The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

terryboxing
  • No tags were found...

The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

190 THE TIBETAN BOOK OF LIVING AND DYINGof course, it is not possible to leave the body alone for thethree-day period that was customary in Tibet, but every supportof silence and peace should be given to the dead to helpthem begin their journey after death.Try and make certain also that while the person is actuallyin the final stages of dying, all injections and all invasive proceduresof any kind are discontinued. These can cause anger,irritation, and pain, and for the mind of the dying person tobe as calm as possible in the moments before death is, as Iwill explain in detail later, absolutely crucial.Most people die in a state of unconsciousness. One fact wehave learned from the near-death experience is that comatoseand dying patients may be much more aware of things aroundthem than we realize. Many of the near-death experiencersreported out-of-the-body experiences, from which they wereable to give surprisingly accurate detailed accounts of their surroundingsand even, in some cases, of other rooms in thesame hospital. This clearly shows the importance of talkingpositively and frequently to a dying person or to a person in acoma. Conscious, alert, and actively loving care for the dyingperson must go on until the last moments of his or her life,and as I will show, even beyond.One of the things I hope for from this book is that doctorsall over the world will take extremely seriously the need to allowthe dying person to die in silence and serenity. I want toappeal to the goodwill of the medical profession, and hope toinspire it to find ways to make the very difficult transition ofdeath as easy, painless, and peaceful as possible. Peacefuldeath is really an essential human right, more essential perhapseven than the right to vote or the right to justice; it is aright on which, all religious traditions tell us, a great dealdepends for the well-being and spiritual future of the dyingperson.There is no greater gift of charity you can give than helpinga person to die well.

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines