Index the ISSueS - The Ontarion

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Index the ISSueS - The Ontarion

4www.theontarion.comWater and WineEngineers WithoutBorders hostsfundraising galaBeth Purdon-McLellanCan’t choose between water andwine? At the University of Guelph,you don’t have to. In March EngineersWithout Borders (EWB)held a gala called Water and Wine:A Toast to Global Water Security, tofundraise for their Junior Fellowsprogram. The gala offered interactiveactivities and served as a wayto inform the audience of waterissues at both a local and internationallevel.Despite the similarity in thename, EWB is not affiliated withDoctors Without Borders. EWB is aCanadian organization, and is representedby both university andprofessional chapters. EWB worksinternationally to provide sanitizedwater access to developing countries.At the moment, they workin four countries: Malawi, Ghana,Burkina Faso and, recently, Uganda.“With the name, Engineers WithoutBorders, sort of on that line,we’re trying to take the engineerapproach to problems,” said KaelaShea, who will be vice president ofthe Guelph chapter of EWB in thefollowing year. “We try to find creativesolutions that are sustainableand fix the problem for good.”EWB takes a fully rounded approachto tackling water issues.They recognize that it’s not just thephysical solution of providing wateraccess, but integrating this solutioninto the community that makesit effective. That’s why EWB alsoworks to provide education, andpartners with local organizationswhile developing their projects. Theorganization consists of long-termstaff members, and Junior Fellowschosen from EWB’s universitychapters.“If you just dig a well, stuff couldgo wrong with it,” said Shea. “If thepeople aren’t taught to maintain it,then they’ll just end up being worseoff. It’s a cycle that we’re trying tobreak.”The Water and Wine gala is thebiggest event hosted by the Guelphchapter of EWB. The event servesnot only as a fundraiser, but alsoas a way to raise awareness aboutthe complexity of water issues.Although EWB works internationally,its guest speakers brought itback to a local level. The audienceheard from Mike Nagy, the currentChair of Wellington Water Watchers,who spoke about the actions takenevery day to address the global watercrisis; Dr. Khosrow Farabakhsh, engineeringprofessor at the Universityof Guelph, talked about water issuesin Canada, specific to First Nationcommunities; and Jordan Daniow,a long term staff member in Malawi.Shea stressed that you don’t needto be an engineer to join EWB, andthat it is an interest-based organization.Due to the wide range ofservices it provides, the organizationalso attracts a lot of people inInternational Development. Studentsare interested in joined EWBare encouraged to attend chaptermeetings in the fall.Fighting back against exam stressAlicja GrzadkowskanewsGerrit AtkinsonEngineers Without Borders held a Water and Wine gala to raise money for its Junior Fellows Program,and raise awareness about water security.With exam season in full swing,students may be faced with thehighest stress levels of the semesteras they focus on finishing theircourses successfully. The Universityof Guelph McLaughlin Libraryhoped to ease students’ sufferingas they entered the final week ofthe school year through the SpringFever Workshops that ran from Mar.29 to Apr. 12.The free workshops were first introducedduring the winter examperiod as a way to provide stressrelieffor students.“We had read about other universitylibraries in North Americathat offered such programmingand wanted to try something atour library,” said Robin Bergart,an associate librarian who helpedorganize the workshop. “Whenthe anxiety level seems to risethrough pre-exam and exam weeks,we wanted to ease the pressure withsome surprise and fun, as well asstrategies students could use to feelbetter.”This semester, through a varietyof workshops to choose from, studentscould learn about yoga-basedrelaxation tricks with instructorsfrom the Athletic Centre, and getnutritional tips and healthy recipesfrom Lindzie O’Reilly, a dieticianfrom Student Health Services. Studentscould also talk one-on-onewith Melanie Bowman from theWellness Centre about their stress.Kathy Somers, from the StressMarianne PointnerThe McLaughlin Library is helping students beat the stress of examsand end of the year assignments with its Spring Fever Workshops.Management and High PerformanceClinic, led the “How to Let it Go”workshops this semester.“My particular session focusedon ‘how to let it go’ when students’exams are close together,”said Somers. “I showed how in threeminutes, you can change whereyour brain is at, and let go of stressfollowing an exam more easily andquickly, rather than going homeand hoping it will pass.”Though many sessions were focusedon providing helpful lifestyletips, workshops which were centeredon food were also available forstudents, and gained much popularitythroughout the weeks.“This week we [had] a differentsnack break every day in the ForsterRoom including a Make-Your-OwnSundae event, which is sponsoredby CSA,” said Bergart. “The mostpopular events are food-relatedand we think that’s because they’requick and easy, and who doesn’tlike free food? We’ve overheard studentseating their newly-decoratedcookie or licking their sundae, say:‘This is the best day in the libraryever!’”The workshop series is plannedto occur again in December. Bergartand her team hope to includenew activities in upcoming sessions.“Some ideas we have for futureevents are chair massages, therapydogs, and a primal scream event,”said Bergart, giving students muchto look forward to.

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