Index the ISSueS - The Ontarion

theontarion.com

Index the ISSueS - The Ontarion

8Ontario University EquestrianAssociation FinalsNatasha VisoskyGryphons in HistoryPublished in TheOntarion October 22,1970.Sasha Odessewww.theontarion.comOn March 30, Guelph’s EquestrianTeam competed at the OntarioUniversity Equestrian AssociationFinals (OUEA). Having taken Firstin the preliminaries against Western,Laurier, McMaster, Toronto,Waterloo, and Windsor, thingswere looking good. The finals alsoincluded the Eastern teams fromMcGill, Queen’s, Ryerson, Trent,Ottawa, and York.The Over Fences rounds provedto be tough but many riders hadgreat rides. Kaylene Sangers, beingWith the passing of Homecomingweekend so came the passingof a historic event in Gryphonone of them, won the Entry OverFences class and Anthony Blurton-Jones finished first in the OpenOver Fences class. The team didexceptionally well in the flat classestoo: Brooke Krause took firstin the Intermediate Flat class andKerrie Norcott finished second. Inthe novice devision Laura Kularfinished in the top four, meaningGuelph had strong riders inall divisions.The team wishes a fond farewellto some of their graduatingriders: Kristina Keilty, third overallin the Open division; Brookehistory. This photo shows theribbon cutting ceremony at theofficial opening of Alumni Stadium,making it 42 years old thisyear. According to The Ontarion,this ceremony was perhapsthe most important event ofthe year, yet the people in thephoto aren’t even named. Somesleuthing done by The OntarionKrause, first overall in the Intermediatedivision; Kerrie Norcott,third overall in the Intermediatedivision; and Sarah Monaco, finishingeight overall in the novicedivision.Some amazing results from ourEquestrian team who took homethe first place trophy for the Westerndivision in the finals. Best inthe West!“We wish our returning ridersthe best of luck next year. Let’sbring home the trophy again!” saidclub president Kristina Keilty.Courtesyhas determined that the footballplayer in the photograph is firststringstarter and “the Gryphonsmain break-away threat,” SteveStewart. If anyone is aware ofwho the woman and the othergentleman are, we would love tohear from you! Email onsports@uoguelph.ca if you have any tipsor leads.An argument for theradioChris Mullersports & HealthI’ve always enjoyed listening tothe radio, even if that sounds likea strange thing to say. It’s strangeto think that in the age of the Internetand an ungodly number oftelevision channels the radio canprovide something other formsof mass communication cannot.I believe there’s a place for theradio alongside the more modernsmart phones and tablets, atleast, for me.Historically, the radio hasserved as an implement in thedispersal of information; it stillserves this purpose today. Music,news, weather, opinions, andmore are available for free onpublic airwaves. Fortunately, thefederal government recognizesthe value of this, and since 1971the Canadian Radio-televisionand Telecommunications Commission(CRTC) has mandated apercentage of broadcasted materialmust be created by Canadians.Today, that percentage is up to40 per cent, something Canadianmusicians often credit in showcasingCanadian talent within thecountry. However, the presentationof Canadian content is notisolated to musical endeavours.My favourite use of the radiois not to listen to music or news.No, my radio rarely wavers from590 on the AM dial between Apriland October. It’s baseball season,and as a lifelong fan of theToronto Blue Jays, the radio hasbecome my link to the boys inblue. While nothing compares tobeing in the Roger’s Center (read:SkyDome), the radio broadcastsof Jerry Howarth, Alan Ashby,and Mike Wilner help bring thegame to life like no other medium,my apologies to Buck Martinezand company on the televisionbroadcasts, I just can’t standGregg Zaun.The emotion and expertise ofthe radio broadcasters help toflesh out the game, giving thethree-plus hour affairs some lifethat’s often lost in the televisionbroadcast. Baseball’s a lot morefun with other people, and thecrew makes you feel like you’resitting in the booth right therewith them.A few weeks ago I went out andbought a portable AM/FM radiothat runs off of two AA batteries.For the few months that I’ll bewalking around the farm all day,that radio will serve as my link tothe baseball team I grew up with;not a terrible way to spend $30.Baseball is something that’srooted in tradition, just ask fansof the National League how theyfeel about the designated hitter.The Blue Jays recognized thisand ditched the awful uniformsfrom recent years in favour ofan updated return to the classicuniforms the team began with in1977. Something new from somethingold seems to be the themefor this year’s season, and howbetter to follow it than on a radio?While some get excited aboutthe chorus of a favourite song, I’llbe listening to Rasmus diving fora fly-ball into the gap, or Escobarand Johnson turning two, andnaturally, Jose Bautista steppinginto the batter’s box.It’s baseball season everyone,so dust off the dial and crank it upto ten, and of course, Go Jays Go.Ontarion ArchivesCourtesy

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines