Timber Bulletin May/Jun - Minnesota Forest Industries

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Timber Bulletin May/Jun - Minnesota Forest Industries

THE VOICE OF THE TIMBER INDUSTRYTIMBERBULLETINDULUTH, MINNESOTA MAY/JUNE 2003 VOLUME 5950th North Star ExpoAugust 1 & 2, 2003Cass Forest Products66th AnnualMembership Meeting


THE VOICE OF THE TIMBER INDUSTRYTIMBERBULLETININ THIS ISSUE66th Annual Membership Meeting..............8_________________________________________________________________________________North Star Expo Schedule of Events.........13_________________________________________________________________________________Cass Forest Products ..................................15_________________________________________________________________________________Manual Approach SuitesMinnesota Logging Team ..........................20_________________________________________________________________________________2003 Legislative Session.............................26_________________________________________________________________________________Friends of the Forest History Center ........28_________________________________________________________________________________Loggers of the Past .....................................30_________________________________________________________________________________Classifieds....................................................33_________________________________________________________________________________Advertisers Index.......................................34_________________________________________________________________________________811Volume 59May/June 2003Duluth, MinnesotaTIMBER PRODUCERSASSOCIATIONPresidentCLARENCE JOHNSONPast PresidentRAMON KILLMER1st Vice PresidentLOWELL PITTACK2nd Vice PresidentDALE ERICKSONSecretary/TreasurerWARREN JOHNSONEditorWAYNE E. BRANDTGraphic Design, Editorial andMechanical ProductionSTEWART-TAYLOR PRINTINGMinnesotaTimber ProducersAssociationON THE COVERThe cover of this month’s Timber Bulletin istaken from the April 1951 issue of theTimber Bulletin. This cartoon shows howforward looking the equipment and loggingindustries have been through the years.This cartoon is run in honor of the 50thNorth Star Expo.The Timber Bulletin is published six times annually,in February, April, June, August, October andDecember by the Minnesota Timber ProducersAssociation, located at 903 Medical Arts Bldg.,324 W. Superior St., Duluth, Minn. MinnesotaTimber Producers Association members receivethe Timber Bulletin at an annual subscription rateof $15 which is included in their membership dues.Periodicals postage paid in Duluth, Minnesota.Advertising rates and data on request. The viewsexpressed in the Timber Bulletin do not necessarilyreflect the views or opinions of the MinnesotaTimber Producers Association.Postmaster: Please send address correctionsto TIMBER BULLETIN, Minnesota TimberProducers Association, 903 Medical Arts Bldg.,324 W. Superior St., Duluth, Minnesota 55802,Phone 218-722-5013.Issn: 10973532 – USPS: 0162082428No articles may be reprinted without written permissionfrom the Minnesota Timber Producers Association.Timber Bulletin May/June 20033


On April 25 the MinnesotaTimber Producers Association’s66th Annual Meeting was held atSpirit Mountain in Duluth. Allthe committee reports wereheard and I want to thankeveryone who worked on thesecommittees for your efforts thispast year.This year we celebrate the 50thAnniversary of the North StarExpo! The Public RelationsPresident’sColumnCommittee hasbeen workingvery hard tomake this amemorable timefor all for attend.You won’t wantto miss this special event!I would also like to welcomethe new members on the boardof directors and the executivecommittee. We look forward toworking with you this comingyear.On Friday, June 13, the TPAgroup will be having theirannual golf tournament inBigfork. This has been a greattime of fun and relaxation foreveryone in years past and I’msure this year will be as well. Ihope to see you there!As you are involved in thebusiness of logging, sawmilling,and trucking this coming year, ifyou have any comments orquestions, we would like to hearfrom you. TPA is here to helpmake Minnesota a better place tomake a living in the timberindustry.Remember to continue to worksafe.Maureen Talarico,New FieldRepresentativeThere’s a new, but notnecessarily unfamiliar, face at theTimber Producers Association.Maureen Talarico has been hired asthe newestmember of thestaff, servingthe role offorestry fieldrepresentative.Talarico maybe new to thetimber industry,but is certainly no stranger to thenorthland. She came to TPA fromthe Minnesota Department ofTransportation, where she hadworked for the past two-and-a-halfyears as public affairs director.Before that, Talarico worked asnews anchor and reporter fortelevision stations KBJR andKDLH, both based in Duluth. “Iam looking forward to learningmuch about the forest industry andthe many fine people who maketheir living in timber and timberproducts,” said Talarico.First on the agenda for Talarico,learning as much as she can aboutthe Timber Producers Associationand meeting the needs of itsmembers.DNR Launches OHVEducation CampaignThe Minnesota Department ofNatural Resources has launched amajor spring education campaignto promote the responsible use ofoff-highway vehicles (OHVs).Publicity efforts include billboardsand radio public serviceannouncements. The campaign iscentered around the theme “ProtectYour Privilege to Ride.”Ron Potter, head of the DNR’sOHV program, said the campaignis aimed primarily at those riderswho don’t always show the properrespect for the environment orother forms of outdoor recreation.“We are committed to providingopportunities for OHV use onpublic lands,” Potter said. “It is alegitimate form of recreation, butsome riders haven’t gotten themessage that they could lose thatprivilege if they don’t exercise itresponsibly.”The DNR shares the concern ofmany Minnesotans about theimpacts of OHV use. RegisteredOHVs now number more than200,000 in the state. That number isincreasing by tens of thousands ofnew machines each year.Billboards appearing throughoutmuch of the state carry themessage: “Protect Your Privilege toRide,” along with one of severalspecific messages, including: “Stayon the Trail,” “Avoid Wetlands,”“Respect Wildlife,” “Keep yourNoise Down,” “Share the Trail,”and “Know the Rules.” A smallerbillboard campaign was launchedlast fall.The same messages are featuredin a new four-part series of radiopublic service announcements.Those PSAs will appear in comingweeks on WCCO, KQRS, theWMNN Radio News Network andother stations around Minnesota.The airtime is a combination ofpaid and donated spots. The PSAsuse a humorous storyline to remindOHV users to ride responsibly.They portray a young teenagercomplaining to his friend about themisdeeds of his father.“Our goal is to change behavior,”said Dennis Asmussen, the directorof DNR Trails and Waterways.“Stepped up enforcement is part ofthe solution, along with a bettersystem of designated trails.Ultimately OHV users need to takeresponsibility for their actions. Weare reminding them to do that in away that we hope will be wellreceivedand therefore effective.”All four of the PSAs are availablefor download on the DNR websiteat: www.dnr.state.mn.us/news/psas/index.html.The education campaign isfunded by a $150,000 appropriationrequested by OHV user groups onbehalf of the DNR. It comes from adedicated account made up ofOHV license fees.4Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


Mark your calendars for the50th North Star Expo on Aug. 1and 2. The Expo will be held at theSouth St. Louis County Fairgroundsin Duluth. We are looking forwardto an outstanding show with manyactivities commemorating the past50 shows and the evolution oflogging equipment and practices.The TPA Public RelationsCommittee has been hard at workputting together a booklet thatchroniclesExecutive VicePresident’sColumnthe past 50years alongwith othermaterials.For the firsttime in anumber ofyears we will beholding a banquetto commemorateand honor all ofthose who havemade the show andthe equipment goin the past.Hotel rooms can fill up fast in theDuluth area during the summer soget your reservations in and plan afun trip to the Expo. The state Legislature completedits work on May 29 after an 11-dayspecial session. The budgetdominated the session but we wereable to move the ball forward, or atleast keep it from being taken outthe game, on some issues. It wasnot a year for making big gains andmost people felt that if they couldjust hold their own it was a victory.The specific legislative actionsthat impact TPA members arecontained in another story but Iwant to acknowledge a few folks hehelped us this year. FreshmanRepresentatives David Dill andDoug Lindgren stuck their nosesright into the fray and wereeffective. Many observers thinkthat Dill may be the freshman ofthe year and Lindgren shepherdedthe DNR timber sale bill veryeffectively.Representative Irv Andersonmade sure that logging equipmentdid not get left behind in the rewriteof sales tax exemptions.Freshman Senator Tom Saxhaugwas always there in the SenateEnvironment Committee and alsoweighed in on some transportationissues. Senator David Tomassoniand Representative Larry Howesworked with their respectiveTransportation Committee Chairs,Senator Dean Johnson andRepresentative Bill Kuisle, to makesome improvements in truckingprovisions.As usual, Senator Tom Bakk, whomoved from the House to theSenate this year, was fighting ourfight as an always tireless advocate.Representative Loren Solbergworked hard on finance andtransportation issues that made adifference for us this year. The Draft Plan revisions for theChippewa and Superior NationalForests are out for review. Therevisions are in four volumes thatlook to be a total of about six inchesthick. We are in the process ofreviewing these documents andwill be getting information out toTPA members as soon as we can.There are a couple of numbersthat I can share with you right now.The first number is 20 percent.That’s how much the SuperiorNational Forest is proposing todecrease their Allowable SaleQuantity (ASQ) from the currentplan. The second number is 35percent. That’s how much theChippewa National Forest isproposing to decrease their ASQfrom the current plan. The lastnumber is 25 percent. That’s abouthow much of their annual growtheach forest is proposing to harvest.If you total up all of the acresthat the two forests would harvestduring the first 10 years of thesedraft plans, it amounts to about 40percent of the acres that blew downon July 4, 1999. And we believedwhat the Forest Service was sayingabout wanting to deal with foresthealth. While we’re on numbers, howabout a few from California,courtesy of the American Forest &Paper Association. The costs ofCalifornia’s regulatory forestpractices program are 2,000 percenthigher than the states immediatelyto their north. California has lost26 percent of their mills in the pastfive years and now imports 80percent of its wood demands. Thestate’s private forests are growing170 percent more wood than isbeing harvested, while the rate ofapproval of plans by the state toharvest these lands has dropped 30percent and the costs of the planshas increased 300 percent since1995.This is a great example of hownot to do things. It is also anotherringing endorsement of thevoluntary processes that we have inplace in Minnesota. The programsof the Forest Resources Council,Minnesota Logger EducationProgram, Forest ResourcesPartnership, Sustainable ForestryInitiative and the implementationof the Timber HarvestingGuidelines are all key to our abilityto operate in a reasonably efficientmanner. Many thanks to Lowell Pittackfor his service on the TPA ExecutiveCommittee. Lowell retired at theend of 2002 when his son Scott tookover their business. A tirelessadvocate for TPA and its members,Lowell will continue as TPAmembership committee chair. Hewill be hard at work on thiscommittee when he and his wifeJudy return from a muchanticipated trip to Alaska.Tom McCabe Jr. was elected tothe executive committee at theApril board of directors meeting.Tom will do a great job in this role.He has served as chair of thetransportation committee, on thegroup health trustees, currentlychairs the insurance committee andis president of MLEP.I would also like to welcome ournewly elected members of the TPAboard of directors. Doug Brenner,Dave Goetz, Cory Lovdahl, MikePelland, Nik Rajala and MikeWalsh were all elected at the annualmeeting.We also have a change at the TPAoffice. Maureen Talarico has beenhired as our field representative.She replaces Rachel Benishek whotook a job in wood procurementcloser to her fiancé.Maureen has worked for theMinnesota Department ofTransportation and before that wasa television reporter and anchor.6Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


With her contacts at DOT andbackground in communications,Maureen is a great addition to ourteam. With winter changing to springand now summer, it’s easy to letyour mind wander to your afterwork or weekend plans. But lettingyour mind wander, whether it’syou or your crew, can have serioussafety consequences. Take aminute today to go over safetyissues on the job. It’s fun to thinkabout the fishing hole you may begoing to later, but the only way thatyou will get there and have fun is ifyou work safely today - all day.TPA will honor past mechanizationcommittee members and long-timevendors. Saturday the funcontinues from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.,with more exhibits and contests.Parking for this year’s Expo iseasy to find – right off BoundaryAvenue. Admission to the Expo isfree, and the public is encouragedto come and learn more about thelogging industry.For more information about theExpo, please contact the TPA officeat 218-722-5013.50th North Star ExpoSet for Aug. 1-2If you haven’t marked it on yourcalendar yet, this year’s North StarExpo will be held Aug. 1 and 2 atthe South St. Louis CountyFairgrounds in Duluth. This year,however, will mark the 50thanniversary of the Expo, which isthe largest logging, trucking, andsawmill equipment show in thestate. To mark this specialoccasion, the Minnesota TimberProducers Association, inconjunction with the University ofMinnesota, will be distributingspecial commemorative bookletsoutlining the evolution of loggingand equipment from the past 50years.The Expo will also have many ofthe favorites that attendees haveenjoyed over the years. Along withthe many equipment displays,there are also several contests totest your skills and knowledgeabout the logging industry.Attendees can guess the weight of afully-loaded logging truck, honetheir skills with the WoodIdentification Contest, run a loaderagainst the clock, and even viewthe Celebrity Loader Contest.The day’s festivities begin Fridaymorning at 9 a.m. and run all theway through until 5 p.m., when theevening recognition banquet andprize giveaway begins. This yearTimber Bulletin May/June 20037


66th Annual Membership MeetingOn Friday, April 25, the TimberProducers Association held itsannual membership meeting atSpirit Mountain, in Duluth, Minn.President Clarence Johnson calledthe meeting to order and welcomedall the attendees. Executive VicePresident Wayne Brandt reportedon the association’s activities forthe past year, including a legislativeupdate.The chairmen from themechanization, transportation,public relations, membership andsafety committees reported oncommittee activities during the pastyear and gave summaries of issuesthey would be dealing with in thefuture. John Hill, Lumbermen’sUnderwriting Alliance, gave a briefreport on the workman’scompensation insurance issues. Heemphasized that the rates haveremained steady and LUA has beenable to offer the 20 percentdividends because of the safetyefforts of member companies.By recommendation of thenominating committee thefollowing TPA members werenewly nominated and elected to theboard of directors along withreturning members: Doug Brenner,Grand Marais; Dave Goetz, CassLake; Cory Lovdahl, Effie; NikRajala, Deer River; and MikeWalsh, Park Rapids. Tom McCabe,Jr., Duluth, was elected to theexecutive committee as secretary/treasurer by the board of directors.To start off the morning program,Dr. Susan Stafford, dean, College ofNatural Resources, University ofMinnesota, presented an overviewof the college’s program and thedirection it will be going in thefuture. Also on the morningagenda, Superior National ForestSupervisor Jim Sanders andChippewa National Forest ActingSupervisor Duane Kick updated themembership on the progress of theForest Plan Revision. Mike Carroll,director, DNR Division of Forestrypresented an overview of his goalsfor the state program. Workingwithin the budget cuts, he outlinedthe department’s priorities.Dave Zumeta, executive directorThe 2003 annual membership meeting.of the Minnesota Forest ResourcesCouncil, gave a brief overview ofthe goals of the council.The new director of theMinnesota Logger EducationProgram, Dave Chura, is lookingforward to building on MLEP’ssuccesses to ensure loggers haveaccess to the best training andinformation available.After lunch, Jerry Lamon, withthe Cass County Land Department,explained the benefits of setting uptimber sales with the help of a GPS.Charlie Blinn and Mike Kilgore,both with the University ofMinnesota, provided a program onapplying forest managementguidelines and who pays the cost.The panel discussion, “What doesthe Future Look Like?” includedpresentations from the consumingmills on their companies.TPA would like to thank theSome of this year’s proud safety contest winners.following meeting hosts for theirgenerous contribution to the coffee,rolls, and break food: Amerisafe;Hahn Machinery Inc.; LindsayMachinery, Inc.; Menominee Saw &Supply Company, Inc.; Nortrax;Road Machinery & Supplies;Russell & Herder Advertising; andTwo Harbors Machine Shop, Inc.The keynote speaker for this year’sbanquet was DNR CommissionerGene Merriam. The commissionerspoke about the importance oflogging and the Pawlentyadministration’s plans for the DNR.The banquet concluded with thedoor prize drawings. TPA wouldlike to thank the followingcompanies for their generousdonations: Wells Fargo; MinnesotaForest Industries; Fryberger,Buchanan, Smith & Frederick; BoiseCascade; Potlatch Corp.; UPM(continued on page 10)8Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


Lynsey Carlson of Duluth, Minn., spoke of her experiencesat the Gillette Children’s Hospital, which is funded by theLog a Load for Kids program. She was accompanied by hermother Lynn, left, and Becky Holte, right, of the Children’sMiracle Network.(continued from page 8)Kymmene-Blandin Paper;Lumbermen’s UnderwritingAlliance; Sappi; Weyerhaeuser;Lindsay Machinery; Nortrax; RoadMachinery & Supplies; Land OLakes Wood Preserving. Also a bigthank you to Tilton EquipmentCompany for donating the chainsawfor the Grand Prize drawing.Safety Contest WinnersLogging DivisionB.C. Niesen Logging, WahkonC & M Walsh Logging, Park RapidsC.O. Johnson Logging, BlackduckDean & Bob Walsh Logging, ParkRapidsDick Walsh Forest Products, ParkRapidsDoug Brenner Logging, GrandMaraisDoug Foster Logging, ElyDukek Logging, BagleyErickson Timber Products, Inc.,BirchdaleHarris Walsh Logging, Park RapidsHufnagle Inc., Big FallsJohnson Logging Inc., Cannon FallsKillmer Bros. Inc., Big FallsKimball’s Logging, Inc., Park RapidsKnaeble Timber Inc., NorthomeLundberg Forest Products, SolwayM & R Chips, Grand RapidsMcCabe Forest Products, DuluthNorthwoods Chipping,International FallsPage & Hill Forest Products, BigFallsPalmer Logging, BarnumPittack Logging, BoveyRBC Ent/Manners Logging, ParkRapidsRon Beckman Timber Harvesting,McGregorSkoe Lumber & Timber, NorthomeTim Kelm Logging, BemidjiTodd Wass, BigforkTrucking DivisionB.C. Niesen Logging, WahkonC & M Walsh Logging, Park RapidsDick Walsh Forest Products, ParkRapidsDoug Brenner Logging, GrandMaraisDukek Logging, BagleyErickson Timber Products,BirchdaleHarris Walsh Logging, Park RapidsHufnagle, Inc., Big FallsJohnson Logging Inc., Cannon FallsKimball’s Sawmill & Logging, ParkRapidsLundberg Forest Products, SolwayM & R Chips, Grand RapidsMannco Trucking, InternationalFallsMcCabe Forest Products, DuluthJeff Schommer was the grand prize winner of the chainsawdonated by Tilton Equipment.Norman Johnson Trucking,BaudetteNorthwoods Chipping,International FallsPage & Hill Forest Products, BigFallsPalmer Logging, BarnumPittack Logging, BoveyRBC Ent/Manners Logging, ParkRapidsRon Beckman Timber Harvesting,McGregorStaggemeyer Stave Co., Inc.,CaledoniaThomas Long & Son Trucking, OrrTim Kelm Logging, Inc., BemidjiSawmill DivisionBass Lake Mill LLP, SandstoneCass Forest Products, Cass LakeDeMenge Sawmill, McGregorErickson Timber Products,BirchdaleHedstrom Lumber Company,Grand MaraisRoot River Hardwoods, Preston10Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


50th AnniversaryMinnesota’s LargestLogging, Trucking &Sawmill Equipment ShowSouthSt. Louis CountyFairgrounds Logging, Trucking &Sawmill Displays Workshops Contests:Best Load ContestLoader Contest/MasterLoader ContestMedia Loader Contest Old Time LoggingEquipment Recognition BanquetHighlights of thePast 50 Years Tree Farm Awards:State Tree Farmerof the YearRecognition ofInspecting ForestersDULUTH, MINNESOTAFriday & Saturday - August 1 & 2, 2003For more information:MINNESOTA TIMBER PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 903 Medical Arts Bldg., 324 West Superior Street, Duluth, MN 55802 Phone: 218-722-5013Sponsored by: Minnesota Timber Producers Associationand the University of MInnesota


Schedule of EventsFriday, August 19:00 a.m. Equipment Displays Open9:30 - 11:00 a.m. Workshop Sponsored by the Minnesota State Patrol10:00 - 11:00 a.m. Loader Contest (sign up at site)11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Celebrity/Media Loader Contest12:30 - 3:00 p.m. Loader Contest (sign up at site)2:00 - 3:00 p.m. Workshop to be announced5:00 p.m. Equipment displays close5:00 - 6:30 p.m. Cash Bar Social Hour6:30 p.m. 50th Anniversary North Star Expo Recognition BanquetSpirit Mountain Main LodgeSaturday, August 29:00 a.m. Equipment displays open9:30 - 11:00 a.m. Workshop sponsored by the Minneseota State Patrol10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Loader Contest (sign up at site)1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Workshop to be announced3:00 p.m. Equipment displays closeCONTESTSGuess the Weight – Guess the weight of a fully loaded truckWood Identification – See how many tree species you can identifyLoader – Test your skills against the clockMasters Division Loader – NEW CONTEST for those 50 and over –sign up at site to test your skills against the clockBest Load – Come and see the Best Loads of Wood on DisplayFor additional information, contact:Minnesota Timber Producers Association903 Medical Arts Bldg, Duluth, Minn. 55802Phone 218-722-5013Timber Bulletin May/June 200313


Cass Forest Productsby Maureen TalaricoOn a sunny May day, I passresort sign after resort sign as Ihead into Cass Lake. It’s notresorts I’m after today, but my firsthands-on tour of a sawmill; mytarget: Cass Forest Products.Upon arrival, as I step out of mycar, I am grateful for a stretch aftera long haul. The smell and soundof the sawmill are a pleasure to thesenses. In the office, CEO DaveGoetz is ready to take thisnewcomer to TPA under his wingand show me around his mill.Cass Forest Products is theproduct of a plant closure, whenthree partners purchased thesawmill from ChampionInternational, Wheeler Division, in1985. The business began withpulpwood brokerage, a sawmill, aplaning mill and logging. Thesawmill processed pine logs andproduced lumber, squares, railroadties and large timbers.In 1997, management of theoperation shifted. An employeestock ownership plan, or ESOP, wasformed which bought the majorityownership of the company. AndDave Goetz, who had worked 20years in the wood industry and haddone consulting for Cass ForestProducts, took over as CEO. “Oneof the big factors I have is in doingsome things a little bit differentlythan they were done before. We’veopened up communications withemployees,” says Goetz.Communications that include anewsletter produced twice a monthto keep workers informed onchanges and to focus on the sawmill,not the rumor mill. Goetz also hasexpanded the role of lead personneland now Cass Forest Productsholds meetings with employees ona regular basis. Goetz says one ofhis goals was to take employeesbeyond their paychecks andexplain what’s going on in thebusiness and how it affects theirjobs. “They understand a littlebetter what’s happening, the reasonbehind the decision,” he says. “Badnews is less distasteful.”Bad news is all too much areality in today’s economy, ascompetition from Canada andoverseas competitors make life inthe sawmill not an easy job. CassForest Products has three separatelocations and one division. In CassLake, there is the sawmill, and ahalf-mile on the other side ofhighway 371 is the dimensionplant. The company formed itsfirst division, Aitkin Hardwoods, inAitkin, in 1998.The Aitkin Hardwoods market isretail and wholesale to contractorsand lumberyards with an emphasison flooring and paneling.Moulding and lumber make up asmall part of the sales. The CassLake operations focus on timbersand squares with side lumberprocessed into pallets parts andcut-stock pieces. On a tour of thedimension plant, Goetz allowed meto walk inside the huge kiln, whichhas a 50,000 board-foot capacity.Cass Forest Products suffered afire in February of 2001, which tookout the head rig and the Scraggoperations. The company decidedto benefit from adversity andimprove their already-impressivesafety record with a new head rigand building for the scragg. Withinsix months, the new Cleeremanhead rig boosted productivity.How? With an energy efficient aircompressor, replacement of beltJon Stilwell, with 15 years of service; Cecil Louks, with 8 years of service; andHarold Kloehn, with 13 years of service. Jon is assigned as the rip operator, Cecilas a boiler/kiln operator, and Harold as a fingerjointer operator and technican.Timber Bulletin May/June 200315


conveyors to vibrating conveyors,improved efficient head rig systemand reduced amount of woodgoing through the chipper. CassForest Products separated the twooperations and elevated the line foreasier cleaning.Within four weeks after the fire, ascragg line was up and running inan existing building. A newbuilding was constructed for thescragg in October of 2002.Safety training is also a big partof Cass Forest Products’ operations.Individual employee handbooksand quarterly safety meetings arepart of the program, but Goetz hasmanaged to squeeze in a little funwith the safety training. Eachemployee who has not suffered aloss-time accident gets to spin theroulette wheel for cash prizes up tofifty-dollars. And this year, CassForest Products is implementing anew safety program that reviewseach operation of the company forbest safe practices. The one withthe best safety record over 12months wins.New methods to improve safetyimprove employee morale, one wayto help survive in a strugglingindustry. Business hurdles includehigh stumpage prices, woodimports and generally slow marketconditions. “These are challengingtimes for the sawmills,” says Goetz.“This year is kind of uniquebecause of the glut of wood that’s onthe market. This time of year more(continued on page 16)The Cleereman head rig.The debarking operation.16Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


The scragg.Aspen, should help to reduce therotation age of these species. Thiswould dramatically increase thevolume of sawbolts available tosawmills by minimizing the chronicrot problems that these speciesencounter as they age.In the meantime, however, CassForest Products continues to holdits own in a challenging market,through innovative programs toimprove employee safety,education and morale. Cass ForestProducts truly is an employeeownedcompany and the pride inownership is felt from the drop-offpoint of the delivery trucks, all theway through to the stacks offinished product awaiting pick up.(continued from page 16)than in previous years,” headded. Goetz also believes thatwhile it’s important to staycompetitive in today’s toughtimes, sawmills in the area alsohave to network. “We’retrying to be proactive and openup to our competitors to thedegree that we can,” says Goetz.Using mainly Norway,Jackpine and White Pine, CassForest Products wants to seemore stumpage being sold bythe counties, the Departmentof Natural Resources, andespecially the USFS. Bycreating more supply withmore sales, the stumpageprices would move closer tothe wood coming out ofCanada. Putting up moresales of Jackpine, as well asPete Rairdon in the kiln controlroom. Pete has more than 12years of service.18Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


Manual ApproachSuits Minnesota Logging Teamby Dave JohnsonIt’s 5 a.m., five below zero andpitch dark. Thirty-three-year-oldlogger Blake Meighen is headingout the door to begin his day.Ahead lies a two-hour drive beforehe meets up with his loggingpartner, 27-year-old Josh Wharton.Since he lives closer to this 20-acre job, Wharton will get therefirst and start the portablegenerator they use to warm up theTimberjack 240 cable skidder theywill be using this day.Meighen’s commute takes himalong the Rochester Minnesota“miracle mile” where his pickupblends in with the early commutertraffic. This is "Lake Woebegon"country and the road leading to thejob is cleaned up by the “Sons ofNorway Lodge.”Before their seven- to eight-hourday is done, the partners will felland skid, on average, more than6,000 board feet of logs. This is animportant number since the team ispaid by the thousand. Thecompany they work for, Root RiverHardwoods out of Preston, Minn.(profiled in the March, 2003 issue),cut this particular job 20 years ago.It was one of the first jobs done bythat company and was cut by oneof the mill’s owners, Jeff Wand.This is, by Meighen andWharton’s standards, a pretty easyjob since it is not too steep. Theytry to schedule these jobs for thewinter, since even with tire chains,it’s hard for the skidders to avoidsliding on frozen hillsides. Thetrees, which have been marked, area mixture of ash, oak, hard maple,basswood and box elder. Meighenestimates the job will take about aweek to finish.Root River runs six loggingcrews and the company’s foresterstry to mix in the good jobs with thenot-so-good and the longcommutes with the short ones so asto be fair to all the crews.Regardless of whether it’s a goodjob or a bad one, the rate perthousand is the same.Meighen and Wharton acceptthis and say it all averages out overtime. The stand is dense with small,pole-size young growth. Some ofthis growth is hard maple, but a lotof it is just junk. Some of the larger,marked trees are junk as well,mainly box elders.Luckily for the stand – and theloggers – Root River can utilize anylog of any species over 11 inches.There is no market for pulpwoodthis far south, so anything thatcan’t be sawn is not usable at all.This, of course, is the bigproblem for forest managers. Ifloggers only take high quality trees,leaving the lower quality to grow,timber stand improvement isimpossible. Many of the markedtrees are “wolf” trees, with largetops spreading over wide areas,thus shading out more valuabletrees, so cutting these trees willresult in stand improvement.The large tops are wasted,however. It is Root River policy tojust leave them where they fall. Theloggers buck random length logsoff the trunk and an occasionallarge stick out of the top. They tryto take the remainder down a bitbut, not much.They say that pulling large topsout of the woods would do damageto the stand, and that by leavingthem where they fell, shelters arecreated for wildlife and youngseedlings are also protected fromdeer damage during the time ittakes for them to rot down.Some landowners come in andblock up the tops for firewood but,because of the steep terrain, it’sdifficult to haul the wood out.Even though the partners arepaid by the thousand, regardless ofspecies, they are well aware of thevalue of the logs they areproducing. Their record dayconsisted of 38 black walnut trees,which produced a sale value of$38,000. Meighen says they usednarrow notches and thin hinges onthese trees because any stump pullor cutting of useful wood with a20Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


flat notch would result in expensivedegrade.Other than that, both loggers aretrained in – and use – the open facefelling methods taught by theGame of Logging. Root Riverfurnishes all safety gear. Theloggers buy and maintain theirown saws. Both men useHusqvarna model 372XPs with 20-inch bars.These are modified “hot” sawswhich they buy from a company inOregon. The saws cost about athousand dollars each, and thepartners swear by them, claimingthey get almost 50 percent morepower than they did withconventional saws.The saws are shipped with labelsriveted to them saying “ForCompetition Use Only.” Aside fromthat, they look just like standardchain saws.These custom saws are used forfelling and bucking. Meighen andWharton use chisel bit, square-filedchains, which they buy in reels.Meighen has a grinder and he doesall the sharpening in the evenings.They carry extra chains so as to nothave to sharpen in the woods.For bucking on the landing,conventional saws with roundgroundchains are used.Wharton has been working in thewoods for about two years, havingstarted his career in the Root Riversawmill, which he got out of assoon possible. Like all loggers,these two have independentstreaks. Meighen says he wouldrather “flip burgers” than work in amill.Meighen’s career with Root Riverstarted about 10 years ago. At thetime, he was operatingindependently, subbing for thecompany. He owned a Cat dozerand a Timberjack skidder andemployed one man. He says that hecouldn’t come out financially evenwith just one employee, mainlybecause of Minnesota’s Workers’Comp. rates.He explained that at 53 percentof payroll, every $1,000 he paid outin wages meant he had to send$530 to the state insurance fund. Hediscussed the problem with RootRiver and they bought hisequipment from him and hired himto log for them as an employee.Fifty-three percent sounds like anawful big bite to pay for workers’compensation insurance, butconsider this: About two years ago,Meighen and his partner at thetime were felling a large red oak.There was a limb from another oaktouching the one they were to fell.They discussed the hazard andagreed the limb looked sound. Itwasn’t.Meighen remembers making hisfelling cut but nothing beyond that.The limb hit him squarely on thehead, shattering his hard hat andbreaking all six webbing straps. Hispartner called 911 from his pickupand Meighen was air lifted byhelicopter out of the woods withfive cracked vertebrae.The result was 11 days in thehospital and three and a halfmonths’ recovery time. Both menagree that logging is hazardouswork, but neither would doanything else – even though theirwives worry about them.Wharton says that logging hasmade him more cautious ofeveryday hazards that havenothing to do with his work.Meighen agrees. Both are also quickTimber Bulletin May/June 200321


to condemn saw manufacturerswho don’t include the latest insafety devices on their saws. Theysay this is especially hard to acceptsince amateurs mainly use thesecheap saws, unaware of thedangers involved in operating themand lacking the skills to use themsafely.The partners seem to be wellsuited to working together. This isall important since most of whatthey do is by mutual agreement.Root River interferes very little intheir work. They decide betweenthemselves when and how longthey work. They divide up theduties between themselves. Theyagree that during a working week,they spend more waking hourswith each other than they do withtheir families. Without having todiscuss it, one will climb up intothe skidder and the other will setthe chokers.When a large tree is to be felled,both clear away spring poles andfell trees in the felling path. Oncethe tree is down, both are on it,limbing and bucking. This makesfor a varied day requiring manyskills and a sharp focus.They are both knowledgeableand concerned about good forestryand conservation. Wharton saysthey always cut the stumps low,even on small spring poles, becauselow stumps result in strongersprouts. Even though the steepterrain makes for hard work, theysay they are thankful for it since itprevents mechanization.Both loggers hope that manualfelling will continue to be the waytimber is harvested in their workinglifetimes. Like all professionals,they dislike incompetent amateurs,feeling they give the professionals abad name, especially when they bidhigh for stumpage, get the contractand then either do a bad job orcheat on the payments. They feelthis reflects on them.They also feel that although theytake great care to do good work, itoften goes unnoticed.Neither logger has muchsympathy for horse loggers, either.Both Meighen and Wharton feelthat with the care they take inmaking skid roads and installingwater bars, etc., they do very littledamage to the woods. They alsopoint out that horses can’t pulldown the inevitable hung up treelike a skidder can, thus making itmore dangerous to work withhorses.Even though Root River doesn’tinterfere with them, Meighen saysthe company is really good withbackup support, whether it issending out a mechanic,s or a dozerto upgrade a road. All it takes is aphone call, he says, and the help ison the way.So good timber, hot saws, sharpchains, company backup and thesatisfaction of a demanding jobwell done, keep this team workingsmoothly. Forget air-conditionedcabs, stereo systems and air glideseats; if you’re really into logging, itdoesn’t get any better than this.This article was reprinted withpermission from “The NorthernLogger,” April 2003.22Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


Record NumberTurn Out for10th Annual TPAGolf TournamentFifty-six golfers turned out forthe 10th Annual TPA GolfTournament at the Wilderness GolfCourse in Bigfork on June 13. Therecord 28 teams had a backdrop ofsunny skies and gorgeoustemperatures for hitting the course.Great golf must run in theWarren family, as Mike and RyanWarren took first place in thescramble.The day ended with a terrificbarbeque lunch at the clubhouse,followed by a door prize raffle.Prizes were donated by Boise;Potlatch Corporation; Wells FargoBank; International Paper;Weyerhaeuser; Fryberger,Buchanan, Smith and Frederick;Nortrax; Sappi; Lumbermen’sUnderwriting Alliance; and UPMKymmene. We appreciate all of thewonderful gifts!The Minnesota Timber ProducersAssociation would also like tothank Rajala Companies; Nortrax;M & R Chips; and Figgins Truckand Trailer Repair for providingrefreshments on the beverage cartto the many thirsty golfers thatsunny day. TPA also appreciatesthe generous donation of snacksprovided by Bergstrom WoodProducts.TPA would also like to thank thestaff of the Wilderness Golf Coursefor their extra effort to make thisgolf outing one to remember.The Bergstrom clan heads out.Mike Rieger, Clarence Johnson, Brad Lovdahl and Bruce Meade.On the left are Oscar Johnson and Ron Bailey with local tournament officials.24Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


2003 Legislative SessionThe legislature adjourned itsregular session on May 19 withoutcompleting all of the requiredbudget legislation. It immediatelywent into special session andconcluded all necessary bills onMay 29. It will convene again onFeb. 2, 2004, unless additionalspecial sessions are needed.The record budget deficitdominated the session. Thiscombined with one-third of alllegislators being freshman resultedin a long, drawn-out session withfew major policy initiatives beingpassed.Following are highlights of issuesimpacting the forest productsindustry.Industry Assessment byState of MinnesotaGovernor Pawlenty announcedthat his administration wouldconduct an assessment of theeconomic conditions impacting theforest products industry. Thegovernor appointed an advisorytask force to help guide theassessment. The task force consistsof DNR Commissioner GeneMerriam, DTED CommissionerMatt Kramer, U of M CNR DeanSusan Stafford, St. Louis CountyLand Commissioner Dave Epperly,TPA President Clarence Johnson,Gene Foster - Boise, Joe Maher -UPM, Ron Salisbury - Potlatch, andHoward Hedstrom - HedstromLumber. It is anticipated that theassessment will be completed byJuly 1 and that it will result inactions during the balance of 2003.It is also likely that it will form anagenda for legislative issues in2004.Work is progressing on the issuesidentified by the Advisory TaskForce. Recommendations, whichwill be forwarded to the governoron June 30, will be formatted intoseven broad categories:1) Increase wood availability2) Streamline environmentalregulations within acompetitive range3) Decrease transportationdisadvantages4) Dedicate a portion of timbersale receipts to forestryinvestments5) Certify all public lands inMinnesota and create acombined auditing program6) Create a structure to followthrough on recommendations7) Attract capital investments toMinnesotaSales Tax on Logging EquipmentThe Department of Revenue andthe legislature rewrote sales taxprovisions on various types ofequipment, including loggingequipment. The rewrite eliminatedlanguage dealing with severalspecific exemptions and includesthem in a general definition. TPAdid not feel that the generaldefinition adequately coveredlogging equipment. TPA wassuccessful, after much effort, inadding silviculture to the generaldefinition which was included inthe final tax policy bill.FY ’03 Budget CutsAfter the House and Senate wereunable to reach agreement onbudget cuts for the current fiscalyear, Governor Pawlenty“unalloted.” The Division ofForestry’s budget was cut $1.3million. The division had beenpreparing for these cuts for sometime. They had held 22 vacanciesopen and will continue to do so.They will post closings on 25percent of the forest road system inorder to save maintenance (none ofthese closings will affect timbersales) and they will absorb othermiscellaneous reductions.FY ‘04-’05 Budget - DNRGovernor Pawlenty’s budgetincluded sufficient funds to allowthe DNR to sell its full plannedtimber sales volume. This washighlighted in the governor’sbudget message.The governor’s recommendationwas passed. Language that wouldhave targeted additional budgetcuts to state agencies, includingsignificant cuts to the DNR, wascontained in the State GovernmentFinance bill but was not adopted.Government ReorganizationLegislation requiring a study ofthe potential to merge of the DNR,Pollution Control Agency, Board OfWater and Soil Resources and otherprograms was heard again in theSenate. This language wasincluded in the Senate Environmentand Natural Resources Finance bill.There was no House companionand this language was not includedin the final bill.Sustainable Forest Incentive ActTPA fought a rear guard actionwith the Departments of Revenueand Finance to protect thisprogram, which provides incentivepayments to private landowners tomanage their forestlands. It hadbeen considered for a delay inimplementation into the followingbiennium, but no change infunding for SFIA was made.Forest Resources CouncilThe Forest Resources Councilwas appropriated $730,000 peryear, an increase of $30,000 peryear. These funds are used toimplement the Sustainable ForestResources Act.26 Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


BondingIn numerous meetings withlegislators, TPA requested thatmoney for tree planting that wasvetoed by Governor Ventura berestored. The Senate CapitalInvestment Committee included$1.5 million (the vetoed amount)for tree planting in its proposal. Asmall bonding bill was passed butit did not include funding for treeplanting.TransportationThe Department ofTransportation bill to provide for anew northern zone for winterweights was passed. Anamendment was added in theSenate committee which wouldeliminate individual axleoverweight restrictions during thewinter if the total gross weightlimit was not exceeded. This billalso contains a provision to allowfull winter weights on nine-tonroads.An amendment was offered tothe House Transportation Financebill on the floor of the House toallow 88,000 pound trucks yearround. The amendment wasdefeated on a 120 – 11 vote.The TPA TransportationCommittee met with Capt. KenUrquhart, head of commercialvehicle enforcement, to resolveissues relating to truck-mountedlog loaders. TPA was successful inadding these vehicles to thedefinition of “special mobileequipment.” This means that thesevehicles will not need to belicensed but will be subject to DOTInspections.DNR Timber SalesLegislation to allow shiftingtimber security from one sale toanother, when a sale has beenopened but not operated, waspassed. This legislation alsoprovides the ability to post aperformance security to allowroads and landings to beconstructed before the full securityis provided to operate the sale.County Intermediate SalesTwo separate approaches toprovide a statutory framework forcounty intermediate sales wereconsidered. One of the approachesincluded language to allow the useof letters of credit as security. Thecounties were divided on this topicand decided not to pursuelegislation until 2004.ATV’sThe final compromise that wasworked out on this issue andpassed included languageclarifying that the exemption foroff-trail ATV use for forestrypurposes remains in effect.In summary, as a result of thisyear’s legislative actions: 1) theDNR should be able to sell its fullallowable cut; 2) a new far northernzone for winter weights and areconfigured northern zone shouldbe established; 3) full winterweights will be allowed on ninetonroutes; 4) truck-mounted logloaders will not need to be licensedbut will be subject to DOTinspection; and 5) DNR timber salepurchasers will be able to shiftsecurity on unoperated sales andwill be able to establish roads andlandings with a performance bond.Timber Bulletin May/June 200327


Friends of the Forest History CenterThe Minnesota HistoricalSociety’s Forest History Center,located near Grand Rapids, Minn.,is currently experiencing the best oftimes and the worst of times. Overthe past 25 years, the center haseducated hundreds of thousands ofvisitors and school children onMinnesota’s forest industry. Theexhibit redevelopment currentlyunderway promises major changes,with strong emphasis on educatingthe public about the importance offorests in our daily lives. The newexhibits, augmented by anextensive network of nature trailsthroughout the site’s 157 acres, willprovide visitors an opportunity tolearn about and experiencecontemporary forest managementpractices. Ironically, as the centerapproaches a new beginning,statewide budget reductions arethreatening a possible closure forup to two years beginning July 1,2003.The Forest History Center’sRedevelopment Project is fueled bythe fact that the state is in the midstof a second forest productsrevolution and rebirth. Our forestsnow produce as much timber as itdid a century ago during the heightof the saw log era. Yet, our availableforest landscape has shrunk from31.5 million acres to less than 13.5millions acres today and even lessis available for good forestmanagement. At the same time,the forest industry faces a crisis ofdeclining timberlands for goodmanagement practices. The generalpublic, a rapidly urbanizingculture, understands less and lessabout how forests can be properlymanaged for multiple positivebenefits to the economy, recreation,eco-system and, ultimately, to ourcollective quality of life.The Forest History Centerbelieves a well-informed, educatedpublic is the key to helping us makesound decisions on how to best useour valuable forest resources.To that end the MinnesotaHistorical Society and the ForestHistory Center launched theCenter’s Redevelopment Project in2002. The Project includes:• A new Mission for the center;“The Forest History Centerconnects people to foreststhrough entertaining,meaningful experiences sothey appreciate andunderstand the importance offorests past and present totheir lives”• A major Capital Improvementgrant from the state ofMinnesota to renovate thecenter’s Interpretive Buildingand completely recreate thecenter’s 4,000 square footexhibit area,• A grant from the LegislativeCommission on Minnesota’sResources to redevelop a milelongtrail to allow for ADAaccess and use the trail todiscuss integrated approachesto forest management for schoolgroups and general public,• A major grant from the C.K.Blandin Foundation to acquire40 additional acres of forest28 Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


lands adjacent to the center,developing educational andrecreational trails to connectthe center to Grand Rapidsand the new regional hospital.Additionally, these new landswill be used as an outdoorlearning laboratory whereschool students can applyforest management techniquesto an actively managed forest,and,• Using the center as a majorregional educational center,increasing school tour visitsand developing an outreachprogram where the ForestHistory Center’s message canbe taken into the classrooms ofMinnesota.The center’s redevelopment,underway at the present time, willbe completed and ready to go byJuly 2004. That’s the “Best ofTimes” for the Center.However, now is also the “Worstof Times.”Due to the state’s budget crisisthe Minnesota Historical Society,who owns and operates the ForestHistory Center, has received amajor reduction in its support fromthe state. The Society’s budget cutis over $4 million dollars each year.As a result, and amongst othermajor reductions to the Society’sprograms, seven of Minnesota’sstatewide historic sites will beclosed for the foreseeable future.The Forest History Center isscheduled to be closed beginningJuly 1, 2003 and not reopening untilJuly 1 2005 – two years. Thisclosure threatens the very existenceof the center’s redevelopmentproject and the center’s existence inthe future.A group of northern Minnesotacitizens, The Friends of the ForestHistory Center, have bannedtogether to help prevent this closureand are raising funds to supportthe Forest History Center’s publiceducational program and allow itto remain open for the summer of2003 and on into the future.Their goal is $80,000. This willallow the center to continue toserve and educate the 20,000visitors and schoolchildren to theCenter for now and on into thefuture. To date, the Friends havereceived a $20,000 grant from theIron Range Resources andRehabilitation Agency and havemajor commitments to come closeto matching that figure from two ofthe state’s major timber industries.However, they are short of theirgoal of $80,000.Therefore the Friends of theForest History Center are askingmembers of the forest communityto help reach that goal. The Friendsare asking you to consider sendinga tax deductible check, in anyamount, to: Friends of the ForestHistory Center, c/o Grand RapidsArea Community Foundation, 201NW Fourth Street, Central SquareMall, Grand Rapids, Minn. 55744With your help The ForestHistory Center will continue toconnect people to forests – past andpresent – and help Minnesota tobetter understand and value goodforest management practices forfuture generations.Timber Bulletin May/June 200329


LOGGERS OF THE PAST . . .Life in the Campsby J. C. RyanThis story is reprinted from an earlier Timber Bulletin–one of the first of “Buzz”Ryan’s ever-popular contributions to these pages. The Bulletin will continue toreprint selected stories from the memories he recorded for us.–Editor30 Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


Timber Bulletin May/June 200331


32 Timber Bulletin May/June 2003


ClassifiedsAs a service, the Timber Bulletin offersfree classified ads of up to 85 words toall MTPA members and associatemembers._____________________________________JOB _____________________________________OPENINGProcurement ForesterStora Enso North AmericaUpper Peninsula of MichiganStora Enso is an integrated forestproducts company producingmagazine papers, newsprint, finepapers, packaging boards andwood products. In 2001, Stora Ensohad sales of 13.5 billion andapproximately 15 million tons ofannual paper and board productioncapacity. Stora Enso NorthAmerica (SENA), headquartered inWisconsin Rapids, Wis., employs6,000 people in the U.S. andCanada.In order to achieve our vision tobe the leading forest productscompany in the world, we arecurrently seeking a procurementforester to purchase, set up, andadminister stumpage sales whileimplementing Preferred Supplier(PS) harvest plans. As an area fiberteam member, this individual willimplement Area Preferred Supplierproduction plans and deliveryschedules. This position will be ahome-based position located in theUpper Peninsula of Michigan.Qualified candidates mustpossess a technical degree inforestry or a related field and haveat least three years of woodprocurement experience. Inaddition, this position requiresexcellent communication andinterpersonal skills, strong PCskills, and the ability to walkextensively and toleratetemperature extremes. A currentdriver’s license is also required.To apply, please mail or emailyour resume and cover letter to:Stora Enso North AmericaAttention: Human ResourcesPO Box 8050, Wisconsin Rapids,Wis. 54495-8050Fax: 715-422-4000E-mail: Careers.SENA@storaenso.comCareers.SENA@storaenso.comAn EEO/AAP employer_____________________________________USED _____________________________________EQUIPMENT FOR SALEFOR SALECABLE SKIDDERS1969 C4 TF .................................P.O.R.1973 C5 TF.................................$7,5001970 440A JD...............................8,500GRAPPLE SKIDDERS1993 518C Cat., new trans.......49,0001987 666 Clark, floatationtires.........................................22,0001989 170XL Franklin, 6 cylCummins...............................20,0001991 450B TJ, Cummins eng...20,0001979 540B JD, 28Lx26 tires ......19,0001984 540B JD, 640 rearends,28Lx26 tires ...........................25,0001986 648D JD, dual function...29,0001988 648D JD, dual function...33,0001993 648E JD, dual function ...49,0001997 548G JD, cab & air .............POR1980 C6 TF, with 23.1x26 tires ..9,000CRAWLERS1995 D3CLGP, new undercarriage,very clean ..............................33,0001990 650G, 6-way blade...........39,5001987 D4H LGP, 6-way blade,encl. cab .................................31,000KNUCKLE BOOM LOADERS1987 210C 6 cyl JDslasher pkg ............................27,0001997 Prentice F90T on1989 Lufkin trailer................15,500Prentice 90 on tandem truck,19' bed ......................................9,5001987 XL 175 Husky ..................15,500TRUCKS1998 Peterbilt, 470 Detroit,18 sp .......................................36,0001995 Peterbilt, 400 Cummins,9 sp .........................................16,0001978 GMC 2-ton w/hydr hoist,flatbed dump ........................ 4,500EXCAVATORS1985 JD 490................................15,0001990 JD 490D.............................27,0001002 Mitsubishi MXR55 ..........12,000DELIMBERS1981 743 JD................................15,000Siiro delimber/slasher...............7,0001985 125B Case w/3000Denis ......................................30,0001986 JD 693C w/3000 Denis...25,0001995 CAT 320 w/3500 DTDenharco ...............................79,000Cat EL200 w/Limmit 2000 ....65,0001999 JD 200LC /453Pro Pac .................................110,000FELLER-BUNCHERSAND SHEARS1981 1080C Bobcat....................12,0001979 Drott 40, shearhead.........17,000TIMBER BULLETIN Subscription OrderPlease ENTER my subscription to the Minnesota Timber Bulletin (six issues peryear). Payment is enclosed for: 1 year $ 20 2 years $ 35 3 years $ 50Please type or print clearly.NAME ____________________________________________________________ADDRESS _________________________________________________________CITY _____________________________STATE ____________ZIP____________COMPANY/ORGANIZATION ____________________________________________Please send my GIFT SUBSCRIPTION to the Minnesota Timber Bulletin (six issuesper year) to be sent to the name below. Payment is enclosed for: 1 year $ 15 2 years $ 28 3 years $ 40Please type or print clearly.NAME ____________________________________________________________ADDRESS _________________________________________________________CITY _____________________________STATE ____________ZIP____________Make checks payable to:TPA Services, Inc., 903 Medical Arts Bldg., 324 W. Superior St., Duluth, MN 55802Note: Existing subscriptions will continue at their current rate until they expire.Timber Bulletin May/June 200333


1978 Drott 40, JD eng...............13,0001986 490 JD, w/20" Timbcoshearhead ..............................29,9001993 JD 590D w/18'Roto saw ................................29,0001993 T445 Timbco, w/22" Quadcosawhead w/side tilt...........125,0001993 Risley Black Magicw/Risley sawhead .............110,0001976 544B JD, 20" shear ...........21,0001988 910 Cat, 17" shearhead,rebuilt trans...........................32,0001987 411B Hydro-Ax................20,0001986 511B Hydro-Ax, 6 BTCummins...............................30,000WHEEL LOADERS1988 JD 84 ..................................11,0001992 410D JD backhoe .............27,000544B JD.......................................15,5001979 544B JD .............................18,5001979 544B JD .............................19,5001981 644C JD .............................28,000MISCELLANEOUS1979 Bobcat 731 Skidsteerloader .......................................6,7001991 Bobcat 853 Skidsteerloader .......................................9,500Daewoo G25S-2 LP forklift,gas, side shift, 188" lift,pneu. tires................................8,0001986 Hyster LP forklift, gas ......1,700CAT V80D 8,000# forklift..........6,50020" Koehring sawheadto fit 643 JD .............................9,000NEW DEALER FORBARKO HYDRAULICSWe have other equipment not listed.New and used parts,new and used tires and chains.Something you’re looking for?Give us a call. We may have it orbe able to locate it for you!!!We are distributors forAftermarket Parts, Rud Chainsand Hanfab SlashersNORTHERN TIMBERLINEEQUIPMENT, INC.6000 County Road 8Littlefork, Minn. 56653-9132Phone 218-278-6203Fax 218-278-6716Richard or Cam Hardwig_____________________________________FORESTERSEXCELLENT CAREEROPPORTUNITYAmerican Interstate InsuranceCompany (AIIC) is seeking ahighly motivated individual withexperience in the wood productsindustry or heavy equipment sales.AIIC specializes in workers’compensation for hazardousindustries. Benefits include:expense account, hospitalizationinsurance, 401(k) andreimbursement plan.Location: Northern MinnesotaSend resume to:Mark Burger, AIIC,1235 Valley Ridge Dr.,Lake Mills, Wis. 53551or fax to: 920-648-6542ADVERTISERS INDEXAmerican Interstate Insurance ..................................19Bridgestone/Firestone ................................................18Cass Forest Products ...................................................26Evans Insurance...........................................................22Fryberger, Buchanan, Smith & Frederick, P.A.........27Great Lakes Trailers.....................................................25Greater Insurance Service...........................................29Hedstrom Lumber Co...................................................9Itasca Greenhouse........................................................17Jake’s Quality Tire .......................................................27LM Products .................................................................17Lumbermen's Underwriting Alliance.......................25Northern Engine & Supply ..........................................9Nortrax....................................................................14, 35Otis Magie Insurance Agency......................................7Pomp’s Tire.....................................................................9Ponssee ..........................................................................11Rice Blacksmith Saw & Machine.................................5Road Machinery & Supplies ......................................23Rux Strapping ..............................................................34Schaefer Enterprises ....................................................24SFI ..................................................................................36Stewart-Taylor Printing ..............................................19Stuart's, Inc. ....................................................................2Telmark..........................................................................21Wausau Sales Corp......................................................3434 Timber Bulletin May/June 2003

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