The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

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The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

FOURThe Nature of MindCONFINED IN THE DARK, narrow cage of our ownmaking which we take for the whole universe, very few of uscan even begin to imagine another dimension of reality. PatrulRinpoche tells the story of an old frog who had lived all hislife in a dank well. One day a frog from the sea paid him avisit."Where do you come from?" asked the frog in the well."From the great ocean," he replied."How big is your ocean?""It's gigantic.""You mean about a quarter of the size of my well here?""Bigger.""Bigger? You mean half as big?""No, even bigger.""Is it... as big as this well?""There's no comparison.""That's impossible! I've got to see this for myself."They set off together. When the frog from the well saw theocean, it was such a shock that his head just exploded intopieces.Most of my childhood memories of Tibet have faded, but twomoments will always stay with me. They were when mymaster Jamyang Khyentse introduced me to the essential, original,and innermost nature of my mind.At first I felt reticent about revealing these personal experiences,as in Tibet this is never done; but my students andfriends were convinced that a description of these experienceswould help others, and they pleaded with me and kept oninsisting that I write about them.The first of these moments occurred when I was six or42

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