September - Slope Electric Cooperative

slopeelectric.coop
  • No tags were found...

September - Slope Electric Cooperative

Rate increase announcedSlope Electric has received notification from its power supplier that wholesalepower costs will be increasing on Oct. 1. The management and staff are currentlyevaluating the impact to the cooperative. Due to this cost increase, a rate increasewill be required. More information will follow in the coming months.Kerzman receives Helping Hand AwardKerzmanDirector Jim Kerzman was recognized at the North Dakota Association of Rural ElectricCooperatives (NDAREC) meeting this year, with the Helping Hand Award for all hiscontributions. This award is given to faithful friends and strong supporters of NorthDakota’s electric cooperative. His family surprised him by attending the meeting andwitnessing his award recognition.Kerzman has served Slope Electric since 1983 when he was appointed to fill a vacantposition and then elected to the board in 1986. As a Credentialed Cooperative Director, hehas served on the statewide, regional and national resolutions committees. Kerzman hasreceived numerous other honors including the Farmers Union Family of the Year, RuthMeiers Mental Health award, the legislative service award from the Association of RetardedCitizens, and the Sister Donna Jean Chapman award from the N.D. Conference of SocialWelfare. He has participated in Washington, D.C., fly-ins on behalf of rural electriccooperatives and Farmers Union. He served in the N.D. House of Representatives from 1991to 2009. Currently Kerzman serves on the Hettinger County Job Development Authority boardand the Farmers Union policy and action committee.Farm Rescue assists farm families in needFarm Rescue is a North Dakota-based helping handorganization. It began in 2006 and has assisted 149families in North and South Dakota and Montana.The first person assisted was a 32-year-old farmer who hadlost his right hand in a grain auger accident. Farm Rescuedoesn’t give out money, but lends a hand doing field workto help farmers get through a critical time.Farmers are chosen through an application process.They must submit financial records and medicalverification. Unpaid volunteers come from all over theC2—SLOPE ELECTRIC NEWS • SEPTEMBER 2011country to help, with many of them being retired farmers.Farm Rescue is funded through donations, grants andsponsorships. Contributions are used to pay for the manycosts associated with planting and harvesting a crop,transporting equipment, housing and feeding volunteers.Slope Electric has donated to Farm Rescue, to help theprogram continue to be that “helping hand.”If you would like to volunteer or know someone needinghelp, please contact Farm Rescue at P.O. Box 1100,Jamestown, ND 58402.


FARM SAFELYaroundPOWER LINESAs we observe National Farm Safety and HealthWeek Sept. 18-24, Slope Electric Cooperativereminds you to work safely on the farm andranch. We care about your safety.The following tips will help keep everyone on thefarm safe:• Look over work areas carefully for overhead powerlines and utility poles.• Make sure there are ample clearances of powerlines when moving large machinery such ascombines, grain augers, sprayers and tractors.Do this every year as equipment sizes or soilconditions may change. A newer, larger pieceof equipment may no longer clear a line. Andshifting soil may also affect whether or notmachinery avoids power lines from year to year.• When planning new construction, consider existingpower lines.• Be extra careful when working around trees andbrush that often obstruct power lines.• Train all farm workers on how to properly operatemachinery to avoid overhead power lines.SLOPE ELECTRICSEPTEMBER 2011 • SLOPE ELECTRIC NEWS—C3


Maintain air filters1. and HVAC equipment.Well-maintained equipmentruns more efficiently,so change your air filtermonthly or as needed andtune up your HVACequipment yearly.TOP TIPS TO cutWINTER ENERGY COSTSSet your thermostat as2. low as is comfortable.Roll temperatures back by10 to 15 degrees before bedand before leaving for work.Reduce air leaks,3. which can save up to10 percent on energy bills.Seal doors and windowswith weather stripping orcaulk. Tape clear plastic filmto the inside of windowframes to further reduceleaks, and consider installinginsulated curtains or blinds.Take advantage of the4. sun’s heat and light.Keep your south-facingwindows clean. Opencurtains on south-facingwindows during the day andclose all curtains at night.Add insulation to your5. attic.With the right safety practices, this can be a doit-yourselfproject.Turn down the temperature on water heaters6. and provide good insulation.Most water heaters are set to 140 degrees, but at115 to 120 degrees, you’ll still have plenty of hotwater. Insulate hot waterpipes and, if your waterheater is more than sevenyears old, consider a “wrap”to insulate the tank.Plug and seal the7. chimney flue offireplaces that arenever used.When using fireplaces,keep the damper closedunless a fire is going andmake sure the damper is assnug as possible. Caulkaround the fireplace hearth.Consider installingtempered glass doors and aheat-exchanger system toblow warm air back into theroom. When a fire is lit,open dampers or opennearest window about aninch, close doors leadinginto the room, and loweryour thermostat to between50 and 55 degrees.Unplug electronics8. and appliances whennot in use.Use multiple-outlet stripsso you can turn everythingoff with one flip ofa switch.Replace incandescent bulbs with compact9. fluorescent bulbs (CFLs).Lighting makes up about 10 percent of home energycosts, and CFLs can save up to 75 percentof that energy. They also last longer, saving moneyon replacements.C4—SLOPE ELECTRIC NEWS • SEPTEMBER 2011


Unfortunately, all outages do not occurduring business hours. When you callto report an outage after-hours, youmay be confused or unsure of what happensand how the calls are handled. Please beassured you can contact Slope Electric Cooperative24-hours-a-day, 365-days-a-year.You may call any time of the day and speakto a real person.All of our phone numbers (800-559-4191and 701-579-4191) will get you to the sameplace. Depending on the call volume, the localnumbers may be busy. In that case, please trythe 800 number; if the outage is large, youcould experience a busy line. Please try againin a few minutes.To handle a large number of outage callsat one time, after-hours calls are initiallyanswered by an automated system. The firstthing you will hear is the greeting, “Thank youfor calling Slope Electric.” Then you will beadvised, “Our automated system allows you toreport an outage quickly and easily using aphone number or meter number. Agents arealso available but hold times vary with highcall volumes.”You will then be asked:If you are calling to report:An electrical outage.........................Press 1For a billing issue.............................Press 2Report a meter reading ...................Press 3All other (speak to a person............Press 0Calling after hoursIf you pressed 1 to report an electrical outage:You will be asked if you would like to report an outageusing a phone or meter number. If you have critical informationregarding the cause of an outage, you will also have theoption to speak to a person.To use the automated system and phone number toreport the outage, you will be asked to enter the 10-digitphone associated with the account. If you are going to use ameter number to report the outage, you will be asked toenter the meter number associated with the outage. If youchoose the phone number option and you have more thanone meter on the account, you will be asked if you wouldlike to enter the meter number or speak with a person.When you have answered the questions, you’ll receive amessage confirming your outage has been reported.If you ask to speak to a person, the system will connectyou. If all agents are busy with other customers, you’ll beadvised it may be faster to complete your input through theautomated system options. You can also continue to waitfor the next available agent.If you pressed 2 for a billing concern:A message will give you our regular weekday officehours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and ask you to call backduring that time. We do not have billing personnel availableafter-hours.If you pressed 3 to report a meter reading:A message will ask you to leave your name, accountnumber, phone number, meter reading and date the meterwas read. This information will be given to our billingdepartment the next business day.If you pressed 0 for other issues:A person will answer your call as soon as the next agentis available. Slope Electric thanks you for your patiencewhen calling after business hours. We try to be efficientand upfront when you report problems. Please rememberyou will always have an option to speak with a person whowill be able to have the appropriate people respond in atimely manner.SLOPE ELECTRICSEPTEMBER 2011 • SLOPE ELECTRIC NEWS—C5


YOU HAVE THEPOWERTO SAVEYour attic insulation provides an important barrieragainst both the cold of winter and the heat of summer,and improving your attic insulation is still one of the best energy-efficiency investments.C6—SLOPE ELECTRIC NEWS • SEPTEMBER 2011


Insulate your homeagainst energy leaksYour attic insulation provides an importantbarrier against both the cold of winterand the heat of summer, and improvingyour attic insulation is still one of the bestenergy-efficiency investments, according tothe U.S. Department of Energy. Most homesshould have between R-22 and R-49 insulationin the attic.Get out the rulerYour attic or ceiling insulation is the mostimportant part of your home’s thermal boundarybecause it helps reduce heat gain in thesummer and minimize heat loss in the winter.To assess your attic insulation, measure thethickness of the insulation, and decide whattype of insulation you have. If you’re not familiarwith the type of insulation, take a smallsample to your local building supply store toask for help in identifying it.The effectiveness of insulation is measuredin R-value per inch. The total R-value ofyour insulation depends both on its type andits depth. To determine the total R-value ofyour insulation, decide what type of insulationis installed, and multiply the R-value perinch times the number of inches installed.Cellulose loose-fill insulation, for example, israted at about R-3.5 per inch. If your attic hasfour inches of cellulose, that’s 3.5 x 4 = R-14.The effectiveness of insulation is measured in R-value per inch. The totalR-value depends on the type and depth of the insulation.R-value of insulationInsulation typeR-value per inch of thicknessFiberglass blanket or batt................................................................................2.9 to 3.8High-performance fiberglass blanket or batt ................................................3.7 to 4.3Loose-fill fiberglass...........................................................................................2.3 to 2.7Loose-fill rock wool...............................................................................................2.7 to 3Loose-fill cellulose ............................................................................................3.4 to 3.7Perlite or vermiculite ........................................................................................2.4 to 3.7Expanded polystyrene board ..............................................................................3.6 to 4Extruded polystyrene board................................................................................4.5 to 5Polyisocyanurate board, unfaced ...................................................................5.6 to 6.3Polyisocyanurate board, foil-faced ................................................................................7Types of insulation—Basic formsFORM: METHOD OF INSTALLATION: WHERE APPLICABLE: ADVANTAGES:Blankets: batts or rolls• Fiberglass• Rock woolFitted between studs, joistsand beamsAll unfinished walls, floorsand ceilingsDo-it-yourselfSuited for standard stud andjoist spacing, which is relativelyfree from obstructionsCommonly used insulation forretrofits (adding insulation toexisting finished areas)Good for irregularly shapedareas or around obstructionsLoose-fill (blown-in) or spray-applied• Rock wool• Fiberglass• Cellulose• Polyurethane foamBlown into place or spray appliedby special equipmentEnclosed existing wall cavitiesor open new wall cavitiesUnfinished attic floors andhard-to-reach placesRigid insulation• Extruded polystyrene foam (XPS)• Expanded polystyrene foam (EPSor beadboard)• Polyurethane foam• Polyisocyanurate foamReflective systems• Foil-faced paper• Foil-faced polyethylene bubbles• Foil-faced plastic film• Foil-faced cardboardSource: U.S. Department of EnergyInterior applications: Must becovered with half-inch gypsumboard or other building-codeapprovedmaterial for fire safetyExterior applications: Must becovered with weatherproof facingFoils, films or papers: fittedbetween wood-frame studsjoists and beamsBasement wallsExterior walls under finishingUnvented low slope roofsUnfinished ceilings, wallsand floorsHigh insulating value forrelatively little thicknessCan block thermal short circuitswhen installed continuouslyover frames or joists.Do-it-yourselfAll suitable for framing at standardspacing. Bubble-formsuitable if framing is irregularor if obstructions are presentEffectiveness depends onspacing and heat flowSEPTEMBER 2011 • SLOPE ELECTRIC NEWS—C7SLOPE ELECTRIC


Noteof thanksThanks, Slope Electric!Thank you for the electric grill that we won at the annualmeeting. The meal and entertainment were great.Thanks again!Melvin and Venry StaffordObserve Labor Day,Monday, Sept. 5Our entire organization sends its best wishes for a safe and enjoyable Labor Day.In observance of the holiday, Slope Electric Cooperative will be closed on Monday,Sept. 5.Members: Line crews will be available in case of an electrical emergency outage.Don’t be in thedark aboutGENERATORSAFETYSlope Electric Cooperativestrives toprovide you withreliable, uninterruptedservice every day of theyear, but sometimesMother Nature createsunavoidable power outages.Then, many homeownersuse portable electricgenerators until power isrestored.Follow these portable electric generator safety precautions to avoid dangerous situations:• Do not connect generators directly to household wiring.• Make sure your generator is properly grounded.• Keep the generator dry.• Plug appliances directly into the generator.• Do not overload the generator.• Do not operate the generator in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces.• Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for safe operation and maintenance.SLOPE ELECTRICCOOPERATIVE INC.BOARD OF DIRECTORSJim Kerzman, President ...................................MottTerryl L. Jacobs, V. Pres................................RegentSteve Wegner, Sec. ......................................ReederJerome D. Caron, Treas. ...........................ScrantonJohn Lee Njos ...............................................RhameLyle Narum ................................................BowmanLauren Klewin.............................................AmidonAnthony Larson........................................HettingerEMPLOYEESDon Franklund, Clayton Hoffman .................ManagersRex Sadler ...................................................Chief of StaffTravis Kupper .............................Chief Financial OfficerLaWanna Wilhelm ..................Key Accounts ExecutiveRodney Benz...........................AMR/SCADA TechnicianLynn Klein.........................................................SecretaryBeverly Braun.......Bookkeeper/Consumer Accts. Rep.Judy Kirschmann................................Customer ServiceRep., Slope ServicesKathy Lentz .................................................ReceptionistLinda Peterson ........................................Billing AnalystDaniela Howie ........................Operations CoordinatorDarlene Heberholz.............................Plant AccountantArlin Reindel .........................................Line TechnicianLeonard Gartner ...................................Line TechnicianDarwin Wilke .........................................Line TechnicianKenneth Dobitz.....................................Line TechnicianLyle Kovar..............................................Line TechnicianDean Volk...............................................Line TechnicianCraig Turner...........................................Line TechnicianJeff Boynton...........................................Line TechnicianAndrew Sonsalla...................................Line TechnicianChristopher Backhaus......................... Line TechnicianKyle Binstock.................... Apprentice Line TechnicianCody Braaten.............................Apprentice LineworkerDustin Hoff ................................Apprentice LineworkerRoger Wipf .............................................WarehousemanC8—SLOPE ELECTRIC NEWS • SEPTEMBER 2011

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines