The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

terryboxing
  • No tags were found...

The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

382 APPENDIX TWOdepriving someone of the means to stay alive, regardless of the fact that itwas that person that told us to do it. If the basic motivation of the healerhas always been to help and benefit that person and relieve theirsuffering, then from that state of mind it seems as though nothing karmicallynegative can develop, 4CHOOSING TO DIEThe same 1990 Gallup poll cited earlier showed that 66 percent ofpeople in the United States believed that a person in great pain, with"no hope of improvement," had a moral right to take his or her ownlife. In a country like Holland, ten thousand people are said to chooseeuthanasia each year. The doctors who help them to die must provethat the patient consents, that he or she discussed the alternativeswith them fully, and that the doctor consulted a colleague for a secondopinion. In the United States matters have come to such a headthat a book clearly describing methods of suicide for people facedwith a terminal illness has become a runaway best-seller, and movementshave been begun to legalize "active euthanasia" or "aid indying."But what would happen if euthanasia were legal? Many peopleare afraid that patients labeled as terminal, especially those in greatpain, might choose to die even though their pain might be manageable,and their lives might be longer. Others fear that the elderlymight simply feel it is their duty to die, or choose suicide simply tospare their families' lives and money.Many of those who work with the dying feel that higher standardsof terminal care are the answer to requests for euthanasia.When she was asked about the pending legislation on euthanasia,Elisabeth Kübler-Ross replied: "I find it sad that we have to have lawsabout matters like this. I think that we should use our human judgment,and come to grips with our own fear of death. Then we couldrespect patients' needs and listen to them, and would not have aproblem such as this." 5People are afraid that dying will be unbearable, that they will beovertaken by immobilizing, even dementing illness, and intolerableand meaningless pain. The Buddhist teachings offer us a different attitudetoward suffering, one that gives it a purpose. The Dalai Lamapoints out thatYour suffering is due to your own karma, and you have to bear the fruitof that karma anyway in this life or another, unless you can find someway of purifying it, In that case, it is considered to be better to experiencethe karma in this life of a human where you have more abilities to bear itin a better way, than, for example, an animal who is helpless and cansuffer even more because of that,

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines