The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

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The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

142 THE TIBETAN BOOK OF LIVING AND DYINGtransmission from the master's wisdom mind and heart toyours can take place, revealing to you the full splendor ofyour own buddha nature, and with it the perfect splendor ofthe universe itself.This most intimate relationship between disciple and masterbecomes a mirror, a living analogy for the disciple's relationshipto life and the world in general. The master becomesthe pivotal figure in a sustained practice of "pure vision,"which culminates when the disciple sees directly and beyondany doubt: the master as the living buddha, his or her everyword as buddha speech, his or her mind the wisdom mind ofall the buddhas, his or her every action an expression of buddhaactivity, the place where he or she lives as nothing lessthan a buddha realm, and even those around the master as aluminous display of his or her wisdom.As these perceptions become more and more stable andactual, the inner miracle disciples have longed for over somany lives can gradually take place: They begin to see naturallythat they, the universe, and all beings without exceptionare spontaneously pure and perfect. They are looking at last atreality with its own eyes. The master, then, is the path, themagical touchstone for a total transformation of the disciple'severy perception.Devotion becomes the purest, quickest, and simplest wayto realize the nature of our mind and all things. As weprogress in it, the process reveals itself as wonderfully interdependent:We, from our side, try continually to generate devotion,the devotion we arouse itself generates glimpses of thenature of mind, and these glimpses only enhance and deepenour devotion to the master who is inspiring us. So in the enddevotion springs out of wisdom: devotion and the living experienceof the nature of mind become inseparable and inspireone another.The teacher of Patrul Rinpoche was called Jikmé GyalwéNyugu. For many years he had been doing a solitary retreat ina cave in the mountains. One day when he came outside, thesun was pouring down; he gazed out into the sky and saw acloud moving in the direction of where his master, JikméLingpa, lived. The thought rose in his mind, "Over there iswhere my master is," and with that thought a tremendousfeeling of longing and devotion surged up in him. It was sostrong, so shattering, that he fainted. When Jikmé GyalwéNyugu came to, the entire blessing of his master's wisdommind had been transmitted to him, and he had reached the

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