Issue 5 - Viva Brighton

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Issue 5 - Viva Brighton

contents...............................Bits and Bobs.7-15. A reserved English cricketer, anoutspoken American comedian, and aBrighton punk veteran.Brighton in History.16-17. ‘It was just one massivescream’: The Beatles in Brighton.Clockwise from top: MacGyver, by Zoë Jackson; Dakota Blue Richards by Rankin, The Beatles by Brian GrimwoodMusic and Theatre.19-27. Folk-family-founder LoudonWainwright III, punk postman VicGodard, injured folkie King Creosote,and fish-finger-eating poet RogerMcGough.Art.29-33. The Stone Roses of graphicnovels, the Pleece brothers; plusabstract nudes and artists’ books.Food.35-37. Pollock at the Little FishMarket, chow mein at Ezy Noodlesand tapas at Bellota.Features.39-49. We drink with Simon Fanshawe,print an unseen Rankin photo,try sea fishing, and investigate thepoor old Hippodrome and legolovingoctopi [sic].Football.51. The two most difficult decisionsin Brian Horton’s career.Trade Secrets.53-55. Robert Yates from BrightonRoyal Pavilion and MuseumsInside Left.58. A photo from the Vaults.


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its and bobs...............................NEXT MONTH’s issueOur May issue will, of course, be a Festivals specialcovering Brighton Festival, Brighton Fringe,Artists’ Open House, House and The GreatEscape. Already in the bag, as we go to press, areinterviews with Sinead O’Connor (who revealsshe had a ‘tryst’ in the city), Gomez’ Ben Otteley(playing at Elderflower Festival near Lewes againthis year), fabulously camp punky cabaret trio TheTiger Lillies, progressive-bookshop owner RichardCupidi, Dylan interpreter, cabaret singer and‘English Piaf’ Barb Jungr, Honor Blackman (ofPussy Galore fame) and ice skater Robin Cousins.Plus, all going well, Albion hero Kerry Mayo (themale version).CATCH OF THE WEEKIn an attempt to address the chronic problem ofoverfishing of certain species, Catchbox is setting upa service in Brighton whereby you can supplied bysmall-scale local fishermen with a veggiebox-style‘catchbox’ consisting of their latest edible catch.Check out www.catchbox.coop for more details.We’re on TwitterDaily updates of what’s on, what’swhat and what the weather’s like, inBrighton - and Hove, obviously. Gigs,news stories, cool photos and discerningretweets. Plus – next month –concise festival pre and re-views. @Viva_Brightonfive minutes with... Kinky FriedmanOn Wiki you are billed as being a singer/songwriter/novelist/humourist/politician/journalist. Is thatin the right order? I was good at just one thing I would be an enormous success.What do you think of people who eat horses? Willie Nelson told me: “if you’re going to have sex with ananimal, make it a horse, because you’ll always get a ride back.”Should people be able to smoke in bars? Who’d have thought that in the country that spawned WinstonChurchill they’d embrace a policy like that?You smoke Cuban cigars. Do you agree with the trade embargo on Cuba? The onething good thing Obama is doing is getting rid of the embargo. It’ll make a smallminority very unhappy and a small minority very happy.Should there be a change in the US gun laws? Here in America we’reover regulated, overfed, overworked and undersexed. I don’t carry a concealedweapon so if anyone wants to shoot me they’d better bring theirown gun. The best method of gun control is to use two hands.Do you believe in gay marriage? I think gay people have every right to be asmiserable as the rest of us.In 2006 you ran for Texan Senate. Will you run for office again? Jesus Christwouldn’t win an election in Texas running as an independent. If I do it again I’mgoing to run as an old-style Harry-Truman type Democrat. It’s a giant step downfrom musician to politician but I’ll take it for Texas.The multifaceted Texan is performing at Komedia on April 23.....9 ....


its and bobs...............................tomb with a view: jack hobbsIn summer 1925, ‘the public’s imagination was gripped by the exploits of a shy,middle-aged cricketer with a beaky nose,’ writes Jack Hobbs’ biographer LeoMcKinstry. The Surrey cricketer had reached 125 first-class centuries, one shortof WG Grace’s record, but then hit a dry patch.On July 21st Hobbs and his team-mates took the train to Hove for a matchagainst Sussex, ‘accompanied by a large caravan from the media,’ who were hopingto see him hit a ton. Unfortunately Hobbs, opening Surrey’s batting, was outlbw for one, in a match his team eventually won by an innings.Hobbs, who Wisden made ‘cricketer of the century’ in 2000, eventually reached 197 centuries beforehis retirement in 1935, aged 51. His embarrassment in Hove evidently didn’t put him off the place, asin 1947 he and his wife Ada moved to Third Avenue, a stone’s throw from the County Ground. ‘Bothmy wife and self have been under the weather for the past few months, and we believe we shall enjoybetter health by the seaside,’ he explained. In Hove, he enjoyed watching Sussex matches, and playinggolf. ‘But his last years were dominated by care for Ada, who from the late 1950s was disabled,’ McKinstrywrites. ‘Because she was wheelchair-bound, they moved to a ground-floor flat in Palmeira Avenue,’where Hobbs nursed Ada devotedly. She died in March 1963, and he followed nine months later.Sir Jack (he was knighted in 1953), was buried in Hove Cemetery. At his funeral, the vicar said: ‘He wasalways the perfect gentleman and his kindness and courtesy were noticed by everyone… We all foundhim entirely lovable. The humility of the master batsman was almost unbelievable.’young bands run free - win the chance to play at a festivalThis year’s Elderflower Fields Festival takes place on 24-27May at the Bentley estate. Youth bands (under-18) areinvited to submit recordings – it doesn’t matter what typeof music you play. A shortlist will then be announced forpublic vote on the festival Facebook page, and the bandwith the highest number of votes wins the opportunity toperform on the main stage. Last year’s winners The Tones(pictured) said: “Playing at the Elderflower Fields Festivalwas one of the best experiences we have had since formingour band... we had the biggest buzz ever and didn’t want it to end. And getting our first encorewas really special.” It’s free to enter, and full details of how to take part can be found on the website:elderflowerfields.c.uk. Closing date is midnight on Sunday 14 April.And there are volunteering opportunities at the festival. You’ll need to be over 16 on the 23 May andavailable from 23 to 27 May. You could be doing anything from greeting customers at the entrance tochaperoning the bands back stage. In return you’ll get free entry to the festival plus the excitement ofbeing part of the festival team. For more information email volunteer@elderflowerefields.co.uk....10....


its and bobs...............................pub names: the foundryWe didn’t have to go far for this month’s pub – The Foundry isalmost directly opposite our office, in Foundry Street. The pub hasa name that reflects its place in local history – there were a numberof foundries in the street, including the biggest in the town, theRegent Iron and Brass Foundry. However ‘The Foundry’ is not itshistoric name. According to myhousemystreet (mhms.org.uk) itstarted life as ‘The White Horse’ in the 1850s and between thenand 1866 changed its name three times: first to ‘The Labour inVain’, then to ‘The Lamb’ and finally, in 1866, to ‘The Pedestrians’.It was known as such until as recently as 2007 – the name is stillevident on the antique cube-shaped sign jutting out from the firstfloor, retained by its current owner, who has also refrained fromover-modernising the interior, all wooden panelled nooks, brassfitted crannies, original fireplaces and higgledy-piggledy tables.PERMANENT painting #01: the eyot, richmondMy private island had vanished. I must be in thewrong room, I reasoned, hurrying through the gallerylike a panicked parent in search of a small child. It hasto be here… Brighton Museum’s permanent collectionwas not, it seemed, so permanent after all. Notquite the drama generated by the recent Banksy heist,but a distressing event for a writer with writer’s block,seeking muse. At the front desk, notebook clutcheddesperately in hand, I attempted to describe themissing painting to a member of gallery staff. I didn’tknow the name of the piece, or the artist, only thatits enchanting composition of frosted autumnal huesand distant woodlands invited me to believe again.My ramblings were met with a blank expression. Iquestioned if my words had any relation to the realpainting, or the concocted and more personal versionin my mind. That’s the beauty of art: it’s the first pageof your own story. And then away you go…I’ve sinced been informed that the island will be returned to its rightful owner at the end of April. Be sureto hop on over to the first floor. Rebecca HattersleyThe Eyot, Richmond, by Stanislawa De Karlowska, c.1941. Brighton Museum & Art Gallery. This is the first ofa new series looking at works in the permanent collection at Brighton Museum.


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ighton in history.......................................The Beatles in Brighton‘You couldn’t hear them for the screaming’By Sunday July 12, 1964, the nation’s Beatlesobsession was so bad that when George Harrisoncrashed his car in Fulham, ‘passing teenagersbegan scrambling for pieces of his brokenheadlight glass as souvenirs,’ The Evening Argusreported.That evening, the Beatles appeared at theBrighton Hippodrome, playing two 30-minutesets. They had played there in mid-1963, butthat was before Beatlemania really took hold.This time, extensive security arrangementswere needed. All police leave was cancelled,with 60 officers on duty in and around theHippodrome. The area was closed to all exceptresidents and ticket holders.Fans had once hidden in the Hippodromebefore a Dave Clark Five gig; so this time, thebuilding was guarded all day, and searchedtwice. ‘Adjoining rooftops were also guarded– in some cases with barbed wire – as a precautionagainst fans who might have risked theirlives attempting a skylight route to the Beatles,’read The Evening Argus.With what the paper called ‘a military strategythat would do credit to Monty,’ the Beatleswere smuggled into the Hippodrome unnoticed.The method was ‘a secret’, the Hippodrome’smanager told The Brighton Gazette,as ‘we may want to use the same method forsmuggling in the Rolling Stones next week.’But someone blabbed to The Argus: the Beatleshad driven in through a between-streets garage.‘For hundreds of fans – some had waited sixhours outside the theatre for a glimpse of theBeatles – there were tears of disappointment,’said the Gazette. The 5,000 fans who did seethe band also had some grounds for disappointment,as the music was barely audible over fans’screaming.“You couldn’t hear them at all,” says gig-goerPaul Harrison, now a Lewes-based artist. “Youabsolutely could not hear the songs. It’s onlybecause I knew them so well that I could justabout tell which song they were playing. It wasjust one massive scream. It was really quitemoving, an amazing thing to go and see. Butyou couldn’t hear any of it.”Lesley Potter was one of many female fanswho “ran down to the front of the stage andstayed there”. From there, she says, “above thescreaming you could just about hear it”.The noise was described by an over-excitedBrighton Herald writer as ‘like a thousand sirensblasting off together – inside your head…The one-note, high-pitched hymn reaches anincreasingly frightening volume. A sudden imageof the mesmerised crowds at Hitler’s ralliesflashes through the mind as one watches theeager faces of the worshippers.’The worshippers threw dolls, jelly babies, andjumpers; they stood on their chairs; and theGazette said some ‘tried to scramble on to thestage’. The Argus said ‘at least 12 teenagers weretreated for hysteria and fainting’.....16....


Illustration by Brian Grimwood whose book The Man who changed the look of British Illustration you can buy at Papillon, Union StreetThe Beatles faced similarscenes everywhere they played,and were so sick of it that theirroad manager ‘sometimesliterally chased them from theirdressing-room into the wings,’according to Beatles biographerPhilip Norman.At one point, at the Hippodrome,a female fan ‘leapedfrom a box at the side of thestage and before an astonished– and envious – first houseaudience flung her arms aroundPaul and tried to kiss Ringo,’said The Gazette.In The Argus’ account, ‘thegirl jumped just as the curtainwent down on the group’s finalsong of the evening. Within asecond, PC Dear was after her,losing his helmet on the way.He carried her, shrieking, intothe wings.’During the Beatles’ second set,there was a brief power failure.The Hippodrome’s managerlater said: ‘The electrician putit right in four minutes, buteven so there was time to die athousand deaths. I think if wehad lowered the curtain thefans certainly would have tornthe place apart.’***In October 64, the Beatlesreturned to Brighton, amidequally strict security arrangements,playing to equally excitedfans. But celebrity palmistEva Petulengro seems to havebeen immune to Beatlemania.Backstage at the Hippodromein October, she read GeorgeHarrison’s palms, and wasreading Paul McCartney in hisdressing room when someoneknocked on the door.“I’m having my palms read!”said McCartney.“It’s not for you; it’s for Eva,”the man said, opening thedoor. “There’s a fellah calledfor you.”Eva says: “My heart leapt inmy mouth, because I was livingwith my mum and brothers andsisters, and I thought there hadbeen an accident, because theywouldn’t call otherwise. So Irushed to the phone; it was myboyfriend that I was courting insecret. He’d been away deliveringa yacht.”“I’ve just got back, come andmeet me now”, he said.“Phone a taxi and send it to theHippodrome,” said Eva.Hanging up, Eva went back toMcCartney’s dressing roomand made her excuses. She says:“I think the headline of the daywas: ‘Left the Beatles to seeAnother Man’.”Steve RamseyWith thanks to Eva Petulengro,Paul Harrison and Lesley Potter.....17....


A ONE DAY EXPLORATIONOF DOING BUSINESSIN A CITY BUILT FOR PLEASUREThis major business event celebrates the centenary ofBrighton & Hove Chamber of Commerce with a full day offascinating, provocative speakers, interactive workshops,panel debates, discussion, networking and even a little ofthat famous Brighton pleasure. So what are the specialopportunities and challenges for anyone doing businessin a city built for fun?£20.00 DiSCOUNTTickets £65. We are delighted to offer ViVa BriGHTONreaders a £45 ticket with code ViVa20CENTENARY SUMMITThank you to our sponsors:Full programme and tickets:www.brightonsummit.comFriDay 19TH april9.30am–6.00pm, BrightonCelebrating 100 years of the Brighton and Hove Chamber of CommerceDesign: Stoats & WeaselsCopy: Chimera Communications


music.......................................Loudon WainwrightSinger, actor, comic... fatherDo you prefer recording for smaller independentlabels or bigger ones? Most of my albumsin the last 20 years have been put out on smallindependent labels and that’s great. The recordcompanies let me make the records I want to make,and I’m happy when they provide me with the fundsto make them.Your current record, Older than my Old Man,is obviously very much about mortality. Do yourrecords normally have such a strong theme?In the last 20 or so years I’ve tried to group songstogether into albums that might work as an entity. Ilike the idea of somebody sitting down and spending45 or 50 minutes listening to my record and I wantto leave them with an emotional experience.You’re well-known over here for your comedicoutput as well. Have you ever thought of doingpure stand up? Wearing a guitar is a kind of ashield and I feel protected by it. The idea of puttingit down and just telling jokes doesn’t appeal to me.Your audiences in the UK might remember youfrom your Jasper Carrott sideman days. Doesit bother you that people might not take youseriously? At the beginning of my career John Peelplayed a lot of my first songs on Atlantic, which werequite serious, as a young singer-songwriter’s songsshould be. I’m as happy to be remembered for thatas much as for singing silly songs on Jasper Carrot.However people might have heard of me or foundmy work, I’m happy they found it.Are you troubled by remembering the lyrics ofsongs that are the best part of 40 years old? I’mused to not remembering things, whether it’s songlyrics or car keys, or eye glasses. It goes with theterritory. I’ve written a lot of songs and there are aPhoto by Ross Halfinlot of words to remember and/or forget. If I forgetI usually admit it. I’m always happy when there’s amember of the audience who can prompt me.You have musical offspring... When I come overto do my tour in the UK, my support in more waysthan one is going to be my daughter Lucy WainwrightRoche. She’s in the business, as is Martha,and of course my son Rufus is a household name.Has that brought you a new audience? It’s notunusual for somebody to come up to me after ashow and say ‘I’m here because I’m a fan of Rufus(or Martha or even Lucy) and was interested to seewhat the old man is like.’Are you happy that they followed in yourfootsteps? I am proud of them and I’m happy thatthey’re good at it and doing well. Their motherswere musical too, so the deck was genetically stackedin terms of those three becoming musical.The latest album is, in your phrase, ‘somewhatin the rear view mirror’. I’m guessing it’s not agoodbye. Oh no, I’m working on new songs andI’ve even done a bit of recording so I don’t think I’llhave an album out this year but maybe next.Interview by Jamie Freeman of Union Music StoreBrighton Dome, 28 Apr, 8pm....19....


SPECIAL EVENTS 2013SPECIAL EVENTSHotel Open Day Monday 1st April, 1pm-5pm - Free EntryIf you are planning a celebration for a special occasion, this is a great opportunity tovisit our beautiful hotel and meet with staff and suppliers.Garden Champagne Lunches Taittinger Tuesdays 9th Dinner April, 7th Friday May and 28th 4th September June - £21.50 - £85.00 per personEnjoy Enjoy a tour a of four our course stunning dinner, organically including run Walled Garden, Champagne and see and where wine, our wonderful with our freshguest fruit, vegetables speaker and Justin flowers Llewellyn, are produced. Ambassador A three course for Garden Champagne Lunch Menu Taittinger.is included.Cloudy Bay Wine Dinner Friday 10th May - £85.00 per personGame Dinner Friday 16th November - £40.00Canapés, four course meal, and wines to match each course are included. Our Guest SpeakerA four course dinner with the opportunity to speak with our Game Keeperwill be Bethan Wallace from Estates & Wines, Brand Ambassador Europe at Moet Hennessy.and Head Chef, who will be more than happy to answer any questions.Father’s Day Brunch Sunday 16th June - £25.00 per adult, £12.50 per child (under 12)Join us Christmas for brunch and Party as an Night added option Friday have 7th a & go 20th at Clay December Pigeon Shooting, - £44.50 Quad BikingA or fun even and have festive a ride in evening. our tank. Jacques This event Games includes will also be a available glass of throughout sparkling the wine, day.a three course Jazz dinner, Dinner coffee Saturday and 29th petit June fours - £45.00 with per dancing person until 1am.Our famous Jazz Evening is back! This will be an alfresco evening, with tables on the lawn,overlooking Black the Tie lake Christmas and South Downs. Party Canapés, Night Friday buffet and 21st puddings December will served - £52.50 from 8pm.Enjoy a funWalledand festiveGardenevening.LunchThis event includes a glass of Champagne,Tuesday 9th July - £30.00 per persona three A guided course tour of dinner, the Walled coffee Garden, and followed petit by fours an alfresco with dancing Buffet Lunch until served 1am.under the apple trees. Being only metres away from the source of your lunch will make youDinner, part Bed of the & smallest Breakfast carbon From footprint £115.00 in the country! per personGarden WalkEnjoyanda 3Talkcoursewith Teameal before relaxing for the nightThursday 5th September - £21.50 per personJoin us for a in similar one guided of our tour luxurious of our beautiful bedrooms. Walled Garden withFull Afternoon Tea to follow under the apple trees.Garden Lunch Menu £17.50 for 2 courses & £21.50 for 3 coursesMurder Mystery Friday 6th September - £55.00 per personUsing the freshest ingredients sourced from ourEnjoy a three course dinner, while you work out ‘who done it’estate walled garden or as locally as possible.Game Dinner Friday 15th November - £45.00 per personA glass of wine on arrival with canapés, four course dinner and the opportunity to chat withour Head Groundsman and Game Keeper Stephen Comber and Head Chef Chris Moore.Why not make a night of it and stay here on this special Bed and Breakfast offer when booking anevening event above. Accommodation available from only £125.00 B&B, based on two sharing.NEWICK PARK, NEWICK, EAST SUSSEX BN8 4SB+44 (0)1825 723633 bookings@newickpark.co.ukNEWICK PARK, www.newickpark.co.ukNEWICK, EAST SUSSEX BN8 4SB+44 (0)1825 723633 bookings@newickpark.co.ukwww.newickpark.co.uk


music............................Vic GodardThe Punk PostmanVic Godard went to the first SexPistols gigs with some friends in1976, and liked them: “they werethe only non-musicians we’d seendoing a gig,” he said, soon after,in an interview for the fanzineSniffin’ Glue. “It really did openup the floodgates.” Within weeks,despite none of them being musiciansthemselves, he’d formed hisown band, Subway Sect. PromoterMalcolm MacLaren spotted them,and chose them to open theinfamous 100 Club Punk Festival,on the same bill as Siouxsie andthe Banshees, The Clash and thePistols.Nearly forty years on and Godard,who’s got a day job as a postman inSouth West London, is still touringwith Subway Sect – they’replaying the Green Door Store onApril 5. I meet him outside KewGardens Station on a sunny Fridaylunchtime in February, and we retireto a nearby café to chat. Nowin his mid 50s, he’s wearing a flyingjacket and grey sunglasses, andlooking fairly smart, in a cool-guysort of way. The first question Iask him, once we’ve sat down witha cup of tea in front of us: does hestill consider himself a punk?There’s a pause, and he responds.Photo by Alex Leith“Yeah, I would,” he says, in anold-style London accent. “I don’tsee it as a dress thing, moreas an attitude thing. It’s aboutexperimenting, doing it yourself,improvising. Virtually everything Ido is still punk.”By that he doesn’t mean 100mphsongs, spiky hair and bondagetrousers. “Dada was punk; the Pre-Raphaelites were punks,” he says.“It’s about looking at things in adifferent way and doing somethingdifferently from what came before.It’s about attitude.”At first, it certainly wasn’t aboutaptitude. “The difference betweenus and the other bands was that wewere influenced by Talking Headsand Television,” he says. “The onlyproblem was that we weren’t goodenough to play like them. But inour attempts to do so we inventedour own sound.”Vic soon got disillusioned withthe scene. “There were all theseidentikit bands sounding the sameas one another,” he says. “JohnPeel had previously had a knackfor finding bands who would goon to be influential, but when hediscovered punk, even his qualitycontrol mechanism went out thewindow.”By 1979, Vic, now a competent(though non music-reading) musicianhad turned Subway Sect intoa jazz band, who were regularlybottled off stage as they continuedto play on the same circuit asbefore.Nowadays he tours with twodifferent forms of Subway Sect,a four-piece which plays ‘punkierstuff; people shout out a songand we’ll play it’ and a five-piece,which includes the former Sex Pistolsdrummer Paul Cook, which‘has more of a Northern Soulsound’. It’s the latter format that’splaying in Brighton. “Paul playingshould mean there’ll be a smatteringof old-style punks there,” hesays. “And dads bringing their sonsalong to show them what sort ofmusic they should be getting into.”Alex LeithGreen Door Store, April 5....21....


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theatre..........................................Roger McGoughPoet, pop star, drama adaptor“Something tells me you had fish fingers for tea,” Isay, to Roger McGough, down the phone, and I heara pleasant sound: his machine-gun laugh, a throatierLiverpudlian than his conversational voice: “ha ha haha ha ha”.I’ve spent a frustrating afternoon waiting for anunforthcoming 3pm call from ‘the patron saint ofBritish poets’ (Carol Ann Duffy), twiddling mythumbs, mucking around on various social media.And so I find… he has a Twitter account, is quite newto the game, and has posted a Tweet WHILE HE ISMEANT TO BE TALKING TO ME. The tweetgoes like this, and it smacks of McGough: ‘Have I gotbigger, or have fish fingers got smaller?’ Can I detectsome well-wrapped philosophical message lurkingamid those less-than-140 characters?He finally rings at 4.50pm. McGough, of course,became popularly famous as the leader of comedypop group The Scaffold, whose number one hit Lilythe Pink you still hear on the radio. And also, at thesame end of the sixties, as one of three ‘Merseybeat’poets, alongside Adrian Henri and Brian Patten, acareer which has subsequently spanned nearly fiftyyears and spawned 30 collections. But it’s in a morerecent incarnation that he’s calling me; as an adapterand translator of 17th-century French poet/dramatistMoliere’s plays. The Misanthrope – his third productionafter successful tours of Tartuffe and The Hypochondriac– is coming to the Theatre Royal in April.So, I ask him, why Moliere? There are loads of parallels,it turns out. McGough, who started his professionallife as a French teacher, loves the fact thatthe Frenchman – who he likens to a ‘clown playingHamlet’ - weaves a strong ethical message into anotherwise comedic framework, rather like McGoughdoes in his poetry. And that makes him much moreaccessible to your average modern audience than hisrather-more-serious classicist contemporaries likeRacine and Corneille: “He always seemed to be theanarchic one, the joker in the pack. That’s the appeal, Ithink: he’s a bit of a naughty boy and a rebel.”To maintain that accessibility, McGough has abandonedthe rigid structure of Moliere’s lines (12-syllableAlexandrines, to be exact), but he has maintainedthe Frenchman’s use of rhyming couplets, often splitbetween two characters. “I loved writing those, it’s likeplaying a game.” Unlike other recent adaptations ofthe play, he hasn’t transplanted the action from 17thcenturyParis.Having triggered that staccato laugh, and elicitedthe information that McGough is coming to one ofthe Brighton performances, mainly because he has adaughter who lives in Brighton, I feel I can ask the‘knotty’ question. Moliere’s literary worth has sometimesbeen doubted by critics who don’t consider himweighty enough. McGough, too, has been accused ofnot being a ‘serious poet’. Is this fair? “I’ve had a lot ofthat,” he says. “People will pick up one of my books,and pick out a comic line, and read it out to suggestI’m just a comic writer. But they don’t read out theserious stuff about dementia and the darkness of gettingold.” Alex LeithThe Misanthrope, Theatre Royal, April 30 - May 4....23....


music.....................................King CreosoteFife’s forty-album Fence man“Just give me one second to hobble over to getmy cup of tea,” says Kenny Anderson, when I ringhim unexpectedly. Anderson, aka King Creosote,is housebound with a badly broken ankle. More onthat later. First: why a Mercury Prize-nominee isstill playing village gigs to 50 people.After university, Anderson spent about two yearsbusking round Europe with a band. Back in Scotland,they broke up after struggling to get a recorddeal, and Anderson was depressed by “this ideathat I’d just wasted my whole 20s by following apointless dream.“I realised what I enjoyed about music was thecreation of songs and the recording of songs, andsmall-scale performance.” So, in the mid-90s hestarted selling his own music on CDR, founding amicro-label called Fence.Anderson doesn’t like the record industry. He hasreleased a few albums on mainstream labels, butseems to prefer being self-employed. He’s justquit Fence and started a new project, Alter EgoTrading Company. “I’m committed to it not beingat all digital, so I’m not online. I don’t go online atall - how about that? I’ve started a newsletter thatpeople have to send in an SAE for.”Alter Ego is “a sort of umbrella for all the talentin my band. King Creosote is me on my own, andsometimes there’s 11 or 12 of us, if there’s moneyto pay us all.” Many of these musicians have theirown bands.In February, these groups did a ‘World Tour ofCrail’, the small fishing village in Fife whereAnderson lives. “I think we had an average 40-50people a night, maybe a bit less.“You can do a much more powerful and memorableevent if you have less people. I know that doesn’tpay the wages but then you say ‘the ticket wasn’texpensive and you’ve come here, do you not fancybuying THIS?’ Everyone appears with their ownlittle stall of merchandise: watches, carrot cake, thatkind of thing. Do I sound like I’m losing it? No? Ihave been indoors for a month, and on crutches, soI am actually quite cabin fevered, I want to just saythat now.”He broke his ankle while repairing an old boat. “Ifyou saw the boatyard, you’d probably say ‘yep, thisis an ankle break waiting to happen’. I was on thereversing end of this big heavy bit of larchwood,my foot tripped me up on something, the otherleg got caught. Next thing I’m in an ambulanceon morphine. Three breaks, dislocations, ligamentdamage; it’s all plated and pinned, and I think it’spretty horrific in there.“I think it’s been a really timely reminder of…” Hepauses, inhales. “I just charge headlong throughlife, I never halt. I try and get time off and I don’t.This has been an amazing full stop in my life. I’vejust had to sit in these two rooms of mine and thinkit all out. This month’s newsletter is pretty full, it’sfull to bursting, let me tell you.” Steve RamseyKing Creosote, The Basement, Mon 29, 7.30pm,£12/14, thebasement.uk.com....25....


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music.......................................Nine Below ZeroDennis Greaves, gale-force frontman“One review said: ‘Nine Below Zero blow TheWho off the stage’. Who had the bollocks to writethat in the first place?” says Nine Below Zerofrontman Dennis Greaves. “It was because theyweren’t on form. Someone had thought ‘I enjoyedthe support band better; they were giving it loadsof energy’.”This was 1981. Sixteen years earlier, DennisGreaves had bought his first single, My Generation.Now his blues band were playing tour dateswith The Who. “The tour was struggling,” saysGreaves. “I don’t think it was a happy camp.” But itseems that review shocked The Who into action.“Daltrey didn’t turn up for the next soundcheck,but the others had a rehearsal. Townshend turnedhis fucking amps up and leapt about. This was asoundcheck! It was almost him saying ‘fuck, I’vegot to get in gear here’. I’ve never experiencedanything like it. The volume, the power, the charisma.And from then on they really stepped up.”Over the phone from Germany, part way througha European tour, Greaves is so upbeat that evenhaving spent most of yesterday in a snowy trafficjam behind a 100-car pile-up on the Autobahnwasn’t a complete waste of time. “It was horrible:you’re just stuck, surrounded by lorries. And thenyou come through it and think ‘oh well, that’s anexperience’.”Greaves grew up in London, his school was next toa pub that hosted live music, and “it sounds reallystupid, but we used to bunk off and watch theamps get loaded in. And we’d sneak in there andwatch the bands, sitting on the stairs with openNine Below Zero back in the late 70smouths. That gave me the bug, and it’s still withme now; that joy of playing, or being around livemusic.”After leaving school, “I worked as a floor layer.Our harmonica player [Mark Feltham] was withBT, fixing phones. We had about two years doingproper jobs, so when we became musicians weappreciated it. We definitely didn’t want to go backinto ‘doing real jobs for a living’, as our mumsalways said. ‘When are you going to get a real job,a proper job?’”The band were signed to A&M in 1980 on thestrength of their energetic live performances.They played about 235 gigs that year, keeping up ahigh work rate till 83, when “we blew up. All thosegigs... we never had any time off; we did albums,gigs, albums, gigs.” The band then had a sevenyearhiatus, during which Greaves formed a newgroup while Feltham became a session player.Over the years, Nine Below Zero have opened forChuck Berry, blanked The Cure (“we sat and ignoredeach other, at the opposite ends of the table,at a little café in the middle of nowhere”), hungout with Dr Feelgood, and played with The Kinks.“Memories like that… I think the biggest one ofmy life was when I was on stage with Eric Claptonand Billy Gibbons. Clapton gave me a nod to do asolo, and I thought: ‘Fuck me. Yeah. That’ll do.’”Steve RamseyNine Below Zero, Komedia, 18 Apr, 7.30pm, £15,komedia.co.uk/brighton.....27....


Flooded, High and Over The Cuckmere Valley 24”x30” Oil on canvasRecent paintings byRupert Denyerat Streat Place BarnArtists Open Houses, part of the DitchlingArt Trail and Brighton FestivalMay 4th & 5th, 11th & 12th, 18th & 19th, 25th & 26th.Opening times 11.00am - 5.30pmStreat Place Barn, Streat, Nr Ditchling, East Sussex, BN6 8RUwww.artinditchling.co.ukFor more information please go to;www.rupertdenyer.co.ukrupertdnr888@googlemail.com


art.................................focus on:Lady Greenby Dong Li-Blackwell105 x 74cm, price on requestWho modelled for this piece? My pieces are all femalenudes, and they are either based on photographsthat my husband has taken of me, or on images I findin pornographic websites. This one was inspired by apornographic image.The nature of your painting is very sexual. Is ityour intention to shock? I was brought up in anindustrial city in China and taught painting from theage of nine. Over there, there are severe restrictions onwhat you can or cannot do. I feel it is important to rebelagainst such restrictions: the world doesn’t changeif you don’t challenge the rules. In these paintings I amexpressing personal experiences and feelings I have had. But different people have had different experiencesand these paintings might go beyond the boundaries of what some people find acceptable.The technique looks fairly spontaneous. It is. When I find an image that I engage with I want to paintit quickly. The process of a painting takes a couple of hours. For this one I stretched out ten sheets ofpaper and created ten different paintings. This is the way I always work: usually two or three come outsuccessfully.How did you end up in Brighton? After Chinese High School I was going to train to be an art teacher.I’d have been happy to teach people techniques but I didn’t want the responsibility of influencing people’sstyles. So I decided to develop my own style instead – to jump out of the system by doing a Mastersat Brighton University. While I was doing that I met my husband on an allotment in Portslade, so now Ilive here permanently.Which other painters have influenced you? I think I’ve learnt everything from everybody: I didn’thave the opportunity to see much art in galleries in China, so most of what I saw was prints in books.My influences come from all over: Andrew Wyeth; Francis Bacon; Pierre Bonnard; Frida Kahlo; MarkRothko. When I see something I like I think ‘why did I like that? Why was I touched?’ I admire the mastersfor how deeply they can touch people by creating a simple 2d image. I want to continue using simplematerials to do the same. I believe if I work hard enough, I’ll get there. Interview by AGDong’s work will be exhibited at Aurora, 20 Gardner Street (formerly Blue Dog Gallery) when it opensunder new management at the end of April. The studio she shares, Studio 106 (106, Coleridge Street) willbe open weekends during May as part of Artists Open Houses.....29....


Copyright 2013 Warren and Gary Pleece


graphic novel...........................................Montague TerraceThe Pleece brothers are backThe announcement that Brighton-based brothersWarren and Gary Pleece were bringing out anew-material graphic novel – Montague Terrace– made a big impact among devoted fans of thatsubculture: one critic of the scene likened it tothe Stone Roses reforming.Between the late 80s and the mid 90s the pairproduced the graphic magazine Velocity, withGary’s surreal pictures and storylines illustratedby Warren’s noirish pen-and-ink drawings. “Ourstories weren’t specifically set in Brighton,” I’mtold by Gary, from the plush Old Steine officewhere he carries out his day job as a ‘marketingdissident’. But they were very much inspiredby the place. “The seedy backdrops, and thecrappy back lanes, and the dodgy characterswere all representations of what we’d encounteredwhen we lived in various shitty flats in theSt James St area.”The brothers made sure that production valueswere high, even with their first issue. The stuffthey were putting out soon got a reputation asbeing wildly original. “We were influenced by thecomics we used to read when we were kids,” saysGary. “Whizzer and Chips, Warlord, Roy of the Rovers,Commando Books. Also by all sorts of differentfilms: war films, kitchen sink films, Sergio LeoneWesterns, Carry on films. But we weren’t at firstinfluenced by other graphic novels, because wesimply hadn’t read them.”That soon changed, as they became central to theburgeoning scene. “In the early nineties graphicnovels became ‘the new rock and roll’,” he says.“We were mentioned everywhere for a bit: theNME took us up.” By Issue 4 of Velocity, publishersDeadline had taken over the title.But their success was relative. At the same timetheir contemporary Jamie Hewlett was writingTank Girl. “That went Hollywood,” says Gary,“but we just stayed underground. Warren wastaking up offers from publishers in America likeDC – slut – and was actually starting to make aliving out of it, albeit a feast-and-famine sort ofliving. I was finding the work too infrequent, soin 1996 I decided to get a real job.”Gary set up his marketing company, Warren continuedto illustrate books. “About three years agowe realised we were missing working togetherand decided to develop a story we’d started inVelocity 6, about a thirties block of flats inhabitedby weird people, which was called Montague Terrace.We published a few of them in an anthologywe brought out last year, The Great Unwashed.Enthused by the success of this venture – thebook was recently voted 3rd-best of the year byForbidden Planet – they put together a proposalwhich they sent to publishers Jonathan Cape, whohave published a number of influential graphicnovels. “To our surprise they snapped it up,” hesays. The result – a cracking read, by the way – isbeing released on April 3.So what comes next for the Pleece Brothers?Montague Terrace 2, it seems, is already inproduction. In the meantime Gary hopes thefranchise will be picked up by a film-maker orTV producer. “Shane Meadows or Ben Wheatleywould be perfect,” he says, with a glint in his eye.Are you reading, lads? Alex Leith....31....


focus on:Fond by Big Jump Press[Sarah Bryant]Tell us about your latest project. I’ve been working on a series of letterpress-printed hand-bound artists’books, focusing on the sort of little objects which we keep because they have sentimental value. I choseten things I’ve been carrying around with me for the last few years. This has been a period in which I’vemoved around a lot, including across the Atlantic to live in Brighton, and these objects have moved withme. Things like a broken key, a chestnut, a little toy car, a film canister with undeveloped film in it.How do you turn an object into an art book? There are two different parts to this edition: the deluxeversion, which sells for around $1200, and the smaller version, which goes for $375 – I sell most of mywork in The States. The smaller edition of the book is essentially a number of letterpress-printed pagesbound together as a book, featuring printed images of the objects and tangled trails of words describingwhat they represent. The deluxe copies are boxed, and include the object itself, and a set of prints.So you’re offloading things you hold dearly? Yes! They’re not worth any money as they are, but byturning them into an art project I am infinitely increasing their value, and their life span. Putting them in abox is rather like putting them in a sarcophagus.Is this project typical of the themes of your work? Most of the other projects I’ve done have had ascientific theme. One was based around the periodic table; another featured the human skeleton. My nextproject is looking at printed representations of population graphs, which take on an almost human form.How did you come to start making artists’ books? I started out my artistic career by producing a bunchof terrible paintings. Gradually I realised the art book was the best medium for me as it combined a lotof things I was interested in: fine art, book binding, print-making, publishing and design. And it’s a greatmedium. People connect with artists’ books in a way they can’t with other art forms. Literally so: they haveto physically turn the pages to follow the narrative that develops.Why don’t you trade under your real name? Working under a “press name” is the norm in book arts. Ifyou google ‘Sarah Bryant’, what comes up is some blue-spandex-clad blonde video-game fighting character.It’d take me a while to displace her in the rankings. Interview by Alex LeithSarah’s work will be shown as part of Phoenix Gallery’s Press and Release Exhibition, April 27-June 9, celebratingthe work of artists’ books and self-publishing.....33....


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food.......................................Little Fish MarketSucculent pollock, perfectly cookedWhen I get to the Little Fish Market restaurant, mycompanion, Antonia, has already chosen both our table(just for two, on the other side of the bar from otherdiners, by the window) and our wine (the cheapeston the list, a Sauvignon blanc). I’m joining her thererather than arriving with her because I’ve had to makea trip to the nearest cashpoint, having forgotten that,open just nine weeks, LFM is a cash-only restaurant.We’ve heard good things.I’m happy to be far from the other customers - onehas a particularly loud voice - but I disagree with herwine selection: my policy with white is to go for thesecond cheapest. I don’t often drink the stuff, but, hell,we’re having fish tonight.Little Fish Market was set up last year as a top-endfishmonger with a café attached, a brave move whichlooked destined to failure, with Waitrose just roundthe corner and virtually zero footfall down what is,in effect, a cul-de-sac off Hove-side Western Road.That business has been taken over, and turned into amid-high-end fish restaurant, employing the talentsof Michelin-trained head chef Duncan Ray, who’sworked at the Fat Duck and Pennyhill Park Hotel.We’re treated with great courtesy and diligence fromthe start by a highly informative waiter of indeterminatenationality, who, you can see, loves his job.He brings us four slices of bread, with a dollop ofbutter he tells us has been churned in-house, and asweet little pile of salt grains next to it, to chew whilewe decide what to order. I go for tea-smoked troutwith beetroot, horseradish, mustard cress and crisppotatoes, followed by pollock with duck-fat chips, peapurée and bacon. Antonia fancies the gurnard soup(with various delicious sounding bits, including brownshrimp and dill) and the lemon sole with lobstertortelloni, crispy oyster and celery.What follows (and we both try bits of each others’Photo by Alex Leithfood) is the best hour and a half of eating experienceI’ve had since I last went to the Ginger Man, a yearago. Tea-smoked trout? Succulent. Gurnard soup?Rich. Lemon sole? Delicate but not bland. And thepollock? I chose it, frankly, because I’ve never, everenjoyed it, and I want to know if the chef is capable ofchanging that statistic.He is. The flakes have a cod-like substance to them,and a cod-like taste, too. There are actually threetypes of peas on the side, pea shoots and petis pois accompanyingthe purée; the chips might just be illegal,and come in a little jug, making them all the easier toshare between us.We’re the last to leave, and, as we plough into a shareddessert (chocolate, with 64%Valhrona Ganache, fleurde sel and caramel) we chat to Duncan, who tells usthe secret to cooking pollock is to watch it carefully,because there’s a twenty-second margin of errorbetween perfect and ruined. This conversation is frequentlyinterrupted by loud exclamations of dessertinducedpleasure. Total bill? £59, before service. “We’llbe back,” promises Antonia, and she’s right. Alex LeithLittle Fish Market Restaurant, 10 Upper Market Street,01273 722213....35....


Ezy NoodlesStraight off the hotplatePhoto by Alex LeithMy friends often mock me for my unvaryingchoice of takeaway: chicken chow mein, everytime. But there aren’t many ways to avoid chowmein (normal or Singapore-style) at Ezy NoodleBar. In fact there’s only one: egg fried rice(with several possible toppings). So, adventurously,this time I go for beef chow mein (largeportion, £5), while my food-review buddy, Zara,has the chicken version (normal size, £4). It’scooked in front of us on a big hotplate, and ison our table in about three minutes.The service is great, and the portions are regal,though any illusion one might have of luxury isspoiled somewhat by the budget metallic tablesand chairs, and plastic cutlery.I’ve tried Ezy’s chicken chow mein before, andit’s up there with the best I’ve had in Brighton.This time, the noodles are still superb; butthe beef is disappointing – a bit chewy for mytaste. As we’re eating, at least two people orderchicken chow mein, causing me ‘menu regret’.Zara calls hers ‘nice’, waiting till we’re roundthe corner before giving her full opinion. “Iliked the simple layout; it was fresh and warm,it tasted really good…” (here it comes) “…but it was a little bit too oily for me”. She’dgo again but wouldn’t rave about it to friends.I’d go again and would gladly recommend thechicken chow mein; and as this is a food review,I’m going to. Recommended. Steve Ramsey14 Cranbourne StreethauffeurMonkeyYou enjoy the drinking, we’ll do the drivingWe drive you home in your carBook your Chauffeur Monkey to take you and yourcar home after a function, wedding or party• Drive to your venue • Enjoy the event• Your chauffeur arrives on his monkeybike which is placed in your car boot• Your chauffeur drives yousafely home in your car• No driving over the limit• No collecting your car in the morning08456 212 999www.chauf feurmonkey.co.uk


Photo by Adam ChandlerBellotaBrighton’s latest tapas joint“Have you guys ever had tapas before,” asks the friendlySpanish-accented waiter at Bellota, as the three of usstride into the new pink-and-yellow-walled independentcava bar/Spanish eatery on North St, where LaTasca used to be.“I lived in Barcelona for four years, he was in Marbellafor five, and he was in San Sebastian for six,” I respond,pointing to my companions Adam and Johnny. It’s fairto say that between us we have amassed a good deal ofexperience of eating small-portion Spanish bar snacks.The waiter, from Granada, is really friendly and reallygood at explaining what’s what on the menu. We ordera whole bunch of stuff: bread and olives (£2.95), Padronpeppers (£5.25), sobrasada pâté on toast (£4.95), curedchorizo (£4.95), fried baby squid (£4.95), 4oz rumpsteak (£7.95), and ‘patatas a la pobre’ (£3.25), washeddown with pints of Estrella.We only have a couple of minor quibbles with the food.The freebie slices of iberico ham we are offered seemtoo thick to have been hand-cut (churlish, nosotros?);and the peppers (famous for occasionally throwing up aspicy-hot one) are a little more al dente than we’d haveexpected. Nonetheless they are expertly salted and succulentas hell, and none of them blow our heads off.Everything else, which is wolfed down in what mightbe described as a ‘controlled frenzy’, gets universalapproval, and we all agree we’ll be back. We weren’texactly short of tapas restaurants in the city before now,but I reckon the quality bar has just risen. Alex LeithBellota, 165-169 North St, 01273 737342....37....


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food politics...............................FishloveMedia-savvy campaignWe’re delighted to have beengiven exclusive use of this Rankinphotograph, of Mariella Frostrupholding a carp, by Nicky Rohl,busy organising stage three ofhis brilliant media campaign‘fishlove’, getting celebrities tomake a stand to stop overfishing.Nicky, filmmaker and manager ofJapanese restaurant Moshimo incentral Brighton, got the idea forthe campaign after a conversationwith Charles Clover, authorof the book and documentaryThe End of the Line, who hadapproached him for advice onhow to publicise his new film,which highlights the dire situationcaused by modern fishingmethods.“Charles told me that an advertisingagency had come up with theidea of a naked person holdingup a fish, and wondered if I knewa celebrity who would be photographeddoing this,” says Nicky.“I did.” The person in questionwas actor Greta Scacchi, whoNicky knew was very concernedabout the issue, and the resultingpicture, taken by Rankin, caused amedia storm. “That’s how fishlovewas born.”“The picture had an enormouseffect on the media and it reallyhelped The End of the Line, withwhich it became associated, topromote itself, and the sustainablefishing campaign. Pretty soon wefound that there were a numberof other celebrities who wantedto take part in the campaign, sowe organised another shoot.”Stage two of the project, alsoshot by Rankin, was to createeven more publicity. “One of thepictures – in which Jerry Hallwas riding naked on a yellowfintuna - made even more of animpact than the Greta one. Theinitial week our server went downbecause we registered over 1.6million hits.”“One of the big challenges for allethical campaign groups is to getspace in the tabloids. If you getinto The Guardian or The Observerthere’s an element of preachingto the converted – in this caseevery tabloid ran a full page andthe issue was being brought topeople who might not normallybe concerned with such issues.Because, let’s face it, the issue ofsustainable fishing is fairly boringto most people. It’s all about netsizes and quotas and suchlike andcomplex data that will turn mostpeople off. I see it as an emotional,visceral campaign ratherthan an intellectual one.”Stage three of the campaignis another series of celebrityphotographs, this using black andwhite pictures by Alan Gelati,featuring such celebrities as RichardBranson, Simon Callow andTara Fitzgerald posing naked, orhalf naked, with various differentspecies of sea life. “Now we’vemoved the campaign to Paris,because the European Parliamentrecently voted in favour of aradical reform of common fishingpolicy,” continues Nicky. “ButFrance and Spain and Portugalare trying to tone it down. Frenchactress Melanie Laurenty [famousover here for her role in InglouriousBasterds, but ubiquitous in theFrench media] is one of the models,and we’re going to use her tofront a big campaign.” AL....39....


a pint or two with..........................................Simon FanshaweSteve Ramsey downs a jar with the activist/comedian/writer“One night at the Comedy Store, I was on stageand Keith Allen was at the back. He started toheckle. And being heckled by Keith Allen is noteasy. Then he suddenly stopped. That’s a bit odd,I thought, he’s stopped. And then I realised whathad happened is that Dawn French had gone overand kicked him in the shins, and told him to fuckingshut up. Haha! She’s a gem.”Wearing huge thick-framed glasses and a smarttweed jacket, sitting in a quiet Kemptown pub,Simon Fanshawe sips a large glass of red wine. (“Idon’t know much about wine, but I know I likeit,” he said, searching the list for whatever it washe had last time he was here.) Employing plentyof gesticulation, and a wonderful comedy grimace,he cheerfully discusses his career(s) - activist,comedian, journalist, broadcaster, consultant, etc.He’s also chaired Sussex University since 2007,for which he was recently given an OBE. It wasthe university that first brought Fanshawe toBrighton, when he turned down a place at Oxfordto read Law here. He says he chose law because of“Perry Mason and Ironside.” I laugh; he laughs,and says: “I’m not kidding! Perry Mason, Ironsideand John Mortimer. I just wanted to stand therewith a wig, and defend the poor, and do thingslike that.”At university, he was briefly a Maoist. “TheChristmas after my first term at Sussex, I heardmy mother talking to her great friend Lady OlgaCarnegie, who said ‘what is Simon doing?’. Mymother said [posh voice]: ‘He’s run away to Sussexand become a communist - do you want a drink?’He soon gave up Maoism (“I didn’t mind beingcalled bourgeois, but I objected to being calleda deviation”), but he never moved back fromBrighton. Of the city, he says: “I love the fact thatit’s a bit quirky and falling down, and I hate thefact that it’s a bit quirky and falling down. Didyou ever read Jonathan Franzen? Read JonathanFranzen. He’s the novelist who describes how youcan love and hate somebody in the same instant;that’s how I feel about Brighton.”After university, Fanshawe became a communityworker for four or five years, based in the ResourceCentre in North Road. At the same time,he was performing comedy in a sketch troupe,going solo in the early 80s. His style was “morepolitical than not, I suppose.” Did political comediansthink they could make a difference? “Wellat the time, yes, we absolutely thought this wouldbe it, we would bring down the government withjokes. People used to point out that actually satiredidn’t bring Hitler down, but we ignored that.We just thought as long as you drink Nicaraguancoffee and go on anti-apartheid marches and dopolitical comedy the government would just fall.”His material also featured “lots about sexualityand stuff. When I started, you know, gay comedywas me and Julian Clary. That was it. Julian’s anastonishing performer; he’s got amazing poise,like a burlesque peacock. That sort of statuesqueperforming combined with, as he always says,talking about bums and cocks. Julian’s cleverlyrude, his puns and his wordplay. That’s a greattradition; Carry On and burlesque, seasidepostcards. I was very different. I was gay-man-insuit-on-stage,you know? Looking back on it, I....40....


didn’t know how to handle it, and the audiencedidn’t know how to handle it, so it was quitean uneasy relationship. Whereas now you can’tbloody move for gay comics, they’re all overthe shop.”In 1989, Fanshawe co-founded Stonewall,the gay rights pressure group. Before that,he says, the gay rights movement “had beenprotest, people dressing up as nuns and zappingpsychiatric conferences on rollerskates,all that fabulous stuff. But actually what therewas then a market for, if you want to put itthat way, was consistent, well informed lobbying.So that’s what we decided to do. It’sbeen bizarrely successful. We have reunionssometimes and we all sit around going ‘whathappened! Wow! Can’t believe it’s got towhere it got to.’“The big thing that remains to be done istransferring it overseas.” To that end, Fanshaweco-founded a charity, the KaleidoscopeTrust. “It’s tough; it’s a much more complexbattle. We’ve got the problem now with gaymarriage and the church, but the truth ofit is the church is looking dafter and dafterhere; you just need to look at the polling.The church doesn’t look dafter and dafter inUganda; it looks powerful in Uganda and itlooks right. And that’s a far more complex battle.We’ll win it, but it’ll just… take a while.”Fanshawe himself is getting married, or civilpartnered, in July. “He’s a Muslim and I’m anot-Christian, so - what was it Woody Allensaid - we don’t know what religion not tobring the children up in.”....41....


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the lowdown on..............................................OctopusesFrom aquarist Kerry PerkinsIllustration by Zoë JacksonThe plural of ‘octopus’ can be ‘octopi’ or ‘octopodes’depending on whether you’re speaking Latinor Greek. Some people use ‘octopus’ as the plural.But most people use ‘octopuses’.They are among the smartest animals in the sea:they’re not very fast so they’ve had to develop differentstrategies for escaping their predators.The only hard part of their body is their beak, sothey can fit through very small holes in rocks, and hidein crevices. They can also change colour to camouflagethemselves.They are real houdinis. Brighton Aquarium’s NaturalistHenry Lee wrote his 1875 book The Devil-fishabout how he was angry when he thought his assistantshad put the octopus in the wrong tank. In fact it hadescaped from its own and broken in – and eaten all thefish in its new home.Everyone knows that octopuses have eight arms,but actually two of them could be classed as being legs:they use them to walk on the sea-bed or, if they are outof water, the ground.Some of the larger species of octopus can stay outof water for up to an hour. Sometimes they comeout of the water to catch prey. They won’t be veryhappy after a while, though. Octopuses can’t survive infresh water.We feed them all sorts. Scallops, mackerel, mussels,crab, hermit crab. We don’t give them squid, it’s notgood to give them something too similar to themselves.To eat shellfish they make holes in the shellswith their beaks and suck out the meat.We put Lego and other toys in their tanks. Theycan pull the Lego bricks apart, but they can’t put themtogether. They like ‘playing’ and need stimulation toremain happy.Octopuses’ eyesight is as good as ours, and theyare very observant. Sometimes I think that they enjoylooking at us as much as we enjoy looking at them,and that the Sea Life Centre visitors are their entertainment.They can easily recognise the differencebetween humans and behave differently to aquariststhey like and ones they don’t. If they don’t like youthey can squirt ink at you. It’s rather difficult to get outof your clothes.The ink is one of their defence mechanisms. Theysquirt it to obscure the water to help them escape frompredators.Female octopuses make great mothers. They lookafter their young until they hatch. During this periodthey don’t eat: in effect they starve themselves todeath. Male octopuses die shortly after releasing theirsperm sacs.I’ve seen the scene in Oldboy where they eat theoctopus alive. I don’t think in Korea there’s such aconcern for the welfare of animals as there is here. Idon’t eat octopus. I’ve been studying them for years, itwould feel wrong. As told to Antonia GabassiThe latest addition to the Sea Life Centre is the Octopuses’Garden, where you can see a number of differentspecies of this fascinating cephalopod. You can followthe adventures of MacGyver Bimac on Twitter (@macgyverbimac).More info www.sealife.co.uk.....43....


Bricks and mortar.......................................HippodromeFrom Houdini to the Rolling StonesIn January 1913, the actor-cellist Auguste vanBiene died on stage at the Brighton Hippodrome.He’d been ill, and his wife had warned him notto perform. She was in the audience; his son wasconducting. When Auguste collapsed, ‘nobody inthe audience thought it more than the prescribeddramatic finish to the scene,’ said The New YorkTimes. ‘The stage manager, however, noticed unaccustomedrealism about it, and the curtain wasrung down more hurriedly than usual. When thestage manager went to the actor, he found he waspast human aid.’The Hippodrome had started life, in 1897, as anice rink, competing unsuccessfully against an establishedrink in West Street. In 1901, the ownersturned it into a circus-theatre, hoping to see moreprofits. ‘Several clowns went through the comicbusiness that promoters of this sort of entertainmentseem to think indispensable to its success,’said The Brighton Herald’s lukewarm review of theopening night. The mix of circus acts and varietyperformers clearly didn’t impress punters either,and in little over a year the Hippodrome was sold.The new owners converted the venue into a standardvariety theatre, installing extra seats in placeof the circus ring, and beginning a programme ofcheap twice-nightly shows. The Herald enthusedabout the re-opening night, in December 1902:‘At last, it looks as if the right people have got holdof the Hippodrome – ‘the poor old Hippodrome’as some have pityingly called it.’It went on to become ‘the most famous varietytheatre in Southern England’, accordingto Brighton historian Chris Horlock. Houdiniperformed there, as did George Formby, Laureland Hardy, the Rolling Stones, Tommy Cooper,Buster Keaton, and Fats Waller. ‘Laurence OlivierPhoto by Alex Leithrecalled an early appearance he made in a sketchat the Hippodrome in 1924,’ Horlock writes. ‘Hewas very nervous and tripped flat on his face.’The Hippodrome closed in the mid-60s, dueto competition from TV and cinemas. After anunsuccessful stint as a TV studio, it opened as aMecca Bingo hall in 1968, lasting nearly 40 years.The Grade II* Listed building is now empty.Since at least 2010 the leaseholders, AcademyMusic Group, have been planning to turn it intoa 2,000-capacity music venue. However, the £9mproject appears to still be at the planning stage. AnAMG spokesperson said on March 5 ‘I don’t haveany further comment at the moment,’ so we imagineit won’t be reopening for at least a few weeks.Later that day, I’m standing outside the Hippodrome,taking notes about the boarded up doorsand warning signs. A pickup truck, with ‘NewZealand Crew’ written in dust on the side, pullsup right outside. Two guys get out and inspect thebuilding. They’re going to put steel sheeting overthe doors to keep out squatters, says one. I tellhim about the Hippodrome’s glory days, and howeven the Beatles played here.“It was one of the biggest entertainment venuesin the south east…” I say. “…and now it’s a pile ofshit,” he adds. Steve Ramsey....45....


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neighbourhoods.......................................SaltdeanJo Good, liferDo you like living in Saltdean?Oh yes, I’m its biggest fan. It’s agreat place to live. It’s nice andquiet, but Brighton’s so near.How long have you lived there?As long as I can remember.My family moved here fromPeacehaven when I was six. I’velived here ever since, even when Imoved out of the family home tolive with my former fiancé.Was it a good place to growup in as a kid? There’s a goodprimary school here, but I wentto school in Peacehaven, then inNewhaven. I had a great time inmy free time, though. I rememberrunning around in a big gang,playing games on the park. Sledgingdown the slope on snow days.I used to love going to the Lidowith the family, and down to thebeach as well. Now it’s come fullcircle and my nieces and nephewsare enjoying the same things – Itake them down to the sea all thetime, whatever the weather. I’ma really outdoorsy person, and Ithink that comes from living here.You’d never find me at home withan Xbox or whatever.The Lido nearly closed downrecently… They wanted toturn it into flats, like they’ve justturned the old Butlins Hotel intoflats. But everybody rallied round,it really brought the communitytogether. You’d see posters upeverywhere and people carryingPhoto by Alex Leith‘save the Lido’ bags. Eventuallythe Council bought it from thedeveloper, so it looks like it’sgoing to continue being used as apool, which is great.How much do you use thebeach? All the time. The Undercliffleads all the way to Brighton,so I’ll often go for a run there. It’sbest when the weather’s roughand the waves spatter over you. Inthe summer it’s a good swimmingbeach: the water’s really clean.There’s the Downs if you go theother way, too, of course.What are Saltdean’s facilitieslike? Good. Most people go foodshopping in town, but there arecorner shops dotted around if youwant something small. In terms ofeating and drinking, the SaltdeanTavern is a good meeting place,and does good carvery-style food.Do you work in Brighton? Iwork in the hospital down theroad: it’s very handy. I’m an operatingdepartment practitioner.When the surgeon says ‘scalpel’, Ipass him the scalpel.I hear you and 21 of your colleaguesjust climbed Kilimanjaro.It was an amazing adventure,and unbelievably challenging.Each of us battled oxygen deprivation,freezing temperaturesand the symptoms related to highaltitude. But it all became worth itwhen we reached the summit andlooked over Africa from 19,000feet. We completed the climb in abid to raise awareness of vasculardisease and to raise money forthe Sussex Stroke and CirculationFund. We each paid £2,400 we’dsaved to go on the trip, and haveso far raised £8-10,000 beyondthat – you can find out more atwww.sscfkilimanjaro.co.uk. AG....47....


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we try out..........................................FishingNever mind the pollockNathan, a young indie type in skinny jeans, hookssomething and starts reeling. Straight away, hefeels it swimming out to sea, hard. Crouchedon deck, trying to keep hold of the rod, he sayssomething along the lines of ‘help!’ Our boat’squalified crewman, Jay, takes over and confirms“it’s a biggie”. Jay, in yellow fishing dungarees anda baseball cap, leans back and brings the fish inwithout taking the roll-up out of his mouth.It comes on deck to general amazement. A22.5-pounder! It’s probably the biggest pollock anyboat off Brighton will get this year, announces ourfriendly skipper, Terry Lee. It’s so big that holdingit up for the obligatory photo makes Nathan’sforearms burn. “The biggest workout he’s had inyears!” says his dad, Dave.We’re on the boat Seabreeze3, thirty miles offshore,above a WWI German submarine. In winter,cod and pollock can be found near the coast,but in early spring they tend to hide in shipwrecksfurther out.Skipper Terry has been involved in charterfishing since the 70s. It’s easier nowadays, ashe has a sat nav which knows where all thewrecks are (it can also somehow detect fishbelow us). Having got us to the submarine,Terry manoeuvresso we drift slowly backand forth over it.The boat’s sevenpassengers just haveto drop our lines tothe sea floor, thenslowly wind themback in. There’s nobait; we use lures:plastic fish with convincing-looking eyes, and abig hook poking out of their dorsal fin. Fish go fordifferent coloured lures on different days, so Jaychanges mine a few times.Because the line is weighted down, it’s easy toconvince myself I have a bite. But after an houror so I notice a definite extra pressure, and startreeling excitedly. When it comes up, my line istangled with someone else’s, and only one has afish on the end. It turns out to be mine, making mea confirmed hunter-gatherer. However, it’s onlya little pout, which is “not good eating,” I’m told.Like most deep-sea fish when caught, it comesout boggle-eyed: it has the bends, due to beingbrought up so fast.Later I land a proper fish, a ten-pounder, judged tobe “not bad”. But I quickly prove I don’t have TheRight Stuff by being squeamish about holding itfor a photo.By about 2pm, we’re losing the tide, and no onecan catch anything. (Sea fishing is tide dependent,which is why we left the Marina at 7.30am.) Sowe head back, followed by expectant seagulls,and Jay expertly fillets the group’s haul, about24 big pollock, which we get to take home.The consensus on board seems to be that seafishing is mostly done for relaxation, but asDave says, “the fish helps”. Steve RamseyA day’s fishing starts at £50. Seabreeze3can be hired for: wreck fishing (£600),mini cruises (from £150), privatehire, diving, stag parties and corporateevents. Contact Terry on01273 585372/07850 707572,or see seabreeze3.co.uk.


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football.......................................Brian ‘Nobby’ HortonInspirational 70s/80s Albion skipper“Leaving Brighton in 1981 was the hardest decisionof my career in the game,” recalls former Albionmidfielder and captain Brian ‘Nobby’ Horton, whohad played a key role in the Albion’s meteoric rise upthe leagues between 1977 and 1980.“I’d moved from Port Vale in March 1976, and beenconverted from a wide midfielder to a central midfielderby Peter Taylor. I think when Alan Mulleryjoined the club [several months later] he fancied playingin that position himself – he’d been playing therefor Fulham the year before – but when he realised Ihad it covered he let me carry on, and stayed in thedug-out.”The manager/captain relationship was key to Brighton’ssuccess. “Alan was incredibly driven; nothing lessthan victory would do. I’ve always been the same, sowe were on the same wavelength,” he says. “We werevery well treated, on win bonuses and crowd bonuses,so morale was high. And we had a great team: so itwas success after success in front of big crowds at theGoldstone. Promotion, near promotion, promotion.The only down side was the last season, our second inthe [then] First Division, which was a relegation battle.But it was a battle we won, with four consecutivevictories to finish off the season.”Then… it all went wrong. Mike Bamber’s sale ofMark Lawrenson led to Mullery’s resignation (seeissue 4), and the appointment of Mike Bailey, followedby an exodus of established players, includingPeter O’Sullivan and John Gregory. “Mike Baileysoon made it clear to me that I would have to provemyself in order to keep the captaincy, and my placein the team. After all that I’d done at the club, I didn’tfeel that I needed to do that.”Mullery advised Horton to stay, but when he wasoffered the captaincy of David Pleat’s Luton Town,he decided to make the move, with Tony Grealishgoing in the opposite direction. “I agonised over thatdecision, but it turned out to be a good one. We wonthe league by 18 points that year and then I had twomore years at the top.”Brighton, despite initially becoming harder to beatunder new manager Mike Bailey, went the otherway, and, though they reached the Cup Final in 1983under caretaker Jimmy Melia, they were relegatedin the same year, the beginning of a downward spiralthat nearly saw them going out the league.For Horton, Mikes Bamber and Bailey had tried tochange things too quickly. “The heart of the teamthat had done so well was ripped out.”Things were to get a lot worse before they got anybetter, and the club were second from bottom in thebottom tier of the Football League, playing theirhome matches in Gillingham when Horton wascalled in to manage the team, in 1997. He didn’t lastlong, finding the situation (no stadium, no office, notraining ground) literally unmanageable. Within ayear, having considerably improved Albion’s leagueposition, he was offered the Port Vale job, and took it.“That was the second most difficult decision I had tomake in my career,” he says. Alex Leith....51....


trade secrets.......................................Robert YatesRoyal Pavilion and MuseumsWhat is your job? I’m Head of Fundraising for theRoyal Pavilion and Museums. Our department needsto raise enough money for the Pavilion and our otherproperties to continue to be open and enjoyed by thepeople of Brighton & Hove, as well as the millionsthat visit the city every year. I joined just over threeand a half years ago – though the time has absolutelyflown by. I’m helped by a great team, consisting ofAbigail, Caan, Laura and our volunteer, Sarah.You said ‘museums’ in the plural? We look afterBrighton Museum & Art Gallery, Hove Museum &Art Gallery, The Booth Museum, Preston Manorand, of course, the jewel in the crown - The RoyalPavilion itself.Any interesting events coming up? We put onaround 20 events each year across the portfolio.We’re delighted to be hosting a Jeff Koons exhibitionin our Artist Rooms from May, and have alsojust launched an Ice Age Sussex exhibition in theBrighton Museum Spotlight Gallery. Our biggestevent of the year will open in the autumn when welaunch our Turner in Brighton exhibition at theRoyal Pavilion, centred around our recently acquiredJMW Turner watercolour.Do you get all your funding from the Council?The Royal Pavilion is the only publicly owned royalpalace in the UK and the council are a tremendousresource, providing around a third of the money weneed each year, but we have to raise the remainingtwo thirds ourselves via retail sales, door fees andevents at our venues.And you’re some sort of a membership drive…When I joined, we had around 900 members. Todaywe’ve more than 4,500, and aim to have around6,000 by the end of 2013.What does a member get for their money, then?For their annual £25 or so (various rates are onoffer), they get free access to all of the properties,plus invites to a whole range of events and exclusiveevenings. We’re also proud that access is completelyfree for everyone under 18.What are your fundraising targets for the nextcouple of years? We tend to target projects morethan cash and our current key aim is to secure therestoration of the salon in the Royal Pavilion, whichis the oldest part of the building and was actuallypart of the original farmhouse.What are your broader targets? We want localpeople to explore and enjoy the city’s tremendouslyrich heritage, and to realise that they don’t need togo to London for great art and culture. We wantto increase civic pride by introducing them to thewealth of treasures around them. It’s vital that peoplesupport local art and culture – particularly in theseaustere times, because it considerably enrichens thecommunity and is part of our city’s narrative.How would you sum up Brighton? Brighton gavethe Prince Regent the freedom to create the RoyalPavilion, and today The Royal Pavilion is one of thethings helping to give Brighton the freedom to bedifferent – and that’s why people should support it.Interview by Nick Williams....53....


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trade secrets.......................................Chris DoddManager, The Robin HoodAre you any relation to Ken? We’ve got family inthe Liverpool area, so maybe I am. I used to get alot of stick at school. I’m getting my own back now,because my wife, Anna, who co-manages the pub, hastaken my name. So I call her ‘Doddy’.The Robin Hood is a ‘charity pub’. What doesthat mean? That all the profit, after all the costs aresettled, goes to charity.How did that come about? Martin Webb, the owner,sold a chain of about 40 pubs and clubs and made alot of money from it. So he decided to give some of itback to charity. Instead of a lump sum, he decided tobuy a pub, and set it up as a charity. The Robin Hoodcame up for sale, so it was the perfect fit.How much has it raised? We’re a tied pub, andBrakspear charge a lot for their beer, so it isn’t asmuch as it might be. But over the last eight-and-ahalfyears we’ve given in the region of £90,000 togood local causes, like Whitehawk Youth Club, theAlzheimer’s Society, homeless charity Off the Fence,the Edward Starr Trust and the Carers Centre.Do you have a guest ale? We always have Harveys,and then two other lines which constantly change.Brakspear threatened to replace Harveys with one oftheir own bitters but we started a campaign and theyeventually relented.You don’t have a kitchen, yet you do food…We make wonderful pizzas at a very reasonable price,using homemade oil, and cooked in a pizza ovenbehind the bar. It’s important to offer this becausepeople get hungry and if we couldn’t feed them they’dgo off somewhere else!You’ve got a TV, but it hardly ever seems to beon. We’re a rugby pub, dating back to the days whenthere was a very good Robin Hood rugby XV. Weshow all the Six Nations matches and a couple of yearsPhoto by Alex Leithback we opened at silly o’clock for the World Cup.We show football, on request, if it’s on terrestrial. Wedon’t have Sky because it would attract a different sortof customer than we generally get. And it’s bloodyexpensive.What sort of customers do you get? A goodmixture of real regulars and people who come everyso often. We’re pleasant and friendly behind the bar,so the people who come here tend to be pleasant andfriendly, too.What entertainment do you put on? We have apianist on Sunday evenings and lots of board games,from chess to Jenga. And there’s a pub quiz everyMonday night. The winners have to guess which oneof three envelopes has the money in it, and if theyguess wrong it rolls over. The biggest win has been£600.What don’t you like about your job? The hours arelong – I generally work from 10am till midnight – butyou know that when you go into the business. I don’tlike it on the rare occasions that customers are rude.Give us a top tip. Always be patient and lovely.Interview by Alex Leith....55....


DIRECTORYPlease note that though we aim to only take advertising from reputable businesses, we cannot guaranteethe quality of any work undertaken, and accept no responsibility or liability for any issues arising.To advertise in Viva Brighton please call Nick on 01273 434567 or email advertising@vivabrighton.comBrightonDo you have a roofing problem?Let us help you – call today!01273 486110DAMP?PROBLEM SOLVED• Penetrating damp• Rising damp• Timber treatments• Wet & dry rot• Damp proofing• CondensationPlus all associated building work01273 550318www.brightondampsolutions.co.ukSolar Panel installation undertaken by fully trained staff.We also provide a full design service.• Approved contractor tonumerous local authorities.• Award winning projectsundertaken.• Quality domestic, industrial &commercial roofing.Trades Undertaken• Slating & Tiling• Built up Felt• Mastic Asphalt• Single Ply• Solar PanelsRichard Soan Roofing Services(t/a Rivercrest Ltd)Davey’s Lane, LewesEast Sussex BN7 2BQ• Liquid Coatings• Shingling• Leadwork• Green RoofsEstablished 1988Tel: 01273 486110Fax: 01273 488585E: enquiries@richardsoan.co.ukwww.richardsoan.co.ukALL Advice is FRee And without obLigAtion


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inside left.......................................The Piranhas, 1978Check out the sod-you attitude of Brighton punk band The Piranhas, in 1978, three years before achieving Topof the Pops fame with a remake of the South African kwela song Tom Hark, in a picture taken by Paul Roundhill.The five-piece band was part of a thriving Brighton-based scene which centred around ‘the vaults’, the networkof burial chambers underneath Brighton Resources Centre, by the Presbyterian Church at the top of NorthRoad. “Each band burrowed into their own chamber to create a rehearsal space, and this was the Piranhas vault,”remembers Phil Byford, aka Punk Daddy, who has chronicled that scene on his comprehensive website www.punkbrighton.co.uk. “The problem was, there were a lot of coffins in there, and skulls and stuff kept surfacing:it’s rumoured some of the corpses had died of the plague.” The vaults were also used for impromptu gigs by thebands.The late Rick Blair, owner of new-wave vinyl shop Attrix Records on Sydney Street (where Dave’s Bookshopnow stands) was the mastermind behind Vaultage 78, an LP featuring eight Brighton bands, including Peter andthe Test Tube Babies, Nicky and the Dots, and The Piranhas, who contributed three songs: Virginity, Tension andI Don’t Want my Body. Vaultage 79 and 80 soon followed. In this picture, clockwise from top left are Dick Adland(drummer, aka Dick Slexia), Al Bines (saxist, on loan from the Golinski Brothers), ‘Boring’ Bob Grover (guitar,vocals), Johnny Helmer (guitar, vocals) and Reginald Frederick Hornsbury (bass). Normal saxist Zoot Alors (realname Phil Collis) was still unable to walk after a car crash in which one of their roadies, tragically, had beenkilled. Helmer and Grover have in the past couple of years played together as ‘Piranhas 3D’, reprising a numberof the band’s classic songs.....58....


Five Fabulous VenuesOne Great Membershipto the Royal Pavilion & Museums Foundation.Annual Membership costs from just £25And gives you great benefits:· Free entry to the Royal Pavilion & Preston Manor· Free entry to all paying museum exhibitions· Invitations to private views and member only events· Regular newsletter· Special prices on all public events· 10% discount in our shops (20% in Nov and Dec)· Discount on Royal Pavilion Ice RinkSpring Highlights:AprilBiba & Beyond: Barbara Hulanicki exhibition (Members see it free! )Members’ Opening night at Preston ManorMayARTIST ROOMS Jeff KoonsAttend the Members Private ViewWomen Artists at Brighton MuseumNew gallery tour for members.JuneThe Royal Pavilion Members open eveningWatch Regency dancers and musicians perform,meet curators and enjoy a drinkRegency Colour at the Royal Pavilion (Members see it free!)Member only Garden toursDon’t miss out,become a member today!Visit www.pavilionfoundation.orgTelephone: 01273 292789Get a FREE RoyalPavilion SouvenirGuide Book or aBiba & Beyond Mug.Quote ‘VivaBrighton’ *Whilststocks last


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