The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

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The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

166 THE TIBETAN BOOK OF LIVING AND DYINGthe inherent nature of the thoughts and emotions that arise inour minds as well, although we do not recognize it. When themaster introduces us to the true nature of mind, to the state ofRigpa, it is as if he or she gives us a master key. In Dzogchenwe call this key, which is going to open to us the door to totalknowledge, the "Path Luminosity" or "Child Luminosity." TheGround Luminosity and the Path Luminosity are fundamentallythe same, of course, and it is only for the purposes ofexplanation and practice that they are categorized in this way.But once we have the key of the Path Luminosity through theintroduction of the master, we can use it at will to open thedoor to the innate nature of reality. This opening of the doorin Dzogchen practice is called the "meeting of the Ground andPath Luminosities" or the "meeting of Mother and Child Luminosities."Another way to say this is that as soon as a thoughtor emotion arises, the Path Luminosity—the Rigpa—recognizesit immediately for what it is, recognizes its inherent nature,the Ground Luminosity. In that moment of recognition, thetwo luminosities merge and thoughts and emotions are liberatedin their very ground.It is essential to perfect this practice of the merging of thetwo luminosities and the self-liberation of risings in life,because what happens at the moment of death, for everyone,is this: The Ground Luminosity dawns in vast splendor, andwith it brings an opportunity for total liberation—if, and onlyif, you have learned how to recognize it.It will be clear now, perhaps, that this merging of the luminositiesand self-liberation of thoughts and emotions is meditationat its very deepest level. In fact, a term such as"meditation" is not really appropriate for Dzogchen practice, asultimately it implies meditating "on" something, whereas inDzogchen all is only and forever Rigpa. So there is no questionof a meditation separate from simply abiding by the purepresence of Rigpa.The only word that could possibly describe this is "nonmeditation."In this state, the masters say, even if you look fordelusion, there is none left. Even if you looked for ordinarypebbles on an island of gold and jewels, you wouldn't have achance of finding any. When the View is constant, and theflow of Rigpa unfailing, and the merging of the two luminositiescontinuous and spontaneous, all possible delusion is liberatedat its very root, and your entire perception arises, withouta break, as Rigpa.The masters stress that to stabilize the View in meditation,

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