang”) (Bruce X #T1), very fine500 Tibet, Anonymous, forgery of 1-Tam Srang, 18.82g, (15-43), vertical stroke in northsymbol on reverse (YZM -, KM -), very fineThis coin appears to be a cast forgery of the scarce variant with vertical stroke in the northsymbol on reverse. It has reeded edge instead of plain edge.Note that the endless knot (7 o’clock position) on reverse is open on its upper (left) end.HK$300-450(US$40-60)HK$1,500-1,800(US$200-250)501501 Tibet, Xuan Tong, base metal forgery of 1-Tam Srang, 12.54g, 1st year, possibly acontemporary light weight forgery (YZM -; KM -), with deep toning, fine502 Tibet, Xuan Tong, forgery of Quarter-Sho, 5.66g, first year (YZM 389; KM -), very fineand scarceThis forgery struck in silver or white metal was produced in Northern India in the early1970s.502HK$750-1,000(US$100-120)HK$600-750(US$80-100)503503 Tibet, Anonymous, forgery of a 20-Tam Srang, struck in gold, 10.91g, 15-43 (YZM - ;KM -), very fine and scarcePROVENANCE:Ex. Karl Gabrisch collection, Baldwin, Ma Tak Wo, Monetarium & Gillio Auction,Hong Kong, 1 September 2005, lot 202.Although this coin was described as forgery by Karl Gabrisch (“Beiträge zur TibetischenNumismatik II: Die Tibetischen Goldmünzen und deren Fälschungen”. MünsterscheNumismatische Zeitschrift, vol. 20, no. 2, 1990, p. 1-3 and vol. 21, no. 2, 1991, p. 1-5)and again in the auction catalogue of the Gabrisch collection, it is occasionally offered asgenuine Tibetan gold coin.This forgery was most probably made by a Tibetan medical doctor in Nepal in the 1970s.HK$4,000-4,500(US$500-600)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG504505504 China, Anonymous, Æ fantasy of 10-Cash, 6.40g, undated, legend: tong yong shi wen(10 Cash for circulation), rev. copied from a Nepalese Æ Paisa of Surendra Vir Vikram,very fineThere is a comment by Nicholas Rhodes about this piece on the following webpage:http://www.charm.ru/coins/unkn/tibet-unknown.shtmlThis is a well-known Chinese fantasy, with one side copied from a Nepalese copper Paisaof Surendra Vir Vikram (dating to c.1787 saka = 1865 AD), but with additional Chinesecharacters. The coin was probably made in Shanghai or some such place in the 1920’s or1930’s - maybe later - and has appeared in a few US auctions, if I remember correctly.Such fantasies were made only in small numbers, so it is not an easy piece to find, but hasnothing to do with Tibetan currency, and I don’t generally bother with such concoctionsunless they “fall into my lap”.Obverse: Tong Yong Shi WenReverse: Wu Zu Gong He Center; FanComment by Stephen Tai on the above-mentioned webpage:The obverse legend Tong Yong Shi Wen is translated as “10 Cashes For Circulation”. Thereverse legends is read as “Wu (five) Zu (tribe) Gong (together) He (peace or harmony),that mean “Five Tribes (Han, Manchurian, Mongolian, Islamic and Tibetian) come inpeace”. Fan is not necessary meant Foreign, in old Imperial Chinese vocabulary it also wasused to stand for Barbarian, which could indicate the uncivilized minority or foreignpeople. In this coin, it should mean the former.HK$750-1,000(US$100-140)505 Tibet, Anonymous, forgery 2½-Skar (4), dated 15-53, type KM. Y#A19 (2), one copper(YZM 681), the second in white metal, a third in copper dated 15-55, with the date 15-55 (figures 1 and 5 are connected and have “tails”), a fourth in copper with the erroneousdate 5-55, generally very fine (4)The first two most probably made in the 1990s in Lhasa. The cataloguer happened to stayin Lhasa when these forgeries appeared in the curio market; Lhasa dealers thought thatthe coins were produced in Shigatse, and curio dealers from Shigatse were adamant thatthe forgeries came from Lhasa.The last two are scarce and were most probably produced in Northern India between1960 and 1970 - in small numbers. To this date no other contemporaneous or modernforgeries of this coin type are known, hence this group of four coins represents a completeseries of the modern copies which are known.References: Anonymous (Brian Hannon and Charles Panish): “Tibetan Fake Coins HitUS; Copper 1½ , 7½ Pieces”. World Coin News, vol. 6, no. 16, April 17, 1979, pp. 3 and26.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “Some Modern Forgeries of Tibetan Coins”. ONS Newsletter, no.157, autumn 1998, p. 18-20.Semans, Scot: “Some more Forgeries”, ONS Newsletter, no. 59, August 1977.Semans, Scot: http://www.coincoin.com/TTB28F.jpgBertsch, Wolfgang:http://reviews.ebay.com/gds/forgeries-of-tibetan-coins/10000000012401474/g.htmlHK$500-600(US$70-90)119


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETMISCELLANEOUS506507506 Xikang Province, anonymous, 100-Cash, 6.81g, 15th year of the Republic (1926) (KM.Y # 466a), some corrosion on obverse and reverse, fine and rareSaid to have been struck for the former province of Xikang which included parts ofWestern Sichuan and Eastern Tibet with the capital Kangding where this coin may havebeen struck (see Semans, Scot: The Daniel K. Ching Sale, Seattle, Washington, June 2,1991, lot 870).507 Xikang Province, anonymous, 100-Cash, 6.46g, 19th year of the Republic (1930) (KM.Y # 466a), some corrosion on obverse and reverse, fine and rarePROVENANCE:Ex. Taisai Auction, 11 June 1994, lot 573HK$3,000-4,500(US$400-600)HK$3,000-4,500(US$200-300)508509508 Tibet, Lhasa Motor Repair Factory (c.1960), uniface Æ Token for 4 Liang of grain,7.51g , undated, la xia chang (short for “la sa xiu li chang)/mi/si Liang (Lhasa motorvehicle repair factory/grain/four Liang) (KM Tn 1), fine and scarceIssued by the Lhasa Motor Repair Factory in about 1960. The token was good for 4Liang of grain (rice or barley), equivalent to 200 grams.A Tibetan 5-Sho copper coin of the type Y # 28.1 or Y # 28.2 was used as planchet.See Gabrisch, Karl: “Grain Tokens from Tibet”, Oriental Numismatic Society Newsletter,1983 and Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The Tibetan Grain Tokens”, Oriental Numismatic SocietyNewsletter, no. 155, Winter 1998, pp. 23-24.509 Tibetan government in exile, 14th Dalai Lama, Cu. Ni. Proof Crown, 24.52g,Franklin Mint (USA), Royal Year 2093 (1966), bust of the 14th Dalai Lama threequartersleft, legend: rgyal dbang sku-phreng bcu bzhi pa rgyal lo 2093 (“14th incarnationof the Dalai Lama, Royal Year 2093”), rev. legend around central motif: gangs ljongs rgyalkhab chos srid gnyis lldan (“Tibetan Kingdom, where religion and politics exist”) (BruceX #7), about uncirculated, scarceThis medal is dated in a relatively modern era, known as bod rgyal lo (“Tibetan royalyear”) which places the founding of the Tibetan monarchy in the year 127 BC, when thefirst mythical king gnya khri btsan po supposedly appeared in Tibet.HK$1,500-2,300(US$70-100)HK$500-750(US$60-80)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG510510 Tibet, anonymous, Buddhist Medal, 4.51g, undated, pseudo-Tibetan legendsurrounded by two circles to which petals are attached, each containing a syllable writtenin pseudo-Tibetan script, rev. seated figure of Padma Sambhava (Tibetan: guru rinpoche),very fine511 Tibet and Sichuan, aluminium Medallion, Tibetan General Dance Company, undated(post 1959), the Potala palace, inscriptions in Tibetan and Chinese: bod ljongs lha sa grongkhyer spro ´i chams spyi khyabs kung si (“Tibetan Lhasa city General Dance Company”), rev.grazing yak with mountains in the background; Provincial government of Sichuan,enamelled Badge or Token, undated, five-pointed star and three lines of Tibetan text;Brass Tokens (2), swastika within six-pointed star, similar design, the enamelled item goodvery fine, others fine to very fine (4)The first three items were published by Bertsch, Wolfgang: Modern Medals and Badgesfrom or Related to Tibet, Sikkim and Bhutan in the Collection of Wolfgang Bertsch.Including a Chapter on Coins as Jewellery and two Appendices, Privately published,Gundernhausen (near Darmstadt), 2003, nos. 15, 41 and 56The last two tokens appear to be late 19th, early 20th Century and were probably foundin Tibet. They may have been inspired by the design of Indian temple tokens.HK$450-600(US$100-120)HK$750-1,000(US$120-150)512512 British India, (1903/04), bronze Medal, The Younghusband Mission to Tibet in 1903-04, 27.48g, bust of Edward VII left, rev. TIBET 1903-4, issued to the Peshawar CamelCorps, native camp followers, and others (British Battles and Medals, 2006:117),suspension and ribbon missing, good very fineThis medal was issued in silver and bronze. “This medal was authorized on 1st February1905, to be awarded to all who took part in the Tibet Mission and to the troopsaccompanying it who served at or beyond Silgari between 13th December 1903, and 23rdSeptember 1904. The medal in bronze was issued to the Peshawur Camel Corps, nativecamp followers, and others”.HK$900-1,200(US$120-160)121


BANKNOTES OF TIBETBANKNOTES OF TIBETTibetan paper currency was introduced by the 13th Dalai Lama after his return from exile in British India in the beginning of 1913.The first series of banknotes was printed from two woodblocks, one for the face and one for the backside of the notes and theyreceived the imprint of a red seal which represents the authority of the Dalai Lama and of a black seal which refers to the Tibetanmint, treasury or printing house in which the notes were produced. The notes were printed on local specially prepared paper whichwas reserved for this purpose and could not be used for other printed products. They were hand-numbered by specially trainedcalligraphists which were called Itrugpas (e phrug pa; short: epa). Normally the early notes were printed on three layers of paper,one each for the face and backside of the notes and one which was inserted inbetween and bears a legend in Tibetan script whichcan be considered as a security feature and can be seen, often with difficulty, when the notes are held against the light: Gnam bskosdga’ ldan/pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal (“The heavenly appointed Ganden Palace, victorious in all directions”); this refers tothe form of Tibetan Government which was established by the 5th Dalai Lama in 1641, while he was still residing in the GandenPalace in the Drepung monastery, west of Lhasa). The later banknote issues in Srang denomination consist of only two layers ofpaper and the security legend was printed on the inside of the reverse sheet. The first series of Tibetan banknotes, the second seriesof multicoulered 50 Tam notes and the 10 Srang issues are dated according to Tibetan Era which starts with the year AD 254 andmarks the beginning of the semi-legendary early Tibetan kingdom. For identifying the different types of black seals found on theobverses of Tibetan banknotes the cataloguer follows (without considering all sub-varieties) Narbeth, Colin and Snorrason, Gylfi:Tibetan Paper Money. Published by Geoffrey Flack, Vancouver, 2001. Most collectors of Tibetan paper money will agree that theynot only own mere banknotes, but beautiful examples of Tibetan graphic art which is full of symbolic meaning. Moreover, noTibetan note is exactly identical with another one, since the printing blocks were in slightly different postions for almost everyprint, the colours (mostly imported from British India) changed with every new batch received by the mint and the notes are handnumbered;these features contribute towards being able to consider every note as a unique, partly handcrafted and highly artisticobject.513Tibet, 5 Tam, dated T.E. 1658 (= AD 1912/13),green, serial number 5676, Obverse: The central partfeatures a snow lion facing left and turning his headbackwards, sitting in front of a flower vase. In thebackground, a mountainous landscape with the sun inthe upper right corner below clouds which are drawnin conventional Chinese style. Red unepigraphic sealimprint on the left and imprint of black seal type 1 onthe right. The black seal has two columns of Tibetanseal script which read gzhung dngul khang(“Government Treasury”). Above and below thecentral design, the following legend in four lines:gangs ljongs bod rgyal khab chen po´i lugs zung chab/srid dbu brnyes kyi lo chig stong drug brgya lnga bcu ngabrgyad/ phun tshogs sde bzhi´i dpal mnga´ phan bde´ispyi nor/ chos srid gnyis ldan gyi rab byung bco lnga pa‘i shog dngul/. [“1658 years from the founding of thereligious-secular form of government in the greatcountry of Tibet, the land of snows, paper money (shogdngul) of the 15th cycle (rab byung bco lnga) of thegovernment of religion and politics (chos srid gnyisldan), the universal jewel (spyi nor) of benefit and bliss,endowed with the four types of auspiciousness”].Reverse: The central field is occupied by an ovalshaped cartouche and scroll work in each corner.Inside the cartouche the five symbolic objects whichstimulate the senses (Tibetan: ´don yon sna lnga) arerepresented: The mirror (me long) symbolizes thephysical forms (gzugs) that appeal to the eye. The twopeaches (shing tog) on either side of the mirror arepleasing to the taste (ro). The pair of cymbals (silsnyan) below the mirror represent the sounds (sgra)which reach the ear. The pieces of cloth that areattached to the cymbals excite the sense of touch (regbya). The conch shell (dung) below the cymbals issupposed to contain a fragrant liquid which stimulatesthe faculty of smell. (Pick 1, YZM 866-872), fine forissue and scarceHK$2,000-2,800(US$250-350)513514Tibet, 5 Tam, dated T.E. 1658 (= AD 1912/13),blue, serial number 33196, ditto, black seal type 1B onthe right side of obverse. (Pick 1, YZM 866-872),about very, fine for issue and scarce. While on mostsurviving Tibetan 5 Tam notes the reverse design iscompletely worn off, this note shows all design detailsHK$2,400-3,200(US$300-400)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG515Tibet, 10 Tam, dated T.E. 1659 (= AD 1913), red,serial number 20590, Obverse: Within the centralcartouche, a crouching snow lion, facing left andlooking backwards; he is playing with a ball which inTibetan is referred to as yid bzhin nor bu dga´ khyil(“wish granting jewel, whorl of happiness”). The blackseal to the right is not clearly printed, but probably oftype 1B. Reverse: A large central rectangle is filled withflowers and scroll work at the four corners. In thecentre a vase is surrounded by leaves and flowers. Thevase is composed of the eight auspicious Buddhistemblems (bkra shis rtags brgyad); the lotus flowerbelow carries the knot of life which in turn supportsthe wheel of the doctrine with the two golden fisheson either side. Placed above are the banner of victoryand the parasol with the white conch on top. Theeighth emblem is the vase which is made up of theseven emblems just enumerated. This way of arrangingthe eight auspicious emblems is called rtags brgyadbum gzhugs (“eighth emblems in form of a vase”) inTibetan. (Pick 2, YZM -), about very, fine and veryrareHK$24,000-32,000(US$3,000-4,000)PROVENANCE:Ex collection Colin Narbeth.516Tibet, 15 Tam, dated T.E. 1659 (= AD 1913), violet,serial number 1536, Obverse: In the central field a lionis standing upright in a mountainous landscape withthe sun above on the left. The snow lion supports alarge plate with his front paws. This plate is filled withprecious objects, such as rhinoceros horns, jewels,coral and elephant tusks. Reverse: The central designrepresents a large plate which is supported by a lotusflower. The plate is filled with what most probably aremustard seeds in the middle, wood apples on the leftand red powder, piled up like small pyramids on theright. Above, a large mirror which shows one´s karma,supports a bowl filled with curd which was offered tothe Buddha by a peasant girl (Sujata) after he hadmeditated under a Boddhi tree (ficus religiosa). Abovethe curd bowl a conch stands for the spread of theBuddhist teaching. The note does not have theimprint of the black seal and as such is extremely rare.(Pick 3var., YZM 874var), very fine/extra fineHK$16,000-24,000(US$2,000-3,000)PROVENANCE:Ex collection Alexander LissanevitchThis note is illustrated in Narbeth, Colin andSnorrason, Gylfi: Tibetan Paper Money. Published byGeoffrey Flack, Vancouver, 2001, p. 7517Tibet, 15 Tam, dated T.E. 1659 (= AD 1913), violet,serial number 13129, ditto, but with imprint of blackseal type 1. (Pick 3, YZM 874), extra fineHK$12,000-20,000(US$1,500-2,500)This note is illustrated in Narbeth, Colin andSnorrason, Gylfi: Catalogue of Tibetan Paper Money.Published by Geoffrey Flack, Vancouver, 2001, p. 9123


BANKNOTES OF TIBET518Tibet, 25 Tam, dated T.E. 1659 (= AD 1913),brown, serial number 5533, black seal type 1. Obverse:In the central panel a snow lion is facing left, lookingsidewards and playing with a ball. In the backgroundwe appreciate a mountainous landscape with the sunon the left side. Reverse: The central panel shows twodifferent scenes which are divided by a high mountainwith the sun above. To the left we see a palace on theterrace of which a person of some importance is seatedconversing with another person who is seated to hisleft. Behind the second person three more men areseated; the one in the front is raising his hands inadoration or respect. To the right and behind thisscene a hermit is sitting in a cave. In the right part ofthe central panel an elephant is standing under a fruittree carrying a monkey, a hare and a bird. This scenerefers to a Buddhist legend which tells that fouranimals were trying to find out who could beconsidered as being the oldest. The elephant said thatthe tree was already fully grown when he was young,the monkey that the tree was small when he wasyoung, the hare that he saw the tree as a sapling whenhe was young and the bird claimed that he had carriedthe seed from which the tree grew. So the bird wasrecognized by the other animals as the oldest, and thefour animals lived together in harmony, helping eachother in order to enjoy the tree’s fruits. The Tibetansrefer to this scene as mthun pa rnam bzhi (“fourharmonious brothers”) (Pick 4 YZM 875), fine andrareHK$12,000-16,000(US$1,500-2,000)519Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1659 (= AD 1913), purple,serial number 1589. Obverse: In the central panel twolions are shown facing each other and playing with aball. A mountainous landscape with sun in the centreand clouds can be seen in the background. Reverse:The central panel shows a scene called tshe ring rnamdrug (“the six long living”) consisting of an old man(mi tshe ring) sitting under what most probably is apeach tree, his left hand resting in his lap and holdinga rosary, his raised right hand holding a water pot.Three jewels are placed in front of him and to his rightis seen a pair of deer and a pair of cranes. Behind thecranes, the sun, clouds and mountains are visible. Tothe left of the old man, one notes a waterfall, a large519rock in the shape of a conch and flowers. The pairs ofdeers and cranes, the rock, the waterfall and the peachtree are all features which are associated withlongevity. (Pick 6var., YZM -) The obverse of the notedoes not have the imprint of the black seal and as suchis very rare. The note may have been exposed to waterwhich affected the colour, otherwise it is very fine/extrafine and very rareHK$16,000-20,000(US$2,000-2,500)520Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1659 (= AD 1913), blue,serial number 48347, ditto, but imprint of black sealtype 1A on the right of the obverse, (pick 5, YZM876), very fine and rare HK$9,500-13,000(US$1,200-1,600)Note: the 25 and 50 Tam notes were printed from atleast two different obverse blocks. The first, earlyvariety has a gap between the last word of the secondline of script and the final vertical stroke and thesecond variety does not have this gap. The first blockvariety may have been originally intended to printnotes with the date 1658. By the time the notes wereto be printed the Tibetan New Year of T.E. 1659 hadalready passed and it was decided to change theTibetan word for eight (brgyad) to nine (dgu). TheTibetan word for nine being shorter than that foreight, a space was left before the final vertical stroke ofthe second line of text on the obverse. When the earlyblocks were put out of service, new blocks were carvedwith the date 1659 on which the final vertical stroke ofthe second line was placed close to the last word dgu.The 25 Tam note of lot 518 and the 50 Tam note oflot 519 are printed from the first obverse block type;the 50 Tam note of lot 520 is printed from the secondobverse block type.WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGTHE MULTICOLOURED 50 TAM NOTESSince the early blue or purple 50 Tam Notes, dated T.E. 1659 were frequently forged, the Tibetan government decided tointroduce newly designed 50 Tam notes in AD 1926. The new notes were printed by machine with metal blocks, excepting theblock which was used for printing the four lines of text and the denomination on the obverse of the notes which was carved fromwood. While for the first series of Tibetan banknotes only three different colours were used (black for the obverse legends and theseal of the treasury, red for the seal related to the Dalai Lama and a third colour for the main design on obverse and reverse) forthe production of the new 50 tam notes more than one colour was used for printing the main design of the notes, each colourbeing printed with a separate metal bock. The multicoloured 50 Tam notes continued to be numbered by hand, and are dated byT.E. year, ranging from T.E. 1672 (AD 1926) to T.E. 1687 (A.D.1941). Like on the earlier notes, the Tibetan cycle (rab byung)is also mentioned in the last line of the obverse inscription. The notes dated T.E. 1672 mention the fifteenth cycle, while the notesdated T.E. 1673 and all further 50 Tam issues refer to the sixteenth cycle. This fact allows the conclusion that the notes of T.E.1672 are dated to the last, i.e. 60th year of the 15th cycle (equivalent to AD 1926), while the notes of T.E. 1673 must have beendated to the first year of the sixteenth cycle (equivalent to AD 1927); this conclusion provides the key to the conversion intowestern dates of the somewhat mysterious T.E. dates (T.E. date plus 254 = Western date). The security legend in two lines whichis seen when the notes are held against the light is identical to the one used for the earlier monochrome Tam notes. The Rhodescollection comprises of an almost complete date set of this issue, including the very rare date T.E. 1672 and the rare dates T.E.1674, 1680 and 1684 and excluding the common date T.E. 1687.521Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1672 (= AD 1926), blue, red and yellow, serial number 3572, black seal type 1A, obverse: themain design consists of two snow lions facing each other and playing with a ball. Reverse: Four panels are printed in redon a yellow background containing the image of the four animals which are believed to be the guardians of the fourquarters, a concept which goes back to Tibet´s pre-buddhist Bön religion: Snow lion (seng ge) (upper left), dragon (´brug)(upper right), tiger (stag) (lower left) and mythical bird (khyung) (lower right). The T.E. date 1672 is the rarest amongthis series, (Pick 7, YZM 880 ) very fine and rareHK$4,000-6,500(US$500-800)522Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1673 (= AD 1927), blue,red and yellow, serial number 25019, black seal type1A, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1673 in thesecond line of the inscription and “sixteenth cycle”(rab byung bcu drug) in the last line, (Pick 7, YZM881), fine HK$1,200-2,000(US$150-250)523Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1674 (= AD 1928), blue,red and yellow, serial number 71947, black seal type1B, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1674 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 883), verygood and very scarceHK$1,200-2,000(US$150-250)125


BANKNOTES OF TIBET524Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1675 (= AD 1929), blue,red and yellow, serial number 174367, black seal type1B, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1675 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 884),about, very fineHK$950-1,200(US$120-150)525Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1676 (= AD 1930), blue,red and yellow, serial number 190820, black seal type1B, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1676 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 885),about, fineHK$800-1,000(US$100-130)526Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1677 (= AD 1931), blue,red and yellow, serial number 312309, black seal type1B, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1677 in thesecond line of the inscription and the imprint of anadditional red seal above the upper right serialnumber, (Pick 7A, YZM 886), very , fine and scarceHK$1,600-2,000(US$200-250)527Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1678 (= AD 1932), blue,red and yellow, serial number 400241, black seal type1B, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1678 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 888), verygoodHK$650-950(US$80-120)528Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1679 (= AD 1933), blue,red and yellow, serial number 504397, black seal type2, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1679 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 889)about fineHK$700-1,000(US$90-130)529Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1680 (= AD 1934), blue,red and yellow, serial number 536711, black seal type2, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1680 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 890), fineand very scarceHK$1,000-1,450(US$130-180)530Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1681 (= AD 1935), blue,red and yellow, serial number 612845, black seal type2, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1681 inthe second line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 891),fineHK$800-1,200(US$100-150)531Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1682 (= AD 1936), blue,red and yellow, serial number 712621, black seal type2, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1682 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 892), veryfineHK$1,600-2,000(US$200-250)532Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1683 (= AD 1937), blue,red and yellow, serial number 794685, black seal type2A, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1683 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 893),uncirculatedHK$1,600-2,400(US$200-300)533Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1684 (= AD 1938), blue,red and yellow, serial number 807776, black seal type2, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1684 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM -), aboutuncirculated and rare, two black stains on obverseHK$2,000-2,800(US$250-350)534Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1685 (= AD 1939), blue,red and yellow, serial number 848918, black seal type2, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1685 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 894),extrafine, small tear in upper margin HK$1,450-1,750(US$180-220)535Tibet, 50 Tam, dated T.E. 1686 (= AD 1940), blue,red and yellow, serial number 880242, black seal type2, ditto, but obverse shows altered date 1686 in thesecond line of the inscription, (Pick 7, YZM 895), veryfineHK$1,450-1,750(US$180-220)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGTHE 10 SRANG NOTEThese notes were issued under the regency of Taktra Rinpoche (ruled from 1941 until 1950) and show the same four lines of texton oberse as the early Tam notes. The dates which are to be found in the second line of the obverse inscription range from T.E.1687 (A.D. 1941) until T.E. 1694 (A.D. 1948). For this issue new red and black seals (type 4) were created. In its central partthe red seal displays an undeciphrable script. The black seal is smaller than the one used for the early Tam notes, but has the sametwo columns of text in Tibetan seal script: gzhung dngul khang (“Government treasury”). The security legend in two lines whichis seen when the notes are held against the light is identical to the one used for the earlier Tam notes.538Tibet, 10 Srang, dated T.E. 1691 (= AD 1945) andT.E. 1692 (=AD 1946), blue and red, serial numbers171482 and ka/068476, black seal type 4, ditto,except for dates in second line of obverse inscription,(Pick 9, YZM 902 and 903), fine and very fine (2)HK$400-700(US$50-90)536Tibet, 10 Srang, dated T.E. 1687 (= AD 1941) andT.E. 1688 (=AD 1942), blue and red, serial numbers16591 and 49789, black seal type 4, obverse: In thecentral panel two lions (possibly a lioness with her cub)facing left play with a wheel which has eight spokesand long streamers; reverse: The middle part of thecentral panel is enclosed by lines which form acartouche. Below, a pond in which a lotus flower anda large flower on either side are growing. Above threemythical animals: on top a snow lion with garudahead, below left, a sea monster (chu srin; Sanskritmakara) issuing from a conch and below right an otterwith fish-head. These three mythical animals areknown in Tibet as the “three non-harmoniousbrothers on the battle field” (mi mthun g.yul rgyal) aseach of them is composed of two animals whichnormally do not live together in harmony. On eitherside of the central cartouche one sees two dragons(g.yu ´brug, “turquoise dragon”) and a ball withstreamers among clouds, (Pick 9, YZM 898 and 899),very fine and fine (2)HK$400-700(US$50-90)537Tibet, 10 Srang, dated T.E. 1689 (= AD 1943) andT.E. 1690 (=AD 1944), blue and red, serial numbers72622 and 101777, black seal type 4, ditto, except fordates in second line of obverse inscription, (Pick 9,YZM 900 and 901), very fine and fine (2) HK$400-700(US$50-90)539Tibet, 10 Srang, dated T.E. 1693 (= AD 1947) andT.E. 1694 (=AD 1948), blue and red, serial numbersga/004678 and ca/095363, black seal type 4, ditto,except for dates in second line of obverse inscription,(Pick 9, YZM 904 and 905), very, fine and aboutuncirclated (2)HK$500-800(US$60-100)540Tibet, 10 Srang, dated T.E. 1694 (= AD 1948), blueand red, bundle of ten notes with the consecutiveserial numbers ca/064381 until ca/064390, mostprobably tied with original string, (Pick 9, YZM 905for type), uncirculated and very rare (10) HK$4,000-6,500(US$500-800)PROVENANCE:Ex Wesley Halpert collection, Spink New York, December2000, lot 296127


BANKNOTES OF TIBETTHE 5 SRANG NOTEThese small banknotes feature only two lines of inscription onobverse and bear the same type of seal imprints as the 10Srang notes. They do not record the T.E. year and onlymention the 16th cycle in the second line of the text. They areknown to have been issued between 1942 and 1946. Whenheld against the light one can read the following securitylegend, consisting in a single line of text: dga’ ldan pho brang(“Ganden Palace”).THE 100 (TAM) SRANG NOTEThe undated 100 Tam Srang and 100 Srang notes were issuedbetween 1937 or 1938 and 1959.The first issue consists in 50,000 notes which show thedenomination “100 Tam Srang” and bear the same octogonalred seal as the early notes in Tam denomination, but they havethe imprint of a new type black seal (type 3 and varieties).After these notes had been issued, the denomination waschanged to “100 Srang” and the red seal was replaced by asmaller one which has an undeciphrable inscription. Thesecurity legend in two lines which is seen when the notes areheld against the light is identical to the one used for the earlierTam notes. The Rhodes collection includes some veryinteresting scarce or rare varieties which are offered here forthe specialist collector.541Tibet, 5 Srang, undated, blue and red, serial number64045, black seal type 4, the central panel is printed inblue and features a snow lion facing left and lookingsidewards carrying a silk ball in his mouth. On his leftis a tree with flowers; clouds are seen in thebackground to the left and the sun to the right. Thetwo lines of black script read gnam bskos dga´ ldan phobrang phyogs las rnam rgyal chos srid gnyis ldan rabbyung bcu drug pa ´i shog dngul (“The heavenlyappointed Ganden Palace, victorious in alldirections/paper money of the sixteenth cycle of thereligious and political [Government]”), reverse: twodragons with each a large ball representing nor bu dga´khyil (“whorling jewel of joy”) are facing each otherand are seperated by a cartouche. Within the cartouchewe see a drawing which represents eight auspicioussubstances (Tibetan: bkra shis rdzas brgyad) which arearranged vertically and are accompanied by floraldesigns. From top to bottom one can identify a conch(dung dkar g.yas ´khyil, “right whorled conch”), abowl filled with curd (zho), vermillion powder (li khri)in four small boxes, a mirror (me long), below themirror secretions of the glands of an elephant (gilvang), Darwa grass (rtsa dur ba), bilva fruit (shing togbil pa], aegle marmelos) and white mustard seeds(yungs dkar) placed in a bowl. These objectscommemorate eight scenes from Buddha´s life, (Pick8, YZM 877), very fine HK$550-950(US$70-120)542Tibet, 5 Srang, undated, blue and red, serial numberka/014905, black seal type 4, ditto, (Pick 8, YZM878), very fine HK$550-950(US$70-120)543Tibet, 100 Tam Srang, red, yellow, green and blue,serial number kha/06244, black seal type 3, the mainpanel of the obverse features a pair of standing lionswith human breasts which are facing each other andsupport a large plate with one of their front paws. Theplate is filled with precious objects such as a pair ofelephant tusks, a pair of rhinoceros horns, a branch ofcoral, five jewels and one round and one squareearring. The inscription in two lines reads as follows:gnam bskhos dga´ ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal/chos srid gnyis ldan gyi shog dngul srang brgya tham pa(“From the heavenly appointed Ganden Palace,victorious in all directions. One hundred paper silverSrang of the religious and worldly [government]”).The scene of the central panel of the reverse is similarto the one which is seen on the reverse of the earlymonochrome 50 Tam notes. However, the old man isholding a vase in his right hand, he is accompanied bya boy sitting to his left and the tree under which he issitting can be identified as a pomegranate (Tib. se‘bru). Some fruits have opened and reveal their seeds.According to Chinese and Central Asian traditionthese fruits symbolize fertility, i.e. a large progeniture.To either side of the tree one can observe a flying bat.Below, on the left, a plate decorated with lotus leavesis filled with fruits, (Pick 12, YZM 908), aboutextremely fine and very rare in this high gradeHK$3,200-6,400(US$400-800)WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG544Tibet, 100 Srang, red, yellow, green and blue, serialnumbers nga/19516, black seal type 3, and ja/18353, blackseal 3B, ditto, except the imprint of a new type of red sealand the design of flowers instead of bats below and abovethe red and black seal, (Pick 11), extrafine and uncirculated,early 100 Srang notes are rare in this grade (2) HK$1,200-1,600(US$150-200)545Tibet, 100 Srang, red, yellow, green and blue, serialnumber da/05791 and pha/02190, black seal 3B,ditto, the first note is printed on thick paper, very fineand fine (2)HK$400-550(US$50-70)546Tibet, 100 Srang, red, yellow, green and blue, serialnumbers sa/00151 and sa/08950, black seal 3B,ditto. These two notes of the “sa”-series document thefollowing change of the reverse design: In the lowerleft corner of the green frame the flower hascrosshatching in its centre on the note with serialnumber sa/00151. The cross-hatching has beenreplaced by the letter “a” in the ornamental Bhumijolscripton the note with the serial number sa/08950and remains this way on all 100 Srang notes whichwere issued subsequently. All the 100 (Tam) Srangnotes with serial prefixes from “ka” to “sha” featurethe old design with cross-hatching, but only very fewnotes with low serial numbers of the “sa” series featurethe old design, (Pick 11) very good, the first note rare(2) HK$500-800(US$60-100)547Tibet, 100 Srang, red, yellow, green and blue, serialnumber a/25000, black seal 3, ditto. The 100 Srangnotes were numbered from 00001 to 25000. Everytime after reaching the highest number 25000 a newletter prefix had to be used. The note offered here isthe only one known to the cataloguer which has thehighest possible number 25000, fine and rareHK$650-950(US$80-120)548Tibet, 100 Srang, red, yellow, green and blue, serialnumbers ka1/15632 and kha1/13929, black seal 3,ditto. After having used the 30 letters of the Tibetanalphabet as prefixes to the serial numbers, thecalligraphists numbered the notes by placing the figure“1” above the prefixed letters of the Tibetan aplhabet.The notes offered here are part of the first two serieswhich document the new numbering-system, aboutuncirculated (2)HK$500-650(US$60-80)549Tibet, 100 Srang, red, yellow, green and blue, serialnumber a’1/01225, black seal 3, ditto, the black sealis printed inverted (upside down), (Pick 11d), extrafine and scarceHK$500-650(US$60-80)550Tibet, 100 Srang, red, yellow, green and blue, serialnumbers ya1/00980 and ya1/00981, black seal 3,ditto. Two notes with inverted black seal imprints andconsecutive serial numbers, (Pick 11d) uncirculatedand very scarce (2)HK$1,200-1,600(US$150-200)Note: Nicholas Rhodes suggested in a letter to thecataloguer that most of the notes of the a’1 and allnotes of the ya1 series were probably taken from themint by officials who accompanied the 14th Dalaiduring his flight to India in March 1959. The blackseal imprints may purposely have been applied invertedto distinguish the 100 Srang notes which were beingsealed during and after the flight of the Dalai Lamafrom those which had been issued in Lhasa.129


BANKNOTES OF TIBETTHE 25 SRANG NOTEThe 25 Srang notes are undated and are known to have been issued between AD 1950 and AD 1955. They bear the imprints ofthe same types of red and black seals as the 100 Srang notes, but their obverse inscription consists in only two lines of text. Thesecurity legend in two lines which is seen when the notes are held against the light is identical to the one used for the earlier Tamnotes.551Tibet, 25 Srang, yellow, red and blue, serial numberska/069530 and kha/039467 , the obverse featurestwo snow lions within an ornamental frame. They aresupporting the wheel of (Buddhist) religion with oneof their front paws. The two lines of inscription readsas follows: dga´ ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal/chos srid gnyis ldan gyi shog dngul srang nyi shu rtsalnga (“the Ganden Palace victorious in all directions,twenty-five paper silver srang of the religious andworldly government”). The first line of the legend alsoappears written in seal script in the vertical panels tothe left of the red seal and to the right of the black seal.The reverse shows rulers and monks among palacesand monastic buildings on the left of the central paneland the “four brothers living in harmony” in the rightpart. The latter scene is similar to the one found on thereverses of the early 25 Tam notes, (Pick 10, YZM906) fine and about uncirculated (2) HK$300-500(US$40-60)551552Tibet, 25 Srang, yellow, red and blue, serial numbersga/053290, black seal 3 and ca/033079, black seal3B, ditto, (Pick 10, YZM 906), very fine and aboutuncirculated (2)HK$400-650(US$50-80THE BANKNOTES OF THE PROVINCIAL BANK OF XIKANGThe province of Xikang was formally established on 1st January 1939. It included parts of western Sichuan and large parts ofEastern Tibet (Kham) up to the Kongbo province. The provincial capital was Kangding, known as Tachienlu in older westernliterature. The province of Xikang ceased to exist in November 1955. Its eastern part was incorporated into the Sichuan provincewhile its western part formed part of the future Tibet Autonomous Region. In 1939 the Provincial Bank of Xikang issued threebanknotes in Kangding which are inscribed with both Tibetan and Chinese legends. The denomination on these notes is given assgor mo (“round coin”) in Tibetan and as yuan in Chinese. The unit of value of the notes was equivalent to the Sichuan Rupeeswhich were struck in Kangding and Chengdu.553China, Xikang Provincial Bank, halfRupee, 28th year of the Republic (1939),black serial number D 0021951 printedon obverse and same number in red onreverse, red and yellow, obverse landscapenear Kangding with Tibetan monastery inthe foreground. Tibetan inscription onreverse reads: khams gshing chen gyi dngulmdzod khang (“bank of the KhamProvince”)/ sgor mo phyed (“half rupee”;this inscription is also placed in the upperright and lower left corners on both sidesof the note)/ krung yang tshes grang pubka´ gnang, (“by order of the Minister ofFinance”), (Pick S1739), uncirculatedand very rare in this grade HK$4,800-7,200(US$600-900)553WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONG554China, Xikang Provincial Bank, one Rupee, 28th year of the Republic(1939), serial number A oo0000 printed in black on obverse and in red onreverse, the obverse features the Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibetan inscriptionon reverse is like on the half rupee note, except the second line of text (andthe inscription in the upper left and lower right corners) which reads sgormo gcig (“one Rupee”), specimen, (Pick S1740 for type), uncirculated andvery rareHK$8,000-12,000(US$1,000-1,500)555China, Xikang Provincial Bank, five Rupees, 28th year of the Republic(1939), black serial number E0080000 printed in red over numberD0026789 on obverse and number D0026789 in black on reverse. The redseal is double printed. The obverse features a Tibetan stupa next to a treeand a monastery in the background. The Tibetan inscription on reverse islike on the half and one Rupee note, except the second line of text (and theinscription in the upper right and lower left corners) which reads sgor molnga (“five Rupees”), (Pick S1741), uncirculated and extremely rare(possibly unique) in this grade and with serial number error HK$12,000-20,000(US$1,500-2,500)PROVENANCE:Ex collection Colin Narbeth.This note is illustrated in Bertsch, Wolfgang: The paper currency of Tibet,Thyaka Research Centre, Gundernhausen near Darmstadt (Germany) andLalitpur (Nepal), 2012, p. 185END OF THE SALE131


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETCatalogues:BibliographyBaldwin’s Auctions Ltd, Ma Tak Wo Numismatic Co. Ltd, Monetarium (S) Pte Ltd and Ronals G. Gillio Auctions: Hong KongCoin Auction, Catalogue 40, Hong Kong, 1 September 2005. Includes the Nepalese and Tibetan coins of the collection of KarlGabrisch.Bruce, Colin R. II: Unusual World Coins, Krause Publications, 5th edition, Iola Wisconsin, no dateDong Wenchao: An Overview of China’s Gold & Silver Coins of Past Ages – the Gold and Silver Coins and Medals of Modern China.Beijing 1992.K = Kann, Edward: Illustrated Catalog of Chinese Coins. Los Angeles 1954. Reprint: New York, 1966.KM = George S. Cuhaj, editor, Thomas Michael, market analyst: Standard Catalog of World Coins 1701-1800, 5th edition, KrausePublications, Iola WI, 2010KM = George S. Cuhaj, editor, Thomas Michael, market analyst: Standard Catalog of World Coins 1801-1900, 6th edition, KrausePublications, Iola WI, 2009KM = George S. Cuhaj, editor, Thomas Michael, market analyst: 2012 Standard Catalog of World Coins 1901-2000, 39th edition,Krause Publications, Iola WI, 2011LM = Lin Gwo Min (author), Ma Tak Wo (editor): Illustrated Catalogue of Chinese Gold & Silver Coins. Ching and RepublicanIssues, 6th Edition, Ma Tak Wo Numismatic Co., Ltd., Hong Kong, no dateRGV = Rhodes, N.G., Gabrisch K. and Valdettaro C.: The Coinage of Nepal from the earliest times until 1911. Royal NumismaticSociety. Special Publication no. 21, London 1989.Semans, Scot: The Daniel K. Ching Sale, Seattle, Washington, June 2, 1991.Spink New York: Ancient, Foreign and United States Coins and Banknotes. New York, 11 & 12 December 2000. Includes theNepalese and Tibetan coins of the collection of Wesley Halpert (USA)The Money Company, Auction, 5-6 September 1986Wang Chun Li: “Illustrated Catalogue of Chinese Gold & Silver Coins; 1791-1949” (Zhong guo jin yin bi mu lu), Zhong guoshang ye chu ban she (China Trade Publishing House), Beijing 2012. ISBN 078-7-5044-7683-8The Tibet chapter of this catalogue lists and illustrates most Tibetan silver and gold coins by date with estimated values in Chineseyuan. The listing is less comprehensive than YZM, but more detailed than LM or Dong Wenchao.YZM = Yin Zhengmin: Zhong guo xi zang qian bi tu lu (Illustrated Catalogue of the Money of China’s Tibet), Xizang RenminChubanshe (Tibet People’s Publishing House), Lhasa 2004, ISBN 7-223-01686-8.In Chinese only, but with fairly good illustrations of Tibetan coins and banknotes, including many rare items. Authored by anexperienced Chinese collector from Lhasa, this is the most comprehensive illustrated catalogue of Tibetan coins which is presentlyavailable.WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGOther References:The majority of the books and articles discussing the coinage of Tibet were published in either English or Chinese language. HereI list in alphabetical order with comments what I consider as the most important and useful of these publications. I also includesome articles and general works which I used during the preparation of the introduction to the coinage of Tibet and which Iindicate between brackets in the text. Of course, the references which have been used for the preparation of the present auctioncatalogue are also listed.The first illustrations of three Nepalese silver coins which circulated in Tibet and are referred to as Tibetan coins are to be foundin the third volume of the following French classic on China and Tibet:P.J.B.[Père Jean Babtiste] Duhalde, de la Compagnie de Jésus: Description Géographique, Historique, Chronologique, Politique, etPhysique de l’Empire de la Chine et de la Tartarie Chinoise. Enrichie de Cartes Générales & Particulières de ces Pays, de la CarteGénerale et des Cartes Particulières du Thibet, & de la Corée, & ornée d’un grand nombre de Figures de Vignettes gravées en Tailledouce.A Paris chez P.G. Lemercier, Imprimeur-Libraire, rue Saint Jacques, au Livre d’Or, 1735 (4 volumes).Anonymous (Brian Hannon and Charles Panish): “Tibetan Fake Coins Hit US; Copper 1½ , 7½ Pieces”. World Coin News, vol.6, no. 16, April 17, 1979, pp. 3 and 26.Bertsch, Wolfgang and Gabrisch, Karl: “Some Varieties of Tibet’s First Struck Coins“. Numismatics International Bulletin, vol.20, no. 6, Dallas, 1986, p. 125-128.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “A Pattern Struck in England for Tibet”. Numismatics International Bulletin, vol. 21, no. 2, Dallas, February1987, p. 33-35.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “Some Difficulties in Dating an Early Tibetan Coin”. Numismatics International Bulletin, vol. 25, no. 8,Dallas, August 1990, p. 184-185.Bertsch, Wolfgang and Gabrisch, Karl: “10 tam coins from Tibet”. Oriental Numismatic Society Newsletter, no. 128, March-May,1991.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The 20th Century Pattern Coinage of Tibet”. Numismatics International Bulletin, vol. 32, no. 1, Dallas,January 1997, pp. 7-18Bertsch, Wolfgang: “Some Modern Forgeries of Tibetan Coins”. Oriental Numismatic Society Newsletter, no. 157, autumn1998, p. 18-20.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The Tibetan Grain Tokens”, Oriental Numismatic Society Newsletter, no. 155, Winter 1998, pp. 23-24.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The Silver Coin Presented by the 13th Dalai Lama to Monks in 1910 A.D.”Tibet Journal, vol. 24, no. 4,winter 1999, pp. 22-34.Bertsch, Wolfgang: The Currency of Tibet. A Sourcebook for the Study of Tibetan Coins, Paper Money and other Forms of Currency.Library of Tibetan Works & Archives, Dharamsala, 2002.A comprehensive bibliography of Tibetan currency with an introduction to various aspects of Tibetan numismatics.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The Tibetan Tangka with Rañjana Script”. Oriental Numismatic Society, Newsletter, no. 185, autumn, 2005,pp. 18-31Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The Use of Tea Bricks as Currency among the Tibetans”. Der Primitivgeldsammler, Mitteilungsblatt derEuropäischen Vereinigung zum Sammeln, Bewahren und Erforschen von ursprünglichen und außergewöhnlichen Geldformen(EUCOPRIMO). Jahrgang 27, Heft 1 (vol. 27, no. 1), Rüsselsheim, 2006, p. 19-51.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “The Kong-par Tangka of Tibet”. Journal of the Oriental Numismatic Society, no. 195, Croydon andRingwood, spring 2008, p. 35-46.Bertsch, Wolfgang: “A Fantasy of a Tibetan 10 Tam Pattern Coin”. Journal of the Oriental Numismatic Society, no. 198, winter2009, p. 44-45.Bertsch Wolfgang, Gabrisch Karl and Rhodes Nicholas: A Study of Sino-Tibetan Coins of the Chia Ch’ing Era“. Journal of EastAsian Numismatics, vol. 2, no. 4, summer 1995, p. 23-34.Bertsch, Wolfgang and Rhodes, Nicholas: “The Use of Cut Coins in Tibet”. Tibet Journal, vol. 35, no. 3, autumn 2010, p. 19-40. http://ltwa.tibetanbridges.com/tibet_journal/Tibet_Journal2010_Autumn/pdf%20files/cut%20coins.pdfBertsch Wolfgang (1997c): A Study of Tibetan Paper Money. With a Critical Bibliography. Library of Tibetan Works and Archives,Dharamsala, 1997Bertsch, Wolfgang: The Paper Currency of Tibet. Thyaka Research Centre, Gundernhausen (near Darmstadt) and Lalitpur (Nepal),2012Cao Gang: Zhong guo xi zang di feng huo bi (Chinese Tibet’s Regional Currency), Sichuan Minzi Chubanshe, Chengdu, 1999.In Chinese and in not always intelligible English. Largely Marxist interpretation of Tibet’s currency history (with colourillustrations).133


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETChen Yishi: “Lu bi qin yin kang zang ji qi ying xiang (The penetration of the British Indian rupee into Tibet and Xikang and itsconsequences)”. Zhong guo Qian bi (China Numismatics), no. 28 (Issue 1 for 1990), Beijing, 1990, p. 43-50.Davies, Major H.R.: Yünnan. The Link between India and the Yangtse. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1909.Gabrisch, Karl: “Beiräge zur tibetischen Numismatik I: Die Sichuan Rupien und ihre Varianten”. Münstersche NumismatischeZeitschrift, vol. 12, no. 4, 1982, p. 44-47.Gabrisch, Karl: “The Szechuan Rupee and its Variants”. Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 17, no. 4, Dallas, April 1983,p. 103-112.Gabrisch, Karl: “Grain Tokens from Tibet”, Oriental Numismatic Society Newsletter, 1983Gabrisch, Karl: Geld aus Tibet. Sammlung Dr. Karl Gabrisch, Winterthur and Rikon, 1990.In German only. This is a well researched introduction to the history of Tibetan coins and banknotes with many black and whiteillustrations of coins and banknotes from the author’s collection.Gabrich, Karl: “Beiträge zur Tibetischen Numismatik II: Die Tibetischen Goldmünzen und deren Fälschugen“. MünsterscheNumismatische Zeitschrift, vol. 20, no. 2 (1990), p. 1-3 and vol. 21, no. 2 (1991), p. 1-5.Gabrisch, Karl (translated from German and edited by Wolfgang Bertsch): “The First Coins Struck in Tibet”. NumismaticsInternational Bulletin, vol. 34, no. 3, Dallas, March, 1999, p. 56-63.Gabrisch, Karl and Bertsch, Wolfgang: “Countermarks on Sichuan Rupees and Coins from Tibet”. Numismatics InternationalBulletin, Vol. 26, no. 3, Dallas, March 1991, p. 57-65.Kempf, Fred: A Primary Report on Native Tibetan Coins, Seattle, Washington 1961Laufer, Berthold: Sino-Tibetan Studies, vol. 2, New Delhi, 1987Mangeot, Sylvain: The Adventures of a Manchurian. The Story of Lobsang Thondup. Collins, London, 1974.Martynov, A. S.: “O pervych chekankakh monety v Tibete”Kratkie Soobshcheniia Akademia Nauk SSSR, Institut Narodoz Azji,no. 69, Moscow, 1965, p. 197-202.Martynov, A.S.: “Some Aspects of the Qing Policy in Tibet at the Close of the 18th Century. Prehistory of the Manzhou Invasionof Nepal in 1792”. Rolamba. Journal of the Joshi Research Institute, vol. 7, no. 3, Kathmandu July/Sept., 1987, p. 6-20. Adaptedfrom “Manzhou Rule in China”, Moscow 1983, p. 216-234.Morse, Hosea Ballou: The Trade and Administration of the Chinese Empire. Longmans, Green and Co., New York, Bombay,Calcutta, 1908.Mynak A. Tulku: “The Eight Auspicious Objects”. Bulletin of Tibetology, vol. 5, no. 1, Gangtok, 29 February 1968, p. 42-43.Narbeth, Colin and Snorrason, Gylfi: Tibetan Paper Money. Published by Geoffrey Flack, Vancouver, 2001.Numismatic Research Department of the Institute of Finance of the Tibet Branch of the People’s Bank of China: “Xi zang di fangzhen fu de zhao bi chang (The Mint of the Local Tibetan Government)”. Zhong guo qian bi (China Numismatics), no. 22, issue1, Beijing, 1990, pp. 29-42.O ‘Connor, Sir Frederick Lieut.-Colonel: Things Mortal. Hodder and Stoughton Limited, London, 1940.Pennant, Thomas: The View of Hindoostan, vol. I Western Hindoostan. Printed by Henry Hughs, London, 1798.Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “A Communist Chinese Restrike”. Spink’s Numismatic Circular, vol. 83, London, 1975, p. 239-240.Rhodes, N.G.: “An Unpublished Sino-Tibetan Date”. Numismatics Internatinal Bulletin, Vol. 9, no. 4, Dallas, April 1975, p.101.Rhodes, Nicholas: “A Sino-Tibetan Rupee”. Spink’s Numismatic Circular, vol. 85, London, 1977, p. 107-108.Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “A Tibetan Forgery”. Spink’s Numismatic Circular, Vol. 86, London 1978, p. 364-365.Rhodes, Nicholas G.: Tibetan Mints. Oriental Numismatic Society, Information Sheet no. 19, August 1978.Rhodes, Nicholas: The Gaden Tangka of Tibet. Oriental Numismatic Society, Occasional Paper, no. 17, January 1983.http://gorila.netlab.cz/coins/Tibet/ONS_TangkaTibet.pdf. Excellent English article of 20 pages on this type of tangka. Thecoins are presented in chronological order including all major varieties which are known (with line drawings).Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “Some Sino-Tibetan Forgeries”. Numismatics International Bulletin, vol. 20, no. 11 (November 1986),p. 254-257.Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “The ‘Suchakra Vijaya’ Tangka of Tibet”. Numismatics International Bulletin (NIB), vol. 21, no. 1,Dallas, January 1987, p. 21-23.Rhodes 1987a = Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “Two Tibetan Pattern Coins”. Oriental Numismatic Society Newsletter, no. 105, March-April 1987Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “The Dating of Tibetan Banknotes”. The Tibet Journal, vol. 13, no. 1, Dharamsala, 1988, pp. 57-60.Rhodes, Nicholas G.: “The first Coins struck in Tibet”. Tibet Journal, vol. 15, no. 4, Dharamsala, winter, 1990, p. 115-134.WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGRhodes Nicholas and Gabrisch, Karl: “Two Sino-Tibetan Coins”. Spink’s Numismatic Circular, vol. 88, no. 5, 1980, p. 172.Rhodes, Nicholas G., Gabrisch, Karl and Valdettaro, Carlo: The Coinage of Nepal from the earliest times until 1911, RoyalNumismatic Society, Special Publication, no. 21, London, 1989.Schuh, Dieter: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der Tibetischen Kalenderrechnung. Verzeichnis der orientalischen Handschriften inDeutschland, Supplementband 16, Franz Steiner Verlag GmbH, Wiesbaden 1973.Semans, Scot: “Some more Forgeries”, ONS Newsletter, no. 59, August 1977.Shakabpa, W.D.: “Tibetan Currency”Tibet House Bulletin, vol. 7, no. 1, Spring 1992, p. 2-3Shrestha, Bhupendra Narayan: Tibetan Paper Currency. Transatlantic Authors Ltd., St. Albans, Herts. U.K., 1987.Walsh, Ernest Herbert Cooper: “The Coinage of Tibet”. Memoirs of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, vol. II, no. 2, Calcutta 1907, p.11-23.Wang Haiyan: “Qing dai zai xi zang liu tong de jian sui de ni bo er yin bi”[“The Cut Nepalese Silver Coins Circulated during theQing Dynasty”]. Wen Wu, 1985, issue 11, pp. 92-95Wang Haiyan: “Xi zang di fang zhen fu di liang ci zhao qi zhu bi” (“The two earliest coins struck by the local Tibetangovernment”) Zhong guo Qianbi (China Numismatics), Beijing, 1.1991, p. 27-28.Wang Haiyan: Xi zang di fang huo bi (“The Regional Money of Tibet”or “The Money of the Tibet Region”). Zang xue wen ku(Tibetology Series). Qing hai ren min chu ban she (Qinghai People’s Publishing House), Xining, 2007.In Chinese language only. Deals with coins and banknotes of Tibet. Most of the coins are illustrated as rubbings, while banknotesand banknote printing blocks are illustrated in colour. Nearly all illustrations are taken from Zhu Jinzhong et alii, Lhasa, 2002 –Wang Haiyan being one of the authors of the latter publication.Xiao Huaiyuan: Xi zang di fang huo bi shi (The History of Tibetan Money). Beijing, 1987.In Chinese only. Includes black and white illustrations of poor quality, but presents a well researched history of Tibet’s currencyseen from the Chinese point of view.Zhang Cheng Guang (responsible editor), Zhao Weng Sheng, Tu Hong Qiu, Zhang Ming Cong and Wang Tian Fu (authors):Sichuan Zangyang. Si kron bod dngul (Sichuan Tibet money = Sichuan Rupee). Zhong guo guo ji wen yi chu ban she (ChinaInternational Art Publishing House), n.p. (Beijing?), 2011. ISBN 978-988-19593-0-0/W. 697.In Chinese language only. An illustrated catalogue of varieties of Sichuan rupees and their fractions with a chapter on Sichuanrupees with countermarks and an introductory chapter setting out the historical background of this coin issue.Zhong guo jin rong xue hui (Society of Chinese Finance); Zhong guo qian bi bo wu guan (China Numismatic Museum); Xin huatong xun she she ying bu (Xin Hua News Agency Photo-Department) (Editing superviser: Xu zu gen): Zhong guo jin rong zhengui wen wu dang guan da dian. Xi zang juan (China Finance precious cultural Relics Archive and Catalogue. Tibet Book). Zhongyang wen xian chu ban she (Central Document Publishing House), Beijing, 2002, ISBN 7-5073-1170-8/F.18.Size: 787 X 1092 mm; 224 pages, price 1800 Yuan. Hardbound in yellow cloth.The book contains little text (in Chinese only), but high quality black and white and colour illustrations of Tibetan coins, coinpatterns, banknotes, banknote printing blocks and material from the Tibetan government mint Tabshi Lekhung like coin weights,labels for coin bags or boxes, and seals. Most of the illustrated items are also to be found in the following book:Zhu Jinzhong, Ci-Ren-Ping-cuo and Yan Lunzhang: Yuan xi zang di fang qian bi gai kuang (“Introduction to the TibetanRegional Currency”), Institute of Finance of the People’s Bank of China in Tibet, Lhasa, 1988.Introduction to Tibet’s currency history in Chinese language with many colour illustrations of coins and banknotes. Was notavailable in the book trade and is therefore hardly ever seen in western or oriental libraries.Zhu Jinzhong and Pu-qiong Ci-ren [Puchung Tsering]: “Qian long wu shi nian zao xi zang ga yin bi kao”(“Examining theTibetan Silver Tamga, Struck in the 50th year of Qian Long”). Zhong guo zang xue (China Tibetology), issue 3, Beijing 1990, p.90-92.Zhu Jinzhong (chief editor), Wang Haiyan, Wang Jiafeng, Zhang Wuyi, Wu Hanlin, Wang Dui [dbang ‘dus] and Tsering Pincuo:Zhong guo xi zang qian bi [The Money of Chinese Tibet] Xi zang zi zhi ou qian bi xue hui [Tibet Autonomous Region NumismaticSociety], Zhong hua shu ju, Beijing 2002, ISBN7 – 101 03360 – 1/Z . 449.Only the table of contents and the foreword of this book have been translated into English and Tibetan, while the main texts arein Chinese only. This book gives an excellent survey of the coins, coin dies, coin weights, banknotes and banknote printing blockswhich were preserved in Tibet and which are nearly all illustrated in colour in this volume135


THE NICHOLAS RHODES COLLECTION - COINS OF TIBETOriental Numismatic SocietyNicholas Rhodes was a founder member of the Oriental Numismatic Society back in 1970.Now it is a worldwide club, dedicated to collectors of the coinage of the Islamic World, Asia and theFar East. A quarterly journal packed with numismatic news, reviews of publications,and the latest academic papers is sent free to all members.Each region also holds regular meetings which are both social and educational.If you are reading this catalogue, and considering buying some of the coins, this Society is for you.How to JoinThe society welcomes members with all levels of interest. All members receive the Society's Journal withoutfurther cost.The ONS has regional secretaries who take responsibility for membership issues in different parts of theworld. To join the society you should contact the secretary for your region:General Section:Europe Section:UK & Eire Section:America Section:South Asia Section:Pakistan Section:Mr R Senior, rcsenior@yahoo.comMr J Lingen, lingen@wxs.nlMr P Smith, pnsmith@aol.comMr C Karukstis, charlie@charliek.comDr D Rajgor, drajgor@hotmail.comMr S M Mirza shafqatmirza@hotmail.comCurrent Annual Membership Fee:UK Section £25.00Europe Section €€30.0Americas Section $35WWW.SPINK.COM


August 21, 2013 - HONG KONGHOW TO FIND US9/F Malaysian Consulate Building,50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kongtel +852 25 300 100fax +852 25 266 128email: china@spink.com137


– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –SALE TITLE DATE CODE NAME SALE NO.The Nicholas Rhodes Collection - Wednesday 21 August 2013 TIBET 13020Coins of Tibetat 3.00 p.m.To include a selection of Tibetan BanknotesI request Spink, without legal obligations of any kind on its part, to bid on the following Lots up to the price given below.I understand that if my bid is successful the Purchase Price payable will be the sum of the final bid and a premium as a percentage of the final bid. The Rate of Premiumis 20% of the final hammer price of each lot.All bids shall be treated as offers made on the Terms and Conditions for Buyers printed in the catalogue. I also understand that Spink provides the service of executingbids on behalf of clients for the convenience of clients and that Spink will not be held responsible for failing to execute bids. If identical commission bids are received forthe same Lot, the commission bid received first by Spink will take precedence. Please note that you will not be notified if there are higher written bids received. If yourequire such notification then this is available on bids made via Spink live bidding service.PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY IN BLOCK LETTERS AND ENSURE THAT BIDS ARE IN HONG KONG DOLLARSLot Number(in numerical order)WRITTEN BIDS FORMThis form should be sent or faxed to theSpink auction office in advance of the sale.References for new clients should besupplied in good time to be taken upbefore the sale. Bids received later thanone hour before the start of the sale maynot be processed.NAME ______________________________________________________ADDRESS____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________POSTCODE___________________________________________________Price Bid HK$(excluding Buyer’s Premium)TEL. HOME ______________________________________________ TEL. OFFICE ____________________________________________FAX ____________________________________________________ E-MAIL ________________________________________________SIGNATURE _______________________________________________ VAT NUMBER ___________________________________________Please indicate the type of card: VISA VISA DEBIT MASTERCARD SWITCH AMERICAN EXPRESSPAYMENT MADE BY MASTERCARD OR VISA IS SUBJECT TO A 3% SURCHARGE AND AMERICAN EXPRESS 4%CARD NO: START DATE: ISSUE NO: SECURITY CODE:SIGNATURE EXPIRY DATE NAME (ON CREDIT CARD)Please charge all purchases to my cardLot Number(in numerical order)SALE LOCATION AND AUCTIONOFFICE9/F Malaysian Consulate Building,50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kongtel +852 25 300 100fax +852 25 266 128email: china@spink.com69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury,London WC1B 4ETtel: +44 (0)20 7563 4005fax: +44 (0)20 7563 4037email: auctionteam@spink.com(until 19 August 2013)YOU CAN ALSO BID IN REAL TIME ONthe-saleroom.com.JUST VISIT WWW.SPINK.COM AND REGISTER VIATHE BID LIVE LINKPrice Bid HK$(excluding Buyer’s Premium)Lot Number(in numerical order)THE NICHOLAS RHODESCOLLECTIONOF TIBETAN COINSPrice Bid HK$(excluding Buyer’s Premium)Do not charge my card. I will arrange to send payment. (Spink will only charge your card should you default on the payment terms agreed)Please hold my purchased lots for collection Continued ...21 AUGUST 2013HONG KONG


DATESALE NO.Wednesday 21 August 2013 at 3.00 p.m. 13020PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY IN BLOCK LETTERS AND ENSURE THAT BIDS ARE IN HONG KONG DOLLARSLot Number(in numerical order)Price Bid HK$(excluding Buyer’s Premium)Lot Number(in numerical order)Price Bid HK$(excluding Buyer’s Premium)Lot Number(in numerical order)Price Bid HK$(excluding Buyer’s Premium)BIDDING INCREMENTSBidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in the following orderalthough the auctioneer may vary the bidding increments during the course of the auction.The normal bidding increments are:Up to HK$1,000by HK$50HK$30,000 to HK$60,000 HK$32,000-HK$35,000-HK$1,000 to HK$3,000 by HK$100HK$38,000- HK$40,000HK$3,000 to HK$6,000 HK$3,200-HK$3,500-etc.HK$3,800-HK$4,000 etc. HK$60,000 to HK$200,000 by HK$5,000HK$6,000 to HK$10,000 by HK$500HK$200,000 and up Auctioneer's discretionHK$10,000 to HK$30,000 by HK$1,000It is the responsibility of the Buyer tobe aware of any Import Duties thatmay be incurred upon importation tothe final destination. The onus is alsoon the Buyer to be aware of anyCustoms import restrictions thatprohibit the importation of certaincollectibles.REFERENCES REQUIRED FOR CLIENTS NOT YET KNOWN TO SPINKTRADE REFERENCESBANK REFERENCES_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


SPINK “ON THE GO” TECHNOLOGYSpink are pleased to provide our clients withexciting mobile technology which allows you totake Spink with you no matter where on the globeyou may be. The Spink iPhone/iPad application,which is available free of charge from the iTunesstore, is simple to download! Once installed theprogramme will download the latest auctioncatalogue instantly upon opening the application!We do hope you find these tools useful! Should youhave any further questions or suggestions on howwe can improve our technology in an effort to assistour clients, please contact Berdia Qamarauli, Headof IT at Spink on bqamarauli@spink.com.What you can expect from the Spink app:● Download auction catalogues straight to yourdevice, which are then viewable while online oroffline.● Search all available lots in sales.● View lots individually and zoom in on importantitem details.● Share images, lots or entire auction catalogueswith friends via email, Twitter or Facebook.● Email the Spink Concierge directly from yourdevice to leave bids or receive a quick reply to anyquery you may have.WWW.SPINK.COM


THE GLOBAL COLLECTABLES AUCTION HOUSESTAMPS | COINS | BANKNOTES | MEDALSBONDS & SHARES | AUTOGRAPHS | BOOKS | WINESFor Advice on Building or Disposing of a Collectionor For a Free ValuationTel: +44 (0)20 7563 4000 Email: concierge@spink.com69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ETLONDON | NEW YORK | HONG KONG | SINGAPORE | LUGANOWWW.SPINK.COM


TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR BUYERSThese conditions set out the terms on which we (Spink China Limited of 9/F., Malaysian Consulate Building, 50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kong) contract with you(Buyer) either as agent on behalf of the Seller or as principal if we are the Seller. You should read these conditions carefully.1 DEFINITIONSThe following definitions in this condition apply in these conditions.Buyer’s Premiummeans the charge payable by you as a percentage of the Hammer Price, at the rates set out in clause 5.1 below;Certificate of Authenticity means a certificate issued by an Expert Committee confirming the authenticity of a Lot;Expert Committee means a committee of experts to whom a Lot may be sent for an extension in accordance with clause 3.4.3;Forgerymeans a Lot constituting an imitation originally conceived and executed as a whole with a fraudulent intention to deceive asto authorship, origin, age, period, culture or source where the correct description as to such matters is not reflected by thedescription in the catalogue and which at the date of the auction had a value materially less than it would have had if it hadbeen in accordance with the description in the catalogue. Accordingly, no Lot shall be capable of being a Forgery by reasonof any damage and/or restoration work of any kind (including re-enamelling);Hammer Pricemeans the amount of the highest bid accepted by the auctioneer in relation to a Lot;Lotmeans any item deposited with us for sale at auction and, in particular, the item or items described against any lot number inany catalogue;Reservethe amount below which we agree with the Seller that the Lot cannot be sold;Sellermeans the owner of the Lot being sold by us;Spink GroupSpink China Limited, Spink and Son Ltd, and our associated companies.VATValue added tax chargeable under the Value Added Tax Act in the United Kingdom and any similar replacement or additionaltax.2 SPINK CHINA’S ROLE AS AGENT2.1 All sales undertaken by us either at auction or privately are undertakeneither as agent on behalf of the Seller or from time to time, as principalif we are the owner of the Lot. Please note that even if we are actingas agent on behalf of the Seller rather than as principal, we may havea financial interest in the Lot.2.2 The contract for the sale of the Lot will be between you and the Seller.3 BEFORE THE SALE3.1 Examination of goodsYou are strongly advised to examine personally any goods in whichyou are interested, before the auction takes place. Condition reportsare usually available on request. We provide no guarantee to you otherthan in relation to Forgeries, as set out in clause 5.10 of these Termsand Conditions.3.2 Catalogue descriptions3.2.1 Statements by us in the catalogue or condition report, ormade orally or in writing elsewhere, regarding the authorship,origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness,provenance, condition or estimated selling price of any Lotare merely statements of opinion, and are not to be relied onas statements of definitive fact. Catalogue illustrations are forguidance only, and should not be relied on either todetermine the tone or colour of any item or to revealimperfections. Estimates of the selling price should not berelied on as a statement that this price is either the price atwhich the Lot will sell or its value for any other purpose.3.2.2 Many items are of an age or nature which precludes theirbeing in perfect condition and some descriptions in thecatalogue or given by way of condition report make referenceto damage and/or restoration. We provide this informationfor guidance only and the absence of such a reference doesnot imply that an item is free from defects or restoration nordoes a reference to particular defects imply the absence of anyothers.3.2.3 Other than as set out in clause 5.8, and in the absence offraud, neither the Seller nor we, nor any of our employees oragents, are responsible for the correctness of any statement asto the authorship, origin, date, age, attribution, genuinenessor provenance of any Lot nor for any other errors ofdescription or for any faults or defects in any Lot.3.3 Your ResponsibilityYou are responsible for satisfying yourself as to the condition of thegoods and the matters referred to in the catalogue description.3.4 Extensions – Stamps only3.4.1 If you wish to obtain an expert opinion or Certificate ofAuthenticity on any Lot (other than a mixed lot or lotcontaining undescribed stamps) you must notify us in writingnot less than forty-eight hours before the time fixed for thecommencement of the first session of the auction. If acceptedby us, such request shall have the same effect as notice of anintention to question the genuineness or description of theLot for the purposes of clause 5.8 of these Terms andConditions and the provisions of clause 5.8 shall applyaccordingly.3.4.2 Notice of a request for an expert opinion or Certificate ofAuthenticity must give the reason why such opinion isrequired and specify the identity of your proposed expertwhich will be subject to agreement by us. We reserve theright, at our discretion, to refuse a request for an expertopinion or Certificate of Authenticity including (withoutlimitation) where the proposed expert is not known to us.3.4.3 If we accept a request for an expert opinion or Certificate ofAuthenticity we will submit the Lot to the ExpertCommittee. You acknowledge and accept that the length oftime taken by an Expert Committee to reach an opinion willvary depending on the circumstances and in any event isbeyond our control.3.4.4 We will not normally accept a request for an extension onaccount of condition. Any Lot described in the catalogue ashaving faults or defects may not be returned even if an expertopinion or Certificate of Authenticity cites other faults ordefects not included in the catalogue description, other thanin the case of a Forgery.3.4.5 Should Spink China Limited accept a request for an extensionunder the foregoing provisions of this paragraph, the fact maybe stated by the Auctioneer from the rostrum prior to the saleof the Lot.3.4.6 It should be noted that any stamp accompanied by aCertificate of Authenticity is sold on the basis of thatCertificate only and not on the basis of any other descriptionor warranty as to authenticity. No request for an extensionwill be accepted on such a stamp and the return of such astamp will not be accepted.


4 AT THE SALE4.1 Refusal of admissionOur sales usually take place on our own premises or premises overwhich we have control for the sale, and we have the right, exercisableat our complete discretion, to refuse admission to the premises orattendance at an auction.4.2 Registration before biddingYou must complete and sign a registration form and provideidentification before making a bid at auction. Please be aware that weusually require buyers to undergo a credit check.Some lots may be designated, prior to the auction, as “Premium lots”,which means a deposit may be required before placing a bid on theitem for sale. Information will be posted on our website in such anevent.4.3 Bidding as PrincipalWhen making a bid (whether such bids are made in person or by wayof telephone bids operated by Spink, commission or online or emailbids), you will be deemed to be acting as principal and will beaccepting personal liability, unless it has been agreed in writing, at thetime of registration, that you are acting as agent on behalf of a thirdparty buyer acceptable to us.4.4 Commission BidsIf you give us instructions to bid on your behalf, by using the formprovided in our catalogues or via our website, we shall use reasonableendeavours to do so, provided these instructions are received not laterthan 24 hours before the auction. If we receive commission bids on aparticular Lot for identical amounts, and at auction these bids are thehighest bids for the Lot, it will be sold to the person whose bid wasreceived first. Commission bids are undertaken subject to othercommitments at the time of the sale, and the conduct of the auctionmay be such that we are unable to bid as requested. Since this isundertaken as a free service to prospective buyers on the terms stated,we cannot accept liability for failure to make a commission bid. Youshould therefore always attend personally if you wish to be certain ofbidding.All commission bids should be sent to 9/F Malaysian ConsulateBuilding, 50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kong up till 24 hours prior tothe sale.4.5 On-line BiddingWe offer internet services as a convenience to our clients. We will notbe responsible for errors or failures to execute bids placed on theinternet, including, without limitation, errors or failures caused by (i)a loss of internet connection by either party for whatever reason; (ii) abreakdown or problems with the online bidding software and/or (iii)a breakdown or problems with your internet connection, computer orsystem. Execution of on-line internet bids is a free service undertakensubject to other commitments at the time of the auction and we donot accept liability for failing to execute an online internet bid or forerrors or omissions in connection with this activity.4.6 Telephone BidsIf you make arrangements with us not less than 24 hours before thesale, we shall use reasonable endeavours to contact you to enable youto participate in bidding by telephone, but in no circumstances will webe liable to either the Seller or you as a result of failure to do so.4.7 Currency ConverterAt some auctions, a currency converter will be operated, based on theone month forward rates of exchange quoted to us by Bank of Chinaor any other appropriate rate determined by us, at opening on the dateof the auction. Bidding will take place in a currency determined by us,which is usually Hong Kong dollars for auctions held in Hong Kong.The currency converter is not always reliable, and errors may occurbeyond our control either in the accuracy of the Lot number displayedon the converter, or the foreign currency equivalent of Hong Kongdollar bids. We shall not be liable to you for any loss suffered as a resultof you following the currency converter.4.8 Video imagesAt some auctions there will be a video screen. Mistakes may occur inits operation, and we cannot be liable to you regarding either thecorrespondence of the image to the Lot being sold or the quality ofthe image as a reproduction of the original.4.9 Bidding IncrementsBidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in thefollowing order although the auctioneer may vary the biddingincrements during the course of the auction. The normal biddingincrements are:HK$500 to HK$2,000HK$2,000 to HK$3,000HK$3,000 to HK$5,000HK$5,000 to HK$10,000HK$10,000 to HK$20,000HK$20,000 to HK$30,000HK$30,000 to HK$50,000HK$50,000 to HK$100,000HK$100,000 to HK$ 200,000HK$200,000 to HK$300,000HK$300,000 and upby HK$100by HK$200by HK$200 or HK$300by HK$500by HK$1,000by HK$2,000by HK$2,000 or HK$3,000by HK$5,000by HK$10,000by HK$20,000at Auctioneer’s discretion4.10 Bidding by the Spink Group4.10.1 We reserve the right to bid on Lots on the Seller’s behalf upto the amount of the Reserve (if any), which will never beabove the low estimate printed in the auction catalogue.4.10.2 The Spink Group reserves the right to bid on and purchaseLots as principal.4.11 The Auctioneer’s DiscretionThe auctioneer has the right at his absolute discretion to refuse any bidto advance the bidding in such manner as he may decide to withdrawor divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots and, in the caseof error or dispute, to put an item up for bidding again.4.12 Successful BidSubject to the auctioneer’s discretion, the striking of his hammermarks the acceptance of the highest bid, provided always that such bidis higher than the Reserve (where applicable), and the conclusion of acontract for sale between you and the Seller.4.13 After Sale ArrangementsIf you enter into any private sale agreements for any Lot with theSeller within 60 days of the auction, we, as exclusive agents of theSeller reserve the right to charge you the applicable Buyer’s Premiumin accordance with these Terms and Conditions, and the seller acommission in accordance with the terms of the seller’s agreement.4.14 Return of LotOnce your bid has been accepted for a Lot then you are liable to payfor that Lot in accordance with these Terms and Conditions. If thereare any problems with a Lot then you must notify us within 7 days ofreceipt of the Lot, specifying the nature of the problem. We may thenrequest that the Lot is returned to us for inspection. Save as set out inclause 5.8, the cancellation of the sale of any Lot and the refund of thecorresponding purchase price is entirely at our sole discretion. We willnot normally exercise that discretion if the Lot is not received by us inthe same condition that it was in at the auction date.5 AFTER THE AUCTION5.1 Buyer’s PremiumIn addition to the Hammer Price, you must pay us the Buyer’sPremium at a rate of 20% of the final Hammer Price of each Lot.5.2 Payment5.2.1 You must provide us with your full name and permanentaddress and, if so requested, details of the bank from whichany payments to us will be made. You must pay the fullamount due on your invoice within seven days after the dateof the sale. This applies even if you wish to export the Lot andan export licence is (or may be) required.5.2.2 You will not acquire title to the Lot until all amounts due tous have been paid in full. This includes instances where specialarrangements were made for release of Lot prior to fullsettlement.5.2.3 Payment should be made in Hong Kong Dollars by one ofthe following methods:(i) Direct bank transfer to our account details of which areset out on the invoice. All bank charges shall be met byyou. Please ensure that your client number is noted onthe transfer.


(ii)(iii)By cheque or bank draft made payable to Spink ChinaLimited. Please note that the processing charges forpayments made by cheques or bank drafts drawn on anon-Hong Kong bank shall be met by you. Pleaseensure that the remittance slip printed at the bottom ofthe invoice is enclosed with your payment.By Visa or Mastercard. A charge of 3% will be applied.By American Express, a charge of 4% will be applied.We are not responsible for any foreign exchange lossesor charges that you may incur in connection with suchcard payments.5.2.4 Payments should be made by the registered buyer and not bythird parties, unless it has been agreed at the time ofregistration that you are acting as an agent on behalf of a thirdparty.5.3 NotificationWe are not able to notify successful bidders by telephone. WhileInvoices are sent out by mail after the auction we do not acceptresponsibility for notifying you of the result of your bid. You arerequested to contact us by telephone or in person as soon as possibleafter the auction to obtain details of the outcome of your bids to avoidincurring charges for late payment.5.4 Collection, Packing and Handling of Purchases5.4.1 Unless we specifically agree to the contrary, we shall retainitems sold until all amounts due to us, or to the Spink Group,have been paid in full.5.4.2 Lots may be collected from 9/F Malaysian ConsulateBuilding, 50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kong. In the eventwhere a cheque or bank draft payable to Spink China Limitedhas been presented to us, unless we specifically agree to thecontrary, no Lots shall be released before the cheque or bankdraft has cleared where such funds have been credited intoour bank account.5.4.3 A purchased Lot shall be at your risk in all respects from thetime of collection or the expiry of seven days from the date ofsale, whichever is sooner, and neither Spink China Limitednor its employees nor agents shall thereafter be liable for anyloss or damage of any kind, whether caused by negligence orotherwise, while any Lot is in or under their respectivecustody or control.5.4.4 If required our shipping department may arrange shipment asyour agent. Although we may suggest carriers if specificallyrequested, our suggestions are made on the basis of ourgeneral experience of such parties in the past and we are notresponsible to any person to whom we have made arecommendation for the acts or omissions of the third partiesconcerned.5.4.5 We shall use all reasonable endeavors to take care whenhandling and packing a purchased Lot but remind you thatafter seven days or from the time of collection, whichever issooner, the Lot is entirely at your risk.5.4.6 It is the responsibility of the Buyer to be aware of any ImportDuties that may be incurred upon importation to the finaldestination. Spink will not accept return of any package inorder to avoid these duties. The onus is also on the Buyer tobe aware of any Customs import restrictions that prohibit theimportation of certain collectibles. Spink will not acceptreturn of the Lot(s) under these circumstances. Spink will notaccept responsibility for Lot(s) seized or destroyed byCustoms5.4.7 If the Buyer requires delivery of the Lot to an address otherthan the invoice address this will be carried out at thediscretion of Spink.5.5 Remedies for non-payment or failure to collect purchases5.5.1 If you fail to make payment within seven days of yourstipulated payment date set out in your invoice, we shall beentitled to exercise one or more of the following rights orremedies:5.5.1.1 to charge interest at the rate of 2% per monthcompound interest, calculated on a daily basis, fromthe date the full amount is due;5.5.1.2 to set off against any amounts which the SpinkGroup may owe you in any other transaction theoutstanding amount remaining unpaid by you;5.5.1.3 we may keep hold of all or some of your Lots orother property in the possession of the Spink Groupuntil you have paid all the amounts you owe us or theSpink Group, even if the unpaid amounts do notrelate to those Lots or other property. Followingfourteen days’ notice to you of the amountoutstanding and remaining unpaid, the Spink Groupshall have the right to arrange the sale of such Lotsor other property. We shall apply the proceeds indischarge of the amount outstanding to us, and payany balance to you;5.5.1.4 where several amounts are owed by you to the SpinkGroup in respect of different transactions, to applyany amount paid to discharge any amount owed inrespect of any particular transaction, whether or notyou so direct;5.5.1.5 to reject at any future auction any bids made by youor on your behalf or obtain a deposit from youbefore accepting any bids.5.5.2 If you fail to make payment within thirty-five days, we shall inaddition be entitled:5.6 Failure to collect5.5.2.1 to cancel the sale of the Lot or any other item sold toyou at the same or any other auction;5.5.2.2 to arrange a resale of the Lot, publicly or privately,and, if this results in a lower price being obtained,claim the balance from you together with allreasonable costs including a 20% seller’s commission,expenses, damages, legal fees, commissions andpremiums of whatever kind associated with bothsales or otherwise, incurred in connection with yourfailure to make payment; or5.5.2.3 take any other appropriate action as we deem fit.Where purchases are not collected within fourteen days after the sale,whether or not payment has been made, you will be required to pay astorage charge of HKD 30 per item per day plus any additionalhandling cost that may apply. You will not be entitled to collect theLot until all outstanding charges are met, together with payment of allother amounts due to us.5.7 Export Licence5.7.1 You should always check whether an export licence isrequired before exporting.5.7.2 Unless otherwise agreed by us in writing, the fact that youwish to apply for an export licence does not affect yourobligation to make payment within seven days nor our rightto charge interest on late payment.5.7.3 We will not be obliged to rescind a sale nor to refund anyinterest or other expenses incurred by you where payment ismade by you despite the fact that an export licence isrequired.


5.8 Refund in the case of Forgery5.8.1 A sale will be cancelled, and the amount paid refunded to youif a Lot (other than a miscellaneous item not described in thecatalogue) sold by us proves to have been a Forgery. We shallnot however be obliged to refund any amounts if either (a)the catalogue description or saleroom notice at the auctiondate corresponded to the generally accepted opinion ofscholars or experts at that time, or fairly indicated that therewas a conflict of opinions, or (b) it can be demonstrated thatthe Lot is a Forgery only by means of either a scientificprocess not generally accepted for use until after publicationof the catalogue or a process which at the date of the auctionwas unreasonably expensive or impracticable or likely to havecaused damage to the Lot. Furthermore, you should notethat this refund can be obtained only if the followingconditions are met:5.8.1.1 you must notify us in writing, within seven days ofthe auction date, that in your view the Lot concernedis a forgery;5.8.1.2 you must then return the item to us within fourteendays, in the same condition as at the auction date;and5.8.1.3 as soon as possible following return of the Lot, youmust produce evidence satisfactory to us that the Lotis a Forgery and that you are able to transfer goodtitle to us, free from any third party claims.5.8.2 In no circumstances shall we be required to pay you any morethan the amount paid by you for the Lot concerned and youshall have no claim for interest.5.8.3 The benefit of this guarantee is not capable of beingtransferred, and is solely for the benefit of the person towhom the original invoice was made out by us in respect ofthe Lot when sold and who, since the sale, has remained theowner of the Lot without disposing of any interest in it to anythird party.5.8.4 We shall be entitled to rely on any scientific or other processto establish that the Lot is not a Forgery, whether or not suchprocess was used or in use at the date of the auction.6 LIABILITYNothing in these Terms and Conditions limits or excludes our liability for:6.1 death or personal injury resulting from negligence; or6.2 any damage or liability incurred by you as a result of our fraudor fraudulent misrepresentation.7 COPYRIGHT7.1 We shall have the right (on a non-exclusive basis) to photograph,video or otherwise produce an image of the Lot. All rights in such animage will belong to us, and we shall have the right to use it inwhatever way we see fit.7.2 The copyright in all images, illustrations and written material relatingto a Lot is and shall remain at all times our property and we shall havethe right to use it in whatever way we see fit. You shall not use or allowanyone else to use such images, illustrations or written materialwithout our prior written consent.8 NOTICESAll notices given under these Terms and Conditions may be servedpersonally, sent by 1st class post, or faxed to the address given to the senderby the other party. Any notice sent by post will be deemed to have beenreceived on the second working day after posting or, if the addressee isoverseas, on the fifth working day after posting. Any notice sent by fax orserved personally will be deemed to be delivered on the first working dayfollowing despatch.9 ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS9.1 Limitation of LiabilitySubject to clause 6, we shall not be liable, whether in tort (includingfor negligence) or breach of statutory duty, contract,misrepresentation or otherwise for any:9.1.1 loss of profits, loss of business, depletion of goodwill and/orsimilar losses, loss of anticipated savings, loss of goods, loss ofcontract, loss of use, loss of corruption of data or information;or9.1.2 any special, indirect, consequential or pure economic loss, costs,damages, charges or expenses.9.2 SeverabilityIf any part of these Terms and Condition is found by any court to beinvalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part may be discounted and therest of the conditions shall continue to be valid and enforceable to thefullest extent permitted by law.9.3 Force majeureWe shall have no liability to you if we are prevented from, or delayedin performing, our obligations under these Terms and Conditions orfrom carrying on our business by acts, events, omissions or accidentsbeyond our reasonable control, including (without limitation) strikes,lock-outs or other industrial disputes (whether involving ourworkforce or the workforce of any other party), failure of a utilityservice or transport network, act of God, war, riot, civil commotion,malicious damage, compliance with any law or governmental order,rule, regulation or direction, accident, breakdown of plant ormachinery, fire, flood, storm or default of suppliers or subcontractors.9.4 Waiver9.4.1 A waiver of any right under these Terms and Conditions isonly effective if it is in writing and it applies only to thecircumstances for which it is given. No failure or delay by aparty in exercising any right or remedy under these Terms andConditions or by law shall constitute a waiver of that (or anyother) right or remedy, nor preclude or restrict its furtherexercise. No single or partial exercise of such right or remedyshall preclude or restrict the further exercise of that (or anyother) right or remedy.9.4.2 Unless specifically provided otherwise, rights arising underthese Terms and Conditions are cumulative and do notexclude rights provided by law.9.5 Law and Jurisdiction9.5.1 These Terms and Conditions and any dispute or claim arisingout of or in connection with them or their subject matter,shall be governed by, and construed in accordance with HongKong laws.9.5.2 The parties agree that the courts of Hong Kong shall havenon-exclusive jurisdiction to settle any dispute or claim thatarises out of, or in connection with, Terms and Conditions ortheir subject matter.


SALE CALENDAR 2013STAMPS15/16 August The Collector’s Series Sale New York 14410 September British East Africa and Uganda - The Award Winning Collections of George T. Krieger London 1304021 September Stamps and Covers of South East Asia Singapore 1303022 September The Japanese Occupation Issues of South East Asia Singapore 1303822 October Bermuda - Dr. the Hon. David J. Saul Collection London 1304523 October The Award Winning “Medina” Collection of India Part III London 1302823 October Important British Empire Revenues London 1304124 October The J. B. Bloom Collection of South Africa London 1304613 November The Collector’s Series Sale London 1304314 November Mauritius Stamps and Postal History London 1304814 November The “Lionheart” Collection of Great Britain and British Empire - Part II London 1304911 December Great Britain Stamps and Postal History London 13044COINS21 August Tibetan Coins from the Nick Rhodes Collection Hong Kong 1302024 September North East Indian Coins from the Nick Rhodes Collection London 1301924/25 September Indian, Islamic, British and Anglo-Gallic Coins and Commemorative Medals London 130141 October World Coins and Commemorative Medals London 130399/10 October The Collector’s Series Sale New York 3173 December Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals London 13015BANKNOTES2/3 October World Banknotes London 130184 October The Ibrahim Salem Collection of African Banknotes London 130374 October Banknotes of Bermuda - Dr. the Hon. David J. Saul Collection London 130479/10 October The Collector’s Series Sale New York 3175 December World Banknotes London 13034MEDALS25 July Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria London 1300221 November Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria London 13003BONDS AND SHARES9/10 October The Collector’s Series Sale New York 31728 November Bonds and Share Certificates of the World London 13017AUTOGRAPHS9/10 October The Collector’s Series Sale New York 317WINES20 September An Evening of Exceptional Wines Singapore SFW03The above sale dates are subject to changeSpink offers the following services:– VALUATIONS FOR INSURANCE AND PROBATE FOR INDIVIDUAL ITEMS OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS –– SALES ON A COMMISSION BASIS EITHER OF INDIVIDUAL PIECES OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS –


HK$500© Copyright 2013STAMPS COINS BANKNOTES MEDALS BONDS & SHARES AUTOGRAPHS BOOKS WINES9/F Malaysian Consulate Building, 50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kongwww.spink.com

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